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Woodland, AL Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Woodland is about the same as Alabama average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Woodland is lower than Alabama average and is higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #440

Woodland, AL
0.03
Alabama
0.08
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Woodland, AL
0.0000
Alabama
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #472

Woodland, AL
198.63
Alabama
255.80
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 3,163 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Woodland, AL were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:0Cold:22Dense Fog:3Drought:70
Dust Storm:0Flood:159Hail:1,129Heat:10Heavy Snow:26
High Surf:0Hurricane:4Ice Storm:12Landslide:0Strong Wind:24
Thunderstorm Winds:1,415Tropical Storm:10Wildfire:0Winter Storm:10Winter Weather:15
Other:254 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Woodland, AL.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Woodland, AL.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Woodland, AL.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 85 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Woodland, AL.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
7.61974-01-26333°08'N / 85°28'W33°24'N / 85°17'W21.30 Miles150 Yards17250K0Randolph
9.31984-05-03233°31'N / 85°24'W33°30'N / 85°20'W5.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Cleburne
11.11970-04-26233°15'N / 85°31'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0225K0Randolph
13.41984-05-03233°29'N / 85°38'W33°30'N / 85°32'W6.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Randolph
15.92008-05-11233°33'N / 85°13'W33°33'N / 85°13'W002.0M0KCarroll
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that two brief spinup tornadoes occurred within a larger and extensive area of straight-line wind damage across much of central Carroll county. The first brief tornado spinup was an EF2 in the Jonesville community, just northeast of Bowdon and west of Carrollton. The tornado touched down approximately two miles east of where the straight-line wind damage began. The tornado was only on the ground approximately 100 yards and had a path width of 100 yards as well. The roofs of two homes were completely blown off the structures, including nearly $1 million in damages to a Dalton Carpet Outlet. Hundreds of trees were also down in the area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
16.12008-02-26333°33'N / 85°17'W33°34'N / 85°10'W7.00 Miles100 Yards018.0M0KCarroll
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A ground and aerial damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia and the Carroll County Emergency Management Director concluded that an EF3 tornado touched down in extreme western Carroll county, just across the Alabama state line, about 13 miles west of Carrollton and continued to a point approximately five miles west of Carrollton. The tornado traveled a path length of seven to eight miles and had a maximum path width of 100 yards. Maximum wind speeds were estimated at 140 mph. Twelve structures, mostly single family homes, suffered extensive damage along the path of the tornado. Only four of the affected structures were manufactured or mobile homes. Two of the affected homes were destroyed, on Indian Creek Road. A woman was injured on Smithfield Road when she was blown from her home. Numerous trees and power lines were down throughout the area as well. Damages were estimated to be nearly $10 million. This plus the following tornado resulted in damage to 128 structures. Six single-family and one mobile home were destroyed, two mobile homes suffered major damage, 34 single-family homes sustained minor damage, and 84 single-family homes, along with one mobile home, suffered minor damage. Five businesses were damaged, two of which were destroyed, along with one suffering major and two others minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A deep upper trough was moving from the mid-south toward the southeast U.S. early on the 26th. A strong cold front accompanied the upper system. A squall line of thunderstorms developed after midnight on the 25th across Mississippi and Alabama and reached the Georgia/Alabama border around 5 am EST. The line of thunderstorms intensified and bowed out just as it was moving in Georgia during the early morning hours. Wind gusts in excess 60 mph affected many counties as these thunderstorms rolled through the area during the early morning hours, causing extensive wind damage to trees, power lines, and some structures from the west and northwest side of Atlanta toward the Alabama border. In addition, two tornadoes, one an EF3, developed along the stronger part of the line as it moved through Carroll county before daybreak causing extensive damage along their paths.
16.11974-04-03233°33'N / 85°28'W33°40'N / 85°21'W10.40 Miles100 Yards000K0Cleburne
16.81984-05-03233°32'N / 85°41'W33°34'N / 85°31'W8.40 Miles400 Yards00250K0Cleburne
17.41984-05-03233°26'N / 85°44'W33°29'N / 85°38'W7.00 Miles300 Yards02250K0Clay
17.92005-08-29233°25'N / 85°06'W33°29'N / 85°06'W4.00 Miles200 Yards104.4M0Carroll
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service Damage Survey Team, in conjunction with the Carroll County Emergency Manager and Chief of Fire and Rescue operations, concluded that the F2 tornado, which began just south of Glenloch in Heard county, continued north into Carroll county. The tornado entered Carroll county approximately three miles southeast of Roopville and continued north at 30-35 mph to a point about three miles northeast of Roopville. The overall path length within Carroll county was 4.0 miles with an approximate path width of 200 yards. Extensive damage occurred along the path of the tornado. A total of 17 large chicken houses were destroyed along with 1,000,000 chickens. This resulted in agricultural damages alone in Carroll county of $3,000,000. A 40-year old man was killed while stepping outside his house to check on the status of his poultry and one of his chicken houses. Other livestock, including cattle and horses were also killed along the tornado path. Several homes and vehicles were also damaged or destroyed. One Chevrolet pickup truck was flipped over by the tornado onto a pile of bricks and wooden panels. Damage to homes and residential property from the tornado was estimated at $1,435,800. Overall damage in Carroll county from the tornado and subsequent thunderstorm wind was estimated at $5,235,800. All together 30 homes in the county suffered moderate damage, with another 100 homes sustaining minor damage. M40OU
18.22005-08-29233°24'N / 85°05'W33°25'N / 85°05'W1.50 Miles200 Yards03750K0Heard
 Brief Description: A National Weather Survey Team concluded that an F2 tornado touched down approximately 1/4 mile south of Glenloch in far northern Heard county, then continued north at 30-35 mph into Carroll county about three miles southeast of Roopville, finally terminating three miles northeast of Roopville. This was the first confirmed tornado in the Peachtree City forecast area associated with Hurricane Katrina. While the overall damage path with this tornado was 5.5 miles long, only 1.5 miles of this damage path occurred within Heard county. The path width of this tornado was approximately 200 yards wide. Several homes in the Glenloch area were severely damaged, along with a number of downed trees and power lines. Three residents at one of the damaged homes were injured by debris during the tornado.
18.61989-03-05233°06'N / 85°17'W33°10'N / 85°14'W0.50 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Randolph
18.71989-03-05233°10'N / 85°14'W33°22'N / 84°58'W20.00 Miles167 Yards102.5M0Heard
20.11973-05-27233°15'N / 85°05'W0.80 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Heard
20.72008-08-25233°34'N / 85°40'W33°35'N / 85°40'W00100K0KCleburne
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down on US-431, about a half mile south of the intersection with AL-281. It then moved northwestward, along and just east of US-431, and lifted just before reaching AL-281. One gas station/convenience store and one auto body shop were significantly damaged. Approximately 100 to 200 trees were snapped off or were uprooted along the damage path. This tornado was associated with the remnants of Tropical Storm Fay. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Tropical Storm Fay, and its remnants after landfall, brought high winds, heavy rain, and numerous tornadoes to Central Alabama.
20.91980-06-17233°20'N / 85°48'W33°21'N / 85°43'W5.20 Miles23 Yards0025K0Clay
23.81999-05-07233°39'N / 85°13'W33°42'N / 85°10'W4.50 Miles150 Yards00200K0Carroll
 Brief Description: Sight survey by NWS personnel and newspaper accounts determined that the tornado touched down in Carroll county near Five Points Road and Mt Zion Road. The storm path was to the northeast across Interstate 20 and then into Haralson county. All along the path there was structural damage to several homes, businesses, barns and outbuildings. Many hundreds of trees were snapped or uprooted, which caused much of the damage. Several of the trees were very large hardwoods and pines. There was also extensive damage to power and telephone lines.
24.71964-04-28333°44'N / 85°25'W33°44'N / 85°20'W5.10 Miles33 Yards0825K0Cleburne
25.91973-05-27433°27'N / 85°54'W33°32'N / 85°45'W10.40 Miles33 Yards0025.0M0Clay
25.91989-03-05232°54'N / 85°31'W33°06'N / 85°17'W15.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Chambers
26.31964-04-28333°44'N / 85°20'W33°44'N / 85°09'W10.60 Miles33 Yards0225K0Haralson
26.91953-05-01433°13'N / 85°56'W33°18'N / 85°45'W12.10 Miles440 Yards712250K0Clay
27.21957-11-18233°16'N / 85°51'W0025K0Clay
28.51999-05-07233°42'N / 85°10'W33°45'N / 85°06'W5.50 Miles150 Yards03400K0Haralson
 Brief Description: The tornado continued northeast from Carroll county and crossed into Haralson county southwest of Bremen. There was heavy damage to a mobile home dealership in Bremen, where around 35 mobile homes were damaged or destroyed. Debris was tossed across the highway. The tornado continued northeast and did damage at the Maple Creek golf course before lifting. Newspaper accouints said three people in Haralson county were taken to the hospital with fractures.
28.81989-03-05233°22'N / 84°58'W33°28'N / 84°50'W10.00 Miles167 Yards062.5M0Coweta
28.91968-03-12233°45'N / 85°16'W33°47'N / 85°10'W6.20 Miles100 Yards0025K0Haralson
28.92008-05-11233°34'N / 84°57'W33°34'N / 84°57'W007.0M0KCarroll
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet a second brief spinup tornado, spawned by the same parent thunderstorm, touched down in Carroll county. This tornado affected eastern Carroll county, touching down near the Diamond Court Subdivision off Cross Plains-Hulett Road, about three miles south of Hulett. Again, this tornado was embedded within a much larger and extensive area of straight-line wind damage that tracked across much of central Carroll county from near Bowden to the Douglas county line, southeast of Hulett. One home was completely destroyed by this second tornado and another received significant damage. A number of other homes sustained minor to moderate roof damage. Again, the path length and path width of this tornado were also only 100 yards. The combined damage from the two tornadoes and straight-line wind damage within Carroll county caused damages in excess of $10 million. Damages consisted of the destruction of three mobile homes, 18 mobile homes with major damage, and 16 mobile homes with minor damage. Thirty-five single family dwellings were destroyed, 211 single-family dwellings sustained major damage, and another 346 suffered minor damage. In addition, a total of four businesses were destroyed, 133 more which had major damage, and 31 suffering minor damage. A public works building was also destoyed. Finally, at least $800,000 in damages was reported to electric utility poles in Carroll county. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
29.01990-02-16233°35'N / 85°03'W33°41'N / 84°57'W7.00 Miles100 Yards011250K0Carroll
29.01983-12-03333°35'N / 85°50'W33°38'N / 85°48'W4.00 Miles150 Yards2512.5M0Calhoun
29.61967-11-22233°43'N / 85°09'W33°44'N / 85°03'W6.10 Miles33 Yards0025K0Haralson
29.61985-04-05233°35'N / 85°51'W33°36'N / 85°50'W1.00 Mile200 Yards00250K0Calhoun
30.31985-04-05233°34'N / 85°53'W33°35'N / 85°51'W2.00 Miles200 Yards05250K0Talladega
31.61967-03-06233°38'N / 85°51'W0025K0Calhoun
31.62007-01-07233°17'N / 84°54'W33°18'N / 84°49'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00350K0KCoweta
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service office in Peachtree City, GA confirmed that an F2 tornado had touched down approximately 8 miles southwest of Newnan near the intersection of Bohannon Road and New Corinth Road near Blalock Lake. The tornado then traveled northeast between Old Corinth Road and New Corinth Road traveling approximately 4 miles to the northeast along Earl North Road before lifting. As the tornado crossed Walker Brooks Road and Joe Brown Road just northeast of its touchdown point, a home was destroyed. The winds in the tornado at this point were estimated to range between 125 and 135 mph. As the tornado continued northeast along Earl North Road, several homes sustained minor to moderate damage. A number of trees and at least two power lines were also downed along the path of the tornado. Damage was also reported to a convenience store awning and several storage sheds were destroyed. Portions of Earl North Road were blocked from downed trees and telephone poles. While several residents, including a 14-year old boy were trapped in homes from debris and downed trees, no injuries were reported and all were rescued safely. The tornado path length was approximately four miles long with a maximum path width of 200 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Another strong storm system and deep upper trough, similar to the one of January 5th, swept through the area during the afternoon hours of January 7th. A weak warm front was located across middle Georgia. A narrow, yet intense squall line spread into the area during the mid-afternoon bringing severe weather and yet another tornado to Coweta county in West Central Georgia. This was the third tornado in Coweta county since January 1st. Overall, however, the total amount of severe weather was less also less widespread than that observed on January 5th.
32.01974-04-03233°40'N / 85°21'W33°54'N / 84°55'W29.60 Miles150 Yards152.5M0Haralson
33.71961-05-09232°56'N / 85°09'W0.80 Mile50 Yards0025K0Troup
33.81996-03-18333°15'N / 85°55'W32°54'N / 85°48'W14.00 Miles440 Yards0000Tallapoosa
 Brief Description: A tornado began on the northeast side of Eclectic and extended for 10 miles in Elmore County crossing the Elmore-Tallapoosa county line just east of Highway 63. The tornado continued for another 14 miles in Tallapoosa County crossing Lake Martin and ending on the north side of Jacksons Gap not far from where a tornado had occurred earlier in the evening. This was classified as an F3 tornado with a total damage path of 24 miles with a width of a quarter of a mile at the widest. Numerous buildings of all types were damaged along the track. Some of the most intense damage occurred as the tornado emerged from crossing Lake Martin in the Peckerwood area just southwest of Jacksons Gap. Numerous permanent homes and mobile homes were seriously damaged or destroyed.
34.22004-11-24233°35'N / 86°00'W33°39'N / 85°50'W10.70 Miles500 Yards1085K0Calhoun
 Brief Description: F75MH The tornado touched down in the vicinity of the Talladega Superspeedway. Two concession stands within the infield area of the race track had their roofs blown off. The Bush Garage area received building damage and the garage doors were bowed out. Debris was scattered between the garage area and Victory Lane. One digital leader board was completely destroyed and another one sustained major damage. The tornado continued on a northeast path across northern Talladega County. Numerous trees were blown down or snapped off along the path. Several out-building were destroyed and sheet metal was lofted into trees. The tornado moved into the Eastaboga area where it caused severe damage. Two homes suffered major roof damage, two porches were destroyed and many trees were blown down. The tornado continued northeastward into southwest Calhoun County. In Bynum, two mobile homes were heavily damaged by fallen trees. One of the trees smashed a mobile home killing a 75 year old woman around 712 am. In the Coldwater area, one home was significantly damaged and a shed was destroyed. Numerous trees were still being knocked down along the path. The tornado then moved into the southwestern part of Anniston. A cinder block building sustained major structural damage and an animal shelter received major roof damage. Several other businesses sustained damage near Anniston. The total tornado damage path length was 15.2 miles and was 500 yards wide at its widest point. Begin: 33 34.19/86 04.42 End: 33 38.94/85 49.68
34.31967-11-22233°44'N / 85°03'W33°44'N / 84°55'W7.80 Miles33 Yards0225K0Carroll
34.61970-04-02333°20'N / 84°48'W0.30 Mile100 Yards0025K0Coweta
34.71962-03-21333°45'N / 85°49'W33°45'N / 85°47'W2.30 Miles250 Yards010250K0Etowah
34.81967-11-22233°39'N / 85°55'W33°41'N / 85°52'W3.80 Miles33 Yards02250K0Calhoun
35.02008-05-11233°04'N / 84°55'W33°04'N / 84°55'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0080K0KTroup
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down approximately one mile south of Louise or 5.5 miles northeast of LaGrange in northeast Troup county. This was just one of 15 tornadoes that affected the central portion of Georgia early on Mother's Day 2008 and the first of two tornadoes, within the same parent thunderstorm, to touch down in Troup county. The tornado touched down near the intersection of U.S. Highway 29 and Willowwood Road. The tornado tracked approximately 1 mile to the east-northeast to a point less than one mile east-southeast of Louise. The path width was approximately 150 yards wide. Three homes were damaged, a well house was destroyed, and numerous large trees were snapped in half along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
35.31974-04-02232°53'N / 85°14'W0025K0Chambers
35.42008-05-11233°06'N / 84°53'W33°07'N / 84°52'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0050K0KTroup
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that a second tornado touched down in Troup county. This was spawned by the same thunderstorm that earlier spawned the first tornado south of Louise. This second tornado was also rated an EF2, touching down initially 4.5 south-southeast of Hogansville along the 1100 block of Perkins Road. The tornado tracked about one mile east-northeast across Troup county before crossing into Meriwether county. At the point of the initial touchdown on Perkins Road, a house was damaged and two trucks were destroyed as they were lifted up and tossed approximately 50 feet. Just before the tornado crossed into Meriwether county, near the intersection of Perkins Road and Duchesne Lane along the Troup/Meriwether county line, it completly lifted the roof off a brick home and partially destroyed a cinder block outbuilding. The path length within Troup county was approximately one mile with a maximum path width of 300 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
36.81976-03-29233°37'N / 85°58'W1.00 Mile40 Yards0025K0Calhoun
36.82000-04-02233°54'N / 85°31'W33°54'N / 85°31'W0.20 Mile100 Yards000K0KCleburne
 Brief Description: The tornado began at 12:34 am just south of Vigo at the end of Helen Drive. Vigo is located east of Piedmont, AL. The tornado traveled on a northeast track crossing Bethel Church Road and continuing along Vigo Road (County Road 70). The tornado straddled the road moving up a hill and crossing a few hundred feet into Cleburne County. Damage in Cleburne County was confined to downed trees. The tornado path was 1.9 miles long and approximately 100 yards wide. Most of the property that was damaged or destroyed was located in the area of Helen Drive and Bethel Church Road. Six mobile homes were destroyed along with two houses, one of which was under construction. One elderly woman was killed and six people were injured in that area. The woman was one of three people in a mobile home whose frame was thrown approximately 130 feet by the force of the tornado. Beginning: 33 54.855/85 33.720 End: 33 55.293/85 31.752
36.91989-03-05333°17'N / 84°50'W33°25'N / 84°41'W14.00 Miles120 Yards02325.0M0Coweta
37.11961-12-11333°48'N / 85°47'W33°50'N / 85°45'W3.30 Miles200 Yards00250K0Calhoun
37.42008-05-11233°06'N / 84°51'W33°07'N / 84°49'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0030K0KMeriwether
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the tornado, that originally touched down in northeastern Troup county, continued into Meriwether county. The EF2 tornado entered Meriwether county a little over two miles west-southwest of Saint Marks and tracked to a point approximately 9.25 miles northwest of Greenville along Saint Marks Road, approximately 3.67 miles northeast of Saint Marks. The tornado tracked a little over two miles within Meriwether county with a maximum path width of 300 yards. Many trees were snapped or uprooted along the path of the tornado. Structural damage was confined to one shed, which was destroyed, and minor roof damage to several homes in the Saint Marks area and east-northeastward toward U.S. Highway 27. Some of this later damage may have been caused by straight-line winds. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
37.62000-04-02233°54'N / 85°33'W33°55'N / 85°31'W1.70 Miles100 Yards16300K0KCalhoun
 Brief Description: F90MH The tornado began at 12:34 am just south of Vigo at the end of Helen Drive. Vigo is located east of Piedmont, AL. The tornado traveled on a northeast track crossing Bethel Church Road and continuing along Vigo Road (County Road 70). The tornado straddled the road moving up a hill and crossing a few hundred feet into Cleburne County. Damage in Cleburne County was confined to downed trees. The tornado path was 1.9 miles long and approximately 100 yards wide. Most of the property that was damaged or destroyed was located in the area of Helen Drive and Bethel Church Road. Six mobile homes were destroyed along with two houses, one of which was under construction. One elderly woman was killed and six people were injured in that area. The woman was one of three people in a mobile home whose frame was thrown approximately 130 feet by the force of the tornado. Beginning: 33 54.855/85 33.720 End: 33 55.293/85 31.752
38.21967-05-07233°24'N / 86°06'W33°26'N / 86°01'W5.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Talladega
39.11970-03-19332°50'N / 85°12'W2.00 Miles200 Yards214250K0Chambers
39.31964-04-28233°46'N / 85°55'W33°47'N / 85°51'W4.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Calhoun
39.41978-04-18233°56'N / 85°17'W33°56'N / 85°13'W4.10 Miles200 Yards00250K0Polk
39.82004-11-24233°35'N / 86°04'W33°37'N / 86°00'W4.50 Miles500 Yards00125K0Talladega
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down in the vicinity of the Talladega Superspeedway. Two concession stands within the infield area of the race track had their roofs blown off. The Bush Garage area received building damage and the garage doors were bowed out. Debris was scattered between the garage area and Victory Lane. One digital leader board was completely destroyed and another one sustained major damage. The tornado continued on a northeast path across northern Talladega County. Numerous trees were blown down or snapped off along the path. Several out-building were destroyed and sheet metal was lofted into trees. The tornado moved into the Eastaboga area where it caused severe damage. Two homes suffered major roof damage, two porches were destroyed and many trees were blown down. The tornado continued northeastward into southwest Calhoun County. In Bynum, two mobile homes were heavily damaged by fallen trees. One of the trees smashed a mobile home killing a 75 year old woman around 712 am. In the Coldwater area, one home was significantly damaged and a shed was destroyed. Numerous trees were still being knocked down along the path. The tornado then moved into the southwestern part of Anniston. A cinder block building sustained major structural damage and an animal shelter received major roof damage. Several other businesses sustained damage near Anniston. The total tornado damage path length was 15.2 miles and was 500 yards wide at its widest point. Begin: 33 34.19/86 04.42 End: 33 38.94/85 49.68
39.82001-11-24233°16'N / 86°09'W33°22'N / 86°01'W9.10 Miles200 Yards00230K0KTalladega
 Brief Description: The same thunderstorm that spawned the Sylacauga tornado produced another tornado in eastern Talladega County. This tornado was also rated an F2 on the Fujita scale and began at 3:59 pm 4 miles southeast of Winterboro in the Talladega National Forest. The tornado tracked northeast across Germany Mountain and ended at 4:09 pm, 1 mile southeast of Waldo. Several homes were damaged on Germany Mountain with one receiving significant damage. At least 6 mobile homes were totally destroyed and several outbuildings and barns were destroyed. Several trees were blown down or snapped off along the path. No injuries were reported. Beg: 33 17.453/86 08.146 End: 33 22.351/86 00.750
40.11954-12-05333°47'N / 86°00'W33°55'N / 85°36'W24.70 Miles100 Yards026250K0Calhoun
40.41963-04-29233°30'N / 86°05'W0425K0Talladega
40.51994-03-27433°43'N / 86°09'W34°01'N / 85°25'W50.00 Miles880 Yards22150500K50.0MSt. Clair, Calhoun And Cherokee
 Brief Description: A tornado began about one mile south-southwest of Ragland in St. Clair County at 1055 CST and traveled northeast at between 45 and 55 miles an hour crossing the Alabama/Georgia border about five miles northeast of Rock Run in Cherokee County. The tornado moved across County Highway 144 just south-southwest of Ragland where it first began then destroyed a number of structures along 144 to the east of Ragland. The tornado crossed primarily wooded land before moving through a camping area on the west side of Neely Henry Lake. A woman was killed outside on the west side of the lake as she tried to secure a boat. The tornado crossed Neely Henry Lake just north of the dam as it moved into Calhoun County. Twenty-six homes were damaged, 18 homes were destroyed, and 20 mobile homes were destroyed in St. Clair County. Moving into Calhoun County at 1104 CST, the storm continued on a steady northeast track (60 degree heading) crossing the north side of Ohatchee. The storm crossed U.S. Highway 431 at 1120 CST where one man was killed when the van he was in was thrown into a ditch. Three other people in the van were injured. The storm continued northeast across mostly woodlands with only scattered structures, mostly homes, in its path. It crossed U.S. Highway 278 between four and five miles west-northwest of Piedmont. The storm entered Cherokee County at 1135 CST. At 1139 CST the tornado destroyed the Goshen United Methodist Church located one mile north of the Cherokee/Calhoun County line on County Highway 9 killing 20 people and injuring 92. The tornado continued northeast across Cherokee County reaching the Alabama/Georgia state line at approximately 1152 CST. Deaths: St. Clair County - (F540); Calhoun County - (M49V); Cherokee County - (F02O) (M03O) (F04O) (M05O) (F10O) (M12O) (F24O) (M25O) (F34O) (M34O) (M37O) (M38O) (M39O) (M44O) (F50O) (M54O) (F54O) (M64O) (F72O) (M79O)
40.71953-01-08233°25'N / 86°07'W33°27'N / 86°05'W3.00 Miles867 Yards003K0Talladega
40.81979-11-25232°44'N / 85°54'W33°04'N / 85°44'W25.00 Miles60 Yards02250K0Tallapoosa
42.11964-12-24333°30'N / 84°55'W33°15'N / 84°25'W33.60 Miles400 Yards00250K0Troup
42.22000-04-03233°58'N / 85°23'W34°00'N / 85°16'W6.00 Miles75 Yards061.0M0Polk
 Brief Description: Survey of damage by NWS personnel indicated that an F1 - F2 tornado, 50 - 100 yards wide, touched down in the Potash community at approximately 2:00 am EDT near Harmony Road. The tornado traveled approximately 6 miles with the terminating point just southwest of Cedartown. The tornado snapped off and uprooted several trees at its touchdown point on Harmony Road and caused a poultry house to lean as well as blowing off some of its tin roof. Next, a house on Blair Road was severely damaged and numerous trees were felled. Further downstream, several mobile homes and numerous trees were hit on Branch Road, Cornelius Road, and Highway 278 between Cornelius Road and Berry Road. The most severe damage was on Berry Road where two mobile homes were totally destroyed and 3 people seriously injured. The Polk county EMA director reported that a total a 6 people were injured, 2 seriously, and a total of 20 homes were destroyed or damaged. In addition, a roof was blown off a fruit/vegetable stand on Highway 27 south of Cedartown, but this did not appear to be related to the tornado. In excess of 1 million dollars damage was caused by the tornado.
42.92008-03-15233°58'N / 85°37'W33°59'N / 85°34'W4.00 Miles50 Yards0075K0KCherokee
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down near the intersection of CR-6 and CR-31, just west of AL-9, about 5 miles north of Piedmont. From there, it moved just north of due east, across AL-9, and then roughly parallel to CR-10 for about 3 miles, before lifting near Hurricane Creek. Some metal roof paneling was torn off a barn and one-half of a roof was torn off a brick home. Two other homes and another barn also sustained damage. Numerous trees in the area were also snapped or uprooted. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level disturbance, and a developing surface low and associated cold front, caused several rounds of strong to severe thunderstorms across central Alabama.
43.71972-01-10232°44'N / 85°35'W32°47'N / 85°33'W4.50 Miles50 Yards0025K0Chambers
44.21964-04-28333°36'N / 86°07'W0125K0Talladega
44.21964-07-09233°36'N / 86°07'W0025K0Talladega
44.71989-11-15233°27'N / 84°40'W33°31'N / 84°36'W3.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Coweta
44.91973-05-27433°15'N / 86°27'W33°27'N / 85°54'W34.60 Miles33 Yards01725.0M0Talladega
45.32009-02-18233°13'N / 84°46'W33°14'N / 84°30'W16.00 Miles1760 Yards00500K0KCoweta
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the EF2 tornado that touched down at 923 Bradberry Road, just inside the Meriwether county line, quickly crossed into Coweta county and continued on an east-northeastward track across far southern Coweta county, crossing into Spalding county approximately four miles east-northeast of Haralson. Within Coweta county the tornado caused minor to moderate damage to several homes. One home completely lost its roof. A horse was killed from flying debris near U.S. Highway 27A. Hundreds of trees were also blown down along the path of the tornado. The tornado tracked almost 16 miles within Coweta county. The maximum path width was estimated to be one mile with maximum winds of 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front accompanied and deep negatively tilted upper trough through the eastern U.S. from the 18th into the 19th. An unseasonably warm and unstable air mass developed in advance of the cold front during the late afternoon and early evening across north and central Georgia as warm, moist air rode northward into Georgia on a strong low-level jet. Afternoon temperatures in the 70s and dewpoints in the 60s, combined with strong shear and moderate instability, resulted in the development of numerous supercell thunderstorms from mid-afternoon until a few hours after midnight on the 19th. Ten tornadoes, ranging in scale from EF0 to EF3 tracked across several north and central Georgia counties. The worst tornadoes affected the east central Georgia counties of Jasper, Putnam, Hancock, and Jasper. A death was observed in Hancock county with an EF3 tornado and several injuries were reported from Putnam and Hancock counties. In addition to the tornadoes, very large hail occurred with several of the thunderstorms, including four-inch diameter hail in Coweta and Fayette counties just south of Atlanta. Numerous reports of golf ball and larger-sized hail were received. The event resulted in millions of dollars of damage and the destruction of several homes in north and central Georgia counties.
45.31989-11-15233°29'N / 84°39'W33°31'N / 84°36'W3.00 Miles300 Yards072.5M0Coweta
45.62006-01-02233°31'N / 84°40'W33°31'N / 84°35'W4.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0Fulton
 Brief Description: A damage survey team from the National Weather Service in Peachtree City concluded that an F2 tornado had touched down just east of Palmetto in the far southern portion of Fulton county near the Coweta and Fayette county borders. The tornado touched down near Interstate-85 and U.S. Highway 29 east of Palmetto and then traveled east into extreme northwest Fayette county. The tornado was rated an F2 and traveled a path of seven miles, of which approximately four miles occurred within Fulton county. The maximum path width was 1/4 mile wide. Roof damage was observed to a number of homes along the path of the tornado. At least six homes east of Palmetto had sustained major damage with large trees down on the structures. Additionally, a number of trees were down along the path along with several power lines. Specifically, the tornado began around 8225 Tatum Road. Numerous trees were down in this area and several homes had sustained roof damage. The chimney was destroyed on one home. The tornado then continued across the intersection of Johnson and Tatum Road to Gullatt Road. Several homes in this area had sustained roof damage and in fact, one home had completely lost its roof. Numerous trees were either uprooted or snapped off along the path and several power lines were down as well. From this point, the tornado traveled toward the intersection of Bohannon and Kirkley Roads. Damage in this section was less extensive with just minor roof damage and only a few trees uprooted or down in the area. The tornado then crossed into Fayette county.
46.11991-03-29233°45'N / 84°46'W33°46'N / 84°43'W3.00 Miles200 Yards0225.0M0Douglas
46.11961-12-11233°02'N / 86°05'W0025K0Coosa
46.11973-12-26233°02'N / 86°05'W0.10 Mile27 Yards0125K0Talladega
46.61989-11-15233°31'N / 84°36'W33°32'N / 84°37'W1.00 Mile300 Yards002.5M0Fulton
47.71989-11-15233°31'N / 84°36'W33°33'N / 84°35'W4.00 Miles300 Yards072.5M0Fulton
48.21989-03-05233°16'N / 86°22'W33°26'N / 86°06'W20.00 Miles100 Yards022.5M0Talladega
48.32006-01-02233°31'N / 84°36'W33°30'N / 84°33'W3.00 Miles440 Yards002.0M0Fayette
 Brief Description: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City Georgia and the Fayette County Emergency Management Director concluded that the F2 tornado, which originally developed in far south Fulton county just east of Palmetto continued into extreme northwest Fayette county. The overall tornado path length was seven miles, of which approximately three miles occurred within Fayette county. The maximum path width was 1/4 mile. The most significant damage associated with the tornado occurred in Fayette county. The tornado entered the county just south of Fairburn and just west of Georgia Highway 74 (Senoia Road) near Milam Road. In this area the tornado destroyed a small apartment home and rolled a hay baler approximately 15 yards from its origin. A number of trees were uprooted or snapped off in this area as well. The storm then skipped across Georgia Highway 74 just south of the Wendell Coffee Golf Center into the River Oaks Subdivision. A home on Westbourne Drive next to the Golf Center was damaged with trees down on the structure. A metal awning was also torn off the home. Further down the street, also in the River Oaks Subdivision, a large home was damaged beyond repair and about six others sustained minor to moderate damage, mainly to the roofs of the structures. While one family was trapped in their home during the event, they were rescued without injury. The tornado ended in the 600 block of Westbourne Drive in the River Oaks Subdivision.
48.31969-12-30233°47'N / 86°03'W33°54'N / 86°00'W8.60 Miles100 Yards00250K0Calhoun
48.82006-04-08234°01'N / 85°04'W34°01'N / 85°01'W3.00 Miles100 Yards01450K0Polk
 Brief Description: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that a second tornado, this one an F2, touched down one mile northwest of Rockmart and traveled to the east approximately three miles, terminating at a point around two miles east-northeast of Rockmart. Over two dozen homes along the path of the tornado were destroyed. A young child was injured at one of the damaged homes when sheet rock and rafters fell on the couch where he was sleeping. Over three dozen outbuildings were also heavily damaged or destroyed. A carport was blown off one home northwest of Rockmart and five coal cars were completely blown off a railroad track in the Rockmart area and left lying on their side, while an 18-wheel truck trailer was also blown over in the same general area. Finally, minor damage was reported to the roof of the Rockmart Highschool and especially to the athletic fields. Hundreds of trees and dozens of power lines were blown down along the path of the tornado. A total of 700 residents were left without power for many hours following the storm. The tornado was determined to have a path length of approximately 3.0 miles with a path width of 50 to 100 yards. Overall tornado damage from the two tornadoes in Polk county netted: 30 homes with minor damage. 2 homes destroyed. 60 outbuildings heavily damaged or destroyed. Minor damage to the Rockmart Highschool and athletic facility. 700 customers without power. Extensive loss to timber in the area
49.11954-12-05332°41'N / 85°25'W32°40'N / 85°05'W19.40 Miles100 Yards04250K0Lee
49.61980-03-20233°10'N / 86°15'W33°12'N / 86°12'W3.80 Miles50 Yards06250K0Talladega
49.91977-04-04233°44'N / 86°09'W0.50 Mile20 Yards00250K0St. Clair


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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