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Texas Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Texas is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Texas is much higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #45

Texas
0.04
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #14

Texas
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #11

Texas
208.58
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 72,131 other weather extremes events from 1950 to 2010 were recorded in Texas. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:11Cold:76Dense Fog:16Drought:326
Dust Storm:17Flood:9,453Hail:35,788Heat:140Heavy Snow:236
High Surf:5Hurricane:19Ice Storm:107Landslide:2Strong Wind:1,178
Thunderstorm Winds:22,484Tropical Storm:56Wildfire:358Winter Storm:136Winter Weather:235
Other:1,488 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Texas.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 10 historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in Texas.

DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
1931-08-166.4N/A30.6-104.2
1978-06-165.31033.03-100.77
1966-07-204.8N/A35.7-101.2
1964-06-034.2N/A31.3-94
1976-01-254.1231.9-103.08
1982-10-143.9536.1-102.57
1982-01-043.9531.18-102.49
1984-03-033.9528.85-98.46
1964-04-243.7N/A31.5-93.8
1978-03-023.51131.56-102.51

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 1,638 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in Texas.

DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
1953-05-11531°33'N / 97°09'W31°45'N / 96°53'W20.90 Miles583 Yards11459725.0M0Mclennan
1964-04-03533°54'N / 98°30'W33°56'N / 98°26'W4.70 Miles500 Yards711125.0M0Wichita
1970-05-11533°33'N / 101°54'W33°36'N / 101°46'W8.40 Miles1333 Yards26500250.0M0Lubbock
1973-05-06531°38'N / 97°29'W31°44'N / 97°21'W10.60 Miles100 Yards000K0Mclennan
1976-04-19531°43'N / 99°04'W31°49'N / 98°56'W10.50 Miles440 Yards0112.5M0Brown
1997-05-27530°49'N / 97°37'W30°46'N / 97°40'W5.10 Miles650 Yards271240.0M100KWilliamson
 Brief Description: F34PH, M15PH, F13PH, F37PH, M11PH, M46PH, F45PH, F17PH, M15PH, M15PH, M41PH, F40PH, M40PH, F40PH, M16PH, F15PH, F44PH, M5PH, M22PH, F50PH, M15PH, M14PH, F36PH, F13PH, F10PH, F36PH, M16PH Several eyewitnesses reported that the Jarrell tornado was preceded for a period of 8 to 10 minutes by a series of short-lived very small tornadoes that formed from the same supercell thunderstorm. These touched down, then dissipated in order. The first tornado in Williamson County formed near 2:25 pm CST and built rapidly to F2 strength. It survived for approximately 8 minutes, often returning briefly to a roped and tilted feature before it died. This tornado was followed by a second that formed near 2:35 pm CST. It built quickly into a multi-vortex tornado that appeared to be near F2 strength as well. This dissipated after only 4 minutes. The final tornado from this same supercell, , the Jarrell Tornado, developed as a small...rope-shaped tornado, touching down around 2:40 pm CST inside the Williamson County line northwest of Jarrell. From film and eyewitness accounts, it expanded quickly into a very large vortex nearly 1/2 mile in width. Observations recounted by eyewitnesses indicated that the damage path may not have been made strictly by one tornado. A number of eyewitnesses reported seeing several small, rope-like funnels before the character of the tornado changed drastically into the killer tornado. Ground damage patterns in the Double Creek Subdivision also suggested this possibility. The tornado crossed CR 308, CR 305, and then CR 307. Where the tornado crossed each of these county roads, approximately 525 feet of asphalt was ripped off each of the roadways. This particular destruction was believed to be very close to the centerline of the tornado circulation. As the tornado crossed the intersection of CR 305 and 307, a business on the corner was destroyed. The tornado moved into the Double Creek area at this point with total destruction. F5 destruction continued from shortly after its formation until very close to the end of the damage path. The tornado began a brief turn toward the southeast as it entered the Double Creek subdivision and the surrounding area, moving very slowly. It reached the subdivision at 3:48 pm. This time is based on a clock found at a destroyed residence in the extreme northwest corner of the subdivision and the home believed to be the first struck by the tornado. Here, it widened to it maximum width of three-quarters of a mile. From the air, the ground appearance changed abruptly in the vicinity of CR 308 and continued until very near the end of the path. No definitive circulation patterns or suction spots were evident, but there was the noted obvious change in the appearance of the ground. In the Double Creek area, approximately 40 structures were totally destroyed. One of the most striking signs in approaching this area was the distinct lack of debris of any size. Closer inspection showed lots of little debris but no sign of large items. It was estimated that several dozen vehicles had been in the subdivision and removed by the tornado. Nearly 300 cattle grazing in a pasture near the subdivision were also killed, with many of them tossed and blown for over 1/4 mile. At least half a dozen cars were identified from the air lying in the open areas, most of them flattened and encrusted with mud and grass. Trees in the subdivision were completely stripped of bark. Later ground survey revealed that most of the debris that was left in the area was extremely small indicating the power of the tornadic wind. All 27 deaths associated with the Jarrell tornado occurred in the Double Creek area. Eyewitnesses reported that it appeared to have slowed down as it entered the subdivision, and that may account for the nearly total destruction that took place. After passing through the Double Creek area, the tornado shifted its track again slightly, moving toward the south-southwest across CR 309 and into a heavily wooded area of cedar trees. The total destruction of the tornado ends abruptly shortly after entering the wooded area. However, a small swath of tree damage on the north side of the main damage path suggested the possibility of a multiple vortex pattern. No other evidence of multiple vortices was observed. The sequence of weather phenomenon reported with this tornado was exactly opposite of that often reported- the tornado first appeared, followed by nearly calm conditions, then hail, followed by rain and finally brief, gusty winds. This is attributed to the fact that the parent supercell was moving toward the southwest for most of its life. The storm essentially "backed into" the area as it moved.
1950-04-28432°25'N / 99°30'W32°25'N / 99°29'W1.30 Miles233 Yards55250K0Callahan
1951-05-18433°25'N / 98°45'W2.00 Miles200 Yards21002.5M0Young
1952-04-21431°30'N / 97°27'W31°29'N / 97°25'W2.30 Miles200 Yards0025K0Mclennan
1953-03-13433°17'N / 99°57'W33°24'N / 99°49'W11.20 Miles50 Yards12202.5M0Haskell
1953-03-13433°24'N / 99°49'W33°25'N / 99°47'W2.70 Miles50 Yards552.5M0Knox
1953-04-28429°34'N / 98°42'W1.00 Mile1760 Yards2150K0Bexar
1953-05-11431°32'N / 100°35'W31°32'N / 100°25'W9.90 Miles880 Yards131592.5M0Tom Green
1954-05-01433°59'N / 99°43'W34°04'N / 99°28'W15.40 Miles267 Yards0025K0Foard
1954-05-01434°04'N / 99°28'W34°12'N / 99°11'W18.60 Miles267 Yards02250K0Wilbarger
1955-05-25435°00'N / 100°13'W35°14'N / 100°07'W17.10 Miles1100 Yards0525K0Collingsworth
1955-05-25435°14'N / 100°07'W35°28'N / 100°00'W17.40 Miles1100 Yards0525K0Wheeler
1957-04-21433°36'N / 102°18'W33°50'N / 102°21'W16.40 Miles880 Yards042.5M0Hockley
1957-04-21433°50'N / 102°21'W34°01'N / 102°23'W12.80 Miles880 Yards032.5M0Lamb
1957-04-21433°26'N / 101°38'W33°35'N / 101°50'W15.50 Miles100 Yards062.5M0Lubbock
1957-05-15434°28'N / 101°18'W34°40'N / 101°03'W17.00 Miles300 Yards2180250K0Briscoe
1957-11-07430°06'N / 93°44'W29°58'N / 93°53'W12.90 Miles200 Yards1812.5M0Orange
1959-03-31431°51'N / 97°13'W31°59'N / 97°08'W10.40 Miles1760 Yards63125K0Hill
1961-09-12429°19'N / 94°47'W1.00 Mile100 Yards82000K0Galveston
1962-05-26433°10'N / 99°46'W33°10'N / 99°35'W10.70 Miles133 Yards012.5M0Haskell
1965-06-02433°54'N / 102°09'W33°56'N / 102°05'W4.70 Miles200 Yards0025K0Lamb
1965-06-02433°56'N / 102°05'W34°13'N / 101°35'W34.60 Miles200 Yards47625.0M0Hale
1970-04-17433°36'N / 102°38'W33°36'N / 102°36'W2.00 Miles880 Yards02025.0M0Cochran
1970-04-17433°36'N / 102°36'W33°44'N / 102°20'W18.50 Miles880 Yards0425.0M0Hockley
1970-04-17433°44'N / 102°20'W33°49'N / 102°12'W9.50 Miles880 Yards0025.0M0Hockley
1970-04-17434°00'N / 101°59'W34°11'N / 101°43'W19.80 Miles880 Yards2472.5M0Hale
1970-04-17434°23'N / 102°37'W34°27'N / 102°31'W7.40 Miles880 Yards132.5M0Parmer
1970-04-17434°11'N / 101°43'W34°19'N / 101°39'W10.10 Miles880 Yards000K0Floyd
1970-04-17434°27'N / 102°31'W35°22'N / 101°05'W103.0 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Randall
1970-04-17434°19'N / 101°39'W34°22'N / 101°28'W11.00 Miles880 Yards2025.0M0Swisher
1970-04-17434°22'N / 101°28'W34°28'N / 101°17'W12.60 Miles880 Yards140K0Briscoe
1970-04-17434°28'N / 101°17'W34°41'N / 100°57'W24.20 Miles880 Yards000K0Briscoe
1970-04-17434°41'N / 100°57'W34°45'N / 100°52'W6.60 Miles880 Yards000K0Hall
1970-04-17434°45'N / 100°52'W34°51'N / 100°41'W12.30 Miles880 Yards000K0Donley
1970-04-18435°22'N / 101°05'W35°36'N / 100°53'W19.60 Miles880 Yards0102.5M0Gray
1970-04-18434°39'N / 101°32'W34°57'N / 101°06'W32.20 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Swisher
1970-04-18434°57'N / 101°06'W34°59'N / 101°01'W5.20 Miles880 Yards16422.5M0Donley
1970-04-18434°59'N / 101°01'W35°02'N / 100°58'W4.70 Miles880 Yards000K0Donley
1970-04-18435°02'N / 100°58'W35°11'N / 100°44'W16.80 Miles880 Yards000K0Donley
1970-04-18435°11'N / 100°44'W35°14'N / 100°39'W6.10 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Gray
1971-03-12433°29'N / 94°29'W33°30'N / 94°24'W5.10 Miles880 Yards150K0Bowie
1971-06-09436°02'N / 101°49'W36°05'N / 101°44'W5.90 Miles1320 Yards000K0Sherman
1971-06-09436°16'N / 101°24'W36°26'N / 101°12'W15.90 Miles1760 Yards000K0Hansford
1973-03-10431°32'N / 96°50'W31°35'N / 96°57'W7.90 Miles150 Yards020K0Mclennan
1973-03-10431°38'N / 96°51'W31°46'N / 96°49'W9.50 Miles150 Yards000K0Limestone
1973-03-10431°46'N / 96°49'W31°51'N / 96°48'W5.90 Miles150 Yards6750K0Hill
1973-04-15428°50'N / 99°13'W28°49'N / 98°50'W23.30 Miles440 Yards5120K0Frio
1976-05-26432°16'N / 97°17'W32°15'N / 97°16'W1.90 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Johnson
1976-05-26432°15'N / 97°16'W32°12'N / 97°01'W15.00 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hill
1976-05-26432°12'N / 97°01'W32°11'N / 97°00'W1.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Ellis
1979-04-10433°59'N / 99°35'W34°02'N / 99°28'W7.60 Miles880 Yards003K0Foard
1979-04-10434°02'N / 99°28'W34°12'N / 99°09'W21.50 Miles880 Yards116725.0M0Wilbarger
1979-04-10433°49'N / 98°39'W33°50'N / 98°38'W1.30 Miles880 Yards003K0Archer
1979-04-10433°50'N / 98°38'W33°55'N / 98°26'W12.90 Miles1760 Yards421700250.0M0Wichita
1979-04-10433°55'N / 98°26'W34°02'N / 98°07'W19.90 Miles1320 Yards0400K0Clay
1980-04-02433°36'N / 99°11'W33°41'N / 99°05'W8.40 Miles250 Yards000K0Baylor
1981-05-13433°46'N / 95°42'W33°47'N / 95°33'W8.80 Miles400 Yards0302.5M0Lamar
1982-03-18436°01'N / 101°44'W36°04'N / 101°37'W6.00 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Moore
1982-03-19436°04'N / 101°37'W36°25'N / 101°05'W48.00 Miles880 Yards052.5M0Hansford
1982-03-19436°25'N / 101°05'W36°35'N / 101°00'W5.00 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Ochiltree
1982-04-02433°39'N / 95°38'W33°40'N / 95°20'W17.00 Miles250 Yards1017025.0M0Lamar
1982-04-02433°40'N / 95°20'W33°41'N / 95°14'W6.00 Miles250 Yards0025.0M0Red River
1987-05-22431°00'N / 103°41'W31°02'N / 103°38'W3.00 Miles1000 Yards301212.5M0Reeves
1989-05-16429°17'N / 100°25'W29°31'N / 100°11'W17.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Kinney
1990-04-25432°47'N / 97°50'W32°54'N / 97°45'W10.00 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Parker
1990-06-01431°05'N / 102°21'W30°51'N / 101°57'W22.00 Miles1233 Yards22125.0M0Pecos
1992-06-27435°41'N / 101°44'W35°41'N / 101°37'W10.00 Miles1583 Yards0025.0M0Moore
1992-06-27435°41'N / 101°37'W35°35'N / 101°35'W5.00 Miles1583 Yards0725.0M0Hutchinson
1992-06-27435°35'N / 101°35'W35°32'N / 101°29'W5.00 Miles1583 Yards0025.0M0Carson
1992-11-21429°44'N / 95°17'W29°57'N / 95°00'W20.00 Miles1800 Yards015250.0M0Harris
1992-11-21429°57'N / 95°00'W30°05'N / 94°54'W10.00 Miles200 Yards01250K0Liberty
1994-04-25432°36'N / 96°45'W32°40'N / 96°40'W6.00 Miles800 Yards348500K0Dallas
 Brief Description: The Lancaster tornado was on the ground for approximately 6 miles and was 1/2 mile wide, producing upper F3 to lower F4 damage. Two hundred twenty-three homes were destroyed, 227 damaged, 58 businesses destroyed. Severe damage was done to one elementary and one junior high school. Eighty percent of the historic downtown square was destroyed. (F73O)(F70O)(M71O)
1995-06-08435°15'N / 100°36'W35°33'N / 100°23'W5.00 Miles600 Yards000.2M0Gray
1995-06-08435°15'N / 100°36'W24.00 Miles800 Yards008.0M2.0MWheeler
 Brief Description: Three additional tornadoes were added to the storm data based on video provided by National Weather Service employee. Fortunately, these were over open country with the only damage occurring to power lines. The one tornado crossed the county line from Donley into Gray at about 1718CST. A violent tornado dropped down just north of McLean and moved north northeast. Several homes received minor damage north of McLean with the Crockett estate, on County Line road, having two homes destroyed and another seriously damaged. But the main destruction occurred in Wheeler county at the Wheeler Stock Yard and several hundred cattle there. A few other businesses received significant damage from this tornado. This last tornado had two small satellite tornadoes with it and crossed the county line between Gray and Hemphill at 1755CST. The start and end times for this tornado have been modified based on additional information.
1995-06-08435°30'N / 100°13'W35°41'N / 100°06'W10.00 Miles2200 Yards002.0M1.0MWheeler
1997-05-27430°22'N / 98°01'W30°20'N / 97°59'W5.60 Miles440 Yards1515.0M0KTravis
 Brief Description: M25MH The Pedernales Valley tornado began on the shore of Lake Travis destroying trees and a floating marina where nearly all of the watercraft were destroyed. While numerous trees were twisted and uprooted in this area, several structures sustained only what appeared to be minor damage that would be no more than F0. The tornado was initially moving westward as it moved into rough terrain. A number of structures sustained varying damage until the tornado reached Bee Creek Road. At that location, a Southwest Bell building housing telephone switching equipment was destroyed. The building was well constructed and was one of several buildings which indicated at F4 rating for this tornado. Bee Creek Road takes a bend close to the telephone building and across the street a house was destroyed with walls knocked down. Approximately 2.2 miles from the lake, the tornado path takes a distinct dog leg turn toward the southwest. The point at which this dog-leg turn occurred also corresponds with a knoll. Trees and buildings at the top of the knoll were destroyed. After the dog-leg turn, the tornado assumed a heading of 250 degrees and crossed a major power distribution line. One steel tower was destroyed bringing all lines to the ground. The tornado remained on the 250 degree heading moving through the area described as the Hazy Hills subdivision. Numerous houses and several mobile homes were totally destroyed. Several houses survived but sustained major damage making them totally uninhabitable. The only death associated with this tornado occurred here when one man was killed. He lived in a mobile home that was demolished and his vehicle was tossed several hundred feet. Other survey team members were unable to learn whether he was in the mobile home or had left it to drive away. The tornado continued west-southwest moving across State Road (SR) 71. A number of well built homes in the Hazy Hills subdivision were heavily damaged or destroyed. Crossing SR 71, the tornado moved into another subdivision with widely separated houses in the Lick Creek valley, a steep walled creek that feeds into the Pedernales River. One stone-walled house located just north of Pedernales Drive and west of SR 71 was completely deroofed. Other structures in this subdivision sustained roof damage in the F2 range. After following the terrain into the creek it climbed another rise in the land before ending shortly after passing the crest of the small hill. As the tornado ended, damage was minimal to trees.
1999-05-11430°41'N / 99°06'W30°39'N / 99°00'W7.00 Miles1400 Yards16750K250KMason
 Brief Description: A large multiple-vortex tornado ripped through eastern Mason County during the late afternoon hours. The slow moving tornado first touched down near the Llano River 9 miles northwest of Loyal Valley and then travelled a 7-mile long path, finally dissipating 5 miles north of Loyal Valley. This tornado, whose width would reach three-quarters of a mile wide at times, caused widespread devastation. Two homes were completely destroyed, with debris scattered over great distances. Large pieces of a pick-up truck were located three-quarters of a mile away from the house where it had been left. Tragically, one person was killed and 5 others were injured when that same house was destroyed. The people had sought refuge in a car in a stone garage, but as the tornado tore across the garage, debris smashed through the car, killing one man and injuring the remaining occupants. Sixteen other houses were damaged, along with additional barns and outbuildings. Numerous head of cattle and deer were also killed as the tornado passed. When the tornado crossed Farm-to-Market Road 152, a stretch of asphalt 720 feet wide was ripped off of the road surface. M75PH A series of supercell thunderstorms ripped across the Heartland and Northwest Hill Country on the afternoon of the 11th. Three tornadoes would touch down, including a devastating F4 tornado north of Loyal Valley in eastern Mason County. One person was killed and 6 others injured as the three-quarters of a mile tornado tracked a 7 mile long path.
1950-02-11329°40'N / 95°03'W29°50'N / 95°00'W12.00 Miles1000 Yards11225K0Harris
1950-02-12331°48'N / 94°12'W31°48'N / 94°11'W1.90 Miles50 Yards315250K0Shelby
1950-06-05330°11'N / 96°24'W30°01'N / 96°03'W23.90 Miles67 Yards06250K0Washington
1951-06-06335°26'N / 101°11'W35°19'N / 101°04'W10.40 Miles100 Yards012250K0Carson
1952-04-30331°27'N / 100°28'W0.50 Mile100 Yards06250K0Tom Green
1953-04-28330°00'N / 97°10'W0.50 Mile200 Yards0325K0Bastrop
1953-04-28329°33'N / 98°32'W29°35'N / 98°28'W4.90 Miles200 Yards15250K0Hays
1953-05-16331°14'N / 95°34'W31°15'N / 95°39'W5.20 Miles33 Yards180K0Houston
1953-12-01329°30'N / 97°56'W29°32'N / 97°52'W5.10 Miles1760 Yards010250K0Guadalupe
1953-12-02330°30'N / 96°58'W30°32'N / 97°00'W3.30 Miles100 Yards0425K0Lee
1954-04-30330°25'N / 97°27'W30°26'N / 97°25'W3.00 Miles880 Yards000K0Travis
1954-04-30330°26'N / 97°25'W30°37'N / 97°12'W18.10 Miles880 Yards06250K0Williamson
1954-04-30330°37'N / 97°12'W31°29'N / 95°28'W118.8 Miles880 Yards00250K0Milam
1954-04-30332°55'N / 94°43'W32°56'N / 94°40'W3.30 Miles50 Yards0025K0Morris
1954-04-30332°56'N / 94°40'W33°10'N / 94°03'W39.20 Miles50 Yards0125K0Cass
1954-04-30333°24'N / 94°38'W33°35'N / 94°23'W19.20 Miles440 Yards0025K0Bowie
1954-05-02332°13'N / 95°40'W040K0Henderson
1954-06-01334°01'N / 100°18'W33°52'N / 100°09'W13.40 Miles267 Yards1142.5M0Cottle
1954-06-01333°57'N / 98°40'W33°57'N / 98°34'W5.90 Miles50 Yards14250K0Wichita
1954-07-18332°19'N / 94°31'W0.80 Mile880 Yards0025K0Rusk
1954-10-22328°09'N / 97°26'W27°52'N / 97°20'W20.50 Miles333 Yards025250K0San Patricio
1955-04-06333°38'N / 96°36'W33°36'N / 96°24'W11.90 Miles67 Yards1272.5M0Grayson
1955-04-06333°26'N / 98°24'W33°28'N / 98°16'W8.20 Miles33 Yards00250K0Jack
1955-04-06333°36'N / 96°24'W33°35'N / 96°05'W18.30 Miles67 Yards002.5M0Fannin
1955-04-06333°28'N / 98°16'W33°28'N / 98°02'W13.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Clay
1955-04-06333°34'N / 97°13'W33°38'N / 96°58'W15.10 Miles33 Yards00250K0Cooke
1955-04-12332°03'N / 95°31'W32°05'N / 95°26'W5.60 Miles300 Yards07250K0Anderson
1955-04-18335°24'N / 100°06'W35°30'N / 100°00'W8.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Wheeler
1955-06-17334°51'N / 100°13'W34°53'N / 99°56'W16.20 Miles67 Yards00250K0Collingsworth
1956-04-05330°41'N / 96°22'W30°41'N / 96°17'W5.20 Miles67 Yards00250K0Brazos
1956-06-17333°49'N / 102°11'W1.00 Mile20 Yards003K0Hockley
1957-03-20330°16'N / 96°50'W30°19'N / 96°44'W7.20 Miles33 Yards0225K0Lee
1957-03-20330°19'N / 96°55'W30°23'N / 96°47'W9.30 Miles1760 Yards0225K0Lee
1957-03-20330°23'N / 96°47'W30°27'N / 96°41'W7.60 Miles880 Yards0025K0Burleson
1957-04-02333°17'N / 96°37'W33°24'N / 96°37'W8.00 Miles33 Yards02250K0Collin
1957-04-02332°51'N / 96°50'W33°06'N / 96°50'W17.20 Miles100 Yards102002.5M0Dallas
1957-04-02333°24'N / 96°37'W33°25'N / 96°35'W2.70 Miles33 Yards02250K0Grayson
1957-04-02333°02'N / 97°33'W01250K0Wise
1957-04-18333°42'N / 96°44'W1.00 Mile17 Yards003K0Grayson
1957-04-24330°16'N / 97°22'W30°23'N / 97°17'W9.60 Miles880 Yards01250K0Bastrop
1957-04-24330°23'N / 97°17'W30°26'N / 97°14'W5.10 Miles880 Yards00250K0Williamson
1957-04-26332°23'N / 94°54'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Gregg
1957-04-26332°29'N / 94°43'W32°21'N / 94°54'W14.20 Miles50 Yards0025K0Gregg
1957-05-15335°01'N / 101°03'W35°07'N / 100°55'W10.20 Miles50 Yards01250K0Donley
1957-05-15334°39'N / 101°30'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Swisher
1957-05-22331°54'N / 96°59'W31°55'N / 96°55'W4.10 Miles200 Yards04250K0Hill
1957-05-24334°11'N / 102°51'W1.90 Miles200 Yards03250K0Lamb
1957-05-24333°10'N / 101°47'W33°24'N / 101°40'W17.50 Miles200 Yards01250K0Lynn
1957-05-24333°24'N / 101°40'W33°43'N / 101°19'W29.80 Miles200 Yards00250K0Lubbock
1957-05-24332°19'N / 101°52'W1.50 Miles83 Yards013K0Martin
1957-06-12332°41'N / 96°53'W003K0Dallas
1957-10-14330°07'N / 96°00'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Waller
1957-10-22330°15'N / 94°58'W30°15'N / 94°54'W4.30 Miles100 Yards0125K0Liberty
1957-11-07329°57'N / 93°56'W29°58'N / 93°53'W3.60 Miles200 Yards2592.5M0Jefferson
1957-11-07329°54'N / 94°00'W1.50 Miles33 Yards01250K0Jefferson
1958-04-02333°54'N / 98°30'W33°54'N / 98°26'W4.30 Miles333 Yards114250K0Wichita
1958-04-02333°54'N / 98°26'W33°57'N / 98°14'W12.10 Miles333 Yards00250K0Clay
1958-04-02333°39'N / 97°54'W33°52'N / 97°43'W18.20 Miles300 Yards0125K0Montague
1958-04-28331°54'N / 98°36'W31°57'N / 98°33'W4.90 Miles880 Yards00250K0Comanche
1958-05-03332°21'N / 95°13'W32°34'N / 94°14'W59.20 Miles440 Yards00250K0Gregg
1958-06-06333°05'N / 96°05'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Hunt
1959-03-31333°42'N / 97°08'W33°42'N / 97°01'W6.80 Miles1760 Yards0162.5M0Cooke
1959-05-10330°17'N / 97°43'W30°25'N / 97°37'W11.00 Miles667 Yards00250K0Travis
1959-05-10330°46'N / 96°36'W30°54'N / 96°23'W15.80 Miles333 Yards073K0Robertson
1959-05-21329°23'N / 94°46'W29°25'N / 94°43'W4.30 Miles67 Yards0025K0Galveston
1959-05-25335°19'N / 100°41'W000K0Webb
1959-10-04332°46'N / 96°35'W32°59'N / 96°27'W16.90 Miles67 Yards00250K0Dallas
1959-10-04332°59'N / 96°27'W33°08'N / 96°25'W10.70 Miles67 Yards05250K0Collin
1959-11-04332°02'N / 95°51'W32°19'N / 95°35'W25.10 Miles67 Yards03250K0Henderson
1959-11-04332°26'N / 94°26'W32°26'N / 94°10'W15.50 Miles67 Yards0025K0Harrison
1960-04-12334°21'N / 102°18'W34°24'N / 102°14'W5.20 Miles100 Yards332250K0Castro
1960-05-04332°48'N / 97°26'W32°52'N / 97°20'W7.40 Miles500 Yards012250K0Tarrant
1960-05-24333°45'N / 100°51'W33°47'N / 100°49'W3.30 Miles17 Yards003K0Motley
1960-10-11334°38'N / 102°43'W1.00 Mile100 Yards01250K0Parmer
1961-03-26332°29'N / 97°22'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Johnson
1961-03-26333°10'N / 94°54'W0.20 Mile33 Yards023K0Titus
1961-03-26333°08'N / 95°13'W33°13'N / 95°08'W7.60 Miles60 Yards0125K0Franklin
1961-03-26332°11'N / 96°53'W32°15'N / 96°45'W9.10 Miles280 Yards042.5M0Ellis
1961-03-26333°13'N / 95°08'W33°17'N / 95°05'W5.40 Miles60 Yards0025K0Titus
1961-03-26333°14'N / 94°57'W09250K0Titus
1961-03-27331°43'N / 94°35'W31°44'N / 94°21'W13.80 Miles200 Yards24250K0Nacogdoches
1961-04-08333°36'N / 98°38'W1.00 Mile33 Yards010K0Archer
1961-05-04330°32'N / 102°22'W1.10 Miles33 Yards00250K0Pecos
1961-05-07332°56'N / 99°35'W32°58'N / 99°33'W3.60 Miles133 Yards00250K0Shackelford
1961-06-03334°07'N / 102°32'W33°55'N / 102°10'W25.10 Miles200 Yards0025K0Lamb
1961-06-18329°19'N / 94°47'W2.50 Miles50 Yards05250K0Galveston
1961-09-03333°23'N / 99°51'W0.70 Mile30 Yards00250K0Haskell
1961-09-11331°55'N / 95°17'W0325K0Jackson
1961-09-11329°46'N / 95°08'W1.00 Mile83 Yards0220K0Harris
1961-09-12329°16'N / 94°52'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Galveston
1961-09-12330°09'N / 94°44'W0.50 Mile17 Yards000K0Liberty
1961-09-12333°34'N / 95°16'W0.50 Mile300 Yards000K0Red River
1961-11-22329°23'N / 98°32'W1.00 Mile50 Yards003K0Bexar
1961-11-22331°44'N / 94°55'W31°50'N / 94°40'W16.20 Miles150 Yards110250K0Nacogdoches
1961-11-22331°50'N / 94°40'W31°55'N / 94°40'W5.70 Miles150 Yards00250K0Rusk
1961-11-22329°24'N / 96°05'W2.00 Miles200 Yards010K0Wharton
1962-03-24332°40'N / 95°30'W0.50 Mile100 Yards082.5M0Wood
1962-04-26333°59'N / 98°30'W34°00'N / 98°27'W3.30 Miles100 Yards0132.5M0Wichita
1962-05-25332°50'N / 100°00'W32°53'N / 99°58'W4.10 Miles67 Yards1125K0Jones
1962-05-27336°11'N / 100°53'W36°14'N / 100°50'W4.50 Miles200 Yards0132.5M0Ochiltree
1962-05-31332°18'N / 99°33'W2.00 Miles33 Yards020K0Callahan
1963-03-11332°35'N / 96°18'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Kaufman
1963-05-21334°17'N / 103°03'W34°20'N / 102°58'W5.90 Miles50 Yards0025K0Bailey
1963-11-08328°10'N / 97°25'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0125K0Refugio
1964-04-22333°26'N / 95°51'W33°30'N / 95°47'W5.90 Miles50 Yards0225K0Delta
1965-02-11331°37'N / 94°41'W31°58'N / 94°05'W42.70 Miles200 Yards00250K0Nacogdoches
1965-03-16332°00'N / 96°54'W32°01'N / 96°52'W2.70 Miles50 Yards0025K0Hill
1965-03-16332°01'N / 96°52'W32°03'N / 96°44'W8.40 Miles50 Yards0125K0Navarro
1965-04-14333°52'N / 97°40'W1.00 Mile200 Yards000K0Montague
1965-04-19329°27'N / 96°00'W0.20 Mile150 Yards1325K0Fort Bend
1965-04-19326°42'N / 98°20'W1.50 Miles30 Yards000K0Hidalgo
1965-05-15332°27'N / 99°44'W32°35'N / 99°43'W9.30 Miles100 Yards02250K0Jones
1965-05-15331°58'N / 102°06'W1.00 Mile33 Yards00250K0Midland
1965-06-03334°51'N / 100°12'W34°55'N / 100°04'W8.80 Miles33 Yards00250K0Collingsworth
1965-06-04335°19'N / 100°09'W35°19'N / 100°02'W6.80 Miles50 Yards1125K0Wheeler
1965-06-05327°14'N / 97°44'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Kenedy
1965-09-21330°18'N / 101°48'W10.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Terrell
1965-09-22332°36'N / 94°45'W0025K0Upshur
1965-09-22330°13'N / 95°44'W0.80 Mile33 Yards000K0Montgomery
1965-10-17333°55'N / 102°26'W0.20 Mile17 Yards0025K0Hockley
1966-02-09328°58'N / 96°40'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Jackson
1966-03-28329°27'N / 96°20'W29°23'N / 96°12'W9.30 Miles1760 Yards0025K0Colorado
1966-04-18329°04'N / 95°27'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Brazoria
1966-04-25328°49'N / 97°52'W28°49'N / 97°52'W03250K0Karnes
1966-05-23333°23'N / 96°04'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0525K0Hunt
1966-06-12333°18'N / 97°00'W33°20'N / 96°58'W3.60 Miles133 Yards000K0Denton
1967-05-29328°24'N / 98°11'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Live Oak
1967-07-03335°32'N / 100°27'W35°30'N / 100°27'W2.30 Miles33 Yards000K0Wheeler
1967-08-18329°25'N / 94°55'W0.50 Mile50 Yards000K0Galveston
1967-09-20328°42'N / 96°13'W1.00 Mile100 Yards4725K0Matagorda
1967-09-20329°04'N / 96°31'W0.10 Mile33 Yards030K0Jackson
1967-09-20329°21'N / 97°04'W29°21'N / 97°00'W4.30 Miles333 Yards042.5M0Lavaca
1967-09-20329°39'N / 98°07'W5.00 Miles67 Yards00250K0Comal
1967-09-20329°27'N / 96°51'W2.00 Miles167 Yards0325K0Lavaca
1967-09-20328°04'N / 97°03'W1.50 Miles100 Yards03250K0Aransas
1967-12-21333°06'N / 96°06'W0.10 Mile33 Yards00250K0Hunt
1968-05-06335°40'N / 100°38'W0.50 Mile100 Yards062.5M0Roberts
1968-05-16334°07'N / 99°20'W2.00 Miles23 Yards0025K0Wilbarger
1968-05-24332°38'N / 100°46'W2.00 Miles67 Yards0025K0Scurry
1968-05-24332°38'N / 100°36'W32°38'N / 100°40'W4.10 Miles67 Yards0025K0Scurry
1968-05-24332°38'N / 100°42'W32°39'N / 100°40'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Scurry
1968-11-05328°48'N / 97°00'W28°43'N / 96°47'W14.40 Miles200 Yards02250K0Victoria
1968-12-12330°19'N / 95°26'W30°22'N / 95°21'W6.20 Miles200 Yards00250K0Montgomery
1969-03-23329°48'N / 94°18'W0.50 Mile67 Yards0125K0Jefferson
1969-04-11328°48'N / 95°39'W2.00 Miles67 Yards0132.5M0Matagorda
1969-04-19332°42'N / 102°40'W0.10 Mile50 Yards003K0Gaines
1969-04-27333°43'N / 95°16'W2.00 Miles440 Yards0025K0Red River
1969-05-06330°38'N / 99°31'W31°14'N / 99°35'W41.60 Miles200 Yards0025K0Kimble
1969-05-06330°06'N / 98°35'W30°07'N / 98°34'W2.30 Miles100 Yards0025K0Kendall
1969-05-06330°07'N / 98°34'W30°17'N / 98°24'W15.20 Miles100 Yards0225K0Blanco
1969-05-06330°17'N / 98°24'W30°29'N / 98°21'W14.20 Miles100 Yards0025K0Blanco
1969-05-06330°29'N / 98°21'W30°35'N / 98°19'W7.20 Miles100 Yards0025K0Burnet
1969-05-06334°12'N / 102°24'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Lamb
1969-05-12326°13'N / 97°41'W0025K0Cameron
1969-05-12326°06'N / 97°36'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Cameron
1969-05-14333°03'N / 95°29'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Hopkins
1969-05-14331°55'N / 96°53'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Hill
1969-05-16328°02'N / 97°50'W0.50 Mile20 Yards0025K0San Patricio
1969-05-16333°55'N / 102°30'W0.60 Mile50 Yards0025K0Lamb
1969-05-27329°47'N / 94°42'W1.50 Miles67 Yards3025K0Chambers
1969-09-08329°42'N / 95°13'W0.80 Mile50 Yards0025K0Harris
1969-10-12332°40'N / 96°50'W32°59'N / 96°32'W28.00 Miles200 Yards023K0Dallas
1969-10-12332°59'N / 96°32'W33°14'N / 96°27'W17.90 Miles200 Yards003K0Collin
1970-03-03332°18'N / 94°59'W0.50 Mile67 Yards0025K0Rusk
1970-06-24327°34'N / 97°47'W1.50 Miles200 Yards115250K0Nueces
1970-06-26329°13'N / 100°32'W29°14'N / 100°29'W3.80 Miles880 Yards00250K0Kinney
1970-10-11329°55'N / 93°53'W29°58'N / 93°51'W4.30 Miles100 Yards0192.5M0Jefferson
1971-03-12333°23'N / 96°50'W33°26'N / 96°46'W5.20 Miles440 Yards000K0Grayson
1971-03-12333°30'N / 96°36'W33°33'N / 96°32'W5.10 Miles440 Yards000K0Grayson
1971-03-12333°30'N / 96°36'W33°33'N / 96°32'W5.10 Miles440 Yards000K0Grayson
1971-04-19334°49'N / 102°22'W34°52'N / 102°17'W6.10 Miles133 Yards0240K0Deaf Smith
1971-05-23331°56'N / 97°19'W31°57'N / 97°12'W7.10 Miles33 Yards1490K0Hill
1971-06-05335°55'N / 101°32'W35°55'N / 101°27'W4.70 Miles1320 Yards000K0Hutchinson
1971-10-17335°22'N / 101°06'W35°22'N / 101°03'W2.30 Miles100 Yards020K0Carson
1972-10-22332°29'N / 94°17'W0.50 Mile30 Yards0225K0Harrison
1973-03-10330°44'N / 98°14'W30°49'N / 98°09'W7.80 Miles250 Yards0400K0Burnet
1973-03-10333°46'N / 96°51'W33°46'N / 96°44'W6.80 Miles100 Yards030K0Grayson
1973-04-15334°11'N / 101°45'W34°14'N / 101°38'W7.60 Miles200 Yards2260K0Hale
1973-04-15332°05'N / 96°28'W32°05'N / 96°31'W3.80 Miles200 Yards030K0Navarro
1973-04-23332°22'N / 97°23'W2.50 Miles333 Yards030K0Johnson
1973-06-03331°46'N / 95°10'W0.10 Mile33 Yards030K0Cherokee
1973-11-24332°21'N / 97°24'W0.10 Mile33 Yards000K0Johnson
1973-12-03332°48'N / 95°41'W32°48'N / 95°38'W3.00 Miles27 Yards000K0Rains
1974-01-19331°18'N / 94°16'W0.80 Mile400 Yards020K0San Augustine
1974-03-20331°21'N / 94°49'W000K0Angelina
1974-03-20331°31'N / 94°07'W31°32'N / 93°59'W8.20 Miles100 Yards040K0San Augustine
1974-03-20331°32'N / 93°59'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Sabine
1974-03-20331°21'N / 94°00'W31°35'N / 93°50'W18.90 Miles77 Yards000K0Sabine
1974-05-14333°32'N / 96°51'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Grayson
1974-09-13329°35'N / 95°45'W29°37'N / 95°43'W3.60 Miles73 Yards020K0Fort Bend
1974-10-28329°42'N / 95°01'W29°44'N / 94°59'W3.30 Miles50 Yards172.5M0Harris
1974-10-28329°38'N / 94°22'W29°45'N / 94°17'W9.60 Miles67 Yards100K0Chambers
1974-10-31331°37'N / 95°35'W2.00 Miles500 Yards040K0Anderson
1975-03-26335°26'N / 100°49'W1.00 Mile220 Yards2420K0Gray
1975-04-29329°04'N / 99°11'W29°04'N / 99°03'W8.30 Miles500 Yards350K0Medina
1975-05-13331°50'N / 99°26'W0.10 Mile27 Yards250K0Coleman
1975-12-24329°01'N / 96°30'W1.00 Mile440 Yards000K0Jackson
1976-03-08329°22'N / 95°26'W29°27'N / 95°14'W13.40 Miles200 Yards0182.5M0Brazoria
1976-03-08329°27'N / 95°14'W29°31'N / 95°06'W9.30 Miles200 Yards0025K0Galveston
1976-04-15332°02'N / 100°06'W31°58'N / 99°57'W9.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Runnels
1976-04-17333°52'N / 99°30'W33°59'N / 99°43'W14.70 Miles150 Yards01250K0Foard
1976-04-19333°45'N / 97°35'W33°54'N / 97°34'W10.40 Miles373 Yards02250K0Montague
1976-04-19332°04'N / 98°53'W2.20 Miles250 Yards000K0Comanche
1976-04-29328°15'N / 97°41'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Bee
1976-05-25332°00'N / 97°08'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Hill
1976-05-25332°34'N / 99°41'W32°30'N / 99°39'W5.20 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Jones
1976-05-25332°30'N / 99°39'W32°29'N / 99°35'W4.30 Miles300 Yards012.5M0Taylor
1976-05-25332°29'N / 99°35'W32°28'N / 99°24'W10.80 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Callahan
1976-05-26332°31'N / 99°39'W1.00 Mile300 Yards00250K0Jones
1976-05-26332°24'N / 97°27'W32°21'N / 97°26'W3.80 Miles100 Yards0025K0Johnson
1976-05-26332°54'N / 96°51'W32°55'N / 96°47'W4.50 Miles150 Yards012.5M0Dallas
1976-05-26331°08'N / 97°32'W2.00 Miles100 Yards272.5M0Bell
1976-05-30331°14'N / 99°26'W31°12'N / 99°24'W3.60 Miles500 Yards00250K0Mcculloch
1977-04-19331°25'N / 102°56'W31°26'N / 102°52'W4.30 Miles200 Yards0182.5M0Ward
1977-05-16334°51'N / 100°24'W35°04'N / 100°16'W16.70 Miles500 Yards003K0Collingsworth
1977-05-16335°10'N / 100°17'W35°12'N / 100°15'W3.60 Miles500 Yards003K0Collingsworth
1977-05-16335°12'N / 100°15'W35°18'N / 100°10'W8.50 Miles33 Yards003K0Wheeler
1977-11-01333°28'N / 94°15'W33°33'N / 94°14'W5.90 Miles50 Yards00250K0Bowie
1977-12-13329°47'N / 95°17'W29°59'N / 95°03'W19.70 Miles400 Yards13525.0M0Harris
1977-12-13329°59'N / 95°03'W30°02'N / 94°59'W5.40 Miles400 Yards0525K0Liberty
1978-04-30336°22'N / 100°26'W36°30'N / 100°14'W14.40 Miles100 Yards0025K0Lipscomb
1979-02-23332°09'N / 95°30'W32°10'N / 95°28'W3.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Henderson
1979-02-23332°10'N / 95°28'W32°12'N / 95°21'W7.30 Miles33 Yards010K0Smith
1979-03-02330°46'N / 99°23'W30°47'N / 99°16'W7.10 Miles150 Yards012.5M0Mason
1979-04-01332°35'N / 94°48'W32°39'N / 94°45'W5.60 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Gregg
1979-04-10331°42'N / 99°45'W31°44'N / 99°43'W3.30 Miles880 Yards003K0Runnels
1979-04-10331°44'N / 99°43'W31°55'N / 99°25'W21.70 Miles880 Yards012.5M0Coleman
1979-05-03332°47'N / 95°31'W32°49'N / 95°24'W7.20 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Wood
1979-05-21332°34'N / 98°49'W2.00 Miles1320 Yards000K0Stephens
1979-06-06333°13'N / 98°37'W33°15'N / 98°30'W7.10 Miles400 Yards02250K0Young
1979-10-30332°37'N / 98°59'W32°48'N / 98°45'W18.60 Miles127 Yards002.5M0Stephens
1980-04-07330°31'N / 97°42'W30°29'N / 97°36'W6.50 Miles100 Yards12250K0Williamson
1980-04-07330°29'N / 97°36'W30°27'N / 97°31'W5.70 Miles33 Yards03250K0Travis
1980-04-07330°27'N / 97°31'W30°23'N / 97°15'W16.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Bastrop
1980-04-07330°23'N / 97°15'W30°21'N / 97°13'W3.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Lee
1980-05-28334°31'N / 101°56'W34°33'N / 101°50'W6.10 Miles2333 Yards003K0Swisher
1980-05-28334°32'N / 101°46'W2.00 Miles833 Yards003K0Swisher
1981-05-09331°58'N / 97°01'W31°56'N / 96°56'W5.20 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Hill
1981-05-09331°57'N / 95°54'W32°03'N / 95°47'W9.90 Miles100 Yards00250K0Anderson
1981-05-09332°03'N / 95°47'W32°03'N / 95°42'W5.10 Miles33 Yards00250K0Henderson
1981-10-13331°57'N / 96°09'W32°03'N / 96°08'W7.20 Miles100 Yards0125K0Navarro
1982-03-14331°52'N / 100°09'W32°04'N / 99°42'W30.00 Miles173 Yards042.5M0Runnels
1982-03-14332°04'N / 99°42'W32°05'N / 99°38'W5.00 Miles173 Yards052.5M0Coleman
1982-03-14332°05'N / 99°38'W32°06'N / 99°37'W2.00 Miles173 Yards052.5M0Taylor
1982-03-14332°06'N / 99°37'W32°09'N / 99°33'W3.50 Miles173 Yards002.5M0Callahan
1982-04-02333°38'N / 96°17'W33°38'N / 95°51'W22.00 Miles150 Yards112.5M0Fannin
1982-04-02333°38'N / 95°51'W33°38'N / 95°42'W10.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Lamar
1982-04-02333°38'N / 95°02'W33°37'N / 94°46'W17.00 Miles233 Yards00250K0Red River
1982-04-02333°37'N / 94°46'W33°34'N / 94°37'W5.00 Miles233 Yards00250K0Bowie
1982-04-02333°34'N / 94°37'W33°38'N / 94°32'W4.00 Miles233 Yards02250K0Bowie
1982-05-09335°09'N / 102°05'W35°11'N / 102°05'W2.00 Miles40 Yards002.5M0Randall
1982-05-09335°11'N / 102°05'W35°17'N / 102°07'W6.20 Miles40 Yards012.5M0Potter
1982-05-11334°39'N / 100°43'W34°34'N / 100°26'W15.00 Miles40 Yards00250K0Hall
1982-05-12332°29'N / 98°14'W32°31'N / 98°10'W5.00 Miles100 Yards02250K0Erath
1982-05-12332°31'N / 98°10'W32°33'N / 98°05'W4.00 Miles100 Yards003K0Palo Pinto
1982-05-12331°50'N / 98°41'W31°54'N / 98°44'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Comanche
1982-05-12331°54'N / 98°44'W32°03'N / 98°44'W9.00 Miles100 Yards03250K0Comanche
1982-05-13330°30'N / 94°03'W30°37'N / 93°57'W8.50 Miles150 Yards11250K0Jasper
1982-05-16333°56'N / 99°24'W34°04'N / 99°07'W15.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Wilbarger
1982-05-19335°32'N / 101°02'W1.50 Miles587 Yards00250K0Gray
1982-05-19335°33'N / 100°53'W35°37'N / 100°50'W4.00 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Gray
1982-05-19335°33'N / 100°49'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Gray
1983-01-31330°05'N / 94°11'W1.00 Mile40 Yards012.5M0Jefferson
1983-03-15326°03'N / 98°19'W26°00'N / 98°16'W4.00 Miles900 Yards012.5M0Hidalgo
1983-03-15326°00'N / 98°16'W25°58'N / 98°16'W1.50 Miles900 Yards092.5M0Hidalgo
1983-03-15325°58'N / 98°16'W25°57'N / 98°17'W0.60 Mile900 Yards002.5M0Hidalgo
1984-05-01334°03'N / 100°55'W34°01'N / 100°47'W8.00 Miles440 Yards012.5M0Motley
1984-12-13332°43'N / 96°38'W32°47'N / 96°38'W3.10 Miles500 Yards0025.0M0Dallas
1984-12-13332°47'N / 96°38'W32°53'N / 96°38'W6.90 Miles500 Yards02825.0M0Dallas
1985-04-21333°14'N / 99°00'W33°15'N / 98°59'W1.50 Miles400 Yards30250K0Throckmorton
1985-04-21333°15'N / 98°59'W33°17'N / 98°57'W3.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Young
1986-02-05330°02'N / 95°33'W29°59'N / 95°29'W5.00 Miles70 Yards2025.0M0Harris
1986-04-19332°27'N / 100°26'W32°29'N / 100°21'W4.50 Miles600 Yards110025.0M0Nolan
1986-05-07335°50'N / 100°27'W35°56'N / 100°28'W7.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Hemphill
1986-05-14333°32'N / 98°42'W33°34'N / 98°25'W11.00 Miles250 Yards042.5M0Archer
1986-05-14333°34'N / 98°25'W33°34'N / 98°13'W9.00 Miles250 Yards002.5M0Clay
1987-03-22336°12'N / 100°19'W36°29'N / 99°58'W30.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0Lipscomb
1987-05-25336°12'N / 101°24'W36°15'N / 101°24'W3.00 Miles530 Yards0025K0Hansford
1987-05-25336°16'N / 101°03'W36°16'N / 100°59'W3.00 Miles700 Yards00250K0Ochiltree
1987-11-15331°36'N / 95°42'W31°45'N / 95°38'W10.50 Miles250 Yards15925.0M0Anderson
1987-11-15331°49'N / 95°20'W32°09'N / 95°12'W21.00 Miles500 Yards27525.0M0Cherokee
1987-11-15332°09'N / 95°12'W32°18'N / 95°09'W12.00 Miles500 Yards2625.0M0Smith
1987-11-15331°52'N / 94°11'W32°00'N / 94°08'W8.00 Miles200 Yards0152.5M0Shelby
1987-11-15333°04'N / 94°32'W33°14'N / 94°27'W12.20 Miles200 Yards00250K0Cass
1987-11-15332°00'N / 94°08'W32°06'N / 94°02'W8.00 Miles200 Yards052.5M0Panola
1988-04-01332°33'N / 94°55'W32°35'N / 94°55'W2.00 Miles440 Yards002.5M0Gregg
1988-04-01332°35'N / 94°55'W32°45'N / 94°50'W11.00 Miles440 Yards092.5M0Upshur
1989-05-17330°46'N / 97°37'W30°49'N / 97°36'W3.00 Miles1700 Yards1282.5M0Williamson
1989-06-06333°37'N / 101°32'W33°29'N / 101°01'W29.00 Miles900 Yards0025K0Crosby
1989-06-06333°29'N / 101°01'W33°29'N / 100°59'W1.00 Mile900 Yards0025K0Dickens
1989-06-07332°01'N / 94°25'W32°03'N / 94°19'W6.00 Miles447 Yards0025K0Panola
1990-01-19331°13'N / 94°57'W31°16'N / 94°54'W5.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Trinity
1990-01-19331°16'N / 94°54'W31°21'N / 94°50'W8.00 Miles100 Yards022.5M0Angelina
1990-03-14331°04'N / 97°30'W31°06'N / 97°21'W9.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Bell
1990-04-27331°36'N / 96°30'W31°38'N / 96°27'W4.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Limestone
1990-05-14332°53'N / 99°53'W0.20 Mile10 Yards020K0Jones
1990-05-31336°10'N / 101°03'W36°12'N / 100°48'W14.00 Miles1407 Yards002.5M0Ochiltree
1991-02-19331°30'N / 94°15'W31°33'N / 94°09'W5.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0San Augustine
1991-04-24333°09'N / 99°46'W33°12'N / 99°42'W3.50 Miles200 Yards01250K0Haskell
1991-04-26332°03'N / 95°18'W32°05'N / 95°15'W3.00 Miles200 Yards01250K0Cherokee
1991-05-10333°50'N / 102°34'W33°51'N / 102°35'W1.00 Mile450 Yards00250K0Hockley
1991-05-10333°51'N / 102°35'W33°52'N / 102°36'W4.00 Miles450 Yards00250K0Lamb
1991-05-10333°52'N / 102°36'W33°55'N / 102°39'W3.50 Miles450 Yards00250K0Bailey
1991-05-15335°04'N / 100°15'W35°12'N / 100°05'W11.50 Miles450 Yards00250K0Collingsworth
1991-05-15335°12'N / 100°05'W35°14'N / 100°01'W3.50 Miles450 Yards00250K0Wheeler
1992-06-27335°42'N / 101°57'W35°43'N / 101°51'W5.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Moore
1992-11-21330°01'N / 95°05'W30°06'N / 95°02'W4.00 Miles300 Yards0025.0M0Harris
1992-11-21330°06'N / 95°02'W30°27'N / 94°47'W28.00 Miles300 Yards012.5M0Liberty
1994-05-13330°34'N / 98°16'W30°36'N / 98°14'W3.50 Miles800 Yards015.0M50KBurnet
 Brief Description: The storm approached the city from the west-southwest. There were unconfirmed reports of funnels in the Horseshoe Bay area, four miles southwest of Marble Falls, before the storm arrived. Spotty damage was reported to roofs in the Horseshoe Bay area. The tornado first struck the west side of the city, crossing a heavy commercialized and residential area. Roofs were severely damaged at this time with several structures sustaining F1 and F2 damage. Several boats at a dealership were tossed on top of each other. Two-by-four's were embedded into the side of a church preschool care center, penetrating an inside classroom wall by four to five feet. Fortunately, all children had been moved into hallways just before the tornado arrived. Numerous commerical signs were down with widespread roof damage. This damage became even more extensive as the tornado moved across the northern part of the city. Marble Falls primary school also sustained damage, but students had been evacuated to the main school. Trees were uprooted on the school grounds and damage was reported to outbuildings. Metal I-beams were bent at a nearby metal building, indicating F2 to F3 damage. Three nearby semi-tractor trailer delivery trucks and a bread delivery truck were overturned. Two of these trucks were reported to have been lifted "two to three feet off of the ground" as they were overturned. At a nearby Wal-Mart department store 100 to 200 employees had taken shelter, having practiced their severe weather drill the day before. The store was hit and severely damaged, with the employees sustaining only a few minor injuries. Additional roof damage was reported at Marble Falls High School. Students had just executed a tornado drill as the storm struck. There was extensive peeling of metal from the auditorium and gymnasium roofs. In summary, over 440 homes sustained damage, with one house and 17 mobile homes destroyed and major damage to 36 homes. Eighteen businesses reported major damage with 47 others reporting minor damage. In addition, two bridges were damaged, along with severe damage to schools. In all, 512 structures sustained damage.
1994-05-29333°20'N / 98°49'W33°14'N / 98°50'W7.00 Miles600 Yards005K0Young
 Brief Description: A large tornado was video-taped by storm chasers. The tornado was on the ground for 20 minutes and moved south-southeast across open ranch land with the only known damage being to a garage and an oil storage tank.
1995-05-07333°31'N / 97°32'W33°48'N / 97°26'W19.00 Miles880 Yards1112.0M0Montague
 Brief Description: Tornado number two was a large tornado with a path one-half mile wide and 19 miles long. The storm ripped through Montague County, killing a 97 year-old man near Forestburg and injuring 11 other people. At least 30 houses and two mobile homes were destroyed, numerous barns and other outbuildings were destroyed, telephone and power lines were downed across the eastern half of the county, and an undetermined number of cattle and dairy cows were killed or injured. (M97O)
1995-05-14331°28'N / 100°09'W31°24'N / 100°07'W5.00 Miles100 Yards00300K0Tom Green
1997-05-27331°19'N / 97°20'W31°16'N / 97°21'W3.00 Miles150 Yards00150K0Mclennan
 Brief Description: The third tornado developed about 1.5 miles east-southeast of Moody in open country just south of Farm-to-Market Road 107. The tornado moved south-southwest and destroyed a house and a barn. Another house was damaged and numerous trees were uprooted. Two vehicles were tossed several hundred feet by the tornado. The strong tornado dissipated about 0.5 miles after moving into extreme northern Bell County.
1997-05-27331°16'N / 97°23'W31°16'N / 97°23'W0.70 Mile150 Yards0000Bell
 Brief Description: This is the same tornado that began 1mile east of Moody in McLennan County.
1997-05-27331°10'N / 97°28'W31°07'N / 97°32'W1.40 Miles275 Yards00900K0Bell
 Brief Description: The fourth tornado that was produced by the large supercell thunderstorm developed on the north side of Lake Belton, near Morgans Point where a marina was destroyed. Over 100 boats at the marina were destroyed by the strong tornado that moved slowly south-southwest. Ten homes along the lakeshore also sustained severe damage and damage to trees was nearly total. The tornado dissipated just northeast of Woodland.
1997-05-27330°33'N / 97°49'W30°29'N / 97°50'W5.60 Miles200 Yards01570.0M50KWilliamson
 Brief Description: The Cedar Park tornado formed around 3:05 pm CST from a different supercell thunderstorm. It first touched down about 3.5 miles north of Cedar Park at a location 0.6 miles south of CR 178 and 1.4 miles east of the intersection of US 183 and CR 178. The initial damage was to trees, however, the ground survey revealed damage nearby to a church and a trucking company. The aerial survey did not reflect this damage as being in line with the damage path. It is quite possible this damage was caused by strong wind near the tornado. The beginning point was in a relatively open area with damage primarily to a few trees and minor shingle damage to one house. The tornado moved south-southwestward skirting a residential area before it crossed CR 180 immediately east of US 183. A historic train located on the north side of CR 180 just to the east of US 183 was in the direct path of the tornado. While the engine remained on the track, a coal tender converted to hold diesel fuel and weighing approximately 65,000 pounds including the 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel was flipped over and thrown a short distance. Continuing across CR180, it entered a shopping center where it weakened and pushed inward slightly the north wall of a grocery store. It also pushed large metal doors inward that were built to open toward the outside. Damage at this point had been generally F2 with brief F3 as the tornado knocked the train tender off the track and damaged the wall and doors of the food store. It tore off much of a weakly supported roof of a grocery store. The manager of the store, who had been a victim of the Wichita Falls Tornado of 1979, saw the approaching tornado, and made an announcement to all in the store to meet him in the middle of the store. He then led everyone he could gather into the meat locker. This very quick and decisive action probably saved several lives. The tornado crossed US 183 causing additional damage to a number of businesses. One business on the west side of US 183 lost nearly the entire roof. Most damage to other businesses was believed to be minor. After crossing US 183 the tornado moved across Marquis Lane and North Park Circle moving through an area with widely scattered housing and a relative abundance of trees. Again, most damage to structures in this area was minor. From North Park Circle the tornado moved into the northwestern portion of Buttercup Creek, a subdivision of well constructed homes. Damage to homes was irregular with one house losing a roof but the house next door losing only shingles. Two homes in the area were nearly destroyed an one damaged when a pickup truck was lifted and tossed against its front wall. Eleven homes were destroyed, with damage reported to over 100 homes. The damage level ranged from F0 to F2. At this point, the tornado track was taking a gentle right turn as the tornado track became more southwesterly. The tornado moved into a wooded area crossing into Travis County before ending 1.1 miles from Lake Travis. Damage in the wooded area was irregular ranging from near total destruction of all trees to sections with about 10 percent of the trees down.
1997-06-11335°20'N / 100°27'W35°13'N / 100°23'W9.00 Miles600 Yards0131.7M0Wheeler
 Brief Description: Tornado occurred near Pakan community on CR 453. Twelve homes damaged or destroyed along with 13 vehicles on Interstate 40. Two inch diameter hail fell along most of the tornado path. Tornado track was determined by official storm survey.
1999-01-01330°00'N / 94°27'W30°03'N / 94°24'W5.50 Miles400 Yards05500K0Jefferson
 Brief Description: A strong tornado that developed in Liberty County moved into western Jefferson County, destroying several rice dryers, two mobile homes, and a brick house. Five people were injured in the mobile homes and brick house. Two people received broken necks and other injuries after they were ejected from one of the mobile homes. A fiberglass tub from the destroyed brick home was found one mile away. Cancelled checks and other paperwork were found seven miles away in southern Hardin County. This tornado was strongest southwest of Nome, and was weakening as it passed through the small community of Nome. At least 20 homes received minor damage such as shingles blown off, and many trees were blown down.
1999-03-02330°54'N / 93°54'W30°48'N / 93°47'W9.00 Miles500 Yards13500K0Jasper
 Brief Description: The strongest tornado of the evening developed a mile northwest of Holly Springs. Moving southeast at 50 mph, this fast moving storm damaged or destroyed over 25 homes and a church. The worst damage was done in Holly Springhs, where a brick home lost its roof and portions of two walls. This is where the elderly woman was fatally injured. Several vehicles were picked up and rolled over. This storm moved into Newotn County, producing more injuries and damages. F84PH
1999-03-02330°56'N / 93°51'W30°54'N / 93°49'W3.00 Miles500 Yards03250K0Newton
 Brief Description: The Holly Springs tornado moved into Newton County, tearing up the Baptist Encampment community. A mobile home was flipped over 100 feet, ejecting three people. One young girl escaped with no injuries after being thrown over 50 feet from the home. Two trucks were flipped over in their driveways and a car was moved at least 15 feet. One couple sitting on the couch in the TV watched their wood-framed home fall apart around them, and miraculously walk away.
1999-05-04333°11'N / 95°10'W33°15'N / 95°10'W2.10 Miles25 Yards0000Franklin
 Brief Description: Supercells developed in unstable airmass ahead of strong upper low over central plains states. Damage confined to broken branches off trees and snapped twigs. This tornado moved into Titus county, TX.
1999-05-04333°12'N / 95°08'W33°20'N / 94°47'W19.20 Miles100 Yards10330K0Titus
 Brief Description: Seven homes were destroyed. Two of the homes were swept from their slabs. F79PH
1999-05-04333°23'N / 94°52'W33°27'N / 94°44'W7.50 Miles100 Yards005K0Red River
 Brief Description: Numerous trees were blown over or broken. A few out buildings were severely damaged. This tornado moved from Titus county, TX into Red River county, TX and exited into Bowie county TX.
1999-05-04333°24'N / 94°44'W33°37'N / 94°29'W19.50 Miles200 Yards022125.0M0Bowie
 Brief Description: This tornado moved directly through the downtown district of De Kalb and across a high school. Numerous homes and businesses were severely damaged or destroyed. The high school suffered severe damage. Sirens sounded 15 minutes prior to arrival of the storm. The damage resulted in a Presidential Disaster Declaration. This tornado moved from Red River county, TX across Bowie county, TX into Little River county, AR.
1999-05-11330°18'N / 99°12'W30°15'N / 99°11'W3.50 Miles200 Yards001.0M100KGillespie
 Brief Description: The tornado was preceded by strong, gusty winds, very heavy rainfall and finally, large hail. Severe winds in advance of the tornado took a roof off the High School in Harper and laid it on the ground on the opposite side of the building. These winds also damaged several other roofs in the area. The tornado began its track around three miles east of Harper, moving toward the southeast. It lifted post oak trees out of the ground with their roots in tact. Approximately 2 miles down the path, it turned toward the south and continued for another 1.5 miles. Along its track, it destroyed. 35 homes, 10 mobile homes, and damaged or destroyed 25 outbuildings and barns. The tornado damage several vehicles and tossed one jeep over 100 yards.
2000-03-10330°25'N / 96°41'W30°24'N / 96°21'W21.00 Miles800 Yards021.0M0Burleson
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down near Harmony at 1955 CST with significant tree damage including an 18 inch diameter tree blown down. A trailer was also significantly damaged. Tornado then tracked to just south of Center Line with mostly F0 tree damage along its path. Tornado then reached the Pin Oak subdivision at about 2022 CST. Several trailers, including a double-wide, were destroyed. A total of 7 homes were destroyed and another 10 severely damaged in this area, with damage reaching F2 status. Tornado then struck a ranch on the south side of FM 1361 with large trees uprooted or cut in half and windows blown out and portion of roof torn off large frame house. Several rural outbuildings at the ranch which had been bolted down were destroyed. Damage in this area was rated F3 with damage swath up to a half mile wide. Tornado then tracked to just north of Clay by 2051 CST with a narrow swath of F0 to F1 tree damage along the path. When tornado passed north of Clay before dissipating, car was blown off road and damage swath reached 200 yards wide.
2000-03-28332°45'N / 97°21'W32°45'N / 97°21'W4.00 Miles250 Yards28000Tarrant
 Brief Description: M52OU, M67OU Tarrant County Thunderstorm Narrative The first tornado damage was reported near Castleberry High School, about four miles west of downtown Fort Worth (618 PM). Additional roof and tree damage occurred in Monticello neighborhood of River Oaks. A number of businesses were then damaged or destroyed near the intersection of Camp Bowie and West Seventh (620 PM). Tornado moved east along West Seventh Street, striking the Montgomery Ward building and the adjacent Linwood neighborhood, doing extensive damage to older homes (622 PM). The tornado then did extensive damage to the six story Cash America building, nearly destroying it. Further significant damage was then done to the Mallick Tower building and Calvary Cathedral Building (624 PM). The tornado weakened as it entered downtown, but wind borne debris broke thousands of windows in buildings and high rises (626 PM). Particularly hard hit was the Bank One Building, which had 80% (3,000) of its windows broken, and the Union Pacific Resources Building (1,300 of 5,000 windows broken). Numerous other structures were affected to a lesser degree. Automobiles in streets and parking lots were also damaged. The tornado then dissipated as it moved east of downtown, although scattered minor damage occurred to roofs, trees, fences, and billboards about 3 miles east of the city near I-30 and Brentwood Stair. Two people were killed as a direct result of the tornado. A man (age 52) was killed while trying to reach shelter after warning others of the tornado, while a homeless man (age 67) was killed by a wall that collapsed on him. Some 80 other people were injured, but only six required hospitalization. Hail did extensive damage to roofs and autos mainly in Lake Worth and Saginaw. Initial tornado damage in Arlington occurred at a restaurant on South Cooper street. The tornado moved east and gained strength, doing F3 damage near Bardin and Matlock (707 PM), south of I-20. The tornado then struck the northern part of Arlington Airport (F2). The tornado paralled I-20, crossing the Interstate about one mile west of Highway 360, overturning at least one 18-wheeler (F1)(712 PM). The tornado then began moving northeast, ending with F2 damage to subdivision just northeast of Grand Prairie airport (near Arkansas and Parkside)(720 PM). In spite of the damage, there were no deaths or serious injuries in Arlington or Grand Prairie. One commercial building was destroyed in Arlington, and 22 others damaged. Residential building damage (Tarrant county) was as follows: Location Destroyed Major Damage Minor Damage Azle 0 0 13 (hail) Lake Worth 0 0 118 (hail) River Oaks 0 3 51 Fort Worth 28 48 136 Arlington 67 146 458 Grand Prairie 6 9 32 Total 101 206 808
2000-03-28332°44'N / 97°07'W32°44'N / 97°07'W7.00 Miles300 Yards0000Tarrant
 Brief Description: Tarrant County Thunderstorm Narrative The first tornado damage was reported near Castleberry High School, about four miles west of downtown Fort Worth (618 PM). Additional roof and tree damage occurred in Monticello neighborhood of River Oaks. A number of businesses were then damaged or destroyed near the intersection of Camp Bowie and West Seventh (620 PM). Tornado moved east along West Seventh Street, striking the Montgomery Ward building and the adjacent Linwood neighborhood, doing extensive damage to older homes (622 PM). The tornado then did extensive damage to the six story Cash America building, nearly destroying it. Further significant damage was then done to the Mallick Tower building and Calvary Cathedral Building (624 PM). The tornado weakened as it entered downtown, but wind borne debris broke thousands of windows in buildings and high rises (626 PM). Particularly hard hit was the Bank One Building, which had 80% (3,000) of its windows broken, and the Union Pacific Resources Building (1,300 of 5,000 windows broken). Numerous other structures were affected to a lesser degree. Automobiles in streets and parking lots were also damaged. The tornado then dissipated as it moved east of downtown, although scattered minor damage occurred to roofs, trees, fences, and billboards about 3 miles east of the city near I-30 and Brentwood Stair. Two people were killed as a direct result of the tornado. A man (age 52) was killed while trying to reach shelter after warning others of the tornado, while a homeless man (age 67) was killed by a wall that collapsed on him. Some 80 other people were injured, but only six required hospitalization. Hail did extensive damage to roofs and autos mainly in Lake Worth and Saginaw. Initial tornado damage in Arlington occurred at a restaurant on South Cooper street. The tornado moved east and gained strength, doing F3 damage near Bardin and Matlock (707 PM), south of I-20. The tornado then struck the northern part of Arlington Airport (F2). The tornado paralled I-20, crossing the Interstate about one mile west of Highway 360, overturning at least one 18-wheeler (F1)(712 PM). The tornado then began moving northeast, ending with F2 damage to subdivision just northeast of Grand Prairie airport (near Arkansas and Parkside)(720 PM). In spite of the damage, there were no deaths or serious injuries in Arlington or Grand Prairie. One commercial building was destroyed in Arlington, and 22 others damaged. Residential building damage (Tarrant county) was as follows: Location Destroyed Major Damage Minor Damage Azle 0 0 13 (hail) Lake Worth 0 0 118 (hail) River Oaks 0 3 51 Fort Worth 28 48 136 Arlington 67 146 458 Grand Prairie 6 9 32 Total 101 206 808
2000-04-23333°03'N / 94°23'W33°04'N / 94°04'W16.00 Miles880 Yards00165K0Cass
 Brief Description: This tornado developed in a high precipitation supercell as it moved eastward across the county. This was one of several tornadoes that occured. The tornado tracked eastward across wooded territory and farmland. Several barns and 2 cross country electrical towers were toppled.
2000-04-30333°22'N / 98°46'W33°22'N / 98°46'W13.00 Miles800 Yards00300K0Young
 Brief Description: A large tornado was reported from near the county line (between Elbert and Padgett) to east of Olney. A 100 year old home was completely destroyed one mile south of the Olney Airport. A total of three homes and two motor homes were destroyed. Damage was reported to a nursing home, barns, power lines and trees. Most of the damage, however, occurred in open country. April 30, 2000 - Event Narrative A big day for severe weather across northwest portions of the area. Several outflow boundaries, a dryline, and moist unstable air all helped contribute to thunderstorm development. There were several rounds of thunderstorms, the first wave was in the early morning hours, from about 3 am to 5 am. This activity developed in Young and Palo Pinto counties and moved eastward to affect Parker, Jack, Wise and Tarrant counties. Another event developed in the early evening, generally north and west of a Dallas, Glen Rose, Eastland line. Most of the activity was centered on Young, Jack, and Stephens county. A large tornado occurred near Olney (Young County) during this event. A continuation of aa tornado that began in Throckmorton county.
2000-05-12331°54'N / 97°22'W31°54'N / 97°22'W7.00 Miles400 Yards203.0M0Bosque
 Brief Description: A tornado formed over the central part of Lake Whitney at approximately 1610 CST. The tornado moved south and dissipated near the dam at 1625 CST. The tornado caused two deaths, both of which occurred in the same home, but no other injuries. The most significant damaged occurred at the Lakewood Harbor Subdivision, three miles northwest of the Dam, around 1615 CST. 38 homes were destroyed and 27 others were damaged. M70PH, F80PH May 12, 2000 - Event Narrative A cold front moved into North Texas, and became stationary along a Bonham, Dallas, Hillsboro, Goldthwaite line. Numerous hail and wind reports were received. An F-3 tornado touched down near Lake Whitney in the late afternoon hours.The parent storm continued to develop on the south flank, resulting in a long lived wall cloud that moved south through southern Bosque, western McLennan, eastern Coryell, and western Bell counties. While reports of hail and funnels continued through the life of the storm, no additional tornadoes were sighted.
2001-05-29335°24'N / 101°23'W35°26'N / 101°13'W10.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0Carson
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed an office building associated with a grain elevator...unroofed and severely damaged a nearby home...and tossed a pickup truck and suburban about fifty and one hundred yards respectively. Several cattle and one horse were reported killed or injured from the tornado. As many as fifty power poles and transmission lines were brought down from the storm. The tornado path and width were estimated and an official damage survey was made on the tornado. Severe thunderstorms produced tornadoes and large hail from the central and southern Texas panhandle into the eastern and southeastern Texas panhandle during the evening hours.
2001-10-12330°15'N / 98°40'W30°16'N / 98°39'W2.50 Miles400 Yards051.0M100KGillespie
 Brief Description: The strongest of the Friday night tornadoes struck the town of Stonewall. This tornado, rated F3 on the Fujita Scale, was preceded by brief gusty winds of 30 to 40 miles per hour, very heavy rainfall and spotty .5-inch hail. The tornado formed around 830 pm CST near the intersection of Hahn Road and SH290. It moved north-northeastward for .75 miles, crossing SH290 and the Pedernales River. Just north of the river, it made a slight turn toward the east, now moving another mile toward the northeast. It crossed North River Road and continued over open country until it crossed Ranch Road 1623. After passing RR1623 for approximately .25 miles, it dissipated. The worst damage, F3 level, was to trees and homes between RR1623 and SH290, across the northwest and north central part of Stonewall. Ninety homes sustained damage with 6 destroyed. In addition, 7 mobile homes were destroyed and 20 damaged. Damage was also reported to 22 buildings. A two-story home had the entire second story destroyed, and a concrete building lost most of its walls and all of its roof. Other damage along the path typically included destroyed and damaged roofs and walls of homes and businesses as well as widespread damage to trees. The tornado path was approximately .25 miles in width and 2.5 miles in length. Although the tornado was not seen due to the late hour and darkness, residents did report that after heavy rain and hail, the wind became calm, and it was followed by a "roaring sound" so often reported in tornadoes. Five persons were injured with one man hospitalized as a result of the tornado.
2002-03-30331°07'N / 94°46'W31°20'N / 94°27'W24.30 Miles440 Yards065.0M0Angelina
 Brief Description: Numerous trees and power lines broken, snapped, and pulled out of the ground along the entire track. Several barns were severely damaged and numerous homes were with missing roofs while others suffered severe roof and structural damage. South of the Ora Community one house was totally blown off its foundation and destroyed. This tornado moved into Angelina County, TX from Polk County, TX and continued into Nacogdoches County, TX and San Augustine County, TX.
2002-03-30329°37'N / 95°01'W29°38'N / 95°00'W0.70 Mile60 Yards00350K0Harris
 Brief Description: This Tornado began its path in the Shoreacres subdivision, 3 miles south of La Porte, with a home on Greenleaf Road receiving structural and roof damage (F1), then moved northeast and partially demolished a Super Mart on Broadway (F3), then ripped through an apartment complex across the street causing major roof and window damage and knocking down trees (F2), collapsing a car garage and destroying at least one car. Just northeast of the apartments, a few homes had minor damage with fences and large trees down. On Carlisle Street, in the Bayside Terrace subdivision, a few homes had minor roof damage, yard trees down, and debris from the convenience store, while part of the roof off the Super Mart dropped onto a Truck parked at the north end of Carlisle next to Galveston Bay. No injuries were reported. A survey was conducted.
2002-04-16332°45'N / 97°21'W32°45'N / 97°21'W2.10 Miles80 Yards00250K0Tarrant
 Brief Description: The fourth and most significant tornado of the day developed in east Fort Worth just south of Ramey Avenue east of Loop 820, moved north and dissipated between Forest and Haynie streets, south of Greenlee Street. Damage occurred to a strip mall, with heavy damage to a duplex. Several homes were partially unroofed, two businesses suffered heavy damage, and roof damage occurred to the sanctuary of a church.
2003-04-06331°55'N / 94°59'W32°15'N / 94°41'W34.00 Miles440 Yards009.0M0Rusk
 Brief Description: A supercell thunderstorm moved northeast across Rusk County. Numerous wood frame and mobile homes were damaged with several homes totally destroyed. A few barns were damaged as well. One power substation was severely damaged. Numerous large Pine, Oak, and Pecan trees were twisted, broken and uprooted. This tornado moved into Rusk County from Cherokee County, TX.
2005-05-12333°35'N / 101°30'W33°39'N / 101°25'W6.00 Miles500 Yards00300K200KCrosby
 Brief Description: F3 tornado in Ralls. A strong tornado developed approximately 9 miles to the southwest of Ralls around 8:40 PM and tracked to the northeast for six miles. Along the path of this tornado, several power poles were blown over or snapped and a few center pivots were overturned or twisted. A residence was completely destroyed with debris entirely removed from the foundation. The majority of the debris from this structure was blown to the northeast approximately 10 to 30 feet from the foundation...with other related debris dispersed over a mile away. Two pickup trucks were lifted and deposited upside down 5 to 30 feet from former locations. Trees were mud-splattered and stripped of bark with large branches completely torn off trunks. Center pivot irrigation systems were either blown over or twisted in surrounding fields...however some were left unscathed to the northeast of this tornado. Additional debris associated with this tornado was also deposited in a field across from US Highway 62/82 before dissipating. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
2005-05-13333°38'N / 99°38'W33°29'N / 99°28'W16.00 Miles1000 Yards0000Knox
 Brief Description: The tornado began in Knox County and traveled just over 16 miles, eventually moving into Baylor County for less than a half a mile before dissipating 3.3 miles SW of Bomarton. The storm was being seeded by precipitation from another supercell just to its southwest and the tornado was apparently rain-wrapped throughout its duration. However mobile research radars, Doppler on Wheels (DOW), were able to track this tornado. The initial path of the tornado was to the south-southwest crossing U.S. Highway 82. The tornado then generally moved to the southeast for the rest of its life. This tornado moved through sparsely populated areas with no reported damage. Preliminary analysis of data from the Doppler On Wheels indicated a maximum wind velocity of 79 m/s (about 177 mph) at 30 m above ground level which was measured at 1829 CST when the tornado was in open country about 6 miles south of Vera.
2005-06-09333°52'N / 101°31'W33°52'N / 101°16'W10.00 Miles900 Yards00200K70.0MFloyd
 Brief Description: The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX conducted a damage survey in the vicinity of McCoy, TX in Floyd county. The tornado was a long-lived occurrence stretching from the Petersburg area in southeast Hale county across portions of southwest and south-central Floyd county. Significant damage resulted from a tornado impacting a grain elevator about 5 miles east of Petersburg/5 miles west of McCoy. The tornado destroyed the grain elevator, numerous power poles and center pivot irrigation systems across the area along and either side of FM 54. Numerous homes sustained roof and structural damage. One home sustained extensive roof damage as tornadic winds breached the garage and moved a pickup truck about ten inches in the driveway. The damage surveyed indicated the tornadic circulation was multi-vortex in nature. Extensive video of the tornado was captured by media and storm chasers depicting a very large, wedge tornado appearance. Another residence sustained extensive damage with a pickup truck thrown over 1/2 mile from the driveway into a field behind the home. The truck was lifted and carried through the air to the field and sustained only glass damage. The Fujita-rating for this long-lived tornado was rated F-3 based on the movement and condition of the vehicle, however the majority of the damage was rated in the F-1 and F-2 categories.
2006-05-09333°22'N / 96°31'W33°24'N / 96°38'W4.00 Miles300 Yards261.0M0Collin
 Brief Description: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Fort Worth found that a significant tornado developed approximately three miles east-northeast of Anna. A house was unroofed and another damaged just east of Collin County Road 477. Trees and power lines were also downed. A roof was damaged along FM 2862 west of Collin County Road 480. The tornado ranged from an F1 to an F2 on the Fujita Tornado Intensity Scale during this part of its lifetime. The tornado then turned on a slightly more northerly track. The tornado reached its maximum intensity of F3 as it crossed FM 3133 just north of the Westminster community. Vegetation west of FM 3133 was scoured. Two homes were heavily damaged south of Collin County Road 531. A mobile home and several permanent structures suffered heavy damage along Brangus and Black Roads, near the Collin-Grayson County line. These were the locations of the fatalities. Several other people suffered injuries and were transported to hospitals. Numerous livestock were killed. The affected parts of Collin County were declared disaster areas. The tornado continued on its destructive path as it crossed into Grayson County. F80MH, M82MH
2006-05-09333°23'N / 96°26'W33°27'N / 96°24'W5.30 Miles300 Yards14500K0Grayson
 Brief Description: A significant tornado which formed in northern Collin County continued into southeastern Grayson County. A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Fort Worth found that the tornado remained strong F3 as it crossed into Grayson County. A fatality occurred on Black Road, just over the border into Grayson County, where permanent homes suffered heavy damage. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted along Yellow Bridge Road, Durham Road, and Red Moore Road. The tornado damaged outbuildings, rolled over a mobile home, and caused at least minor damage to structures in the area. The tornado, which had briefly weakened to an F1, strengthened again and caused F2 damage as it approached Gordon Road southeast of the Pilot Grove community. At least two additional homes were heavily damaged. The tornado crossed FM 121 and damaged a shed along Bethel Canyon Road, just west of Highway 160. The tornado crossed Highway 160, weakened to an F0, and dissipated approximately three miles south of Whitewright just before 11 PM. In addition to the fatality, several people suffered injuries and were transported to the hospital. M14PH
2007-03-28335°07'N / 100°56'W35°10'N / 100°56'W3.00 Miles600 Yards020.2M0KDonley
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado formed in the northwest part of Donley county at 1839 CST three miles south southwest of Jericho and tracked north northwest for about three miles before exiting Donley county one and a half miles west northwest of Jericho at 1848 CST.The tornado continued in Gray county for about another three miles before dissipating at 1854 CST. Damage was first noted two miles south of Interstate 40 along County Road 9 in northwest Donley County. The roof of a horse barn was completely destroyed...as was the rear room addition. Beside the barn...welded steel fencing was bent or mildly twisted. A refrigerated boxcar that had contained tools and horse feed was rolled northward eleven times and found on its side almost one hundred yards north of its original location. A feeding trough originally near the boxcar was carried one hundred yards northwest of its previous location. Three hundred yards away...the mobile home of the property owner suffered only minor damage. One mile north northwest of this location...a large home apparently lost a substantial portion of its roof. An irrigation pivot was overturned in a field just northwest of the home. The most significant damage from this tornado occurred to three semi trucks that were caught and badly damaged in the tornado on Interstate 40 on the Donley county and Gray county line. In this area...power poles were snapped near their bases. The cab of one of the semi trucks was reportedly lifted and deposited atop its trailer. The driver and his wife were sucked out of the cab. The driver was completely disrobed some distance away from the truck. His clothing was found tangled in the engine of the truck. The driver and his wife were reported to be in critical and serious condition...respectively. Additionally the cab was crushed to the steering column. The trailer roof appeared to have been pried up and twisted...and at least one of the side walls failed. The contents of the truck were scattered downstream into a field for nearly a mile. In this field...irrigation pivots were overturned. The property owner also reported that irrigation pivot tires weighing three hundred pounds were relocated and a fifteen hundred gallon fertilizer tank that was one quarter full was gone. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-03-28335°16'N / 101°01'W35°18'N / 100°58'W3.00 Miles600 Yards020.1M0KGray
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado formed three miles south southwest of Jericho in northwest Donley county at 1839 CST and entered Gray county about one and a half miles west northwest of Jericho at 1848 CST. The tornado then continued moving north northwest for another three miles before dissipating just south of Farm to Market Road 2477 and just east of State Highway 70 four miles northwest of Jericho or about eleven miles southwest of Lefors at 1854 CST. As highlighted in the Donley County portion of this tornado track...the most significant damage from this tornado occurred to three semi trucks that were caught and badly damaged in the tornado on Interstate 40 on the Donley County and Gray County line. In this area...power poles were snapped near their bases. The cab of one of the semi trucks was reportedly lifted and deposited atop its trailer. The driver and his wife were sucked out of the cab. The driver was completely disrobed some distance away from the truck. His clothing was found tangled in the engine of the truck. The driver and his wife were reported to be in critical and serious condition...respectively. Additionally the cab was crushed to the steering column. The trailer roof appeared to have been pried up and twisted...and at least one of the side walls failed. The contents of the truck were scattered downstream into a field for nearly a mile. In this field...irrigation pivots were overturned. The property owner also reported that irrigation pivot tires weighing three hundred pounds were relocated and a fifteen hundred gallon fertilizer tank that was one quarter full was gone. Light damage was observed along Vernon Road just east of State Highway 70 and just south of Farm to Market Road 2477 in southwest Gray county...where metal roofing damage was observed to barns...stables...and sheds. A large quantity of metal roofing panels was also found south of these buildings...with several twisted around fence posts and trees. The tornado dissipated just north of this area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-03-28335°19'N / 100°33'W35°25'N / 100°36'W8.00 Miles1760 Yards0027K0KGray
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado developed from the same storm that moved just east of McLean. The initial circulation developed eight miles north northeast of McLean at 1945 CST and was initially moving northeast at forty miles per hour. As it crossed Farm to Market Road 2473 at the McClellan Creek bridge...high-tension power lines supported by double wooden pole structures were broken or snapped at the ground at several locations. Numerous hard and softwood trees were debarked with only stubs remaining. At 1949 CST...the tornado moved more northwesterly and accelerated to forty-five miles per hour. A local rancher...who lives seven miles northwest of Kellerville heard the tornado approaching and took shelter. Damage to his property included a covered porch that was completely blown off and steel roofing was peeled back on the the southward facing side. A brick chimney also collapsed. Several trees...as much as two hundred feet from the west edge of the house...were blown down. A bunkhouse on the property lost of the roof. An anchored large steel feed bunk was pulled out of the ground. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-03-28335°41'N / 100°29'W35°48'N / 100°30'W8.00 Miles1408 Yards113.0M0KHemphill
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado developed in southwestern Hemphill County approximately sixteen miles south southwest of Canadian. The tornado moved north northwest at twenty miles an hour and encountered an area of active oil drilling rigs. The tornado hit two drilling rigs. An employee of the first drilling rig that was hit was residing in a single-wide mobile home that was anchored into the ground. The mobile home was destroyed and displaced one hundred yards from its original location and the employee was thrown approximately fifty yards. A semi trailer used for storage was blown over. A structure used to lift the oil-well casing onto the oil derrick was also blown down and severely damaged. The tornado rolled a railroad boxcar one hundred and fifty yards. A series of power poles along County Road W covering a distance of zero point six miles was also blown down. A second oil drilling rig and production facility were hit by the tornado where another unoccupied and anchored single-wide mobile home was rolled over. Nearby...two goose neck fifth-wheel camper trailers were parked...both unanchored with one occupied. This person was critically injured and later died from his injuries. The camper trailer that was occupied rolled forty-five yards to the northeast while a second unoccupied trailer was blown thirty yards before coming to rest on an oilfield production unit. By 2041 CST...the tornado was crossing U.S. Highway 60...resulting in severe tree damage. Texas Department of Transportation officials...using light tree damage as an indicator...measured a damage width of zero point eight miles along U.S. Highway 60. At the center of this swath were numerous hardwood trees with trunks that had been broken off halfway up the tree. On the periphery of this area was a home located thirteen miles south southwest of Canadian that suffered only minor damage due to trees falling on the home. Many large trees were snapped twenty feet in the air. A second well built home suffered severe damage to the roof structure. The majority of the steel roofing structure was completely removed and six feet of brick chimney toppled onto the house. Several cedar beams were removed from the roof structure as well as several rafters despite being tied down by hurricane clips. Additionally...a steel feed bunk containing twenty six thousand pounds of feed was turned over on its side. At 2045 CST...a Burlington Northern Santa Fe train was derailed with over fifty cars blown over. The tornado dissipated around 2055 CST. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-04-24328°38'N / 100°24'W28°36'N / 100°21'W4.00 Miles400 Yards7080.0M0KMaverick
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A supercell thunderstorm formed in the Mexican mountains west of Piedras Negras, across the Rio Grande from Eagle Pass. Reports from west of the Rio Grande indicate that a large and devastating tornado stuck Piedras Negras from the west, then dissipated on the west side of the Rio Grande. The supercell crossed the Rio Grande near 6:00 pm CST and struck the community of Rosita Valley near 6:01pm CST. Severe outflow winds from the storm estimated at between 80 mph and 100 mph struck the community first, causing minor damage to houses and mobile homes. Roofs were partially lifted, exteriors of homes were damaged, and trees were knocked over. Following the wind damage, hail to the size of golfballs struck the area, along with very heavy rain. Following the winds and hail, the tornado struck next. The team found the tornado touchdown point approximately one-quarter mile to the southwest of the Rosita Valley Elementary School. It struck a four room home??? destroying the outer walls and leaving only the interior walls standing. This damage was rated as EF-2 damage. The tornado then moved toward the east-northeast, directly toward the school. Along its path it damaged three more homes and destroyed a fourth. Damage to the three homes was rated EF-1 with the destroyed home rated EF-2. The tornado next struck a mobile home, tearing off its frame and tossing the debris into the school building. This also indicated EF-2 damage. Then the tornado crossed Rosita Valley Road, destroying mobile homes and damaging homes and tossing the debris into the south and west sides of the Rosita Valley Elementary School building. The initial strike points at the school showed only minor EF-0 damage. However damage was severe from the center of the school northeastward. It appeared that the tornadic winds were able to open enough of the center part of the roof to enter the interior of the school. These winds as well as winds that entered through wall openings caused severe damage to the north and south wings of the building. This damage indicated wind speeds approaching 140 mph and damage at EF-3 level. To the northwest of the school were two brick retail buildings; both were well-constructed. Outer walls were destroyed in each with damage to interior walls in one of the structures. This also suggested wind speeds near 140 mph and EF-3 level damage. Finally as the tornado exited the school area it struck an area of single family houses some 200 yards to the northeast. Most of the houses were swept off their foundations and many of them were completely flattened. This damage suggested wind speeds approaching 150 mph, the highest speeds found at Rosita Valley. This was mid-range EF-3 damage. In conclusion???the tornado was rated EF-3 on the Enhanced Fujita Scale with a path width near one-quarter mile and a path length near four miles. In all the tornado destroyed one elementary school, along with 59 manufactured homes and 57 houses. Major damage was reported to 21 manufactured homes and 19 houses with minor damage to10 manufactured homes, 22 houses, and 9 apartments. There were seven deaths in Rosita Valley as a result of the tornado. A family of five in one mobile home were killed as it was destroyed and rolled into the Rosita Valley Elementary School. Two other victims were found, one in a permanent home that had collapsed and one in another mobile home. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A supercell thunderstorm produced one of the strongest and deadliest tornadoes to strike near the Rio Grande in many decades.
2009-12-23331°18'N / 94°43'W31°22'N / 94°41'W4.00 Miles300 Yards0210.0M0KAngelina
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF3 tornado touched down on the south side of Lufkin, on Loop 287 near Olive Garden just west of the intersections Loop 287 and South Chestnut Street. The tornado then tracked north northeast causing roof and tree damage to several homes behind Morgan Insurance Company on Loop 287. The tornado continued its north northeastward track then crossed South Chestnut causing major damage to Gibson Funeral Home. It then tracked northward through a residential neighborhood causing more tree and roof damage, before destroying Max Welding Shop on Denman Rd. The tornado crossed Denman Road moving through another residential area causing moderate to major tree and roof damage. The tornado then destroyed the VFW building just before crossing Lufkin Avenue. More residential damage was observed between Lufkin Avenue and Atkinson Drive. The tornado crossed Atkinson Drive causing major damage by tossing several 18-wheelers parked at a trucking company on Loop 287. The tornado then crossed Loop 287, damaging Goodyear Tires and Jim Walter Homes. The storm then tracked north into a wooded area before reaching Kit McConnico Park and causing moderate to major damage to the park. The tornado lifted on the northern end of Kit McConnico Park around 10:07 PM. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong upper level storm system moved its way out of the southern Great Basin and into the Southern Plains during the afternoon hours of December 23rd. Strong southerly flow was found ahead of this storm system with dewpoint temperatures in the lower to middle 60s noted northward to the Interstate 20 corridor of northeast Texas and northern Louisiana. Impressive deep layer shear was noted in the warm sector across the region which was conducive for discrete storm cells during the afternoon and evening across northeast Texas. These storms spawned tornadoes and produced large hail across portions of northeast Texas. The storm system moved eastward during the predawn hours of December 24th with again, numerous storms producing tornadoes across southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana. In addition to all the storm damage...these storms were prolific rain makers with numerous reports of flash flooding across the region as well.
2010-01-20332°29'N / 94°10'W32°31'N / 94°02'W8.00 Miles1087 Yards001.5M0KHarrison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado first touched down in a wooded area west of Ireland Williams Road. The tornado quickly intensified as it approached Interstate 20 near mile marker 628 where 2 businesses were destroyed on both the south and north services roads. One of the businesses was a metal building and the other was a mobile home. One home was completely destroyed with only a few interior walls remaining. A second home sustained major damage to the roof and carport. Debris was scattered across interstate 20 and Hwy 80. Several other homes were damaged further east along both sides of the service road. Many trees were snapped and uprooted in the area???some were snapped down close to the base. The tornado continued northeast crossing Bellview Road into Jonesville, TX where a grocery store roof was peeled and walls were blown out of a large warehouse. The tornado also damaged some metal buildings north of Jonesville along FM 134. The tornado tracked east across a wooded area snapping and uprooting trees crossing FM 9 headed east into Caddo Parish in LA. Maximum winds are estimated at 150-160 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A very warm and unstable air mass developed across the region on January 20th. This air mass was accompanied by unusually high dewpoint values for late January with ambient temperatures approaching the 70 degree mark. A very strong and vigorous storm system moved out of the Great Basin and into the Southern Plains and Lower Mississippi Valley during the late afternoon and evening hours of January 20th. Wind shear throughout the atmosphere was very strong and supportive of strong to severe thunderstorms. Low level wind shear was significant enough such that super cell thunderstorms developed across the region, producing tornadoes, large hail and damaging wind gusts.
2010-04-22334°10'N / 100°30'W34°15'N / 100°19'W12.00 Miles975 Yards00300K0KCottle
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and rain wrapped tornado tracked from southwest of Cee Vee to just west of U.S. Highway 62/83 east-northeast of Cee Vee between 18:46 and 19:20 CST. A storm spotter observed the tornado as it passed southeast of Cee Vee at approximately 19:05 CST, and described it visually as a large wedge-shaped vortex. A post-storm ground and aerial survey conducted by local emergency management officials and National Weather Service meteorologists concluded that the tornado resulted in significant EF-3 damage. A number light weight objects and structures, including well-houses, horse stables, utility poles, empty semi-truck trailers, and a partially filled petroleum tank were heavily damaged or destroyed along the initial portions of the tornado's track through ranchland southwest and south of Cee Vee. This includes minor roof damage to a permanent farm home near County Road 172. Significant damage first occurred at a farmstead 3 miles east-southeast of Cee Vee, south of Farm to Market Road 1440. At this site, upwards of twenty-percent of the roof was removed from a well-built permanent home. A large metal building was partially collapsed and a well-house was completely destroyed. A horse trailer was blown over and rolled. In addition, several large trees were uprooted. The tornado continued to move northeastward and impacted a second farmstead four miles east of Cee Vee, just south of Farm to Market Road 1440. The tornado's maximum damage intensity was observed at this site, where a well-built stucco constructed permanant home, a cinderblock two-car garage, and several outbuildings were destroyed. The home's roof was totally removed, and three exterior walls collapsed. A portion of the home's roof and exterior walls were blown downwind and struck the two-car cinderblock garage broadside. This contributed to the complete destruction of that structure with only the frames of two exterior walls remaining. Two outbuildings and a horse stable were completely destroyed, with another unroofed. In addition, an entire stand of more than a dozen large trees were uprooted. A detailed survey by local officials of the site, revealed that the home was well-built, and that the exterior walls were secured to the slab foundation with bolts. In collaboration with experts at Texas Tech University's Wind Engineering Department, the developers of the Enhanced-Fujita Scale, it was determined that estimated wind speeds at the site of the destroyed residence ranged between 130 and 150 mph. With an average expected wind speed of 140 mph, the tornado was assigned an EF-3 rating based on this damage. The tornado continued northeastward across Farm to Market Road 1440. It caused light roof damage to a couple of light weight structures before dissipating just west of U.S. Highway 62/83 east-northeast of Cee Vee at approximately 19:20 CST. Despite damaging three residences, no injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Scattered thunderstorms developed over the central and eastern South Plains region of west Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 22nd. These storms resulted in significant severe weather, including strong tornadoes, as they impacted portions of the extreme southeastern Panhandle and the Rolling Plains. The severe weather over the South Plains of west Texas on the 22nd was part of a larger tornado outbreak that impacted areas from west Texas northward through western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Thunderstorms initiated over the central South Plains along and east of a dryline late in the day. These storms, some exhibiting supercell characteristics, initially became severe and produced large hail and damaging winds before 18:00 CST. By 18:20 CST, the first of three tornadoes, two of which were long-lived and significant, developed over northeastern Motley County. The parent supercell thunderstorm produced two damaging and rain-wrapped tornadoes over portions of Motley and Cottle Counties. The initial tornado south of Northfield crossed the Motley and Cottle County line southwest of Cee Vee. This three-quarter mile wide EF-2 tornado destroyed windmills and utility poles as it tracked through rural ranchlands. The second tornado heavily damaged or destroyed three farmsteads south and southeast of Cee Vee (Cottle County). Winds were estimated at approximately 140 mph where one home was destroyed east of that community. No injuries were reported. A second supercell thunderstorm developed south of the initial tornadic storm, and became tornadic near Swearingen (Cottle County) shortly after 21:00 CST. In addition to tornadoes, numerous reports of large hail up to the size of baseballs were received. Another Cottle County home was heavily damaged by thunderstorm winds just north of Paducah as convection organized into a linear complex late in the evening. Also, training thunderstorms repeatedly moved over the Tahoka area in Lynn County. This resulted in areas of flooding and portions of two U.S. Highways were rendered impassable. In all, property damages were estimated at $530,000. No injuries were reported.
2010-05-14331°49'N / 102°43'W31°54'N / 102°43'W4.00 Miles500 Yards00100K0KEctor
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: At 12:15 pm CST, members of the TWISTEX research group confirmed the formation of a tornado approximately 6.5 miles south of Notrees. This tornado progressed northeastward around 20 mph, first causing damage to power poles around from 12:16 to 12:17 pm CST. As it continued to track to the northeast, the tornado caused significant damage to oil equipment from 12:19 to 12:22 pm CST. Two type 320 pump jacks, each weighing 71,000 pounds including the concrete base, were blown over. The tornado then began to weaken at 12:27 pm CST, and dissipated at 12:28 pm CST approximately 2 miles southeast of Notrees, TX. EPISODE NARRATIVE: During the late morning hours, an upper level disturbance slowly progressed over the area. At the surface, abundant low level moisture was available due to southeasterly to easterly winds. A nearly stationary frontal boundary across the Permian basin provided a focus for rapid thunderstorm development. Several supercell thunderstorms resulted in widespread severe weather in the form of tornadoes, flash flooding and large hail across the Texas Permian Basin. The supercell thunderstorms eventually diminished during the late evening hours across the southern Permian Basin.
1950-01-26226°53'N / 98°07'W26°53'N / 98°03'W4.70 Miles133 Yards020K0Brooks
1950-02-11229°25'N / 95°15'W29°31'N / 95°08'W9.90 Miles400 Yards0025K0Brazoria
1950-02-11232°21'N / 95°12'W32°25'N / 95°12'W4.60 Miles100 Yards05250K0Smith
1950-02-11232°59'N / 94°38'W33°00'N / 94°42'W4.50 Miles67 Yards06250K0Cass
1950-02-12233°20'N / 94°25'W33°27'N / 94°25'W8.00 Miles833 Yards1825K0Bowie
1950-02-12231°31'N / 96°33'W31°34'N / 96°33'W3.40 Miles100 Yards0025K0Limestone
1950-05-04236°24'N / 100°48'W36°25'N / 100°46'W1.90 Miles50 Yards113250K0Ochiltree
1950-05-15229°47'N / 98°50'W29°40'N / 98°34'W18.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Kendall
1951-04-20233°55'N / 98°27'W1.50 Miles17 Yards0025K0Wichita
1951-05-09233°56'N / 98°41'W33°56'N / 98°46'W4.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Wichita
1951-06-06234°26'N / 100°12'W34°26'N / 100°08'W3.60 Miles1760 Yards00250K0Childress
1951-06-16232°27'N / 97°25'W32°27'N / 97°10'W14.50 Miles20 Yards0025K0Johnson
1951-07-02234°11'N / 102°07'W1.00 Mile20 Yards00250K0Lamb
1952-02-01230°05'N / 93°46'W1.00 Mile67 Yards0025K0Orange
1952-04-03233°36'N / 96°42'W33°38'N / 96°38'W4.90 Miles200 Yards0125K0Grayson
1952-12-03230°54'N / 95°18'W30°57'N / 95°05'W13.30 Miles100 Yards0425K0Trinity
1953-03-12232°10'N / 94°20'W2.00 Miles80 Yards0225K0Panola
1953-05-11231°19'N / 96°13'W31°22'N / 96°04'W9.50 Miles267 Yards0025K0Leon
1953-07-15231°54'N / 100°38'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Coke
1953-08-11233°56'N / 98°30'W33°56'N / 98°30'W00250K0Wichita
1953-10-23227°50'N / 97°04'W27°52'N / 97°01'W4.10 Miles100 Yards0025K0Nueces
1953-11-19231°46'N / 95°43'W31°48'N / 95°38'W5.60 Miles50 Yards0025K0Anderson
1953-12-02229°12'N / 96°02'W1.50 Miles200 Yards003K0Wharton
1953-12-02230°22'N / 96°11'W250K0Washington
1953-12-02230°38'N / 96°29'W0.20 Mile67 Yards0025K0Brazos
1954-02-19232°13'N / 98°41'W32°15'N / 98°39'W3.00 Miles17 Yards0225K0Eastland
1954-02-19230°19'N / 95°27'W30°27'N / 95°25'W9.50 Miles150 Yards07250K0Montgomery
1954-04-15230°40'N / 93°51'W30°40'N / 93°50'W1.30 Miles200 Yards003K0Newton
1954-04-21231°02'N / 102°53'W1.00 Mile880 Yards003K0Pecos
1954-04-27231°44'N / 99°57'W31°34'N / 99°57'W11.50 Miles33 Yards000K0Runnels
1954-04-30230°06'N / 96°58'W30°08'N / 96°59'W3.00 Miles880 Yards02250K0Lee
1954-04-30230°08'N / 96°49'W30°12'N / 96°37'W12.80 Miles880 Yards0025K0Fayette
1954-04-30230°38'N / 96°20'W30°39'N / 96°19'W1.90 Miles67 Yards000K0Brazos
1954-04-30231°04'N / 95°07'W31°11'N / 94°51'W17.80 Miles883 Yards013250K0Trinity
1954-04-30231°11'N / 94°51'W31°22'N / 94°28'W25.90 Miles883 Yards012250K0Angelina
1954-04-30231°22'N / 94°28'W31°33'N / 94°06'W25.10 Miles883 Yards00250K0Nacogdoches
1954-05-01233°33'N / 98°09'W33°34'N / 98°08'W1.30 Miles67 Yards000K0Clay
1954-05-02232°32'N / 94°57'W32°32'N / 94°57'W000K0Gregg
1954-05-29231°24'N / 102°36'W020K0Crane
1954-06-01230°54'N / 102°18'W30°56'N / 102°10'W8.30 Miles880 Yards003K0Pecos
1954-06-01233°38'N / 99°35'W33°39'N / 99°34'W1.90 Miles133 Yards000K0Knox
1954-06-02233°24'N / 95°42'W33°27'N / 95°37'W5.90 Miles1000 Yards1825K0Delta
1954-06-13231°30'N / 103°30'W25.00 Miles133 Yards010K0Reeves
1954-07-06229°42'N / 96°54'W29°43'N / 96°58'W4.50 Miles50 Yards000K0Colorado
1954-07-12229°35'N / 98°20'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Bexar
1954-10-22230°55'N / 96°07'W30°55'N / 96°00'W7.10 Miles100 Yards0025K0Madison
1955-03-20232°05'N / 96°43'W0.30 Mile50 Yards003K0Navarro
1955-03-21231°10'N / 97°20'W31°10'N / 97°17'W3.60 Miles17 Yards003K0Bell
1955-03-31233°38'N / 97°10'W33°39'N / 97°10'W1.10 Miles33 Yards00250K0Cooke
1955-04-05232°56'N / 99°48'W32°57'N / 99°46'W2.70 Miles67 Yards03250K0Jones
1955-04-05232°57'N / 99°46'W32°59'N / 99°29'W16.60 Miles67 Yards00250K0Haskell
1955-04-05232°59'N / 99°29'W33°02'N / 99°04'W24.40 Miles67 Yards03250K0Throckmorton
1955-04-05233°49'N / 98°11'W003K0Clay
1955-04-06233°22'N / 97°11'W33°25'N / 96°49'W21.40 Miles33 Yards0125K0Denton
1955-04-06233°25'N / 96°49'W33°27'N / 96°32'W16.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Grayson
1955-04-06233°34'N / 96°54'W33°37'N / 96°50'W5.20 Miles33 Yards000K0Grayson
1955-04-06233°20'N / 95°22'W33°21'N / 95°12'W9.80 Miles33 Yards000K0Hopkins
1955-04-12231°46'N / 95°07'W003K0Cherokee
1955-05-05231°25'N / 103°32'W010K0Reeves
1955-05-06231°06'N / 97°21'W30°59'N / 97°15'W10.10 Miles33 Yards11250K0Bell
1955-05-06230°47'N / 97°16'W30°44'N / 97°13'W4.90 Miles100 Yards00250K0Milam
1955-05-11232°06'N / 96°30'W000K0Navarro
1955-05-18228°42'N / 96°14'W2.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Matagorda
1955-05-18229°34'N / 97°10'W29°20'N / 96°57'W20.70 Miles300 Yards0025K0Lavaca
1955-05-19229°27'N / 96°57'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0025K0Lavaca
1955-05-19231°11'N / 94°48'W0.50 Mile67 Yards003K0Angelina
1955-05-22233°48'N / 101°35'W000K0Lubbock
1955-05-22233°50'N / 101°50'W33°40'N / 101°32'W20.70 Miles400 Yards003K0Hale
1955-05-23229°19'N / 96°05'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Wharton
1955-05-25233°25'N / 99°58'W33°33'N / 99°50'W11.90 Miles300 Yards003K0Knox
1955-05-26233°55'N / 98°30'W33°55'N / 98°29'W1.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Wichita
1955-05-30231°50'N / 103°05'W2.00 Miles600 Yards0025K0Winkler
1955-06-04232°03'N / 99°08'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Brown
1955-06-05228°02'N / 99°21'W28°02'N / 99°18'W3.60 Miles33 Yards00250K0La Salle
1955-06-05229°42'N / 96°47'W000K0Colorado
1955-06-16230°43'N / 101°13'W3.00 Miles333 Yards000K0Crockett
1955-06-16235°00'N / 101°04'W1.00 Mile20 Yards000K0Donley
1955-09-25233°26'N / 98°46'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Young
1956-02-14229°59'N / 93°57'W30°13'N / 93°56'W16.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Jefferson
1956-03-21230°57'N / 96°59'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Milam
1956-03-21231°17'N / 97°44'W0.80 Mile33 Yards0025K0Coryell
1956-05-08234°01'N / 100°17'W1.00 Mile67 Yards003K0Cottle
1956-08-08234°04'N / 98°13'W2.00 Miles50 Yards003K0Clay
1956-08-14232°33'N / 97°04'W32°35'N / 97°01'W3.80 Miles33 Yards003K0Ellis
1956-09-04230°38'N / 97°39'W30°09'N / 96°53'W56.60 Miles250 Yards0025K0Williamson
1956-09-07226°54'N / 99°17'W0.10 Mile50 Yards003K0Zapata
1956-10-18228°41'N / 99°49'W1.00 Mile27 Yards003K0Zavala
1956-10-20228°27'N / 98°06'W1.50 Miles33 Yards000K0Live Oak
1956-10-20229°35'N / 97°58'W1.00 Mile33 Yards013K0Guadalupe
1956-11-05229°54'N / 94°00'W0.20 Mile17 Yards003K0Jefferson
1957-03-17229°23'N / 95°08'W29°28'N / 94°58'W11.60 Miles67 Yards040K0Galveston
1957-03-17229°29'N / 94°56'W000K0Galveston
1957-03-17229°24'N / 94°55'W170K0Galveston
1957-03-17229°25'N / 94°49'W29°28'N / 94°43'W7.10 Miles67 Yards040K0Galveston
1957-03-17229°57'N / 93°57'W0.90 Mile100 Yards003K0Jefferson
1957-03-31229°49'N / 98°45'W1.50 Miles880 Yards003K0Kendall
1957-03-31230°23'N / 97°43'W0.50 Mile100 Yards00250K0Travis
1957-03-31230°30'N / 97°38'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0025K0Travis
1957-03-31230°43'N / 95°33'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0225K0Walker
1957-04-02233°28'N / 96°35'W0225K0Grayson
1957-04-02233°56'N / 97°43'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0125K0Montague
1957-04-02233°29'N / 95°46'W33°34'N / 95°43'W6.50 Miles100 Yards1225K0Lamar
1957-04-02235°27'N / 100°16'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Wheeler
1957-04-02233°30'N / 95°48'W0025K0Lamar
1957-04-02233°33'N / 95°46'W1225K0Delta
1957-04-03232°53'N / 94°43'W000K0Morris
1957-04-03232°37'N / 94°23'W003K0Harrison
1957-04-03231°37'N / 94°03'W2.00 Miles33 Yards003K0Shelby
1957-04-19232°24'N / 98°50'W0.30 Mile17 Yards003K0Eastland
1957-04-20233°48'N / 100°25'W0.40 Mile100 Yards003K0King
1957-04-21233°42'N / 102°00'W33°50'N / 102°03'W9.70 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lubbock
1957-04-21233°42'N / 102°00'W33°50'N / 102°03'W9.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lubbock
1957-04-21233°50'N / 102°03'W34°00'N / 102°05'W11.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hale
1957-04-21233°50'N / 102°03'W34°00'N / 102°05'W11.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hale
1957-04-21234°00'N / 102°05'W34°08'N / 102°06'W9.20 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lamb
1957-04-21234°00'N / 102°05'W34°08'N / 102°06'W9.20 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lamb
1957-04-21233°35'N / 101°50'W33°42'N / 102°00'W12.60 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Lubbock
1957-04-22234°41'N / 100°50'W34°44'N / 100°41'W9.20 Miles200 Yards0025K0Hall
1957-04-24231°57'N / 96°41'W32°00'N / 96°36'W6.10 Miles100 Yards003K0Navarro
1957-04-24231°38'N / 96°16'W31°40'N / 96°13'W4.10 Miles100 Yards000K0Freestone
1957-04-26229°41'N / 97°39'W003K0Caldwell
1957-04-26232°21'N / 95°19'W32°24'N / 95°14'W6.10 Miles100 Yards062.5M0Smith
1957-04-26232°27'N / 94°44'W0.20 Mile50 Yards000K0Gregg
1957-04-26232°44'N / 94°57'W32°42'N / 94°45'W11.90 Miles67 Yards0025K0Upshur
1957-05-12231°36'N / 97°28'W1.00 Mile30 Yards003K0Mclennan
1957-05-15233°11'N / 102°50'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Yoakum
1957-05-15234°11'N / 101°42'W2.00 Miles17 Yards0025K0Hale
1957-05-16235°50'N / 100°48'W003K0Roberts
1957-05-24234°26'N / 102°53'W35°11'N / 102°03'W70.10 Miles33 Yards003K0Parmer
1957-05-24232°09'N / 102°08'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Martin
1957-06-10236°20'N / 100°55'W003K0Ochiltree
1957-08-12233°26'N / 99°24'W0.40 Mile100 Yards0025K0Baylor
1957-08-12232°35'N / 99°41'W0.50 Mile7 Yards003K0Jones
1957-08-17232°06'N / 96°28'W32°06'N / 96°24'W4.10 Miles1333 Yards0025K0Navarro
1957-10-07233°37'N / 99°25'W2.00 Miles33 Yards003K0Baylor
1957-10-14230°06'N / 96°06'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Waller
1957-10-14230°03'N / 95°55'W0.50 Mile17 Yards0025K0Waller
1957-10-14230°12'N / 94°54'W0.50 Mile200 Yards0025K0Liberty
1957-11-17232°43'N / 97°22'W2.00 Miles50 Yards023K0Tarrant
1958-01-14233°08'N / 96°06'W0.30 Mile33 Yards003K0Hunt
1958-04-21232°28'N / 96°59'W32°16'N / 96°51'W15.90 Miles440 Yards018250K0Ellis
1958-04-27233°12'N / 96°35'W33°12'N / 96°19'W15.40 Miles50 Yards00250K0Collin
1958-04-29231°59'N / 95°06'W31°59'N / 95°04'W2.30 Miles50 Yards04250K0Rusk
1958-05-02229°17'N / 98°51'W29°34'N / 98°44'W20.80 Miles200 Yards00250K0Medina
1958-05-03233°00'N / 94°39'W33°00'N / 94°09'W29.00 Miles133 Yards0025K0Cass
1958-05-03229°43'N / 98°41'W29°43'N / 98°20'W21.00 Miles67 Yards0025K0Bexar
1958-05-03232°37'N / 94°14'W32°33'N / 94°11'W5.40 Miles440 Yards0025K0Harrison
1958-05-28233°07'N / 94°09'W2.00 Miles100 Yards003K0Cass
1958-07-06232°21'N / 95°19'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Smith
1958-08-12232°55'N / 96°38'W32°55'N / 96°35'W3.00 Miles300 Yards003K0Dallas
1958-08-20233°38'N / 99°34'W1.00 Mile50 Yards013K0Knox
1958-11-17233°19'N / 99°40'W1.00 Mile33 Yards07250K0Haskell
1958-11-17233°23'N / 98°46'W33°28'N / 98°41'W7.60 Miles133 Yards01250K0Young
1958-11-17233°54'N / 98°36'W33°57'N / 98°33'W4.90 Miles200 Yards0025K0Wichita
1959-03-20233°26'N / 96°21'W33°35'N / 96°18'W10.70 Miles67 Yards0025K0Fannin
1959-03-20233°26'N / 96°21'W33°35'N / 96°18'W10.70 Miles67 Yards0025K0Fannin
1959-03-20231°54'N / 94°14'W31°57'N / 94°10'W5.40 Miles880 Yards000K0Shelby
1959-04-08231°18'N / 94°01'W0.20 Mile50 Yards000K0Sabine
1959-05-01229°19'N / 99°28'W29°23'N / 99°25'W5.70 Miles33 Yards000K0Uvalde
1959-05-02229°10'N / 99°39'W29°14'N / 99°39'W4.60 Miles1200 Yards00250K0Bexar
1959-05-10229°16'N / 98°20'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Bexar
1959-05-10228°29'N / 98°26'W28°20'N / 98°17'W13.80 Miles150 Yards0025K0Mcmullen
1959-05-10228°06'N / 98°06'W28°03'N / 98°03'W4.90 Miles250 Yards0025K0Live Oak
1959-05-10228°07'N / 98°07'W28°05'N / 98°04'W4.30 Miles167 Yards0025K0Live Oak
1959-07-02229°54'N / 93°56'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Jefferson
1959-07-13233°48'N / 96°43'W1.00 Mile13 Yards003K0Grayson
1959-09-03232°45'N / 98°01'W0.30 Mile200 Yards003K0Parker
1959-11-03233°05'N / 97°14'W1.20 Miles300 Yards0025K0Denton
1959-11-03229°57'N / 99°02'W30°02'N / 98°55'W9.10 Miles1760 Yards0025K0Kerr
1959-11-03233°34'N / 97°51'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Montague
1960-01-14233°08'N / 95°49'W0.30 Mile33 Yards013K0Hopkins
1960-02-17229°46'N / 95°48'W29°48'N / 95°44'W4.90 Miles100 Yards0325K0Harris
1960-04-12234°38'N / 102°43'W1.00 Mile67 Yards033K0Parmer
1960-04-21230°49'N / 102°56'W0.30 Mile67 Yards0025K0Pecos
1960-04-26231°08'N / 102°13'W31°08'N / 102°02'W10.90 Miles200 Yards003K0Upton
1960-05-04232°05'N / 98°24'W0.30 Mile33 Yards003K0Erath
1960-05-05232°33'N / 94°09'W32°33'N / 94°08'W1.30 Miles33 Yards000K0Harrison
1960-05-20233°38'N / 96°35'W33°39'N / 96°33'W2.70 Miles67 Yards00250K0Grayson
1960-05-20233°08'N / 96°04'W33°08'N / 96°03'W1.90 Miles17 Yards003K0Hunt
1960-06-08234°52'N / 100°52'W003K0Donley
1960-06-26231°11'N / 94°46'W0.70 Mile100 Yards0025K0Angelina
1960-08-21233°07'N / 97°01'W0.20 Mile40 Yards0225K0Denton
1960-09-22231°11'N / 94°46'W0.40 Mile30 Yards00250K0Angelina
1960-10-13231°53'N / 97°04'W0.10 Mile17 Yards000K0Hill
1960-10-13231°47'N / 98°57'W31°48'N / 98°53'W4.30 Miles17 Yards012.5M0Brown
1960-10-15228°54'N / 97°42'W2.00 Miles880 Yards0025K0Karnes
1960-10-16227°59'N / 97°31'W28°04'N / 97°32'W5.90 Miles100 Yards01125K0San Patricio
1960-10-16227°46'N / 97°26'W27°43'N / 97°23'W4.70 Miles33 Yards01250K0Nueces
1961-03-16232°24'N / 100°27'W32°24'N / 100°04'W22.40 Miles100 Yards003K0Taylor
1961-03-16232°20'N / 97°33'W1.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Johnson
1961-03-16229°57'N / 96°16'W0.10 Mile80 Yards003K0Austin
1961-03-26231°19'N / 95°27'W1.50 Miles100 Yards01250K0Houston
1961-03-26233°04'N / 96°14'W3.00 Miles880 Yards0025K0Hunt
1961-03-26232°33'N / 97°22'W0.30 Mile17 Yards010K0Johnson
1961-03-26233°20'N / 95°22'W0.80 Mile280 Yards0025K0Hopkins
1961-03-26231°41'N / 95°07'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0025K0Cherokee
1961-03-26233°02'N / 95°24'W33°04'N / 95°20'W4.70 Miles250 Yards0025K0Hopkins
1961-03-26233°01'N / 95°31'W33°03'N / 95°28'W3.80 Miles250 Yards0125K0Hopkins
1961-03-26233°22'N / 96°06'W0025K0Kaufman
1961-03-28232°43'N / 95°25'W32°40'N / 95°22'W4.70 Miles280 Yards0025K0Wood
1961-04-05227°17'N / 99°28'W2.50 Miles880 Yards0025K0Webb
1961-04-08233°57'N / 98°31'W33°59'N / 98°30'W3.00 Miles33 Yards0225K0Wichita
1961-04-08231°02'N / 94°49'W0.40 Mile17 Yards0125K0Polk
1961-04-09230°40'N / 93°52'W0.80 Mile17 Yards0025K0Newton
1961-04-11232°58'N / 96°45'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0325K0Dallas
1961-04-11231°58'N / 96°48'W32°00'N / 96°45'W3.80 Miles150 Yards0025K0Navarro
1961-04-11232°01'N / 95°24'W0.30 Mile50 Yards003K0Cherokee
1961-04-27232°45'N / 94°33'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Marion
1961-04-29227°48'N / 97°27'W27°58'N / 97°16'W16.00 Miles17 Yards0025K0Nueces
1961-05-03233°57'N / 101°05'W33°56'N / 101°03'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Floyd
1961-05-04233°28'N / 95°16'W0.80 Mile1000 Yards000K0Red River
1961-05-16235°19'N / 101°20'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Carson
1961-05-16230°54'N / 102°53'W0.10 Mile33 Yards00250K0Pecos
1961-05-20233°19'N / 102°25'W0.10 Mile23 Yards003K0Terry
1961-06-02235°21'N / 100°57'W0.50 Mile23 Yards000K0Gray
1961-06-03233°53'N / 102°09'W33°52'N / 102°06'W3.00 Miles440 Yards000K0Hockley
1961-06-05233°13'N / 101°22'W33°09'N / 101°20'W5.10 Miles200 Yards000K0Garza
1961-06-07233°31'N / 97°10'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Cooke
1961-06-18227°40'N / 97°15'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Nueces
1961-06-18232°37'N / 102°33'W0225K0Gaines
1961-07-21231°55'N / 102°23'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Ector
1961-07-24231°20'N / 94°43'W0.20 Mile17 Yards000K0Angelina
1961-08-04229°42'N / 97°31'W0.10 Mile100 Yards033K0Caldwell
1961-09-04229°37'N / 98°04'W29°37'N / 98°05'W1.90 Miles33 Yards003K0Guadalupe
1961-09-11229°00'N / 95°54'W0.40 Mile50 Yards000K0Matagorda
1961-09-13232°22'N / 94°06'W023K0Panola
1961-09-19231°27'N / 103°23'W000K0Ward
1961-11-02232°14'N / 96°30'W0.20 Mile33 Yards000K0Navarro
1961-11-02232°26'N / 94°46'W32°29'N / 94°44'W4.30 Miles17 Yards003K0Gregg
1961-11-02228°37'N / 96°37'W0.30 Mile200 Yards0025K0Calhoun
1961-11-12229°54'N / 97°43'W1.00 Mile433 Yards0025K0Caldwell
1961-11-12229°52'N / 97°56'W003K0Hays
1961-11-22232°22'N / 94°52'W2.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Gregg
1962-02-23230°15'N / 96°47'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0025K0Lee
1962-03-24233°16'N / 95°44'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0025K0Hopkins
1962-03-24232°31'N / 95°23'W1.00 Mile50 Yards00250K0Smith
1962-04-26232°52'N / 99°43'W32°55'N / 99°40'W4.70 Miles440 Yards0025K0Jones
1962-05-17231°26'N / 103°29'W2.00 Miles67 Yards03250K0Reeves
1962-05-20233°59'N / 99°16'W1.00 Mile50 Yards000K0Wilbarger
1962-05-26233°10'N / 99°46'W1.00 Mile67 Yards000K0Haskell
1962-05-27236°29'N / 100°32'W000K0Lipscomb
1962-05-27236°11'N / 100°53'W1.00 Mile83 Yards000K0Ochiltree
1962-05-28230°17'N / 98°51'W30°17'N / 98°46'W5.10 Miles100 Yards000K0Gillespie
1962-05-31232°40'N / 100°22'W1.00 Mile20 Yards000K0Fisher
1962-06-01227°39'N / 98°05'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Jim Wells
1962-06-01230°39'N / 97°01'W0.50 Mile50 Yards000K0Milam
1962-06-01226°28'N / 97°47'W1.00 Mile50 Yards010K0Willacy
1962-06-01232°20'N / 99°22'W012.5M0Callahan
1962-06-05234°09'N / 99°16'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Wilbarger
1962-06-07234°28'N / 101°17'W1.50 Miles33 Yards000K0Briscoe
1962-06-07234°28'N / 101°19'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Briscoe
1962-06-07232°54'N / 100°32'W32°52'N / 100°30'W3.60 Miles200 Yards000K0Fisher
1962-06-08232°27'N / 97°21'W1.50 Miles133 Yards000K0Johnson
1962-06-09229°49'N / 102°49'W0.20 Mile100 Yards003K0Brewster
1962-06-14234°58'N / 101°55'W1.40 Miles67 Yards00250K0Randall
1962-06-16232°28'N / 102°14'W0.80 Mile20 Yards000K0Andrews
1962-06-16233°12'N / 101°32'W33°18'N / 101°22'W11.90 Miles33 Yards000K0Garza
1962-06-18230°04'N / 95°56'W000K0Waller
1962-06-24235°14'N / 102°00'W1.50 Miles27 Yards003K0Potter
1962-06-28232°20'N / 97°20'W1.00 Mile27 Yards000K0Johnson
1962-07-10231°24'N / 102°21'W000K0Crane
1962-07-26232°42'N / 97°47'W000K0Parker
1962-08-20228°05'N / 97°49'W1.50 Miles43 Yards000K0San Patricio
1962-09-07232°20'N / 97°25'W2.00 Miles167 Yards01250K0Johnson
1963-04-05233°09'N / 99°44'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Haskell
1963-04-22233°08'N / 96°49'W33°12'N / 96°43'W7.70 Miles1760 Yards00250K0Collin
1963-04-26232°44'N / 100°55'W32°48'N / 100°36'W19.00 Miles67 Yards000K0Scurry
1963-04-28232°59'N / 98°58'W000K0Camp
1963-04-28231°07'N / 97°44'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0325K0Bell
1963-05-29233°25'N / 102°29'W1.00 Mile1320 Yards000K0Hockley
1963-05-29233°21'N / 102°17'W33°30'N / 102°17'W10.30 Miles67 Yards010K0Bailey
1963-06-04233°43'N / 101°51'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Lubbock
1963-06-08233°36'N / 102°22'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Hockley
1963-06-29228°14'N / 97°40'W28°15'N / 97°42'W3.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Bee
1963-08-30231°37'N / 97°10'W1.00 Mile17 Yards0025K0Mclennan
1963-09-06233°30'N / 97°43'W0.10 Mile17 Yards0025K0Montague
1963-09-06232°33'N / 97°19'W1.50 Miles50 Yards000K0Johnson
1963-09-07232°50'N / 97°06'W0.40 Mile50 Yards0025K0Tarrant
1964-02-04229°36'N / 96°20'W29°37'N / 96°17'W3.80 Miles880 Yards01250K0Colorado
1964-03-19229°45'N / 95°00'W2.50 Miles200 Yards00250K0Harris
1964-03-19230°08'N / 94°24'W0.20 Mile17 Yards00250K0Hardin
1964-04-05232°40'N / 95°29'W32°41'N / 95°27'W2.70 Miles1760 Yards00250K0Wood
1964-04-16229°31'N / 100°57'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Val Verde
1964-04-17229°55'N / 95°23'W29°42'N / 95°07'W21.90 Miles27 Yards123K0Harris
1964-04-23233°39'N / 95°37'W33°39'N / 95°30'W6.60 Miles100 Yards0025K0Lamar
1964-04-23233°39'N / 95°37'W2.00 Miles23 Yards0025K0Lamar
1964-04-26230°33'N / 97°42'W1.00 Mile17 Yards003K0Williamson
1964-04-26231°48'N / 94°10'W31°47'N / 94°11'W1.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Shelby
1964-05-01230°18'N / 96°12'W30°20'N / 96°07'W5.60 Miles880 Yards0025K0Washington
1964-06-11234°23'N / 103°03'W34°34'N / 102°49'W18.30 Miles67 Yards0025K0Parmer
1964-06-11234°25'N / 101°58'W1.00 Mile27 Yards043K0Swisher
1964-06-12234°23'N / 103°02'W2.00 Miles27 Yards0025K0Parmer
1964-06-12234°23'N / 103°02'W34°28'N / 102°55'W8.80 Miles27 Yards000K0Parmer
1964-06-15229°18'N / 96°06'W1.50 Miles20 Yards003K0Wharton
1964-06-20232°15'N / 101°40'W0.80 Mile23 Yards003K0Howard
1964-07-27231°16'N / 100°48'W1.00 Mile20 Yards010K0Irion
1964-08-05229°42'N / 93°52'W0.20 Mile33 Yards06250K0Jefferson
1964-08-19235°41'N / 101°58'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Moore
1964-08-26233°47'N / 97°43'W0.10 Mile17 Yards0025K0Montague
1965-01-21229°37'N / 96°53'W0.80 Mile50 Yards0025K0Fayette
1965-01-22229°35'N / 94°19'W0.10 Mile67 Yards003K0Shelby
1965-02-11231°30'N / 95°03'W31°30'N / 95°00'W3.00 Miles33 Yards01250K0Cherokee
1965-02-11231°50'N / 94°32'W32°07'N / 94°07'W31.30 Miles33 Yards00250K0Nacogdoches
1965-02-11232°04'N / 94°26'W32°17'N / 94°02'W27.80 Miles117 Yards0025K0Panola
1965-04-14233°03'N / 98°04'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Jack
1965-04-15229°51'N / 97°31'W29°54'N / 97°25'W6.90 Miles50 Yards000K0Caldwell
1965-05-04235°12'N / 101°58'W1.00 Mile20 Yards003K0Potter
1965-05-04235°40'N / 101°25'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Hutchinson
1965-05-09231°56'N / 97°20'W0.10 Mile17 Yards0025K0Hill
1965-05-09232°35'N / 95°31'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Smith
1965-05-09232°23'N / 95°50'W2.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Van Zandt
1965-05-10232°06'N / 96°28'W8.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Navarro
1965-05-12233°18'N / 97°47'W0.10 Mile17 Yards0025K0Wise
1965-05-12232°00'N / 99°57'W32°00'N / 99°53'W4.10 Miles440 Yards013K0Runnels
1965-05-13233°25'N / 101°50'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Lubbock
1965-05-15227°50'N / 97°14'W0.10 Mile17 Yards000K0San Patricio
1965-05-15231°46'N / 99°21'W000K0Coleman
1965-05-15231°46'N / 99°21'W000K0Coleman
1965-05-16230°30'N / 99°00'W0.20 Mile33 Yards000K0Gillespie
1965-05-18228°18'N / 97°16'W28°22'N / 97°06'W11.20 Miles100 Yards003K0Refugio
1965-05-18230°00'N / 97°10'W1.00 Mile17 Yards003K0Bastrop
1965-05-18229°16'N / 97°46'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Gonzales
1965-05-18229°07'N / 98°20'W000K0Wilson
1965-05-18227°56'N / 98°15'W0.30 Mile200 Yards003K0Duval
1965-05-25232°09'N / 100°41'W2.00 Miles200 Yards01250K0Mitchell
1965-06-06230°35'N / 99°18'W1.00 Mile200 Yards000K0Mason
1965-06-08232°54'N / 102°10'W32°54'N / 101°50'W19.40 Miles17 Yards0825K0Dawson
1965-06-09233°52'N / 102°48'W34°10'N / 102°46'W20.80 Miles33 Yards003K0Bailey
1965-06-09233°43'N / 102°46'W33°50'N / 102°39'W10.40 Miles33 Yards003K0Cochran
1965-06-09235°52'N / 101°40'W0.20 Mile17 Yards000K0Moore
1965-06-10234°11'N / 101°46'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Hale
1965-06-14235°52'N / 101°42'W003K0Moore
1965-06-23232°37'N / 97°32'W0.10 Mile17 Yards0025K0Johnson
1965-08-06233°46'N / 96°41'W0.50 Mile17 Yards003K0Grayson
1965-08-09231°06'N / 97°25'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Bell
1965-08-10230°08'N / 102°24'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Terrell
1965-08-28229°51'N / 97°37'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Caldwell
1965-08-31232°45'N / 100°22'W2.00 Miles20 Yards000K0Fisher
1965-09-18228°39'N / 98°11'W1.50 Miles880 Yards0025K0Live Oak
1965-10-17233°36'N / 102°10'W0.20 Mile20 Yards000K0Hockley
1965-12-11232°27'N / 94°21'W32°30'N / 94°21'W3.40 Miles33 Yards020K0Harrison
1966-04-10233°21'N / 98°35'W1.00 Mile133 Yards000K0Young
1966-04-14229°18'N / 96°06'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Wharton
1966-04-19232°04'N / 97°45'W2.00 Miles880 Yards003K0Bosque
1966-04-23232°20'N / 95°34'W32°20'N / 95°34'W00250K0Henderson
1966-04-23232°57'N / 95°17'W32°57'N / 95°17'W0025K0Wood
1966-05-10233°56'N / 102°19'W2.00 Miles50 Yards020K0Lamb
1966-05-10234°05'N / 101°51'W34°05'N / 101°51'W000K0Hale
1966-05-18230°50'N / 97°48'W30°50'N / 97°48'W000K0Williamson
1966-05-21229°42'N / 98°06'W2.00 Miles880 Yards000K0Cottle
1966-05-23233°43'N / 96°55'W33°43'N / 96°55'W0025K0Dallas
1966-05-23232°57'N / 95°17'W3.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Wood
1966-05-23228°42'N / 99°50'W28°51'N / 99°38'W16.00 Miles133 Yards000K0Zavala
1966-05-28234°34'N / 102°24'W1.50 Miles67 Yards003K0Castro
1966-06-10234°21'N / 101°44'W34°35'N / 101°09'W36.90 Miles100 Yards000K0Swisher
1966-06-14235°32'N / 100°57'W1.00 Mile27 Yards000K0Gray
1966-06-18229°48'N / 95°24'W29°51'N / 95°21'W4.90 Miles27 Yards000K0Harris
1966-08-12231°20'N / 93°45'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Sabine
1967-02-20230°49'N / 94°26'W0.50 Mile100 Yards00250K0Tyler
1967-03-19234°32'N / 102°43'W0.60 Mile33 Yards003K0Parmer
1967-03-25233°24'N / 96°14'W2.00 Miles67 Yards003K0Fannin
1967-04-09234°12'N / 99°16'W0.30 Mile300 Yards000K0Wilbarger
1967-04-12233°50'N / 100°06'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Cottle
1967-04-12233°55'N / 102°20'W33°58'N / 102°16'W5.20 Miles33 Yards000K0Lamb
1967-04-12232°43'N / 100°15'W0.20 Mile40 Yards000K0Fisher
1967-04-12231°45'N / 99°57'W0.10 Mile67 Yards003K0Runnels
1967-04-12232°51'N / 100°28'W0.30 Mile200 Yards000K0Fisher
1967-04-13231°04'N / 97°27'W31°07'N / 97°23'W5.40 Miles90 Yards003K0Bell
1967-04-13232°12'N / 95°18'W32°20'N / 95°06'W14.90 Miles40 Yards0025K0Smith
1967-04-13232°30'N / 95°57'W32°30'N / 95°51'W6.10 Miles100 Yards003K0Van Zandt
1967-04-13231°43'N / 95°52'W31°37'N / 95°47'W8.60 Miles300 Yards0025K0Leon
1967-04-26226°12'N / 98°28'W26°23'N / 97°51'W40.20 Miles67 Yards0025K0Hidalgo
1967-05-01230°55'N / 96°05'W0.60 Mile33 Yards003K0Madison
1967-05-01232°57'N / 94°55'W1.00 Mile50 Yards003K0Camp
1967-05-01232°10'N / 96°27'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Navarro
1967-05-01230°48'N / 95°07'W30°49'N / 94°59'W8.00 Miles67 Yards0225K0Polk
1967-05-01230°04'N / 94°53'W1.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Liberty
1967-05-01229°39'N / 97°58'W0.50 Mile20 Yards003K0Guadalupe
1967-05-05235°13'N / 101°30'W35°20'N / 101°15'W16.20 Miles100 Yards0025K0Carson
1967-05-05236°02'N / 102°00'W36°02'N / 101°58'W2.30 Miles67 Yards000K0Moore
1967-05-08228°58'N / 98°02'W29°01'N / 97°54'W8.90 Miles440 Yards003K0Karnes
1967-05-30236°20'N / 94°10'W36°20'N / 94°07'W3.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Hardin
1967-05-30234°07'N / 98°44'W34°08'N / 98°43'W1.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Wichita
1967-06-01233°36'N / 101°51'W2.00 Miles67 Yards010K0Lubbock
1967-06-01234°56'N / 102°24'W34°56'N / 102°19'W4.70 Miles33 Yards000K0Deaf Smith
1967-06-01233°45'N / 101°51'W0.10 Mile67 Yards003K0Lubbock
1967-06-11231°40'N / 97°18'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Mclennan
1967-06-11231°58'N / 96°39'W0.10 Mile50 Yards003K0Navarro
1967-06-15235°07'N / 101°47'W0.10 Mile33 Yards003K0Randall
1967-06-29233°16'N / 97°13'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Denton
1967-07-03232°11'N / 95°18'W0.10 Mile100 Yards000K0Smith
1967-07-03236°25'N / 100°45'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Ochiltree
1967-07-03235°51'N / 100°31'W0.10 Mile17 Yards000K0Hemphill
1967-07-13230°06'N / 94°06'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Jefferson
1967-09-20228°25'N / 96°45'W28°30'N / 96°31'W15.40 Miles33 Yards013K0Calhoun
1967-09-21229°34'N / 96°44'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Colorado
1967-09-21229°56'N / 95°22'W2.00 Miles50 Yards033K0Harris
1967-09-22227°43'N / 97°29'W27°50'N / 97°13'W18.20 Miles200 Yards000K0Nueces
1967-09-22227°56'N / 98°05'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Jim Wells
1967-10-29229°09'N / 95°05'W0.10 Mile33 Yards003K0Galveston
1967-10-30230°40'N / 93°53'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Jasper
1967-12-21232°28'N / 94°21'W0.20 Mile37 Yards000K0Harrison
1968-02-01229°56'N / 93°55'W29°56'N / 93°54'W1.30 Miles20 Yards0025K0Jefferson
1968-03-30233°30'N / 97°10'W33°30'N / 97°06'W3.60 Miles100 Yards0025K0Cooke
1968-04-02235°21'N / 101°23'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Carson
1968-04-19233°30'N / 97°03'W1.50 Miles23 Yards0025K0Cooke
1968-04-21231°12'N / 94°31'W1.00 Mile17 Yards003K0Angelina
1968-05-09227°42'N / 97°36'W1.50 Miles10 Yards0125K0Nueces
1968-05-11232°10'N / 97°14'W32°17'N / 97°03'W13.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Hill
1968-05-13232°56'N / 96°30'W0.40 Mile33 Yards0025K0Collin
1968-05-13232°23'N / 97°22'W0.20 Mile33 Yards00250K0Johnson
1968-05-31234°18'N / 101°55'W34°18'N / 101°52'W3.00 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hale
1968-06-24232°30'N / 95°25'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Smith
1968-09-17228°21'N / 97°45'W0.80 Mile100 Yards00250K0Bee
1968-11-26228°38'N / 99°13'W28°48'N / 98°59'W18.20 Miles50 Yards000K0Frio
1968-12-12232°17'N / 94°59'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Rusk
1968-12-12232°32'N / 94°25'W1.00 Mile17 Yards000K0Harrison
1968-12-27231°54'N / 94°42'W1.00 Mile17 Yards000K0Rusk
1968-12-27233°05'N / 94°11'W1.00 Mile23 Yards0025K0Cass
1969-04-04230°30'N / 96°38'W30°35'N / 96°31'W9.00 Miles440 Yards003K0Burleson
1969-04-11228°57'N / 97°18'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0De Witt
1969-04-27233°06'N / 95°57'W1.00 Mile20 Yards003K0Hunt
1969-04-27232°52'N / 97°13'W00250K0Tarrant
1969-04-27233°03'N / 96°43'W33°08'N / 96°27'W16.50 Miles200 Yards045250K0Collin
1969-05-02235°20'N / 101°50'W0.10 Mile50 Yards003K0Potter
1969-05-03229°23'N / 98°25'W1.00 Mile67 Yards00250K0Bexar
1969-05-05233°09'N / 101°37'W33°11'N / 101°33'W4.70 Miles33 Yards003K0Lynn
1969-05-06232°37'N / 99°42'W0.10 Mile50 Yards003K0Jones
1969-05-06228°40'N / 100°29'W0.10 Mile17 Yards000K0Maverick
1969-05-12227°47'N / 97°50'W27°49'N / 97°46'W4.90 Miles33 Yards003K0Nueces
1969-05-12225°53'N / 97°29'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Cameron
1969-05-15233°22'N / 97°12'W0.20 Mile33 Yards0025K0Denton
1969-05-16229°25'N / 98°30'W29°27'N / 98°27'W4.30 Miles100 Yards03250K0Bexar
1969-05-16234°25'N / 102°36'W0.10 Mile20 Yards003K0Parmer
1969-05-22229°36'N / 97°57'W003K0Guadalupe
1969-06-03232°00'N / 102°20'W32°09'N / 102°09'W14.90 Miles33 Yards000K0Ector
1969-06-10233°44'N / 102°19'W000K0Hockley
1969-06-12232°04'N / 100°16'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0025K0Coke
1969-06-19232°47'N / 99°37'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0025K0Jones
1969-07-15232°02'N / 95°10'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Cherokee
1969-08-14231°05'N / 97°18'W00250K0Bell
1969-08-14231°05'N / 97°18'W0.20 Mile33 Yards00250K0Bell
1969-08-22233°32'N / 99°38'W0.30 Mile67 Yards00250K0Knox
1969-10-19234°15'N / 102°07'W1.00 Mile10 Yards0025K0Lamb
1970-01-10230°10'N / 94°24'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Hardin
1970-02-01229°48'N / 94°18'W0.10 Mile40 Yards0225K0Jefferson
1970-03-03233°12'N / 94°58'W1.00 Mile27 Yards000K0Titus
1970-03-03232°51'N / 94°13'W0.20 Mile50 Yards000K0Marion
1970-04-18232°48'N / 97°28'W2.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Tarrant
1970-04-18229°40'N / 98°40'W0.50 Mile67 Yards0025K0Bexar
1970-04-18232°58'N / 96°19'W0025K0Rockwall
1970-04-19232°30'N / 94°41'W1.20 Miles33 Yards00250K0Gregg
1970-04-25232°48'N / 96°56'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0122.5M0Dallas
1970-04-25232°40'N / 96°20'W0.10 Mile10 Yards100K0Kaufman
1970-04-25233°05'N / 94°36'W32°58'N / 94°23'W14.90 Miles100 Yards000K0Morris
1970-04-25233°03'N / 98°35'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Young
1970-04-26232°12'N / 99°48'W0.10 Mile200 Yards003K0Taylor
1970-04-26232°00'N / 99°24'W32°07'N / 99°12'W14.20 Miles440 Yards0025K0Coleman
1970-04-26231°55'N / 98°45'W1.00 Mile267 Yards0225K0Comanche
1970-05-12233°15'N / 101°41'W33°18'N / 101°35'W6.80 Miles17 Yards003K0Lynn
1970-05-14229°30'N / 99°24'W0.50 Mile440 Yards000K0Medina
1970-05-15230°15'N / 98°36'W0.50 Mile27 Yards003K0Gillespie
1970-05-23226°54'N / 99°16'W26°54'N / 99°12'W4.50 Miles50 Yards0202.5M0Zapata
1970-05-23226°54'N / 99°17'W26°54'N / 99°13'W4.50 Miles50 Yards0202.5M0Zapata
1970-05-24226°30'N / 97°46'W26°20'N / 97°47'W11.60 Miles100 Yards0125K0Willacy
1970-05-24226°20'N / 97°47'W26°08'N / 97°48'W13.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Cameron
1970-05-31232°30'N / 102°07'W32°40'N / 101°52'W18.60 Miles67 Yards000K0Martin
1970-06-23233°45'N / 96°30'W0.10 Mile67 Yards003K0Grayson
1970-07-04230°26'N / 97°55'W1.50 Miles47 Yards140K0Travis
1970-08-03228°24'N / 96°24'W003K0Calhoun
1970-08-03228°06'N / 97°54'W0225K0Live Oak
1970-08-03228°35'N / 99°11'W003K0Frio
1970-08-03228°44'N / 99°17'W0025K0Frio
1970-08-04229°25'N / 95°14'W003K0Galveston
1970-08-18234°20'N / 99°54'W0.80 Mile440 Yards0125K0Hardeman
1970-09-13229°13'N / 98°26'W0.10 Mile17 Yards003K0Bexar
1970-09-20232°30'N / 94°40'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Harrison
1970-10-11229°21'N / 94°53'W1.00 Mile100 Yards01250K0Galveston
1970-10-11229°47'N / 93°58'W29°52'N / 93°57'W6.10 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Jefferson
1970-10-22232°23'N / 98°49'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Eastland
1970-10-23229°18'N / 96°00'W1.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Wharton
1970-10-23229°18'N / 95°54'W1.50 Miles27 Yards0025K0Wharton
1970-10-27229°53'N / 95°20'W2.00 Miles40 Yards000K0Harris
1971-02-18231°57'N / 99°57'W0.20 Mile50 Yards003K0Runnels
1971-02-18232°00'N / 99°57'W0.50 Mile100 Yards003K0Runnels
1971-02-18231°50'N / 97°10'W0.50 Mile440 Yards003K0Hill
1971-02-21231°37'N / 97°06'W0.10 Mile17 Yards00250K0Mclennan
1971-02-25230°10'N / 99°19'W0.30 Mile300 Yards003K0Kerr
1971-02-25228°32'N / 99°53'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0025K0Dimmit
1971-02-25229°53'N / 97°40'W29°57'N / 97°29'W11.90 Miles50 Yards000K0Caldwell
1971-02-25230°10'N / 96°23'W0.30 Mile33 Yards003K0Washington
1971-02-25230°10'N / 96°23'W0.30 Mile33 Yards000K0Washington
1971-02-25229°44'N / 96°47'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0025K0Colorado
1971-02-25229°48'N / 96°48'W0.50 Mile50 Yards000K0Fayette
1971-02-25229°48'N / 96°50'W0.50 Mile50 Yards000K0Fayette
1971-03-09229°20'N / 94°50'W0.50 Mile20 Yards0125K0Chambers
1971-03-09229°35'N / 95°15'W1.00 Mile440 Yards0425K0Harris
1971-04-18234°15'N / 102°40'W34°15'N / 102°36'W4.30 Miles200 Yards0025K0Bailey
1971-04-18234°15'N / 102°40'W34°15'N / 102°36'W4.30 Miles200 Yards000K0Bailey
1971-04-19236°11'N / 102°40'W36°15'N / 102°34'W7.20 Miles150 Yards0025K0Dallam
1971-04-19236°16'N / 102°43'W030K0Dallam
1971-04-28232°13'N / 98°12'W00250K0Erath
1971-04-28232°28'N / 97°50'W32°32'N / 97°39'W11.70 Miles33 Yards00250K0Hood
1971-04-28232°26'N / 97°11'W0.50 Mile20 Yards000K0Johnson
1971-04-28232°25'N / 96°51'W10.00 Miles100 Yards012.5M0Ellis
1971-04-28232°21'N / 96°37'W1.00 Mile100 Yards020250K0Ellis
1971-05-04233°25'N / 99°37'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Knox
1971-05-08232°36'N / 102°07'W1.00 Mile440 Yards000K0Dawson
1971-05-08233°24'N / 101°46'W2.00 Miles67 Yards0025K0Lubbock
1971-05-08231°59'N / 99°37'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Coleman
1971-05-09231°43'N / 97°36'W0.10 Mile67 Yards000K0Bosque
1971-05-10231°50'N / 94°40'W0.10 Mile67 Yards003K0Nacogdoches
1971-05-10231°35'N / 94°40'W0.10 Mile50 Yards003K0Nacogdoches
1971-05-23231°56'N / 97°19'W31°57'N / 97°12'W7.10 Miles33 Yards000K0Hill
1971-05-23231°56'N / 97°19'W31°57'N / 97°12'W7.10 Miles33 Yards000K0Hill
1971-05-30231°06'N / 99°28'W31°06'N / 99°25'W3.30 Miles200 Yards000K0Mcculloch
1971-05-31233°50'N / 100°17'W2.00 Miles67 Yards003K0Cottle
1971-06-05235°05'N / 101°50'W0.30 Mile50 Yards000K0Randall
1971-06-05235°55'N / 101°32'W000K0Hutchinson
1971-06-05235°55'N / 101°32'W000K0Hutchinson
1971-06-05235°55'N / 101°32'W000K0Hutchinson
1971-06-05235°55'N / 101°32'W000K0Hutchinson
1971-06-05235°55'N / 101°32'W000K0Hutchinson
1971-06-05235°55'N / 101°32'W000K0Hutchinson
1971-06-08236°03'N / 102°31'W2.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Hartley
1971-06-08236°03'N / 102°31'W2.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Hartley
1971-06-09236°02'N / 101°49'W000K0Sherman
1971-06-09236°02'N / 101°49'W000K0Sherman
1971-06-09236°02'N / 101°49'W000K0Sherman
1971-06-09236°03'N / 101°26'W36°03'N / 101°23'W3.00 Miles440 Yards003K0Hutchinson
1971-06-09236°16'N / 101°24'W0025K0Hansford
1971-06-20229°54'N / 95°04'W0.30 Mile50 Yards020250K0Harris
1971-06-21231°16'N / 100°41'W0.10 Mile200 Yards000K0Irion
1971-06-21231°10'N / 100°40'W0.30 Mile100 Yards000K0Irion
1971-06-29227°25'N / 99°00'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Webb
1971-07-06233°36'N / 99°25'W0.30 Mile10 Yards0125K0Baylor
1971-07-26233°08'N / 97°01'W0.50 Mile17 Yards0125K0Denton
1971-07-29229°50'N / 95°08'W0.30 Mile20 Yards0825K0Harris
1971-08-10234°24'N / 101°43'W0.50 Mile100 Yards000K0Swisher
1971-08-12233°11'N / 102°12'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Terry
1971-08-12233°11'N / 102°12'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Terry
1971-08-12233°11'N / 102°12'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Terry
1971-08-13233°17'N / 102°21'W33°17'N / 102°17'W4.10 Miles133 Yards000K0Terry
1971-08-22234°22'N / 101°46'W34°22'N / 101°43'W2.70 Miles20 Yards000K0Swisher
1971-10-17234°01'N / 102°25'W34°11'N / 102°11'W17.60 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lamb
1971-10-17234°02'N / 102°23'W34°19'N / 102°12'W22.20 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Lamb
1971-10-17234°11'N / 102°11'W34°24'N / 102°07'W15.50 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lamb
1971-10-17234°19'N / 102°12'W34°24'N / 102°09'W6.40 Miles400 Yards042.5M0Castro
1971-10-17234°01'N / 102°25'W34°20'N / 102°02'W31.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lamb
1971-10-19232°25'N / 97°32'W32°29'N / 97°26'W7.60 Miles50 Yards0025K0Johnson
1971-11-17230°26'N / 97°21'W30°46'N / 96°59'W31.70 Miles33 Yards00250K0Bastrop
1971-11-18233°07'N / 94°08'W1.30 Miles333 Yards00250K0Cass
1971-12-14232°31'N / 97°26'W0.20 Mile17 Yards00250K0Johnson
1971-12-14233°37'N / 96°35'W0.60 Mile20 Yards01250K0Grayson
1971-12-14233°02'N / 97°00'W0.10 Mile17 Yards0025K0Denton
1971-12-14232°46'N / 96°36'W32°47'N / 96°32'W4.30 Miles167 Yards042.5M0Dallas
1971-12-14233°08'N / 96°06'W33°15'N / 95°57'W11.90 Miles440 Yards022.5M0Hunt
1971-12-14233°10'N / 95°37'W0.50 Mile20 Yards000K0Hopkins
1971-12-14232°33'N / 94°58'W0.30 Mile20 Yards0025K0Gregg
1972-03-20229°20'N / 96°05'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0025K0Wharton
1972-03-20229°26'N / 96°56'W29°26'N / 96°52'W4.50 Miles50 Yards0025K0Lavaca
1972-03-24232°37'N / 96°22'W2.00 Miles200 Yards0025K0Kaufman
1972-03-26232°01'N / 97°08'W32°03'N / 97°02'W6.50 Miles100 Yards02250K0Hill
1972-03-28231°16'N / 94°50'W31°26'N / 94°35'W18.70 Miles150 Yards0132.5M0Angelina
1972-05-06228°55'N / 100°37'W28°57'N / 100°31'W6.50 Miles17 Yards02250K0Maverick
1972-05-07228°37'N / 96°37'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0125K0Calhoun
1972-05-10236°14'N / 102°14'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00250K0Dallam
1972-05-10236°15'N / 102°14'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Dallam
1972-05-12229°55'N / 94°15'W29°55'N / 93°55'W19.90 Miles30 Yards02250K0Jefferson
1972-06-21235°12'N / 101°50'W35°12'N / 101°46'W4.10 Miles100 Yards052.5M0Potter
1972-08-06234°44'N / 101°59'W1.00 Mile50 Yards000K0Swisher
1972-10-21231°15'N / 97°24'W31°18'N / 97°20'W5.40 Miles100 Yards0025K0Bell
1972-10-21231°33'N / 97°11'W1.50 Miles20 Yards000K0Mclennan
1972-10-21231°33'N / 97°11'W1.00 Mile20 Yards03250K0Mclennan
1972-10-22232°17'N / 96°12'W1.30 Miles440 Yards000K0Henderson
1972-10-22232°17'N / 96°12'W1.30 Miles440 Yards01250K0Henderson
1972-10-29228°37'N / 96°46'W28°31'N / 96°38'W10.80 Miles100 Yards0225K0Calhoun
1972-11-13231°03'N / 94°25'W31°05'N / 94°23'W3.30 Miles100 Yards20250K0Angelina
1972-11-13229°51'N / 93°58'W2.30 Miles50 Yards002.5M0Jefferson
1973-01-20232°09'N / 95°17'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0125K0Smith
1973-01-20230°21'N / 97°55'W0.10 Mile40 Yards0025K0Travis
1973-01-21231°50'N / 94°08'W31°53'N / 94°00'W8.70 Miles200 Yards03250K0Shelby
1973-02-13229°58'N / 95°43'W29°59'N / 95°40'W3.30 Miles30 Yards0125K0Harris
1973-03-01231°37'N / 97°12'W31°37'N / 97°04'W8.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Mclennan
1973-03-06232°49'N / 97°11'W1.50 Miles30 Yards0025K0Tarrant
1973-03-10231°35'N / 100°15'W0.30 Mile70 Yards17250K0Tom Green
1973-03-10232°20'N / 99°45'W0125K0Taylor
1973-03-10233°34'N / 95°24'W1.50 Miles100 Yards0125K0Lamar
1973-03-10233°10'N / 95°38'W0.50 Mile150 Yards0025K0Hopkins
1973-03-23233°52'N / 100°22'W34°00'N / 100°46'W24.70 Miles300 Yards0025K0Motley
1973-03-23235°13'N / 101°53'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0025K0Potter
1973-03-23232°28'N / 100°24'W32°28'N / 100°21'W3.30 Miles300 Yards00250K0Nolan
1973-04-13235°12'N / 101°34'W35°18'N / 101°20'W14.90 Miles150 Yards0025K0Armstrong
1973-04-13235°18'N / 101°20'W35°33'N / 101°12'W18.80 Miles150 Yards000K0Armstrong
1973-04-13235°33'N / 101°12'W35°55'N / 100°18'W56.40 Miles150 Yards000K0Gray
1973-04-22232°17'N / 99°19'W0.30 Mile100 Yards003K0Callahan
1973-04-22231°41'N / 99°59'W0.20 Mile50 Yards000K0Runnels
1973-04-22231°41'N / 99°59'W0.20 Mile50 Yards000K0Runnels
1973-04-22231°41'N / 99°59'W0.20 Mile50 Yards000K0Runnels
1973-04-23235°16'N / 100°15'W0.30 Mile100 Yards00250K0Wheeler
1973-04-24233°24'N / 94°06'W2.00 Miles300 Yards082.5M0Bowie
1973-04-26229°48'N / 95°01'W29°44'N / 94°59'W5.20 Miles100 Yards000K0Harris
1973-04-30235°24'N / 101°12'W0.50 Mile100 Yards03250K0Carson
1973-05-06232°53'N / 97°55'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Parker
1973-05-06232°50'N / 97°53'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0325K0Parker
1973-05-06232°33'N / 97°20'W12.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Johnson
1973-05-06233°35'N / 96°11'W0.10 Mile20 Yards0025K0Fannin
1973-05-06232°45'N / 97°07'W2.50 Miles150 Yards00250K0Tarrant
1973-05-06233°48'N / 95°55'W0.50 Mile67 Yards03250K0Fannin
1973-05-11232°55'N / 97°27'W32°48'N / 97°25'W8.40 Miles200 Yards00250K0Tarrant
1973-05-12231°51'N / 102°19'W1.00 Mile120 Yards00250K0Ector
1973-05-22231°49'N / 100°01'W2.00 Miles33 Yards003K0Runnels
1973-05-23231°06'N / 97°20'W31°06'N / 97°17'W3.30 Miles150 Yards0025K0Bell
1973-05-24231°19'N / 98°23'W2.50 Miles250 Yards0025K0Lampasas
1973-05-26230°07'N / 94°52'W30°01'N / 94°39'W14.70 Miles33 Yards04250K0Liberty
1973-05-26229°57'N / 94°18'W29°52'N / 94°16'W6.20 Miles167 Yards03250K0Jefferson
1973-06-03231°26'N / 96°37'W31°29'N / 96°31'W6.80 Miles100 Yards00250K0Limestone
1973-06-03232°44'N / 94°57'W0025K0Upshur
1973-06-03233°22'N / 95°07'W0025K0Titus
1973-06-04230°45'N / 95°23'W31°04'N / 95°08'W26.40 Miles40 Yards00250K0Walker
1973-06-19232°45'N / 97°20'W0.30 Mile500 Yards00250K0Tarrant
1973-10-11229°39'N / 97°16'W29°45'N / 97°15'W7.10 Miles50 Yards0025K0Gonzales
1973-10-11229°45'N / 97°15'W29°46'N / 97°15'W1.10 Miles50 Yards0125K0Fayette
1973-11-24233°00'N / 97°37'W0025K0Wise
1973-11-24233°04'N / 94°43'W1.00 Mile200 Yards003K0Morris
1973-11-24233°18'N / 94°25'W003K0Cass
1973-11-24232°30'N / 94°22'W0.10 Mile33 Yards010K0Harrison
1973-12-03233°04'N / 97°00'W0.10 Mile7 Yards003K0Denton
1974-03-20231°52'N / 94°11'W0.50 Mile77 Yards00250K0Shelby
1974-04-11232°46'N / 96°47'W0.30 Mile100 Yards00250K0Dallas
1974-04-13231°33'N / 97°15'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0125K0Mclennan
1974-04-19235°57'N / 100°35'W36°01'N / 100°31'W5.90 Miles30 Yards000K0Roberts
1974-04-21233°35'N / 95°27'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Lamar
1974-04-21233°40'N / 95°23'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0625K0Lamar
1974-04-21232°44'N / 96°17'W1.00 Mile200 Yards000K0Kaufman
1974-04-26231°25'N / 103°29'W0.50 Mile110 Yards012250K0Reeves
1974-05-03233°40'N / 95°23'W0025K0Lamar
1974-05-14232°42'N / 97°30'W0.30 Mile100 Yards000K0Tarrant
1974-05-25233°30'N / 95°23'W0025K0Lamar
1974-06-04233°06'N / 98°36'W1.00 Mile467 Yards000K0Young
1974-06-07233°13'N / 96°13'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0125K0Hunt
1974-06-07233°09'N / 95°57'W0025K0Hunt
1974-07-14229°47'N / 95°34'W0.80 Mile880 Yards002.5M0Harris
1974-08-29229°47'N / 95°32'W1.00 Mile67 Yards00250K0Harris
1974-10-28233°39'N / 97°12'W33°38'N / 97°09'W3.30 Miles33 Yards00250K0Cooke
1974-10-28229°31'N / 94°29'W29°47'N / 94°20'W20.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Chambers
1974-10-28229°51'N / 93°59'W0225K0Jefferson
1974-10-28230°03'N / 94°06'W30°10'N / 94°07'W8.30 Miles50 Yards03250K0Jefferson
1974-10-28230°10'N / 94°07'W30°17'N / 94°09'W8.40 Miles50 Yards00250K0Hardin
1974-10-28230°04'N / 94°06'W000K0Jefferson
1974-10-30233°38'N / 97°09'W0.50 Mile40 Yards01250K0Cooke
1974-10-30233°43'N / 96°54'W0025K0Grayson
1974-10-30230°41'N / 97°40'W1.80 Miles200 Yards000K0Williamson
1974-10-31232°03'N / 96°41'W0025K0Navarro
1974-10-31233°08'N / 95°36'W33°10'N / 95°32'W4.70 Miles40 Yards012.5M0Hopkins
1974-10-31229°37'N / 95°10'W29°37'N / 95°09'W1.90 Miles167 Yards000K0Harris
1974-10-31229°41'N / 95°04'W29°43'N / 95°01'W4.30 Miles77 Yards01250K0Harris
1975-01-10233°02'N / 94°44'W0.30 Mile213 Yards0025K0Morris
1975-01-10233°28'N / 94°16'W4.00 Miles107 Yards00250K0Bowie
1975-03-17232°16'N / 98°56'W32°23'N / 98°54'W8.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Eastland
1975-03-27233°28'N / 97°10'W2.00 Miles320 Yards0225K0Cooke
1975-04-07232°21'N / 97°24'W0.20 Mile27 Yards01250K0Johnson
1975-04-29230°52'N / 97°00'W31°00'N / 96°35'W26.30 Miles200 Yards00250K0Milam
1975-04-29232°40'N / 95°29'W0025K0Wood
1975-04-29233°30'N / 94°37'W00250K0Bowie
1975-05-07230°43'N / 98°22'W00250K0Travis
1975-05-07231°05'N / 97°37'W02250K0Bell
1975-05-14232°58'N / 97°21'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0125K0Tarrant
1975-05-19229°13'N / 99°48'W000K0Uvalde
1975-05-29232°49'N / 97°48'W003K0Parker
1975-05-29233°00'N / 97°29'W00250K0Wise
1975-06-08232°48'N / 97°48'W0025K0Parker
1975-06-08232°59'N / 98°25'W000K0Palo Pinto
1975-07-03232°06'N / 96°28'W0025K0Navarro
1975-10-23230°32'N / 95°03'W30°32'N / 94°57'W6.40 Miles100 Yards00250K0San Jacinto
1975-10-24232°08'N / 96°57'W0025K0Ellis
1975-11-19232°52'N / 95°10'W000K0Wood
1976-02-17231°43'N / 94°14'W31°55'N / 93°55'W23.10 Miles50 Yards000K0Shelby
1976-03-30229°56'N / 98°55'W29°58'N / 98°40'W15.20 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Kendall
1976-03-30230°00'N / 98°04'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Hays
1976-03-30230°02'N / 97°55'W2.50 Miles200 Yards01250K0Hays
1976-03-30230°49'N / 95°08'W30°59'N / 94°49'W22.10 Miles1300 Yards012.5M0Polk
1976-03-30230°49'N / 94°49'W31°07'N / 94°32'W26.70 Miles1300 Yards00250K0Polk
1976-04-15231°39'N / 100°03'W0.10 Mile33 Yards000K0Runnels
1976-04-15233°26'N / 99°16'W0.10 Mile33 Yards000K0Baylor
1976-04-15233°07'N / 98°37'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Young
1976-04-15233°06'N / 98°35'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Young
1976-04-15231°26'N / 97°31'W31°30'N / 97°27'W5.90 Miles33 Yards000K0Mclennan
1976-04-17233°52'N / 99°50'W33°54'N / 99°47'W3.80 Miles150 Yards000K0Foard
1976-04-19232°41'N / 97°35'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Parker
1976-04-19232°00'N / 98°25'W32°02'N / 98°14'W11.10 Miles300 Yards0025K0Erath
1976-04-19232°27'N / 97°49'W0.20 Mile33 Yards000K0Hood
1976-04-19232°31'N / 97°47'W0.20 Mile33 Yards000K0Hood
1976-04-19232°37'N / 97°17'W0.10 Mile33 Yards000K0Tarrant
1976-04-20231°08'N / 97°55'W0.10 Mile33 Yards000K0Coryell
1976-04-28227°35'N / 97°48'W0.50 Mile30 Yards003K0Nueces
1976-05-05230°57'N / 97°46'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Bell
1976-05-07227°58'N / 97°56'W000K0Jim Wells
1976-05-12232°45'N / 97°50'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Parker
1976-05-12232°43'N / 97°51'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Parker
1976-05-23232°54'N / 96°29'W0.10 Mile33 Yards003K0Rockwall
1976-05-25231°40'N / 97°28'W31°38'N / 97°25'W4.10 Miles33 Yards0025K0Bosque
1976-05-25231°38'N / 97°25'W31°30'N / 97°22'W9.70 Miles33 Yards0025K0Mclennan
1976-05-25231°39'N / 97°19'W0.20 Mile100 Yards0025K0Mclennan
1976-05-25231°41'N / 96°30'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Limestone
1976-05-26227°57'N / 97°41'W0.50 Mile40 Yards0125K0San Patricio
1976-05-26232°16'N / 97°18'W0.20 Mile100 Yards000K0Johnson
1976-05-26231°13'N / 97°28'W0.10 Mile33 Yards000K0Bell
1976-05-26231°06'N / 97°38'W000K0Bell
1976-05-26231°01'N / 97°42'W000K0Bell
1976-05-31232°22'N / 98°20'W32°19'N / 98°19'W4.10 Miles33 Yards000K0Erath
1976-06-23233°23'N / 99°42'W0.80 Mile440 Yards0025K0Knox
1976-09-27231°43'N / 99°57'W0025K0Runnels
1977-03-11232°24'N / 94°13'W32°27'N / 93°58'W14.90 Miles73 Yards003K0Harrison
1977-03-27233°12'N / 96°43'W00250K0Collin
1977-04-14230°16'N / 98°00'W30°34'N / 97°54'W21.60 Miles200 Yards00250K0Travis
1977-04-14230°34'N / 97°54'W30°50'N / 97°48'W19.40 Miles33 Yards00250K0Williamson
1977-04-18233°23'N / 95°45'W000K0Delta
1977-04-20232°39'N / 96°55'W1.50 Miles77 Yards0025K0Dallas
1977-04-20232°24'N / 99°18'W32°24'N / 99°08'W9.70 Miles33 Yards000K0Callahan
1977-05-17234°12'N / 101°42'W0.50 Mile60 Yards000K0Hale
1977-05-20234°18'N / 99°17'W34°24'N / 99°15'W7.30 Miles33 Yards003K0Wilbarger
1977-06-30231°10'N / 103°00'W0.50 Mile30 Yards000K0Pecos
1977-07-27232°27'N / 97°47'W0.70 Mile250 Yards003K0Hood
1977-08-22232°06'N / 96°23'W0.20 Mile33 Yards0025K0Navarro
1977-09-12233°01'N / 96°37'W2.50 Miles167 Yards0025K0Collin
1977-09-15231°08'N / 97°55'W0025K0Coryell
1978-04-08233°48'N / 101°41'W2.00 Miles30 Yards00250K0Lubbock
1978-04-08233°52'N / 101°45'W2.00 Miles100 Yards003K0Hale
1978-04-30236°30'N / 100°55'W36°35'N / 100°48'W8.60 Miles100 Yards00250K0Ochiltree
1978-04-30232°24'N / 97°24'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Johnson
1978-04-30231°52'N / 97°37'W003K0Bosque
1978-05-29229°48'N / 95°16'W0.20 Mile20 Yards00250K0Harris
1978-07-03232°29'N / 99°52'W0.10 Mile50 Yards00250K0Taylor
1978-07-28230°36'N / 97°18'W0.50 Mile30 Yards0025K0Williamson
1979-03-02232°11'N / 95°18'W0.10 Mile150 Yards0225K0Smith
1979-03-19233°11'N / 94°59'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Titus
1979-04-01232°43'N / 94°32'W32°48'N / 94°28'W7.10 Miles440 Yards012.5M0Marion
1979-04-01232°14'N / 95°18'W32°16'N / 95°16'W3.60 Miles100 Yards01250K0Smith
1979-04-01232°21'N / 95°06'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Smith
1979-04-10233°51'N / 99°48'W34°02'N / 99°29'W22.10 Miles33 Yards01250K0Foard
1979-04-10234°05'N / 99°02'W34°06'N / 98°57'W5.20 Miles33 Yards100K0Wilbarger
1979-04-10234°06'N / 98°57'W34°08'N / 98°53'W4.70 Miles33 Yards000K0Wichita
1979-04-10233°37'N / 99°18'W33°42'N / 99°09'W10.40 Miles300 Yards0025K0Baylor
1979-04-10231°58'N / 99°48'W31°58'N / 99°45'W2.70 Miles100 Yards000K0Runnels
1979-04-10231°58'N / 99°45'W31°59'N / 99°38'W6.90 Miles100 Yards000K0Coleman
1979-04-10231°45'N / 98°22'W31°54'N / 98°11'W15.00 Miles200 Yards0025K0Comanche
1979-04-11231°54'N / 98°11'W31°59'N / 98°04'W9.00 Miles200 Yards03250K0Hamilton
1979-04-11232°15'N / 95°54'W32°22'N / 95°48'W10.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Henderson
1979-04-11233°07'N / 95°36'W33°12'N / 95°30'W8.30 Miles150 Yards00250K0Hopkins
1979-04-11232°22'N / 95°48'W32°24'N / 95°46'W3.30 Miles150 Yards003K0Van Zandt
1979-04-18230°15'N / 95°12'W30°17'N / 95°07'W4.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Montgomery
1979-05-03232°33'N / 96°53'W32°39'N / 96°50'W7.60 Miles200 Yards0525.0M0Dallas
1979-05-03232°54'N / 95°02'W32°58'N / 94°52'W10.80 Miles200 Yards00250K0Camp
1979-05-10231°56'N / 97°08'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Hill
1979-05-27233°28'N / 94°25'W33°20'N / 94°21'W10.10 Miles100 Yards003K0Bowie
1979-06-06233°12'N / 98°53'W33°13'N / 98°45'W7.90 Miles200 Yards0025K0Young
1979-09-18229°44'N / 95°25'W1.00 Mile350 Yards012.5M0Harris
1979-10-22230°04'N / 94°13'W1.00 Mile50 Yards002.5M0Jefferson
1979-10-30232°13'N / 99°48'W0025K0Taylor
1979-10-30233°03'N / 98°38'W33°19'N / 98°30'W20.00 Miles77 Yards05250K0Young
1979-10-30233°19'N / 98°30'W33°25'N / 98°24'W9.10 Miles77 Yards00250K0Jack
1979-10-30233°06'N / 97°52'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0025K0Wise
1980-04-02232°57'N / 98°01'W32°54'N / 97°58'W4.50 Miles277 Yards01250K0Parker
1980-05-28234°30'N / 101°52'W34°31'N / 101°47'W4.90 Miles1667 Yards000K0Swisher
1980-05-28235°35'N / 100°07'W35°30'N / 100°01'W8.00 Miles50 Yards060K0Wheeler
1980-05-28234°39'N / 101°13'W000K0Collingsworth
1980-05-29234°56'N / 100°19'W34°46'N / 100°07'W16.20 Miles160 Yards000K0Collingsworth
1980-05-29234°14'N / 99°28'W34°07'N / 99°17'W13.20 Miles100 Yards000K0Wilbarger
1980-06-17233°41'N / 102°35'W34°19'N / 102°24'W45.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Parmer
1980-06-19232°50'N / 102°04'W2.50 Miles100 Yards0125K0Dawson
1980-06-20231°50'N / 97°33'W31°48'N / 97°30'W4.30 Miles100 Yards01250K0Bosque
1980-07-27234°33'N / 102°18'W34°31'N / 102°16'W3.00 Miles40 Yards010K0Castro
1980-08-09225°58'N / 97°33'W25°54'N / 97°33'W4.60 Miles50 Yards002.5M0Cameron
1980-08-09227°52'N / 97°20'W1.00 Mile40 Yards002.5M0San Patricio
1980-08-09227°35'N / 97°48'W27°37'N / 97°53'W5.90 Miles50 Yards032.5M0Nueces
1980-08-10227°35'N / 97°48'W2.50 Miles40 Yards002.5M0Nueces
1980-08-10229°25'N / 98°25'W29°25'N / 98°37'W12.20 Miles100 Yards02250K0Bexar
1980-08-10227°45'N / 98°05'W2.00 Miles40 Yards01250K0Jim Wells
1980-08-10230°00'N / 97°10'W30°05'N / 97°28'W18.80 Miles77 Yards000K0Bastrop
1980-08-10230°15'N / 97°39'W30°18'N / 97°43'W5.40 Miles150 Yards04250.0M0Travis
1980-08-10229°54'N / 97°52'W29°54'N / 98°05'W13.10 Miles200 Yards02025.0M0Caldwell
1980-08-10229°54'N / 98°05'W30°06'N / 98°25'W24.20 Miles33 Yards0025.0M0Hays
1980-08-10230°06'N / 98°25'W30°08'N / 98°35'W10.40 Miles33 Yards0025.0M0Blanco
1980-08-23232°55'N / 99°26'W32°52'N / 99°28'W4.30 Miles73 Yards00250K0Palo Pinto
1980-09-06229°59'N / 93°59'W0.10 Mile200 Yards0025K0Jefferson
1980-10-16231°43'N / 95°38'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0125K0Anderson
1980-10-16233°08'N / 95°35'W33°10'N / 95°34'W2.70 Miles77 Yards00250K0Hopkins
1981-02-10230°40'N / 97°40'W0.80 Mile100 Yards00250K0Williamson
1981-02-10230°46'N / 96°00'W2.50 Miles77 Yards02250K0Grimes
1981-02-10230°48'N / 95°34'W30°50'N / 95°14'W19.90 Miles100 Yards18250K0Walker
1981-03-17233°45'N / 96°32'W1.00 Mile73 Yards01250K0Grayson
1981-04-23230°02'N / 94°20'W30°05'N / 94°07'W13.40 Miles50 Yards02250K0Jefferson
1981-05-03229°26'N / 95°19'W29°32'N / 95°18'W7.20 Miles73 Yards010250K0Brazoria
1981-05-07233°40'N / 101°22'W33°45'N / 101°20'W6.10 Miles40 Yards000K0Crosby
1981-05-07233°29'N / 101°23'W1.50 Miles40 Yards00250K0Crosby
1981-05-07233°42'N / 101°22'W1.00 Mile30 Yards00250K0Crosby
1981-05-07233°41'N / 101°20'W33°42'N / 101°18'W2.70 Miles150 Yards00250K0Crosby
1981-05-08232°34'N / 96°59'W32°33'N / 96°54'W4.90 Miles73 Yards0025K0Dallas
1981-05-09231°58'N / 97°15'W31°58'N / 97°05'W9.60 Miles100 Yards0025K0Hill
1981-05-09230°45'N / 96°57'W30°35'N / 96°52'W12.60 Miles60 Yards00250K0Milam
1981-05-09230°35'N / 96°52'W30°29'N / 96°45'W9.70 Miles33 Yards00250K0Burleson
1981-05-09231°52'N / 95°42'W31°53'N / 95°32'W9.90 Miles73 Yards0025K0Anderson
1981-05-09232°26'N / 95°00'W32°26'N / 94°52'W7.70 Miles73 Yards0025K0Gregg
1981-05-09230°27'N / 95°45'W30°23'N / 95°43'W5.10 Miles40 Yards0225K0Montgomery
1981-05-09229°30'N / 95°49'W29°28'N / 95°47'W3.30 Miles40 Yards0025K0Fort Bend
1981-05-09229°29'N / 95°02'W1.50 Miles50 Yards01250K0Galveston
1981-05-13233°32'N / 96°05'W1.00 Mile73 Yards0025K0Fannin
1981-05-13232°42'N / 95°39'W32°41'N / 95°37'W2.70 Miles200 Yards00250K0Van Zandt
1981-05-13232°41'N / 95°37'W32°40'N / 95°35'W2.70 Miles33 Yards00250K0Wood
1981-05-13232°42'N / 95°19'W32°40'N / 95°13'W6.50 Miles50 Yards0025K0Wood
1981-05-15231°11'N / 98°57'W31°10'N / 98°49'W8.00 Miles150 Yards000K0San Saba
1981-05-16230°27'N / 96°48'W30°24'N / 96°39'W9.70 Miles73 Yards01250K0Burleson
1981-05-17233°16'N / 97°20'W33°16'N / 97°15'W4.90 Miles123 Yards003K0Denton
1981-05-18231°45'N / 94°45'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Nacogdoches
1981-05-18231°43'N / 94°45'W31°42'N / 94°38'W7.10 Miles150 Yards000K0Nacogdoches
1981-05-24228°22'N / 100°20'W2.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Maverick
1981-06-01234°49'N / 100°02'W34°49'N / 99°56'W5.70 Miles50 Yards00250K0Collingsworth
1981-06-03233°13'N / 102°17'W2.00 Miles40 Yards0025K0Terry
1981-06-05229°15'N / 94°51'W2.70 Miles100 Yards022.5M0Galveston
1981-06-05229°32'N / 94°45'W1.50 Miles60 Yards01250K0Chambers
1981-10-13231°32'N / 97°11'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0425.0M0Mclennan
1981-10-13232°28'N / 97°23'W32°30'N / 97°22'W2.70 Miles50 Yards0025K0Johnson
1981-10-13232°08'N / 97°20'W32°10'N / 97°19'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Hill
1981-10-13233°39'N / 95°40'W33°43'N / 95°35'W6.60 Miles50 Yards0025K0Lamar
1981-10-15231°39'N / 102°22'W1.50 Miles30 Yards0225K0Ector
1982-03-14232°04'N / 99°55'W32°05'N / 99°53'W2.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Runnels
1982-03-14232°05'N / 99°53'W32°07'N / 99°45'W8.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Taylor
1982-04-02233°39'N / 96°10'W1.00 Mile50 Yards000K0Fannin
1982-04-02233°38'N / 95°13'W33°41'N / 95°07'W5.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Red River
1982-04-02232°42'N / 95°18'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0125K0Wood
1982-04-25233°33'N / 95°21'W33°33'N / 95°20'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00250K0Howard
1982-04-25233°33'N / 95°20'W33°34'N / 95°06'W12.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Red River
1982-05-06229°57'N / 94°53'W0.50 Mile37 Yards00250K0Liberty
1982-05-12232°25'N / 102°45'W32°32'N / 102°43'W6.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Andrews
1982-05-12232°32'N / 102°43'W32°45'N / 102°40'W15.00 Miles100 Yards0172.5M0Gaines
1982-05-12232°36'N / 97°50'W32°40'N / 97°41'W8.00 Miles150 Yards062.5M0Parker
1982-05-12231°32'N / 98°34'W31°38'N / 98°34'W6.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Mills
1982-05-12231°38'N / 98°34'W31°42'N / 98°36'W4.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Mills
1982-05-12231°48'N / 98°28'W31°58'N / 98°28'W10.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Comanche
1982-05-12229°39'N / 101°10'W29°28'N / 100°53'W19.00 Miles120 Yards022.5M0Val Verde
1982-05-12229°22'N / 100°55'W29°22'N / 100°48'W5.00 Miles80 Yards00250K0Val Verde
1982-05-12232°42'N / 98°00'W32°58'N / 97°47'W20.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Parker
1982-05-13230°35'N / 94°00'W30°39'N / 93°55'W6.50 Miles60 Yards00250K0Jasper
1982-05-19235°35'N / 100°45'W35°35'N / 100°39'W6.00 Miles1760 Yards00250K0Gray
1982-05-19235°33'N / 100°38'W2.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Gray
1982-05-27232°10'N / 100°52'W32°25'N / 100°44'W15.00 Miles30 Yards00250K0Mitchell
1982-05-27232°25'N / 100°44'W32°26'N / 100°41'W3.00 Miles30 Yards00250K0Mitchell
1982-05-27232°26'N / 100°41'W32°28'N / 100°31'W5.00 Miles30 Yards00250K0Nolan
1982-05-30233°00'N / 99°58'W32°57'N / 99°56'W3.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Haskell
1982-05-30232°57'N / 99°56'W32°56'N / 99°54'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Jones
1982-06-05235°40'N / 101°23'W35°42'N / 101°21'W3.00 Miles67 Yards062.5M0Hutchinson
1982-06-12231°58'N / 104°32'W31°43'N / 104°32'W15.00 Miles67 Yards00250K0Culberson
1982-06-14236°12'N / 101°12'W36°12'N / 101°05'W7.00 Miles100 Yards010250K0Hansford
1982-06-14236°12'N / 101°05'W36°12'N / 101°00'W5.20 Miles100 Yards00250K0Ochiltree
1982-06-19231°50'N / 99°50'W31°47'N / 99°45'W7.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Runnels
1982-06-19231°47'N / 99°45'W31°45'N / 99°42'W3.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Coleman
1982-06-28231°04'N / 95°08'W31°02'N / 95°05'W3.00 Miles73 Yards0025K0Trinity
1982-12-23233°09'N / 94°08'W33°18'N / 94°04'W10.00 Miles123 Yards0025K0Cass
1983-01-31229°47'N / 96°08'W29°50'N / 96°08'W3.00 Miles60 Yards042.5M0Austin
1983-02-09229°39'N / 95°27'W1.50 Miles50 Yards03250K0Harris
1983-02-09229°29'N / 95°21'W29°34'N / 95°17'W8.00 Miles50 Yards0025K0Brazoria
1983-03-03234°51'N / 101°00'W34°56'N / 101°00'W5.00 Miles880 Yards000K0Donley
1983-03-03235°02'N / 100°57'W35°07'N / 100°57'W5.00 Miles880 Yards0125K0Donley
1983-03-04229°54'N / 98°50'W29°52'N / 98°47'W4.00 Miles100 Yards01250K0Kendall
1983-03-04233°30'N / 94°37'W33°30'N / 94°32'W5.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Bowie
1983-05-20230°04'N / 95°34'W30°04'N / 95°27'W7.00 Miles333 Yards152.5M0Harris
1983-05-20229°50'N / 95°32'W29°56'N / 95°22'W12.00 Miles333 Yards172.5M0Harris
1983-05-20229°57'N / 94°02'W29°58'N / 94°00'W3.00 Miles167 Yards192.5M0Jefferson
1983-05-20229°54'N / 96°06'W29°55'N / 95°00'W4.00 Miles333 Yards12250K0Harris
1983-08-18232°06'N / 96°28'W2.50 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Navarro
1983-11-19230°24'N / 96°14'W1.10 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Brazos
1983-11-22232°21'N / 96°41'W32°21'N / 96°37'W3.00 Miles40 Yards062.5M0Ellis
1983-12-10231°02'N / 95°14'W31°06'N / 95°04'W10.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Trinity
1983-12-10231°12'N / 94°41'W31°14'N / 94°22'W18.00 Miles50 Yards022.5M0Angelina
1983-12-10231°37'N / 94°43'W31°38'N / 94°37'W8.00 Miles50 Yards032.5M0Nacogdoches
1983-12-10230°30'N / 94°33'W30°34'N / 94°06'W26.00 Miles700 Yards042.5M0Tyler
1984-02-11231°05'N / 96°18'W1.50 Miles100 Yards032.5M0Leon
1984-02-11232°50'N / 96°05'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Leon
1984-02-11231°45'N / 95°40'W1.00 Mile100 Yards032.5M0Anderson
1984-10-18233°16'N / 94°55'W33°19'N / 94°51'W5.00 Miles50 Yards12250K0Titus
1984-12-31229°36'N / 95°12'W29°39'N / 95°08'W4.00 Miles200 Yards05325.0M0Harris
1985-04-21233°23'N / 98°55'W33°25'N / 98°52'W2.80 Miles300 Yards02250K0Young
1985-04-21233°25'N / 98°52'W33°25'N / 98°50'W2.20 Miles300 Yards00250K0Archer
1985-04-22230°02'N / 97°51'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00250K0Hays
1985-04-28232°07'N / 100°08'W32°08'N / 100°07'W1.50 Miles300 Yards00250K0Nolan
1985-04-28232°08'N / 100°07'W32°11'N / 100°07'W2.50 Miles300 Yards10250K0Taylor
1985-04-28232°36'N / 100°01'W3.50 Miles400 Yards0025K0Jones
1985-05-13232°21'N / 96°31'W32°23'N / 96°30'W4.50 Miles77 Yards0162.5M0Dallas
1985-05-13233°06'N / 96°06'W33°13'N / 96°01'W8.00 Miles77 Yards0232.5M0Hunt
1985-05-13233°37'N / 95°35'W33°40'N / 95°30'W4.00 Miles77 Yards082.5M0Lamar
1985-10-17231°52'N / 97°04'W31°58'N / 97°01'W7.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Hill
1985-10-18233°08'N / 96°30'W2.00 Miles150 Yards02250K0Collin
1985-12-10230°35'N / 97°40'W30°39'N / 97°39'W5.00 Miles100 Yards022.5M0Williamson
1986-02-02232°39'N / 97°56'W32°44'N / 97°52'W10.00 Miles100 Yards02250K0Parker
1986-02-05229°50'N / 95°51'W29°50'N / 95°49'W4.00 Miles170 Yards05250K0Waller
1986-02-05229°50'N / 95°49'W29°52'N / 95°46'W4.00 Miles170 Yards00250K0Harris
1986-02-05230°01'N / 95°37'W2.50 Miles70 Yards002.5M0Harris
1986-03-11232°46'N / 97°52'W32°52'N / 97°48'W9.00 Miles40 Yards000K0Parker
1986-05-07235°47'N / 100°27'W35°54'N / 100°29'W8.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Hemphill
1987-05-25234°43'N / 100°26'W34°43'N / 100°23'W2.00 Miles90 Yards000K0Hall
1987-05-25234°43'N / 100°23'W34°43'N / 100°19'W4.00 Miles90 Yards000K0Childress
1987-05-25231°27'N / 103°04'W31°34'N / 102°55'W11.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Ward
1987-05-25235°01'N / 101°41'W35°01'N / 101°28'W2.00 Miles150 Yards000K0Randall
1987-05-25235°01'N / 101°28'W35°00'N / 101°31'W4.00 Miles150 Yards000K0Armstrong
1987-05-25234°59'N / 101°48'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Randall
1987-05-28233°33'N / 100°25'W33°33'N / 100°15'W13.00 Miles100 Yards000K0King
1987-05-29233°30'N / 102°02'W33°37'N / 102°01'W8.00 Miles80 Yards03250K0Lubbock
1987-06-02236°27'N / 100°19'W36°32'N / 100°16'W6.00 Miles1600 Yards0025K0Lipscomb
1987-06-02236°09'N / 100°16'W36°15'N / 100°14'W7.50 Miles1600 Yards0025K0Lipscomb
1987-07-01235°34'N / 101°17'W35°34'N / 101°12'W4.50 Miles200 Yards000K0Carson
1987-07-01235°14'N / 101°22'W35°11'N / 101°22'W3.00 Miles150 Yards0225K0Carson
1987-07-01235°11'N / 101°22'W35°05'N / 101°22'W6.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Armstrong
1987-07-14235°32'N / 100°58'W35°35'N / 100°55'W4.50 Miles150 Yards0102.5M0Gray
1987-11-15230°11'N / 96°57'W1.50 Miles200 Yards082.5M0Lee
1987-11-15230°35'N / 96°41'W30°41'N / 96°42'W7.00 Miles500 Yards2122.5M0Burleson
1987-11-15230°41'N / 96°42'W30°45'N / 96°41'W3.00 Miles500 Yards002.5M0Milam
1987-11-15230°58'N / 96°04'W31°06'N / 95°58'W7.00 Miles200 Yards322.5M0Madison
1987-11-15231°06'N / 95°58'W31°09'N / 95°54'W3.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Leon
1987-11-15232°25'N / 95°07'W32°32'N / 95°05'W6.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Smith
1987-11-15232°42'N / 94°45'W32°48'N / 94°40'W7.00 Miles900 Yards092.5M0Upshur
1987-12-06230°41'N / 94°58'W1.00 Mile200 Yards00250K0Polk
1987-12-06230°53'N / 94°51'W1.00 Mile200 Yards002.5M0Polk
1988-09-14235°12'N / 101°49'W0.70 Mile173 Yards00250K0Randall
1988-09-17229°24'N / 98°38'W29°29'N / 98°35'W5.00 Miles50 Yards0325.0M0Bexar
1988-09-17229°22'N / 100°54'W29°30'N / 101°03'W11.00 Miles63 Yards022.5M0Val Verde
1989-05-04232°29'N / 97°52'W32°27'N / 97°48'W3.50 Miles500 Yards0220K0Hood
1989-05-12235°41'N / 102°26'W35°40'N / 102°18'W7.00 Miles200 Yards000K0Hartley
1989-05-13232°35'N / 99°56'W1.50 Miles150 Yards000K0Jones
1989-05-14231°40'N / 100°52'W31°40'N / 100°45'W6.00 Miles600 Yards000K0Sterling
1989-05-14231°08'N / 99°20'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Mcculloch
1989-05-15233°40'N / 100°23'W33°45'N / 100°29'W7.00 Miles90 Yards0025K0King
1989-05-16235°09'N / 102°04'W35°04'N / 101°55'W10.00 Miles300 Yards000K0Randall
1989-05-17230°21'N / 98°52'W2.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Gillespie
1989-05-17231°12'N / 94°58'W31°17'N / 94°55'W6.00 Miles400 Yards032.5M0Trinity
1989-05-17231°17'N / 94°55'W31°29'N / 94°48'W12.00 Miles400 Yards032.5M0Nacogdoches
1989-05-17231°29'N / 94°48'W31°36'N / 94°40'W13.00 Miles400 Yards082.5M0Nacogdoches
1989-05-17230°48'N / 94°53'W30°50'N / 94°50'W3.00 Miles150 Yards000K0Polk
1989-06-03234°13'N / 102°42'W34°17'N / 102°33'W8.00 Miles880 Yards00250K0Bailey
1989-06-06234°11'N / 101°39'W2.50 Miles200 Yards00250K0Hale
1989-06-07232°23'N / 99°28'W32°24'N / 99°22'W6.00 Miles80 Yards0025K0Callahan
1989-06-07233°22'N / 95°06'W33°13'N / 95°02'W12.00 Miles200 Yards000K0Titus
1989-06-07230°40'N / 96°48'W30°39'N / 96°44'W4.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Milam
1989-06-07230°39'N / 96°44'W30°36'N / 96°37'W6.00 Miles150 Yards042.5M0Burleson
1990-01-19232°55'N / 96°38'W0.80 Mile50 Yards012.5M0Dallas
1990-02-09231°42'N / 94°50'W31°43'N / 94°37'W14.00 Miles100 Yards010K0Nacogdoches
1990-02-09231°43'N / 94°37'W31°49'N / 94°30'W11.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Nacogdoches
1990-03-14231°58'N / 97°08'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Hill
1990-03-14232°52'N / 95°56'W32°55'N / 95°53'W4.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Rains
1990-04-05232°27'N / 99°44'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Taylor
1990-04-05232°35'N / 99°54'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Jones
1990-04-05232°50'N / 97°59'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Parker
1990-04-05232°49'N / 97°58'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Parker
1990-04-05232°45'N / 97°21'W0.20 Mile10 Yards002.5M0Tarrant
1990-04-15230°54'N / 102°50'W30°57'N / 102°48'W3.50 Miles250 Yards002.5M0Pecos
1990-04-25232°44'N / 97°51'W32°47'N / 97°50'W4.00 Miles300 Yards000K0Parker
1990-04-25233°04'N / 97°43'W33°05'N / 97°40'W5.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Wise
1990-04-25233°15'N / 97°37'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Wise
1990-04-25232°05'N / 98°28'W32°06'N / 98°27'W1.20 Miles50 Yards0025.0M0Comanche
1990-04-25232°06'N / 98°27'W32°08'N / 98°25'W2.80 Miles50 Yards0025.0M0Erath
1990-04-27231°55'N / 96°48'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Hill
1990-04-27232°01'N / 97°30'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Bosque
1990-04-27231°40'N / 96°42'W16.00 Miles880 Yards0825.0M0Limestone
1990-04-27232°36'N / 94°02'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Harrison
1990-04-27232°28'N / 94°05'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Harrison
1990-05-02231°58'N / 97°34'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Bosque
1990-05-03233°39'N / 95°32'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0130K0Lamar
1990-05-14232°56'N / 100°01'W2.00 Miles100 Yards02250K0Jones
1990-05-14232°53'N / 100°00'W0.20 Mile10 Yards020K0Jones
1990-05-14232°50'N / 100°00'W0.20 Mile10 Yards030K0Jones
1990-05-16233°08'N / 94°45'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Morris
1990-05-16233°20'N / 94°21'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Bowie
1990-05-16233°16'N / 94°23'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Cass
1990-05-16233°25'N / 94°05'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Bowie
1990-05-18231°39'N / 97°08'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Mclennan
1990-05-29234°04'N / 102°26'W2.40 Miles150 Yards0025K0Lamb
1990-05-30232°54'N / 94°29'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Cass
1990-05-30232°59'N / 94°15'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Cass
1990-05-30232°28'N / 94°26'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Harrison
1990-05-30232°29'N / 94°05'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Harrison
1990-05-30232°45'N / 94°11'W2.00 Miles100 Yards000K0Marion
1990-05-30232°15'N / 94°58'W1.50 Miles100 Yards000K0Rusk
1990-05-30232°15'N / 94°55'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Rusk
1990-05-30232°18'N / 94°10'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Panola
1990-05-30232°09'N / 94°20'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Panola
1990-05-30232°17'N / 94°32'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Rusk
1990-05-30232°45'N / 94°11'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Marion
1990-05-30232°46'N / 94°04'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Marion
1990-05-31236°10'N / 101°18'W36°12'N / 101°11'W5.50 Miles600 Yards002.5M0Hansford
1990-05-31236°05'N / 100°58'W36°03'N / 100°51'W3.00 Miles450 Yards00250K0Ochiltree
1990-06-08235°17'N / 101°18'W2.60 Miles300 Yards000K0Carson
1990-06-08235°27'N / 100°15'W1.60 Miles200 Yards0025K0Wheeler
1991-01-14229°59'N / 97°12'W30°02'N / 97°08'W5.00 Miles60 Yards00250K0Bastrop
1991-02-18232°22'N / 94°05'W32°24'N / 94°06'W2.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Panola
1991-02-18232°24'N / 94°06'W32°26'N / 94°04'W2.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Harrison
1991-02-19229°16'N / 97°38'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Gonzales
1991-02-19231°32'N / 94°09'W31°35'N / 94°03'W5.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0San Augustine
1991-04-12232°17'N / 97°45'W32°17'N / 97°42'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Somervell
1991-04-12232°15'N / 97°45'W32°14'N / 97°40'W3.00 Miles150 Yards000K0Somervell
1991-04-12232°17'N / 97°28'W2.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Johnson
1991-04-12232°14'N / 97°32'W1.50 Miles300 Yards0025K0Johnson
1991-04-12232°17'N / 97°28'W0.20 Mile10 Yards0025K0Johnson
1991-04-13233°38'N / 95°13'W33°43'N / 95°05'W12.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Red River
1991-04-13233°35'N / 94°47'W2.50 Miles200 Yards0025K0Red River
1991-04-24233°18'N / 100°45'W33°18'N / 100°35'W12.10 Miles350 Yards0025K0Kent
1991-04-26232°01'N / 95°23'W0.20 Mile10 Yards00250K0Cherokee
1991-04-26232°11'N / 95°01'W32°11'N / 94°59'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Smith
1991-04-26232°11'N / 94°59'W32°11'N / 94°57'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Rusk
1991-04-26232°09'N / 94°52'W0.20 Mile10 Yards00250K0Rusk
1991-04-26233°38'N / 95°16'W0.20 Mile10 Yards00250K0Red River
1991-04-26233°45'N / 95°05'W0.20 Mile10 Yards00250K0Red River
1991-04-28231°40'N / 98°07'W0.20 Mile10 Yards00250K0Hamilton
1991-04-28233°10'N / 96°52'W0.50 Mile77 Yards00250K0Denton
1991-05-02232°53'N / 100°08'W0.20 Mile10 Yards0025K0Jones
1991-05-05226°31'N / 98°29'W1.00 Mile200 Yards00250K0Starr
1991-05-07232°28'N / 101°51'W32°30'N / 101°46'W3.50 Miles120 Yards00250K0Martin
1991-05-10234°25'N / 102°40'W34°27'N / 102°37'W3.00 Miles100 Yards01250K0Parmer
1991-10-27232°14'N / 101°58'W1.00 Mile200 Yards000K0Martin
1991-11-19232°26'N / 95°21'W32°29'N / 95°17'W7.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Smith
1991-11-19232°31'N / 95°17'W2.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Smith
1992-03-03231°50'N / 99°26'W0.50 Mile100 Yards01250K0Coleman
1992-03-27234°24'N / 103°02'W34°30'N / 102°54'W10.00 Miles60 Yards002.5M0Parmer
1992-05-11233°22'N / 96°05'W0.20 Mile200 Yards0025K0Hunt
1992-05-11233°03'N / 95°47'W33°07'N / 95°38'W4.00 Miles400 Yards0025K0Hopkins
1992-05-22231°44'N / 103°48'W31°46'N / 103°45'W5.00 Miles400 Yards000K0Reeves
1992-06-07234°09'N / 99°16'W1.00 Mile100 Yards052.5M0Wilbarger
1992-06-27235°38'N / 101°35'W35°36'N / 101°31'W4.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Hutchinson
1992-06-27234°02'N / 102°56'W0.90 Mile100 Yards0025K0Bailey
1992-11-21229°41'N / 95°48'W29°47'N / 95°46'W4.00 Miles200 Yards0625.0M0Harris
1992-11-21229°47'N / 95°46'W29°58'N / 95°36'W21.00 Miles200 Yards0525.0M0Harris
1992-11-21229°42'N / 95°23'W29°47'N / 95°15'W12.00 Miles200 Yards0625.0M0Harris
1992-11-21230°35'N / 94°48'W2.00 Miles200 Yards0025K0Polk
1993-04-07229°25'N / 96°17'W0.50 Mile400 Yards0050K0Wharton
 Brief Description: The Wharton Newspaper reported large trees blown down, metal roofs blown off barns and water pump housings blown over on Farm-to-Market Road 2614 northwest of Egypt near the community of Bonus. There were numerous reports of street flooding in the Wharton vicinity.
1993-09-13232°34'N / 97°14'W32°42'N / 97°11'W8.00 Miles100 Yards005.0M0Tarrant
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down 5 miles west of Mansfield and moved north-northeast into southwest Arlington before lifting. A large microwave tower was flattened. Additionally, 6 mobile homes, 20 houses, and 3 businesses were damaged.
1993-09-13232°44'N / 97°07'W2.00 Miles100 Yards055.0M0Tarrant
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down in Arlington just north of Interstate 30 on Lamar and Collins streets. A gas station, restaurant, and Ramada Inn motel were unroofed. Five injuries were reported at the Ramada Inn where walls on the second floor were blown inward. Damage was estimated at $3 million.
1993-10-12232°07'N / 98°37'W25.00 Miles800 Yards0125.0M0Comanche
 Brief Description: Ten houses were destroyed, and 12 persons were injured.
1993-10-18232°50'N / 95°42'W2.00 Miles100 Yards10500K0Rains
 Brief Description: A tornado developed 1 SE Emory and moved two miles southeast. A man was killed and his mobile home was destroyed. (M57M)
1993-10-18232°50'N / 95°37'W32°52'N / 95°37'W10.00 Miles100 Yards00500K0Wood
 Brief Description: This tornado developed from the same mesocyclone which produced the tornado southeast of Emory. As the tornado moved across the southwest inlets of Lake Fork Reservoir and traversed the southern end of the lake, several buildings and homes were destroyed. Most of the damage was to the Brady Marina, The Minnow Bucket Restaurant, two mobile homes, and a recreational vehicle. The tornado then moved across open country, and lifted two miles NNW Quitman near FM 2225.
1994-02-19232°55'N / 99°31'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0000Shackelford
 Brief Description: A brief tornado formed in open country on the Nail Ranch.
1994-04-15229°57'N / 95°09'W29°57'N / 95°03'W5.00 Miles300 Yards12050K0Harris
 Brief Description: Tornado began on west shore of Lake Houston, crossed the lake then crossed the east shore in Indian Shores Estates. The air survey located minor damage and trees down on the west shore of the lake. Eye witnesses observed the tornado over the lake and WSR-88D reflectivity/ velocity data indicated a strong low-level mesocyclone near the west shore of the lake just prior to the first tornado reports. The tornado moved across the east shore of the lake and into Indian Shores Estates around 1710 CST and produced a damage path 300 to 400-yards wide and approximately 2.5 miles in length that ended about 1.5 miles east of the intersection of FM 2100 and Heathergate. One woman was killed in a mobile home, and 20 received injuries in the area.
1994-04-26232°04'N / 97°52'W1.00 Mile100 Yards01500K0Bosque
 Brief Description: Tornado number one was on the ground intermittently for about one mile. A grain silo was unroofed, one house destroyed, two mobile homes destroyed, a barn was destroyed, and at least 20 telephone poles were blown down. There was one minor injury.
1994-04-26233°32'N / 97°16'W33°44'N / 97°02'W16.00 Miles200 Yards0850.0M0Cooke
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down approximately eight miles southwest of Gainesville, then moved northeast through the western and northern parts of Gainesville, then east-northeast to near Callisburg before lifting. The tornado moved through at least one house subdivision and two mobile home parks. Seventy homes were damaged, 15 mobile homes destroyed, and 52 mobile homes were damaged. Severe damage was done to a multi-story apartment complex, and 14 businesses were damaged. Several cars and trucks were flipped over as the tornado crossed Interstate 35. Near Callisburg, the Callisburg High School was damaged, a mobile home was unroofed, a house was destroyed, and trees were blown down across county roads. Total damage was estimated at over 7 million dollars. Muenster,26,1445CST,,,0,0,0,0,Hail (1.75) 2 W Gainesville,26,1450CST,1,100,0,0,5,0,Tornado (F0) A tornado touched down between Lindsay and Gainesville just south of Highway 82, crossing Highway 82 just south of the Municipal Airport before lifting. There were numerous reports of trees and power lines downed across city streets, and damage was done to two barns and a truck.
1994-04-29232°46'N / 95°48'W32°52'N / 95°37'W12.00 Miles100 Yards005.0M0Wood
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down just inside the Rains County line on Highway 19, then moved northeast for 12 miles before lifting at FM 515 Lake Fork Reservoir. The tornado entered Wood County at 5 NNW Alba. One house and one church were destroyed, one house was unroofed, one RV unroofed, roof damage was done to a house, and extensive tree and power line damage occured.
1994-05-12232°47'N / 100°36'W2.00 Miles75 Yards00500K0Fisher
1994-05-13229°23'N / 96°47'W0.20 Mile50 Yards0050K5KLavaca
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near Vienna, destroying a mobile home and a house, knocking down power lines and covering the roadway with debris. One witness reported hearing a sound like a "freight train."
1994-05-29232°11'N / 99°12'W32°07'N / 99°09'W6.00 Miles200 Yards03500K0Callahan
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near Cottonwood and moved southeast through Cross Plains doing heavy damage. Eighteen homes were destroyed and one hundred were damaged. Ninety percent of the businesses in town were damaged.
1994-08-17233°59'N / 99°43'W2.00 Miles40 Yards00500K0Foard
1994-11-05230°09'N / 94°24'W2.00 Miles700 Yards013K0Hardin
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down 1.5 miles NNW of Sour Lake and moved toward the northeast for 2 miles, crossing State Highway 326 in the process. It tracked across open fields and the only damage was to trees and fencing along the path. The tornado path averaged around 50 yards wide, increasing to nearly 0.5 miles wide at one point. The tornado was viewed by several hunters, one of whom was slightly injured when she was blown out of her stand as it passed nearby.
1994-11-05230°25'N / 97°09'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0010K0Lee
 Brief Description: A trailer home was destoyed 1 mile north of the town of Blue. The tornado lifted the mobile home and dropped it 25 feet away. A 13-year old boy was eating supper in the mobile home alone as the tornado struck. He described a sound "like a freight train", with the trailer beginning to rock back and forth. He remembered hitting the floor and ceiling as the mobile home was rolled over and destroyed. He was found uninjured amid the debris. At 1845CST the Sheriff's Department reported trees downed just southeast of Blue.
1995-04-19232°44'N / 97°19'W32°48'N / 97°20'W5.00 Miles50 Yards004.0M0Tarrant
 Brief Description: The tornado track was approximately five miles long from the Texas Christian University campus to 1.5 miles southeast of downtown Fort Worth. At least six vehicles were overturned, major damage was sustained by an apartment complex, and significant damage occurred to roofs. Power lines, telephone and power poles, and a large number of trees were blown down by high winds.
1995-06-08235°03'N / 100°50'W35°06'N / 100°46'W10.00 Miles500 Yards0000Donley
1995-06-08235°11'N / 100°39'W35°14'N / 100°37'W4.00 Miles300 Yards000.1M0Gray
1996-01-17233°43'N / 96°09'W33°43'N / 96°09'W2.50 Miles150 Yards05150K0Fannin
 Brief Description: A short lived but strong tornadic circulation developed on the left side of a bow echo type thunderstorm north of Bonham. The tornado destroyed 3 mobile homes and resulted in 5 injuries to the occupants. Minor damage to homes and another mobile home also occurred.
1996-01-17232°36'N / 96°45'W32°36'N / 96°45'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00750K0Dallas
 Brief Description: Tornado number two developed near I-35/Idlewild Ct. and lifted near Marsalis/Pleasant Run Rd.
1996-04-12231°01'N / 97°10'W31°02'N / 97°09'W1.00 Mile250 Yards0060K0Bell
 Brief Description: A tornado destroyed a mobile home, two barns and a cattle feeder.
1996-04-13233°03'N / 97°37'W33°03'N / 97°37'W0.50 Mile75 Yards00100K0Wise
 Brief Description: Two mobile homes and a barn were destroyed by a tornado in Keeter.
1996-04-19233°17'N / 95°54'W33°16'N / 95°53'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00150K0Hunt
 Brief Description: Two mobile homes were destroyed, two homes were damaged, and trees and power lines were blown down by a tornado.
1996-05-25235°03'N / 102°40'W35°01'N / 102°38'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00150K0Deaf Smith
 Brief Description: This tornado blew the roof and some exterior walls of a brick veneer home down and destroyed the adjacent barn. Two other homes were seriously damaged. Two farm hands rode out the storm in the brick veneer home without injuries. The track is an estimate.
1996-09-15229°32'N / 99°32'W29°35'N / 99°32'W4.00 Miles700 Yards0120K0KUvalde
 Brief Description: Tornado formed 6 miles south of Utopia and moved northward to 2 miles south of Utopia before dissipating. It knocked over numerous trees of 15 to 20 foot diameter, damaging vehicles, trailers and barns along the way. The tornado moved cabins and took the roofs off two of the cabins at a Girl Scout Camp. It moved the cabins off their foundations, but caused no injuries as the Scouts had gathered in a larger, more substantial building. The tornado moved across a second campground, destroying the site and causing one injury as it knocked a tree over on one of the campers.
1996-11-07232°32'N / 94°22'W32°34'N / 94°17'W5.00 Miles1760 Yards0000Harrison
 Brief Description: A tornado spun up on the northern comma head of a derecho spawned over extreme northwest Harrison County. Initial touchdown occurred at Hwy 59N between Hwy 80 and Hwy 43 in Marhsall, Texas. Sixty-five homes suffered major damage and 270 homes received minor to moderate damage including the home of the WCM. Twenty business were destroyed or suffered major damage. The tornado dissipated near Bell Cut Off Road.
1997-04-10232°43'N / 102°25'W32°43'N / 102°25'W2.60 Miles250 Yards0080K0Gaines
 Brief Description: This second tornado was spawned about two miles east of were tornado #1 dissipated. This tornado tracked to the northeast and overturned two center-pivot irrigation systems. The second system looked as if a couple of sections had become airborne from the resulting damage which snapped off a large wheel. The beginnings of a monster storm were in western Andrews County along the dry line and began moving to the northeast. Just after leaving Seminole in central Gaines County this storm became a supercell and turned almost straight east. According to the KMAF 88D average storm movement was 221 degrees at 26 kt, but this supercell turned and slowed to 268 degrees at 14 kt (47 degrees to the right at 54% speed). The storm continued into the Texas South Plains where it produced numerous other tornadoes and caused one fatality. The environment for the storms according to the rawinsonde sounding that evening on the SHARP workstation showed a buoyancy of about 2800 J/kg for the best lifted parcel and 1700 J/kg for a mean low level parcel. A cap of 65 J/kg kept other storms from forming in the area.
1997-05-25233°37'N / 97°26'W33°36'N / 97°23'W1.00 Mile75 Yards00100K0Cooke
 Brief Description: A tornado blew over a 1500 lb pumpjack, snapped 25 power poles, destroyed several barns, damaged roofs, and damaged or destroyed numerous trees.
1997-05-27231°23'N / 97°19'W31°23'N / 97°20'W2.00 Miles75 Yards0075K0Mclennan
 Brief Description: A tornado developed just west of Box Ranch Road and moved west-southwest to just west of Mackey Ranch Road where a mobile home was destroyed. The tornado also uprooted numerous large trees along its path.
1997-05-27230°52'N / 97°36'W30°50'N / 97°37'W2.00 Miles200 Yards000K0KWilliamson
 Brief Description: Several eyewitnesses reported that the Jarrell tornado was preceded for a period of 8 to 10 minutes by a series of short-lived very small tornadoes that formed from the same supercell thunderstorm. These touched down, then dissipated in order. The first tornado in Williamson County formed near 2:25 pm CST and built rapidly to F2 strength. It survived for approximately 8 minutes, often returning briefly to a roped and tilted feature before it died. This tornado was followed by a second that formed near 2:35 pm CST. It built quickly into a multi-vortex tornado that appeared to be near F2 strength as well. This dissipated after only 4 minutes. The final tornado from this same supercell, , the Jarrell Tornado, developed as a small...rope-shaped tornado, touching down around 2:40 pm CST inside the Williamson County line northwest of Jarrell. From film and eyewitness accounts, it expanded quickly into a very large vortex nearly 1/2 mile in width. Observations recounted by eyewitnesses indicated that the damage path may not have been made strictly by one tornado. A number of eyewitnesses reported seeing several small, rope-like funnels before the character of the tornado changed drastically into the killer tornado. Ground damage patterns in the Double Creek Subdivision also suggested this possibility. The tornado crossed CR 308, CR 305, and then CR 307. Where the tornado crossed each of these county roads, approximately 525 feet of asphalt was ripped off each of the roadways. This particular destruction was believed to be very close to the centerline of the tornado circulation. As the tornado crossed the intersection of CR 305 and 307, a business on the corner was destroyed. The tornado moved into the Double Creek area at this point with total destruction. F5 destruction continued from shortly after its formation until very close to the end of the damage path. The tornado began a brief turn toward the southeast as it entered the Double Creek subdivision and the surrounding area, moving very slowly. It reached the subdivision at 3:48 pm. This time is based on a clock found at a destroyed residence in the extreme northwest corner of the subdivision and the home believed to be the first struck by the tornado. Here, it widened to it maximum width of three-quarters of a mile. From the air, the ground appearance changed abruptly in the vicinity of CR 308 and continued until very near the end of the path. No definitive circulation patterns or suction spots were evident, but there was the noted obvious change in the appearance of the ground. In the Double Creek area, approximately 40 structures were totally destroyed. One of the most striking signs in approaching this area was the distinct lack of debris of any size. Closer inspection showed lots of little debris but no sign of large items. It was estimated that several dozen vehicles had been in the subdivision and removed by the tornado. Nearly 300 cattle grazing in a pasture near the subdivision were also killed, with many of them tossed and blown for over 1/4 mile. At least half a dozen cars were identified from the air lying in the open areas, most of them flattened and encrusted with mud and grass. Trees in the subdivision were completely stripped of bark. Later ground survey revealed that most of the debris that was left in the area was extremely small indicating the power of the tornadic wind. All 27 deaths associated with the Jarrell tornado occurred in the Double Creek area. Eyewitnesses reported that it appeared to have slowed down as it entered the subdivision, and that may account for the nearly total destruction that took place. After passing through the Double Creek area, the tornado shifted its track again slightly, moving toward the south-southwest across CR 309 and into a heavily wooded area of cedar trees. The total destruction of the tornado ends abruptly shortly after entering the wooded area. However, a small swath of tree damage on the north side of the main damage path suggested the possibility of a multiple vortex pattern. No other evidence of multiple vortices was observed. The sequence of weather phenomenon reported with this tornado was exactly opposite of that often reported- the tornado first appeared, followed by nearly calm conditions, then hail, followed by rain and finally brief, gusty winds. This is attributed to the fact that the parent supercell was moving toward the southwest for most of its life. The storm essentially "backed into" the area as it moved.
1997-05-27230°50'N / 97°37'W30°49'N / 97°37'W0.50 Mile150 Yards000K0KWilliamson
 Brief Description: Several eyewitnesses reported that the Jarrell tornado was preceded for a period of 8 to 10 minutes by a series of short-lived very small tornadoes that formed from the same supercell thunderstorm. These touched down, then dissipated in order. The first tornado in Williamson County formed near 2:25 pm CST and built rapidly to F2 strength. It survived for approximately 8 minutes, often returning briefly to a roped and tilted feature before it died. This tornado was followed by a second that formed near 2:35 pm CST. It built quickly into a multi-vortex tornado that appeared to be near F2 strength as well. This dissipated after only 4 minutes. The final tornado from this same supercell, , the Jarrell Tornado, developed as a small...rope-shaped tornado, touching down around 2:40 pm CST inside the Williamson County line northwest of Jarrell. From film and eyewitness accounts, it expanded quickly into a very large vortex nearly 1/2 mile in width. Observations recounted by eyewitnesses indicated that the damage path may not have been made strictly by one tornado. A number of eyewitnesses reported seeing several small, rope-like funnels before the character of the tornado changed drastically into the killer tornado. Ground damage patterns in the Double Creek Subdivision also suggested this possibility. The tornado crossed CR 308, CR 305, and then CR 307. Where the tornado crossed each of these county roads, approximately 525 feet of asphalt was ripped off each of the roadways. This particular destruction was believed to be very close to the centerline of the tornado circulation. As the tornado crossed the intersection of CR 305 and 307, a business on the corner was destroyed. The tornado moved into the Double Creek area at this point with total destruction. F5 destruction continued from shortly after its formation until very close to the end of the damage path. The tornado began a brief turn toward the southeast as it entered the Double Creek subdivision and the surrounding area, moving very slowly. It reached the subdivision at 3:48 pm. This time is based on a clock found at a destroyed residence in the extreme northwest corner of the subdivision and the home believed to be the first struck by the tornado. Here, it widened to it maximum width of three-quarters of a mile. From the air, the ground appearance changed abruptly in the vicinity of CR 308 and continued until very near the end of the path. No definitive circulation patterns or suction spots were evident, but there was the noted obvious change in the appearance of the ground. In the Double Creek area, approximately 40 structures were totally destroyed. One of the most striking signs in approaching this area was the distinct lack of debris of any size. Closer inspection showed lots of little debris but no sign of large items. It was estimated that several dozen vehicles had been in the subdivision and removed by the tornado. Nearly 300 cattle grazing in a pasture near the subdivision were also killed, with many of them tossed and blown for over 1/4 mile. At least half a dozen cars were identified from the air lying in the open areas, most of them flattened and encrusted with mud and grass. Trees in the subdivision were completely stripped of bark. Later ground survey revealed that most of the debris that was left in the area was extremely small indicating the power of the tornadic wind. All 27 deaths associated with the Jarrell tornado occurred in the Double Creek area. Eyewitnesses reported that it appeared to have slowed down as it entered the subdivision, and that may account for the nearly total destruction that took place. After passing through the Double Creek area, the tornado shifted its track again slightly, moving toward the south-southwest across CR 309 and into a heavily wooded area of cedar trees. The total destruction of the tornado ends abruptly shortly after entering the wooded area. However, a small swath of tree damage on the north side of the main damage path suggested the possibility of a multiple vortex pattern. No other evidence of multiple vortices was observed. The sequence of weather phenomenon reported with this tornado was exactly opposite of that often reported- the tornado first appeared, followed by nearly calm conditions, then hail, followed by rain and finally brief, gusty winds. This is attributed to the fact that the parent supercell was moving toward the southwest for most of its life. The storm essentially "backed into" the area as it moved.
1997-05-27230°28'N / 97°56'W30°26'N / 97°53'W3.60 Miles100 Yards0050K10KTravis
 Brief Description: The Cedar Park tornado formed around 3:05 pm CST from a different supercell thunderstorm. It first touched down about 3.5 miles north of Cedar Park at a location 0.6 miles south of CR 178 and 1.4 miles east of the intersection of US 183 and CR 178. The initial damage was to trees, however, the ground survey revealed damage nearby to a church and a trucking company. The aerial survey did not reflect this damage as being in line with the damage path. It is quite possible this damage was caused by strong wind near the tornado. The beginning point was in a relatively open area with damage primarily to a few trees and minor shingle damage to one house. The tornado moved south-southwestward skirting a residential area before it crossed CR 180 immediately east of US 183. A historic train located on the north side of CR 180 just to the east of US 183 was in the direct path of the tornado. While the engine remained on the track, a coal tender converted to hold diesel fuel and weighing approximately 65,000 pounds including the 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel was flipped over and thrown a short distance. Continuing across CR180, it entered a shopping center where it weakened and pushed inward slightly the north wall of a grocery store. It also pushed large metal doors inward that were built to open toward the outside. Damage at this point had been generally F2 with brief F3 as the tornado knocked the train tender off the track and damaged the wall and doors of the food store. It tore off much of a weakly supported roof of a grocery store. The manager of the store, who had been a victim of the Wichita Falls Tornado of 1979, saw the approaching tornado, and made an announcement to all in the store to meet him in the middle of the store. He then led everyone he could gather into the meat locker. This very quick and decisive action probably saved several lives. The tornado crossed US 183 causing additional damage to a number of businesses. One business on the west side of US 183 lost nearly the entire roof. Most damage to other businesses was believed to be minor. After crossing US 183 the tornado moved across Marquis Lane and North Park Circle moving through an area with widely scattered housing and a relative abundance of trees. Again, most damage to structures in this area was minor. From North Park Circle the tornado moved into the northwestern portion of Buttercup Creek, a subdivision of well constructed homes. Damage to homes was irregular with one house losing a roof but the house next door losing only shingles. Two homes in the area were nearly destroyed an one damaged when a pickup truck was lifted and tossed against its front wall. Eleven homes were destroyed, with damage reported to over 100 homes. The damage level ranged from F0 to F2. At this point, the tornado track was taking a gentle right turn as the tornado track became more southwesterly. The tornado moved into a wooded area crossing into Travis County before ending 1.1 miles from Lake Travis. Damage in the wooded area was irregular ranging from near total destruction of all trees to sections with about 10 percent of the trees down.
1997-10-23229°54'N / 95°04'W29°58'N / 95°00'W7.00 Miles440 Yards00150K0Harris
 Brief Description: The tornado first touched down on the east shore of Lake Houston and moved northeast into extreme western Liberty County. This tornado was mostly F0 and F1 with some F2 damage at Foley Rd and Dallas Rd where a boat house was extremely damaged. An 18-wheeler in the same area was overturned and moved 50 feet.
1997-10-23230°18'N / 95°21'W30°17'N / 95°16'W5.00 Miles440 Yards01175K0Montgomery
 Brief Description: This tornado was probably the most significant in strength and length that occurred this day. Several homes and mobile homes received major damage. There was one injury when a young boy was in a mobile home when the tornado picked it up and wrapped it around a tree. Damage to trees was extensive with many trees being snapped off above the ground. This storm was surveyed from the air and had continuous tree damage from Midway to Shepherd in San Jacinto County.
1998-01-05232°14'N / 95°21'W32°17'N / 95°18'W4.20 Miles75 Yards00120K0Smith
 Brief Description: HP Supercell developed along a quasi-stationary front and moved northeast. This Supercell produced a family of three tornadoes, numerous microbursts and giant hail. A meso was detected by dopplar radar with the HP supercell. In this supercell an F2 tornado was produced. As the supercell developed, massive mid level convergence occurred resulting in giant hail. The evolution continued resulting in a bow echo pattern where two additional weak tornadoes occurred in the northern comma heads In the first tornado, damage consisted of numerous snapped and fallen trees. Fifteen homes and three businesses were either moderately or severely damaged including roofs removed on two homes. Southwestern Bell phone truck heavily damaged from a fallen tree and a Ford Aerostar Van was crushed almost beyond recognition. Several telephone poles were tilted to a 45 degree angle.
1998-04-26234°06'N / 101°50'W34°06'N / 101°50'W0.30 Mile30 Yards00100K25KHale
 Brief Description: A short-lived but strong (F2) tornado occurred just north of Hale Center. Two people narrowly escaped injury when their home was destroyed (they had sought shelter in a small, interior closet in this ranch-style house). The tornado also heavily damaged a vacant house, barn, hangar, and center-pivot irrigation system. Several large trees were destroyed/uprooted. Damage was investigated by NWS officials just a few hours after it occurred. A round of severe thunderstorms affected the South Plains on the 26th. The most significant storm was the one that hit Hale Center (see above) and caused a lightning fatality and tornado damage. Elsewhere, large hail was reported near Friona, Cone, Aspermont, and Jayton.
1998-10-17231°58'N / 96°38'W31°58'N / 96°38'W3.50 Miles100 Yards14100K0Navarro
 Brief Description: A 33 year old man was killed when a tornado struck his mobile home. M33MH
1998-10-17231°25'N / 97°31'W31°25'N / 97°31'W0.10 Mile20 Yards0050K0Coryell
 Brief Description: Two brick homes were destroyed and large trees were uprooted when a narrow tornado touched down briefly.
1998-10-17230°30'N / 96°41'W30°33'N / 96°41'W3.50 Miles100 Yards001.5M0Burleson
 Brief Description: Two tornadoes touched down in the Caldwell area causing substantial damage. Twenty-two homes were completely destroyed, 37 sustained major damage, and 101 homes with minor damage. Caldwell Middle School also had major damage. Tombstones weighing more than 1000 pounds were unearthed and moved.
1998-10-18229°49'N / 95°56'W29°49'N / 95°56'W1.00 Mile50 Yards1175K0Waller
 Brief Description: Tornado destroyed mobile home. One person killed and another injured in the home. Nine other homes damaged and 2 barns destroyed. M47MH
1999-01-01230°50'N / 95°23'W30°46'N / 95°23'W5.00 Miles500 Yards00750K0Trinity
 Brief Description: Funnel reported over the Trinity River bridge. Storm abruptly took a right turn along the eastern shore of Lake Livingston. Tornado touched down 7 miles south of Trinity. Effected Timber Bay, Whiterock Estates, Azteck Cove and Timber Cove subdivisions. Major damage caused by trees falling on residences/vehicles. Strongest damage (and not necessarly caused by falling trees) occurred at Whiterock Estates. Resident in Timber Bay (where the first touchdown occurred) had anemometer that clocked 110 mph winds before it was blown away. Mostly F1 damage with F2 damage in Whiterock Estates.
1999-01-01229°58'N / 94°25'W30°02'N / 94°26'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00175K0Liberty
 Brief Description: The tornado appeared to have formed just on the other side of a canal in the Dunning's Farm area. At this point three large houses were completely destroyed with widespread tree damage. The tornado moved NE and dragged heavy farm tractors (approximately 50000 lbs) over 10 to 15 feet. The tornado moved across a wide open field and crossed into Jefferson county.
1999-01-02230°21'N / 93°58'W30°26'N / 93°54'W8.00 Miles800 Yards1101.3M0Jasper
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado moved across southern Jasper County. At least 15 homes were destroyed, 20 received major damage, and 10 received minor damage. The worst hit area was Callier Loop, south of Buna. The fatality occurred here. A tied down mobile home rolled over at least five times, ejecting a man 100 yards and a woman 500 yards. The man received a broken back and other serious injuries, while the woman died a few days later from a broken neck, back, and internal injuries. Debris from this home was spread over a mile across the fields. Brick walls were cracked in permanent homes, pickup trucks were lifted in the air and pushed 20 feet from where they originally were parked, and any mobile home situated lengthwise north to south was rolled over and destroyed. There were several stories of people being ejected from their mobile homes, and walking away with minor injuries. This tornado moved into Newton County. Total path length for both Jasper and Newton Counties is 12.5 miles. F55MH
1999-01-29230°37'N / 94°11'W30°41'N / 94°06'W6.00 Miles400 Yards0020K0Tyler
 Brief Description: A strong tornado moved across rural sections of eastern Tyler County, tearing up a large swath of trees and damaging a few out buildings. Some trees were as wide as 15 feet across and 100 feet tall. This tornado moved into rural sections of Jasper County.
1999-03-02231°41'N / 94°25'W31°39'N / 94°25'W2.50 Miles150 Yards00250K0Nacogdoches
 Brief Description: The damage was 150 yards wide that began in a rural area, 1/4 mile north of the intersection of Hwy 95 and FM 1878. Damage consisted of a chimney blown down, a large cedar tree snapped in half then blown 20 yards from the stump. A Tyson chicken barn was completely demolished with about 300 chickens killed. Forestry damage consisted of numerous trees fallen. A tin roofing from the chicken barns was tangled in many trees up to 1.2 miles away.
1999-03-02231°40'N / 94°25'W31°39'N / 94°24'W1.30 Miles150 Yards0015K0Shelby
 Brief Description: This was a segment of a tornado which traversed Nacogdoches and San Augustine Counties. Damage was mainly forestry however a large did crushed a mobile home with moderate damage.
1999-03-02231°37'N / 94°14'W31°37'N / 94°14'W5.50 Miles150 Yards00100K0San Augustine
 Brief Description: This was a continuation of the Nacogdoches tornado. Damage was mainly forestry consisting of numerous trees fallen and limbs snapped. Three homes had major roof damage and a carport was completely destroyed. Two large bails of rain saturated hay (Approximately 1500 lbs each dry weight) were moved about 25 yards.
1999-03-12231°00'N / 99°11'W30°59'N / 99°09'W2.00 Miles75 Yards00100K0Mcculloch
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down southeast of Brady, heavily damaging a house and a barn. Several rounds of thunderstorms developed across West Central Texas on the morning and afternoon of the 12th. The first round of storms brought dime to golf ball size hail to parts of the Northern Edwards Plateau, Concho Valley, and the Heartland. A second round of storms that developed during the early afternoon produced a supercell across the southern Heartland. This storm dropped a tornado south of Brady in Southern McCulloch County, as well as hail up the size of golf balls in the town of Brady itself. As the supercell moved into San Saba County, a second tornado would touch down. This tornado had an 8 mile long path and was 100 yards wide, passing 8 miles south of Richland Springs. Although each tornado would produce damage, no injuries or deaths were reported.
1999-03-12231°04'N / 99°03'W31°04'N / 98°51'W8.00 Miles100 Yards00300K0San Saba
 Brief Description: The same thunderstorm that spawned a brief touchdown in McCulloch County produced a second tornado south of Richland Springs. A hunting cabin, two trailer homes, 2 barns, and 3 vehicles were destroyed. Several rounds of thunderstorms developed across West Central Texas on the morning and afternoon of the 12th. The first round of storms brought dime to golf ball size hail to parts of the Northern Edwards Plateau, Concho Valley, and the Heartland. A second round of storms that developed during the early afternoon produced a supercell across the southern Heartland. This storm dropped a tornado south of Brady in Southern McCulloch County, as well as hail up the size of golf balls in the town of Brady itself. As the supercell moved into San Saba County, a second tornado would touch down. This tornado had an 8 mile long path and was 100 yards wide, passing 8 miles south of Richland Springs. Although each tornado would produce damage, no injuries or deaths were reported.
1999-04-03231°57'N / 94°02'W31°58'N / 94°07'W2.80 Miles50 Yards0015K0Shelby
 Brief Description: Minor roof damage to a few homes and outbuildings. Damage largely confined to trees uprooted or snapped. This is a continuation of the DeSoto Parish, Louisiana tornado.
1999-04-04231°47'N / 95°19'W31°50'N / 95°16'W4.50 Miles50 Yards0015K0Cherokee
 Brief Description: Abandoned chicken coop collapsed, large oaks (3 feet in diameter) uprooted otherwise minor damage to vehicles and about 10 homes.
1999-04-30231°42'N / 103°45'W31°42'N / 103°45'W1.00 Mile170 Yards0000Reeves
 Brief Description: This tornado formed from a very young cell that became a small classic supercell very quickly. The cell was on the southern end of a small cluster of cells. The tornado formed near the Pecos River in extreme eastern Reeves County and crossed into western Loving County. As the tornado crossed the river the largest vegetation in the area, lines of Salt Cedar trees were snapped or uprooted. Many of these trees were well established and approximately 25-30 feet tall. The funnel exhibited a condensation funnel to the ground for much of its life. A classic severe weather setup was taking place on this day and would continue into the next day. A strong upper level low pressure system was centered near Las Vegas, NV and was moving slowly eastward toward the area. Surface winds were backed to the southeast with rich moisture. One item of interest was the early start time of the storms with the first tornado by 1130 am CDT...only about 10 am local sun time. With the mid-level flow blowing parallel to the orientation of multicell complexes were oriented, training of storms was common over several parts of the region. In the evening tornadoes and hail events subsided and flash flooding began to take control.
1999-04-30231°46'N / 103°41'W31°50'N / 103°45'W6.00 Miles170 Yards0020K0Loving
 Brief Description: The Reeves County tornado crossed the Pecos River and headed north across open country. Soon after it crossed the river, the tornado hit some oil field supplies and caused some damage. The only oil pumpjack in the path was overturned. Engineers at a pumpjack manufacturer estimated winds in the range of 110-130 mph to knock over this large piece of equipment. Vegetation mainly consisted of brush less than 4 feet tall with disturbances ranging from snapped or flattened to bent more than 45 degrees. The small foliage on these plants was generally still present, but wind-torn. A classic severe weather setup was taking place on this day and would continue into the next day. A strong upper level low pressure system was centered near Las Vegas, NV and was moving slowly eastward toward the area. Surface winds were backed to the southeast with rich moisture. One item of interest was the early start time of the storms with the first tornado by 1130 am CDT...only about 10 am local sun time. With the mid-level flow blowing parallel to the orientation of multicell complexes were oriented, training of storms was common over several parts of the region. In the evening tornadoes and hail events subsided and flash flooding began to take control.
1999-05-04230°57'N / 100°44'W30°57'N / 100°30'W23.00 Miles250 Yards0010K0Schleicher
 Brief Description: A slow moving tornado skipped across a 23 mile long path just north of Eldorado in northern Schleicher County. Eleven power poles were snapped, trees uprooted, and at least 2 barns lost their roofs as the tornado passed. Other outbuildings along the path of the tornado were also damaged. Severe storms developed across much of West Central Texas during the evening of the 3rd and continued into the early morning hours of the 4th. A brief tornado was reported near Maryneal in Nolan County, while hail up to the size of grapefruit was reported northwest of Sterling City. Hail up to tennis ball size was reported in Drasco in northern Runnels County, while golf ball size hail fell in Sterling City, Robert Lee, and Lawn.
1999-05-04233°50'N / 95°03'W33°51'N / 94°56'W1.80 Miles100 Yards07600K0Red River
 Brief Description: Supercells developed in unstable airmass ahead of strong upper low over central plains states. Numerous trees blown over or broken. Nine mobile homes and 1 frame home destroyed. This tornado moved into McCurtain county, OK.
1999-05-04232°23'N / 94°53'W32°23'N / 94°53'W1.80 Miles100 Yards006.0M0Gregg
 Brief Description: Numerous homes and businesses damages. This tornado continued into Rusk County, TX then reentered Gregg County, TX.
1999-05-04232°23'N / 94°53'W32°25'N / 94°42'W8.90 Miles150 Yards0219.0M0Gregg
 Brief Description: Major damage to homes and businesses. Stoneridge Apartment complex lost portions of its roof and walls collapsed. The complex was condemned. This tornado is separate from the Gree County to Rusk County to Gregg County tornado event which occurred at the same time.
1999-05-04232°23'N / 94°53'W32°23'N / 94°53'W0.30 Mile150 Yards0000Rusk
 Brief Description: Open field with no structures.
1999-05-04232°23'N / 94°53'W32°23'N / 94°53'W0.10 Mile100 Yards0025K0Gregg
 Brief Description: Minor damage to homes and a school lost a few shingles. This tornado is continued from the Gregg County to Rusk County, TX tornado event.
1999-05-04232°26'N / 94°40'W32°26'N / 94°40'W0.80 Mile75 Yards0000Harrison
 Brief Description: Wooded region and open field.
1999-05-04231°45'N / 95°06'W31°40'N / 94°59'W9.40 Miles200 Yards0000Cherokee
 Brief Description: Numerous trees blown over or snapped.
1999-05-04231°47'N / 94°53'W31°39'N / 94°44'W13.30 Miles200 Yards0000Nacogdoches
 Brief Description: Numerous trees blown over or snapped. No structures in the area. This tornado entered Nacogdoches county from Cherokee County, TX.
2000-03-16230°36'N / 97°51'W30°36'N / 97°50'W1.50 Miles200 Yards00300K0Williamson
 Brief Description: A strong weather system produced scattered showers and thunderstorms over Central Texas on the afternoon of Thursday March 16. Funnel clouds were first reported by the public and by the Leander Police Department near 4 pm that afternoon. A small, short-lived F0 tornado struck near the police station near 4 pm, with no significant damage. Shortly after 4 pm, another rope-shaped funnel was observed west of Leander. Photographs of this developing tornado indicate a generally-long and rope-shaped structure that slowly twisted and wound its way to the surface. The tornado touched down in the western part of Mason Creek Subdivision located on the west side of Leander and moved slowly eastward. Damage near the tornado touchdown was F0 level approaching F1. It damaged eaves of roofs, took shingles off roofs and knocked down large tree branches. More significant damage was noted along Greening Way and Mason Creek Boulevard in the west and central part of the subdivision, where several large trees of over 1 foot diameter were uprooted. This indicated damage in the lower levels of the F2 scale. In addition, the tornado had destroyed approximately 30 percent of one home. Again, this indicated minimal F2-level damage. The tornado began to lift as it approached Old Bagdad Road on the eastern side of the subdivision. Most of the damage in this part of the subdivision was at the F0 level. In all, the tornado damaged 24 homes and several outbuildings. The tornado was estimated at 200 yards wide with a path length of 1.5 mile.
2000-03-22231°34'N / 101°35'W31°38'N / 101°28'W6.00 Miles300 Yards05200K0Reagan
 Brief Description: The tornado knocked a small house off its foundation by about 15 yards with the house pivoting 90 degrees as well. One infant suffered a slight head injury from falling furniture. The tornado continued travelling north-northeast through rural areas, but struck and destroyed a mobile home, injuring two men, one seriously. Lighter damage was scattered along the rest of its path, including utility poles down, parts of roofs damaged, fences and barns damaged, etc. The tornado crossed into Glasscock County at 31.65N/101.50W. This storm was a classic supercell that formed ahead of the training line of storms to the west.
2000-03-28232°45'N / 96°59'W32°45'N / 96°59'W1.00 Mile300 Yards0000Dallas
 Brief Description: The Arlington tornado damaged several homes just to the west of the Tarrant/Dallas county line in Grand Prairie (see above) before dissipating shortly after 1920 CST. Dallas County Thunderstorm Narrative The parent storm that produced the Arlington-Grand Prairie tornado moved east into Dallas county about 1915C. The storm produced several funnels between Desoto and Lancaster, eventually producing a brief touchdown in rural areas between Red Oak and Wilmer (spotters). Street flooding was reported in southwest Dallas.
2000-04-23233°50'N / 95°16'W33°53'N / 95°03'W12.50 Miles75 Yards0000Red River
 Brief Description: Tornado occurred across farm land and wooded areas with few structures or homes present. The county sheriff, his deputy, and a farmer were talking when the tornado, which was described as a long tube, moved out of the woods to their east and crossed within several hundred yards to their north.
2000-04-23233°10'N / 94°56'W33°13'N / 94°49'W7.00 Miles150 Yards00145K0Titus
 Brief Description: This tornado developed in a high precipitation supercell as it moved eastward across the county. Small to moderate pine and oak trees were snapped and broken. A mobile home dealership in Cookville, TX was moderately damaged and several homes suffered shingle loss. This tornado continued into Morris County, TX. The F2 rating is from the Morris County, TX segment of this tornado.
2000-04-23233°05'N / 94°45'W33°05'N / 94°41'W4.20 Miles200 Yards0012K0Morris
 Brief Description: Numerous large pine and oak trees snapped and broken. A roof was partially removed from a brick house and a chain link fence wrapped in a pine tree about 50 feet up. This was one of several tornadoes which occurred. This tornado continued into Cass County, TX.
2000-04-23233°14'N / 94°48'W33°15'N / 94°39'W9.80 Miles150 Yards0028K0Morris
 Brief Description: This tornado developed in a high precipitation supercell as it moved eastward across the county. Numerous large pine and oak trees were snapped and broken. Several barns were damaged but the tornado stayed mostly across rural farmland and forests. This tornado is a continuation of the Titus County, TX tornado.
2000-04-23233°05'N / 94°38'W33°05'N / 94°33'W2.80 Miles150 Yards0000Cass
 Brief Description: This tornado was one of several which formed over Cass County, TX. Numerous pine and oak trees snapped and broken. No structures were in the path of this tornado. This tornado entered Cass County, TX from Morris County, TX.
2000-04-23233°04'N / 94°36'W33°04'N / 94°24'W11.80 Miles150 Yards0000Cass
 Brief Description: Numerous large pines and oaks were snapped and broken. No structures were in the path of this tornado which was one of several that occurred in this county this day.
2000-04-23232°28'N / 94°30'W32°31'N / 94°24'W10.60 Miles150 Yards008.0M0Harrison
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in a high precipitation supercell as it moved eastward across the county. This supercell produced multiple tornadoes across Harrison county, TX into Louisiana. Approximately 50 homes and 2 business were damaged or destroyed. 17 homes were considered unlivable. Numerous large pine and oak trees anapped and broken. New eateries, hotels, and home development are underway in this location.
2000-04-23233°12'N / 94°26'W33°12'N / 94°14'W14.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Cass
 Brief Description: Tornado developed in a high precipitation supercell as it moved east across the county. This tornado was one of several that occurred. Tornado tracked eastward along Hwy 77 and crossed through downtown Douglassville at Hwy 8 then continued east into the woods before lifting. Several homes, mobile homes, and businesses were damaged including the Post Office.
2000-04-23232°31'N / 94°20'W32°23'N / 94°09'W17.00 Miles100 Yards0000Harrison
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in a cyclic high precipitation supercell as it moved eastward across the county. Damage was confined to numerous pine and oak trees which were uprooted and broken. No structures were in the path of this tornado.
2001-04-10236°08'N / 101°12'W36°11'N / 101°11'W4.00 Miles200 Yards02750K0Hansford
 Brief Description: An official storm damage survey was made on the tornado path length and width. The tornado destroyed several grain bins and a grain elevator to Agco facility. Extensive damage also occurred at a local farm...including the home...barns and equipment. Several power poles also were blown down. Severe thunderstorms producing large hail...damaging winds...and tornadoes occurred across the western Texas panhandle during the early evening hours and then moved east and northeast across the central and eastern Texas panhandle during the late evening hours.
2001-04-10235°23'N / 100°16'W35°26'N / 100°14'W6.00 Miles200 Yards00150K0Wheeler
 Brief Description: An official storm damage survey was made of the estimated tornado path length and width. A home and farm equipment were severely damaged. Several large trees and power poles were also knocked down. Several areas of non-tornadic downburst winds were also assessed...primarily in the west and southwest areas of Wheeler county. Severe thunderstorms producing large hail...damaging winds...and tornadoes occurred across the western Texas panhandle during the early evening hours and then moved east and northeast across the central and eastern Texas panhandle during the late evening hours.
2001-10-11229°42'N / 95°12'W29°42'N / 95°12'W3.50 Miles100 Yards003.8M0Harris
 Brief Description: 120 homes, 3 apartment complexes, 2 schools, and some businesses damaged by a tornado. The tornado touched down near Fairmont and Shaver, moving northeast to near the intersection of Southmore and Red-Bluff Road.
2001-10-12233°09'N / 97°39'W33°09'N / 97°36'W2.50 Miles440 Yards01200K0Wise
 Brief Description: The first tornado touched down in southwest Paradise at the intersection of School House Road and Sunflower. Initial damage was spotty, with damage to trees, mobile homes, and outbuildings. The tornado strengthened as it moved northeast into the downtown area, with the peak F2 intensity along Main Street. The roof of the firehouse was completely removed and thrown several hundred yards. Some bricks on the exterior walls of the firehouse were removed. A woman in the firehouse received a head injury from flying debris, and was treated at a local hospital. A water tower was blown over across the street from the firehouse. Numerous trees along Main Street were either sheared off or uprooted. The tornado crossed Highway114, flipping over a tractor trailer and causing tree damage at an orchard. Showers and thunderstorms developed across north Texas, mainly in the afternoon and night resulting in widespread severe weather, during the period October 10-13. The most significant event occured during the late afternoon and night of October 12, as a line of severe thunderstorms moved east across north texas producing eight tornadoes, and nearly two million dollars in damage.
2001-10-12233°14'N / 97°36'W33°18'N / 97°32'W9.00 Miles590 Yards01750K0Wise
 Brief Description: The second Wise county tornado touched down on the southwest side of Decatur, with initial damage to trees and a large storage shed. The tornado strengthened as it moved east northeast into the Lipsey Subdivision. Several homes sustained roof damage and numerous trees were blown down or snapped off. One large home on Garland Street was rendered uninhabitable, as most of the roof was blown off and two exterior walls were destroyed. The occupant escaped with minor injuries. The tornado crossed Highway 51, blowing down numerous trees, power lines, and utility poles. A large portion of the roof of the Church of Christ building was removed and blown into a tree about one mile away. The Wise County Regional Hospital had some windows broken. As the tornado crossed Highway 287, it weakened doing sporadic F0 damage to trees in a residential area just south of downtown. The tornado reintensified just east of downtown near the intersection if Business Highway 81 and Old Denton Road, where a 10,000 square foot storage building was destroyed. The tornado continued moving northeast, severely damaging three homes. Two four inch diameter posts from a gazebo were thrown 1/4 of a mile and driven one foot into the ground. The tornado crossed Highway 380, heavily damaging a ranch, then moved into a heavily wooded area blowing down hundreds of trees before dissipating. Damage occurred to 50 homes,at least 8 businesses, and 2 churches. Showers and thunderstorms developed across north Texas, mainly in the afternoon and night resulting in widespread severe weather, during the period October 10-13. The most significant event occured during the late afternoon and night of October 12, as a line of severe thunderstorms moved east across north texas producing eight tornadoes, and nearly two million dollars in damage.
2001-10-12231°41'N / 97°27'W31°41'N / 97°27'W4.20 Miles150 Yards00100K0Mclennan
 Brief Description: The first tornado to hit the county touched down 2.5 miles southwest of Valley Mills, then moved east northeast and dissipated 1.5 miles east of Valley Mills. The most significant damage was to a frame house near the beginning of the damage path. There was also damage to house roofs and mobile homes along Cap Fiske Road, Highway 317, and near Highway 6 on the southern edge of Valley Mills. Showers and thunderstorms developed across north Texas, mainly in the afternoon and night resulting in widespread severe weather, during the period October 10-13. The most significant event occured during the late afternoon and night of October 12, as a line of severe thunderstorms moved east across north texas producing eight tornadoes, and nearly two million dollars in damage.
2001-10-12231°45'N / 97°10'W31°48'N / 97°05'W6.20 Miles150 Yards00500K0Mclennan
 Brief Description: The second McLennan county tornado touched down just southwest of Tokio then moved east northeast and dissipated 1.3 miles east of West. Homes, a church, and several businesses were damaged in Tokio. After moving through Tokio, the tornado moved along FM 1858, causing heavy damage to wood-frame structures, mobile homes, storage buildings, and minor damage to several brick homes. As the tornado moved across the extreme southern edge of West, several homes and storage buildings were damaged. Showers and thunderstorms developed across north Texas, mainly in the afternoon and night resulting in widespread severe weather, during the period October 10-13. The most significant event occured during the late afternoon and night of October 12, as a line of severe thunderstorms moved east across north texas producing eight tornadoes, and nearly two million dollars in damage.
2001-10-12229°22'N / 99°10'W29°21'N / 99°09'W1.20 Miles500 Yards02520.0M50KMedina
 Brief Description: The tornado was spotted as it touched down near 940 pm CST just northwest of the Hondo airport. It grew to nearly 500 yards in width and moved toward the southeast for 1.2 miles across the airport and over the National Guard Armory before dissipating near the center of town. Although much of the damage was F0 and F1 on the Fujita Scale, the tornado was rated F2 because of the level of damage from the airport to the armory. During this time it destroyed a large hangar, partially destroyed the roof and walls of the concrete Armory and moved numerous mobile homes off their pads. One mobile home clearly showed the nature of damage from a tornado. The center of the mobile home was completely destroyed, along with a tree in front of it, while much less damage was indicted on both ends of the mobile home as well as vegetation near the ends. The storm also knocked out power to much of the area, and this, along with the darkness in the late night hour, made spotting very difficult. It is possible that additional small tornadoes might have accompanied the storm, but the combination of damage from the large tornado and the downburst winds, along with the darkness of the late night hour made it impossible to tell. Almost 150 homes in Hondo and almost 50 more outside the city were damaged, with nearly 100 mobile homes damaged. At least 10 houses and 30 mobile homes were destroyed. Losses to homes and mobile homes were estimated at 1.5 million dollars. In addition, nearly two dozen aircraft, including one corporate jet and 14 crop dusters, were damaged and destroyed at the Hondo Airport. Some were in collapsed hangars while others were lifted, tossed and set down across the Airport area. Commercial losses placed at 18 million dollars. At least 25 persons were injured.
2001-12-16230°46'N / 95°13'W30°47'N / 95°11'W3.00 Miles200 Yards022.5M0San Jacinto
 Brief Description: An F2 Tornado touched down at the Point Lookout West Estates. There were 2 minor injuries. 15 homes were destroyed, with 15 to 20 other homes receiving major damage. Trees and power lines were down. Reported by the Sheriff's office.
2002-03-19229°15'N / 98°41'W29°16'N / 98°42'W1.50 Miles50 Yards0302.0M0Bexar
 Brief Description: Tornado number five, strongest of the six and rated as a minimal F2 tornado on the Fujita Scale, formed about 3.5 miles southwest of the intersection of Loop 1604 and I35. It struck near 720 pm along near Silver Street and Bravo Street and moved toward the north for 1.5 miles. It apparently weakened periodically, producing a hit-and-miss damage path. It completely destroyed four mobile homes and damaged several others.
2002-03-30231°24'N / 96°35'W31°27'N / 96°28'W7.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0Limestone
 Brief Description: This tornado first touched down just west of farm road 2749 about .5 mile southeast of Thornton. Two houses were damaged, one mobile home destroyed and a mobile home unroofed. The tornado moved northeast damaging a barn, then moved into the Davis Prairie community damaging several houses, some mobile homes, and numerous outbuildings. The tornado moved northeast and weakened before dissipating 2.4 miles south of the Box Church community.
2002-03-30231°19'N / 94°26'W31°21'N / 94°20'W7.50 Miles440 Yards001.2M0Nacogdoches
 Brief Description: Numerous trees and power lines broken, snapped and pulled out of the ground along the track. Numerous homes and business were severely damaged or destroyed. This tornado moved into Nacogdoches County, TX from Polk County, TX and Angelina County, TX then continued northeast into San Augustine County, TX.
2002-03-30231°21'N / 94°19'W31°27'N / 94°07'W15.20 Miles220 Yards0000San Augustine
 Brief Description: Numerous trees snapped and felled along the extreme western portion of the track. A few power lines were also toppled northeast of Townsend. This tornado moved into San Augustine County, TX from Nacogdoches County, TX, Angelina County, TX and Polk County, TX.
2002-04-07233°11'N / 99°20'W33°14'N / 99°15'W7.00 Miles1500 Yards0010K0Throckmorton
 Brief Description: Immediately after the first tornado dissipated, a second larger, more stable multiple vortex tornado developed. Tracking along a 7 mile long path across western Throckmorton County, this tornado would reach over three quarters of a mile wide. Fortunately, the tornado tracked largely over open county and damage was minimal for a tornado of this size. Partially buried fence posts were torn out of the ground and disappeared, while a 300 yard path was swept clean and a large mesquite tree was ripped out of the ground. Severe thunderstorms rolled across much of West Central Texas during the afternoon and evening hours of the 7th. Two supercells produced a total of 5 tornadoes, 3 across the northern Big Country in Throckmorton County and 2 more across the Northern Edwards Plateau in Crockett County. Although one of the tornadoes in Throckmorton was about three quarters of a mile wide and stayed on the ground for 16 minutes, it fortunately crossed open farmland, striking no homes were causing no injuries. Damage was more extensive with the southern supercell, with tennis ball size hail causing tens of thousands of dollars of damage to several ranch houses in eastern Crockett County. Other storms produced hail up to golf ball size across parts of the Concho Valley and Heartland.
2002-04-07229°07'N / 99°10'W29°08'N / 99°11'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00200K0Medina
 Brief Description: As a new supercell formed in southern Medina County and tracked eastward, it spawned an F2 tornado just west of the small community of Yancey. This was very close to the the site where a devastating F3 killer tornado had struck almost exactly 27 years earlier. This tornado touched down along County Road 731, destroying two homes. It moved toward the northeast for one mile, damaging two other homes and a mobile home while rolling over a car and knocking down several large trees.
2002-05-05234°44'N / 101°56'W34°44'N / 101°51'W5.00 Miles300 Yards0000Swisher
 Brief Description: A large tornado developed west of town. It moved eastward across open country and thus the storm survey team, made up of both NWS personnel and a Texas Tech University wind engineer, could only find damage to power poles and to fence posts. Based on storm chaser video, the large tornado weakened and finally dissipated just west of Happy.
2002-05-05234°44'N / 101°51'W34°44'N / 101°48'W3.00 Miles150 Yards244.0M0Swisher
 Brief Description: Storm chaser video indicated that shortly after the large tornado dissipated, another tornado developed just west of town. This tornado tore a 150-yard wide path across the southern part of town. Fifteen homes were destroyed, including at least ten mobile homes, another seventeen received major damage, and eighteen others received minor damage. The storm survey team estimated wind speeds associated with the damage to be in the 115 to 130 mph range. Two fatalities occurred in a mobile home on the southeast side of town; the mobile home was rolled about 50 yards and destroyed. Four injuries also occurred in mobile homes that were in the same area. The church on the west side of town lost 120 feet of its roof and 30 vehicles, including two tractor trailers, were damaged or destroyed. Seventy five utility and telephone poles were snapped. The tornado crossed I-27 and continued to produce significant damage east of town as it struck a home two miles east of Happy on Farm-to-Market Road 1075. Before crossing into southern Randall County about three miles east of Happy, the tornado produced major damage to a second home on Farm-to-Market Road 1075. M37MH, F35MH
2002-05-05234°45'N / 101°48'W34°49'N / 101°43'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0040K0Randall
 Brief Description: A damage assessment was made on this tornado. This tornado began in Lubbock's County Warning Area in Swisher county. After the tornado tore through the community of Happy Texas, it moved east northeast and entered the extreme southern sections of Randall county. Two homes received moderate damage from the tornado in Randall county. No injuries or deaths occurred in Randall county. Severe thunderstorms raked across much of the Texas panhandle during the late afternoon and into the evening hours. Large hail and damaging winds along with several tornadoes occurred with these storms with the extreme southern Texas panhandle being hit hardest. No fatalities or injuries occured from the severe weather...although damage was reported from the high winds and large hail.
2002-10-24227°44'N / 97°37'W27°47'N / 97°25'W2.50 Miles200 Yards12075.0M0Nueces
 Brief Description: One Confirmed fatality and many injuries. The Tornado was first indentified by the public approximately 8 miles south of the CCI airport. Most extensive damage reported across Del MAr College. M?SC
2003-04-06232°18'N / 94°36'W32°18'N / 94°31'W4.90 Miles220 Yards062.3M0Rusk
 Brief Description: A supercell storm moved across the northeast part of the county. About 20 wood frame and mobile homes were damaged. Six (6) mobile homes were totally destroyed. Numerous trees were twisted, broken and uprooted. This tornado remained in Rusk County.
2003-04-06231°54'N / 95°03'W31°56'N / 94°59'W4.20 Miles220 Yards0000Cherokee
 Brief Description: A supercell thunderstorm moved northeast across east extreme east central Cherokee County. Two mobile homes were damaged and numerous trees were twisted, broken and uprooted. This tornado moved into Rusk County, TX.
2003-04-06231°25'N / 94°56'W31°26'N / 94°39'W13.70 Miles440 Yards002.5M0Angelina
 Brief Description: A classic supercell thunderstorm moved northeastward across Angelina County, TX into Nacogdoches County, TX producing a strong tornado. Numerous structures were damaged near Central, TX, northwest of Lufkin, TX. Otherwise damage was confined to uprooted and snapped trees.
2003-04-06231°27'N / 94°44'W31°34'N / 94°31'W13.80 Miles220 Yards0000Nacogdoches
 Brief Description: A classic supercell thunderstorm moved northeastward across Angelina County, TX into Nacogdoches County, TX producing a strong tornado. Damage was confined to uprooted and snapped trees.
2003-04-15234°30'N / 99°55'W34°31'N / 99°52'W3.50 Miles350 Yards0075K0Hardeman
 Brief Description: This tornado began in Hardeman County, Texas producing F2 damage before moving northeast and crossing the Red River at 1829 CST into extreme western Jackson County, Oklahoma then moving into Harmon County, Oklahoma where it dissipated. The tornado moved through a farm north of Williams, Texas causing significant damage. A hay barn, saddle shed, garage, shop, and chicken house were destroyed. The house was also damaged with broken windows, porch removed from the house, tree limbs driven through the north facing wall, and the east wall of the house separated by approximately an inch.
2003-05-03233°04'N / 99°38'W33°07'N / 99°37'W4.00 Miles440 Yards0010K0Haskell
 Brief Description: Spotters watched a large one quarter mile wide tornado that moved across the northeast portion of lake Stamford. This tornado came within yards of hitting the lake Stamford power plant, however it did knock down 11 transmission poles coming out of the power plant and eight distribution poles. This tornado was also filmed by a weather broadcaster from a local Abilene television station. An isolated severe thunderstorm formed along the dry line in the late afternoon in Dickens County. This thunderstorm split into two different cells with one going northeast into Oklahoma and the other moving almost due east across Stonewall, Haskell and Eastern Throckmorton Counties. As the thunderstorm was over eastern Stonewall County, it begin to take on tornadic radar signatures and continued to intensify as it moved into Haskell County. During it's two hour trek across Haskell County, it produced at least four tornadoes. Right after the storm crossed over into Throckmorton County it weakened rapidly and eventually dissipated over the southeastern portion of Throckmorton County.
2003-05-06232°41'N / 95°27'W32°44'N / 95°08'W18.00 Miles880 Yards05330K0Wood
 Brief Description: A strong cyclic supercell tornado developed over Mineola, Texas while a strong tornado developed shortly there after and moved to the east northeast. Numerous Pine, Oak, and other species of trees were either snapped or pushed over along the entire tornado track. Power lines were taken down across many locations along the track as well. The tornado moved over a small community of Pine Mills and destroyed 1 old frame home and 2 old mobile homes while damaging 9 others. Four injuries occurred including 1 broken leg. This tornado moved into Upshur, Harrison, and Marion Counties of northeast Texas.
2003-05-06232°44'N / 95°08'W32°47'N / 94°38'W27.20 Miles440 Yards0060K0Upshur
 Brief Description: A strong cyclic supercell tornado developed over Mineola, Texas while a strong tornado developed shortly there after and moved to the east northeast. Numerous Pine, Oak, and other species of trees were either snapped or pushed over along the entire tornado track. Power lines were taken down across many locations along the track as well. The only structure in the path of this tornado was a construction trailer which was rolled over several times east of Gilmer, Texas. This tornado moved into Upshur County from Wood County and continued into Harrison and Marion Counties of northeast Texas.
2003-05-14233°41'N / 94°42'W33°15'N / 94°15'W40.00 Miles100 Yards00200K0Bowie
 Brief Description: A violent thunderstorm moved rapidly southeast across McCurtain County, OK into Bowie County, TX and Cass County, TX. This thunderstorm also produced a strong microburst in McCurtain County southwest of Idabel, OK and again southeast of Maud, TX, located in Bowie County. Numerous trees and limbs were snapped or pushed over along the entire track. Several homes, mobile homes, barns, garages, and outbuildings were either damaged or destroyed. The primary damage from this event occurred southeast of Maud, TX and was also associated with a microburst with wind speeds approaching 100 mph. The microburst occurred along the east side of the tornado track.
2003-05-15232°33'N / 99°18'W32°33'N / 99°20'W1.50 Miles450 Yards003K0Shackelford
 Brief Description: This was the northern tornado track of the two that paralleled one another. This tornado snapped and stripped large trees and ripped up some T post fence along it's path. It seems that the tree damage was more severe on this track. A warm front was located near Abilene as strong upper level energy moved in from the west. Several thunderstorms developed along and to the north of the front with two storms becoming supercells and producing most of the severe weather that evening. One supercell moved across Fisher county into Jones county with only reports of hail and funnel clouds. Another supercell formed to the south of the first supercell just to the northwest of Abilene. This supercell became the dominant storm just north of Abilene and continued to intensify as it moved across Shackelford county and continued east to near Ranger. One tornado was reported in extreme southern Jones county just north of Abilene and four more tornadoes were confirmed across southern Shackelford county.
2003-05-15232°30'N / 99°20'W32°30'N / 99°19'W1.50 Miles800 Yards0050K0Shackelford
 Brief Description: Two tornadoes paralleled one another. This tornado was the southern tornado track and destroyed oil storage tanks, oil equipment, a small building, and a couple of recreational vehicles. A trained spotter reported that this tornado was multiple vortex. The survey team noted separate damage areas south and southwest of the main track. A warm front was located near Abilene as strong upper level energy moved in from the west. Several thunderstorms developed along and to the north of the front with two storms becoming supercells and producing most of the severe weather that evening. One supercell moved across Fisher county into Jones county with only reports of hail and funnel clouds. Another supercell formed to the south of the first supercell just to the northwest of Abilene. This supercell became the dominant storm just north of Abilene and continued to intensify as it moved across Shackelford county and continued east to near Ranger. One tornado was reported in extreme southern Jones county just north of Abilene and four more tornadoes were confirmed across southern Shackelford county.
2003-05-15235°24'N / 100°07'W35°27'N / 100°00'W10.00 Miles1760 Yards00200K0Wheeler
 Brief Description: No injuries were reported. The tornado severely damaged several homes and outbuildings...uprooted or snapped large trees...and knocked down powerlines. The tornado crossed the Oklahoma and Texas state line along State Highway 152...fifteen miles east of the town of Wheeler. Severe thunderstorms producing numerous tornadoes along with large hail and damaging winds moved northeast across the northwestern...central and eastern Texas panhandle during the late afternoon and evening hours. Although no injuries were reported as a result of the tornadoes...there was considerable damage to homes and businesses as well as to powerlines and trees.
2003-11-17229°37'N / 95°38'W29°37'N / 95°38'W1.50 Miles200 Yards060500K0Fort Bend
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down on west Airport Drive near Industrial in Sugar Land. 60 injuries with 7 people sent to hospital for further treatment. Damage to several office building roofs in Industrial Park. Additional damage to a Daycare facility at West Airport Drive and Dairy Ashford Road. Roof damage to several residential homes in the Meadows subdivision. Reports of several cars overturned or blown off of road along Airport Drive. A total of 24 tornadoes touched down during this 15 hour period of severe weather in southeastern Texas on November 17, 2003. In addition to these tornadoes, a major flood developed over Harris and surrounding counties during the middle of this tornadic outbreak. Over 300 homes, along with hundreds of vehicles, were flooded. These tornadic storms developed over parts of Wharton and Matagorda counties shortly after sunrise with the first confirmed tornado occurring just east of El Campo around 9:00 am. Strong 500mb upper level troughing over the western U.S. moved from west to east across the Southern Plains. The polar jet stream associated with this 500 millibar trough surged into west Texas and then curved sharply northeastward into the Central Plains. The sub-tropical jet stream was oriented west to east across deep southern Texas. This jet stream pattern was the impetus to strong lower level convergence due to the enhanced upper level divergence. Low level moisture had substantially increased and was about 200 percent of normal by 6 AM. Vertical wind profiles also showed a great deal of low level wind shear with the greatest shear occurring in the lowest 2000 feet. In addition, these veering wind speeds rapidly increased with height. A focus for the thunderstorm development was provided by a weak low level boundary which was aligned southwest to northeast, or generally along the U.S. Highway 59 corridor. This feature was nearly-stationary and thunderstorms repeatedly developed and moved along this boundary. The axis of heaviest rain was coincident with this boundary.
2003-11-17229°38'N / 95°34'W29°38'N / 95°33'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00300K0Fort Bend
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down in the Meadows subdivision in Fort Bend County and traveled into Harris County. One home lost roof with several other homes damaged. A total of 24 tornadoes touched down during this 15 hour period of severe weather in southeastern Texas on November 17, 2003. In addition to these tornadoes, a major flood developed over Harris and surrounding counties during the middle of this tornadic outbreak. Over 300 homes, along with hundreds of vehicles, were flooded. These tornadic storms developed over parts of Wharton and Matagorda counties shortly after sunrise with the first confirmed tornado occurring just east of El Campo around 9:00 am. Strong 500mb upper level troughing over the western U.S. moved from west to east across the Southern Plains. The polar jet stream associated with this 500 millibar trough surged into west Texas and then curved sharply northeastward into the Central Plains. The sub-tropical jet stream was oriented west to east across deep southern Texas. This jet stream pattern was the impetus to strong lower level convergence due to the enhanced upper level divergence. Low level moisture had substantially increased and was about 200 percent of normal by 6 AM. Vertical wind profiles also showed a great deal of low level wind shear with the greatest shear occurring in the lowest 2000 feet. In addition, these veering wind speeds rapidly increased with height. A focus for the thunderstorm development was provided by a weak low level boundary which was aligned southwest to northeast, or generally along the U.S. Highway 59 corridor. This feature was nearly-stationary and thunderstorms repeatedly developed and moved along this boundary. The axis of heaviest rain was coincident with this boundary.
2003-11-17229°37'N / 95°33'W29°37'N / 95°33'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00500K0Harris
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down in the Meadows subdivision in Fort Bend County and traveled into Harris County. Tornado moved over the intersection of West Bellfort and Kirkwood. Numerous apartments lost roofs in the extensive SW Village Apartment Complex damage. A total of 24 tornadoes touched down during this 15 hour period of severe weather in southeastern Texas on November 17, 2003. In addition to these tornadoes, a major flood developed over Harris and surrounding counties during the middle of this tornadic outbreak. Over 300 homes, along with hundreds of vehicles, were flooded. These tornadic storms developed over parts of Wharton and Matagorda counties shortly after sunrise with the first confirmed tornado occurring just east of El Campo around 9:00 am. Strong 500mb upper level troughing over the western U.S. moved from west to east across the Southern Plains. The polar jet stream associated with this 500 millibar trough surged into west Texas and then curved sharply northeastward into the Central Plains. The sub-tropical jet stream was oriented west to east across deep southern Texas. This jet stream pattern was the impetus to strong lower level convergence due to the enhanced upper level divergence. Low level moisture had substantially increased and was about 200 percent of normal by 6 AM. Vertical wind profiles also showed a great deal of low level wind shear with the greatest shear occurring in the lowest 2000 feet. In addition, these veering wind speeds rapidly increased with height. A focus for the thunderstorm development was provided by a weak low level boundary which was aligned southwest to northeast, or generally along the U.S. Highway 59 corridor. This feature was nearly-stationary and thunderstorms repeatedly developed and moved along this boundary. The axis of heaviest rain was coincident with this boundary.
2003-11-17229°40'N / 95°14'W29°40'N / 95°14'W0.70 Mile100 Yards00550K0Harris
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down just east of Highway 288 in the Third Ward. One church completely destroyed, 50 homes damaged, and extensive tree damage. Wind damage to several downtown buildings in SE Houston near Minute Maid ballpark. A total of 24 tornadoes touched down during this 15 hour period of severe weather in southeastern Texas on November 17, 2003. In addition to these tornadoes, a major flood developed over Harris and surrounding counties during the middle of this tornadic outbreak. Over 300 homes, along with hundreds of vehicles, were flooded. These tornadic storms developed over parts of Wharton and Matagorda counties shortly after sunrise with the first confirmed tornado occurring just east of El Campo around 9:00 am. Strong 500mb upper level troughing over the western U.S. moved from west to east across the Southern Plains. The polar jet stream associated with this 500 millibar trough surged into west Texas and then curved sharply northeastward into the Central Plains. The sub-tropical jet stream was oriented west to east across deep southern Texas. This jet stream pattern was the impetus to strong lower level convergence due to the enhanced upper level divergence. Low level moisture had substantially increased and was about 200 percent of normal by 6 AM. Vertical wind profiles also showed a great deal of low level wind shear with the greatest shear occurring in the lowest 2000 feet. In addition, these veering wind speeds rapidly increased with height. A focus for the thunderstorm development was provided by a weak low level boundary which was aligned southwest to northeast, or generally along the U.S. Highway 59 corridor. This feature was nearly-stationary and thunderstorms repeatedly developed and moved along this boundary. The axis of heaviest rain was coincident with this boundary.
2003-11-17231°08'N / 93°29'W31°09'N / 93°28'W1.00 Mile20 Yards001.0M0Newton
 Brief Description: Seven homes were destroyed, and 11 were damaged from a short-lived tornado on River Road just below the Toledo Bend Dam.
2004-03-04232°07'N / 99°55'W32°14'N / 99°47'W10.00 Miles440 Yards02800K0Taylor
 Brief Description: A quickly moving tornado tore a 10 mile path through southern Taylor County. This tornado hit the community of Tuscola, where it damaged the Jim Ned high school injuring two people. A strong upper level disturbance combined with a strong surface low pressure system moving across West Central Texas produced a significant squall line that moved through the entire San Angelo county warning area. This squall line was accompanied by 60 to 80 MPH winds which produced widespread damage, especially across the Big Country. Embedded within the squall line, were several Supercell thunderstorms which produced nine tornadoes within the San Angelo county warning area.
2004-03-04233°05'N / 99°37'W33°05'N / 99°37'W1.00 Mile440 Yards00100K0Haskell
 Brief Description: Numerous manufactured homes were damaged or destroyed by the tornado along Lake Stamford. A strong upper level disturbance combined with a strong surface low pressure system moving across West Central Texas produced a significant squall line that moved through the entire San Angelo county warning area. This squall line was accompanied by 60 to 80 MPH winds which produced widespread damage, especially across the Big Country. Embedded within the squall line, were several Supercell thunderstorms which produced nine tornadoes within the San Angelo county warning area.
2004-06-11232°10'N / 100°44'W32°12'N / 100°36'W10.30 Miles200 Yards03250K0Mitchell
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service damage survey team concluded that a significant tornado struck rural areas of southeastern Mitchell County during the evening of the 11th. The team examined a damage path marked by shredded vegetation (mostly mesquite trees), downed utility poles, agricultural fences, and a complex of destroyed mobile homes that extended over ten miles in a continuous horseshoe shaped path that crossed State Route 208 twenty miles south-southeast of Colorado City. The tornado developed seventeen miles south-southeast of Colorado City around 2028 CST. Damage indicates the tornado's motion was initially toward the southeast then east as it crossed the heavily traveled State Route 208. Two Texas Tech University students traveling north on 208 (south of the tornado's path) watched as a Ford Expedition drove into the tornadic circulation. The large sports utility vehicle was blown 100 yards off of the highway. Evidence supports the vehicle was rolled a considerable distance by the tornadic winds, but it is unclear whether it became airborne. Three motorists were transferred to local hospitals. One person sustained serious injuries that included a broken back. A detailed damage path analysis and corresponding radar data suggest that the tornado then tracked very slowly east a few miles before curving to the northeast. Similar curved damage paths (turning left of the tornado's original motion) are commonly observed when well-developed tornadoes enter the dissipation stage. The tornado proved to remain very dangerous, however, as eight mobile homes were destroyed by the tornado near the end of its life cycle twenty miles southeast of Colorado City. The light weight and unanchored structures were blown over and shredded by the dissipation stage tornadic winds. The trailers were arranged in a complex and were used to provide shelter for groups of hunters that frequent the ranch property. They were not occupied when the tornado struck. In summary, a significant round of severe thunderstorms affected parts of west Texas during the afternoon and evening of the 11th. At least two supercell storms produced giant hail and one strong tornado over the region. A supercell thunderstorm tracked across Terrell County in the west Texas Lower Trans Pecos region during the late afternoon hours. Multiple reports of large hail including two different instances of tennis ball sized stones were received as this storm tracked east along U.S. Highway 90 between Sanderson and Dryden. A second area of convection erupted over the eastern Permian Basin by late afternoon and continued into the evening hours. A severe storm associated with this activity produced half-dollar size hail in the Westbrook community. An isolated classic supercell evolved from this complex of storms and took on a distinctly deviant southeastward storm motion. This storm took on radar characteristics consistent with a classic tornadic supercell. Hail up to the size of golfballs was observed southeast of Colorado City as the storm evolved into its tornadic phase. A long-lived significant tornado tracked across mainly rural areas of Mitchell County just after sunset. The tornado resulted in three injuries when it crossed State Route 208 and blew a vehicle off of the highway. Severe rear flank downdraft winds also resulted in widespread wind damage south of the tornado's path.
2004-11-23230°29'N / 94°10'W30°31'N / 94°09'W3.00 Miles600 Yards10500K0Hardin
 Brief Description: A second tornado touched down in northeastern Hardin County, was was witnessed by many people. Residents could see both tornadoes on the ground for a brief time. One elderly woman was killed when several large trees fell on the mobile home she was in. Between 10 and 20 homes were damaged or destroyed, mainly near Highway 92 near the Hardin-Tyler county line. F77MH
2004-11-23230°31'N / 94°04'W30°34'N / 94°01'W8.00 Miles300 Yards00250K1.0MJasper
 Brief Description: As the tornado moved into rural sections of Jasper County, it snapped numerous trees, causing a large loss to the timber industry. Several homes were destroyed, but no one was injured.
2004-11-23230°39'N / 94°00'W30°42'N / 93°55'W6.00 Miles500 Yards00250K1.0MJasper
 Brief Description: A second tornado formed near Kirbyville, narrowly missing downtown, but it did hit the community of Bon Ami. Around 10 to 15 homes were damaged or destroyed, and another large hit to the timber industry occurred with many trees blown down. This tornado crosses into Newton County.
2004-11-23230°43'N / 93°51'W30°47'N / 93°44'W9.00 Miles500 Yards00250K1.0MNewton
 Brief Description: The tornado moved across mainly rural areas of Newton County, but the storm did destroy or damage between 5 and 10 homes near the Pine Grove community. The timber industry saw a continued large loss of income due to trees blown down.
2004-11-23231°10'N / 94°53'W31°09'N / 94°52'W2.00 Miles500 Yards00100K0Trinity
 Brief Description: Seven hunters in the Davy Crockett National Forest were stranded and their vehicles severely damaged. Seventy to ninety percent of trees in path felled or damaged.
2005-05-12234°13'N / 101°19'W34°13'N / 101°19'W1.50 Miles1000 Yards0000Floyd
 Brief Description: F2 Tornado South Plains. Several power poles were snapped in half or blown over. The telephone poles surveyed were blown over in a variety of patterns, south to north direction, southwest to northeast direction, and a west to east direction. In addition, several center pivots were either blown over or twisted and two vehicles were flipped over in a field from a south to north direction. The Tornado produced the most damage shortly before and after crossing State Highway 207. This tornado was the parent or main tornado involved in what is known as a multi-vortex tornado. At times, this tornado was greater than one-half mile in width. Large tornadoes sometimes undergo a process where the flow inside the tornado becomes disrupted, but does not dissipate. The result is a turbulent circulation, or vortex, where smaller and typically weaker tornadoes develop and rotate around the parent or much broader circulation. The following South Plains tornado was one of these smaller and weaker tornadoes associated with this multi-vortex tornado. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
2005-05-12233°41'N / 101°25'W33°44'N / 101°23'W4.50 Miles500 Yards00100K75KCrosby
 Brief Description: F2 tornado in Ralls. In assessing the damage from the F3 tornado, the debris field diminished in areal coverage as the tornado tracked farther to the northeast along the end of its path. Damage assessment and public accounts of the storm suggested the tornado weakened and lifted. Meanwhile, a second tornado developed. This occurrence coincided with a break in the debris field observed during the Survey. This cycle of one tornado weakening and lifting while another tornado forms to the right of the former path is typical in well-organized tornadic thunderstorms. This second tornado developed approximately 1.5 miles west of Ralls and tracked to the north and northwest before dissipating three miles north of Ralls. The tornado damaged a residence and a nearby barn. Two thousand pound bales of hay were tossed from one side of US Highway 62/82 to the other as the tornado scattered debris to the south and southwest across an adjacent field. In addition, a vehicle was overturned on the property within debris from the residence and power poles were either blown down or snapped and center pivots overturned. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
2005-06-05232°34'N / 101°18'W32°30'N / 101°19'W5.00 Miles1300 Yards0080K0Borden
 Brief Description: A significant tornado developed in southern Borden County shortly after 18:00 CST. This tornado initially formed just north of Farm to Market Road 1785 three miles west of that highway's intersection with Farm to Market Road 1205. The tornado then slowly moved southwest, and resulted in a wide swath of damage to mesquite trees, road signs, fences, and utility poles as it crossed Farm to Market Road 1785. The tornado's damaging ground circulation briefly dissipated south of Farm to Market Road 1785 in south-central Borden County. Video provided by the public and storm spotters indicated that this phase of the tornado's life cycle was characterized by a condensation funnel that reached half way to the ground with no debris visible near the ground. National Weather Service meteorologists that conducted a damage survey of the tornado's track initially concluded that the broken damage path was likely the result of two separate tornadoes. Photographic evidence, however, supports that the funnel aloft remained well-defined and that the tornado reformed about one mile north of the Borden and Howard County line. The tornado crossed a county road near the Howard County line, and left a three-quarter mile wide swath of damage to mesquite trees and fences. Large drifts of wind blown mud accumulated several feet high along barbed-wire fences on the north side of the tornadoes circulation. A tin shed also was severely damaged. The tornado then moved over plowed fields as it crossed into north-central Howard County. Damage in the Borden County segment of the tornado's path would suggest a weak category rating. This may be largely due to a lack of man made structures that were affected. More significant (F2) damage was observed along the Howard County segment of the damage path. The total path length over Borden and Howard Counties was nine miles. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes affected parts of west Texas during the afternoon and evening of the 5th. Thunderstorms developed along a stationary frontal boundary over the western low rolling plains and the northeastern Permian Basin during the late afternoon. These storms evolved into supercells, and one storm produced a series of tornadoes across southern Borden and northern Howard Counties. By mid evening, a small cluster of organized severe storms evolved and produced more widespread hail, damaging winds, and heavy rainfall. Damages to agricultural interests across the region were significant, and accounted for a majority of the estimated $2.2 million worth of losses reported.
2005-06-05232°31'N / 101°24'W32°29'N / 101°27'W4.00 Miles300 Yards0025K300KHoward
 Brief Description: The long-lived tornado that developed in south-central Borden County crossed into Howard County east of County Road 41. The tornado's damage path narrowed as it moved over a hay field northeast of Luther. Three hundred round bales of hay, weighing 2,000 pounds each, were shredded by the tornadic winds. All of the hay bales were destroyed and the individual straws of hay served as small missiles, stripping mesquite trees of their bark in a thicket to the west. The tornado crossed County Road 41 about two miles south of the Howard and Borden County line. Chunks of asphalt, some up to six inches in diameter, were removed from the road's surface and deposited in an adjacent field. A 250 yard wide swath was cut through mesquite filled range land west of the road. Large mesquite trees were reduced to stumps that only stood a few feet tall, and were partially debarked. A railroad boxcar that was being used for storage was destroyed one mile west of County Road 41. The boxcar broke into three large pieces as it initially bounced along the earth, leaving large craters in the ground, and then was lofted. The three pieces were displaced a mile to the southwest from the boxcar's original location, near the end of the damage path. A National Weather Service damage survey team concluded that a significant rating (F2) was warranted based on the magnitude of tree and vegetation damage, and the lofting and displacement of the railroad boxcar. The tornadoes total path length across Borden and Howard Counties was nine miles, with a maximum path width of three quarters of a mile in south-central Borden County. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes affected parts of west Texas during the afternoon and evening of the 5th. Thunderstorms developed along a stationary frontal boundary over the western low rolling plains and the northeastern Permian Basin during the late afternoon. These storms evolved into supercells, and one storm produced a series of tornadoes across southern Borden and northern Howard Counties. By mid evening, a small cluster of organized severe storms evolved and produced more widespread hail, damaging winds, and heavy rainfall. Damages to agricultural interests across the region were significant, and accounted for a majority of the estimated $2.2 million worth of losses reported.
2005-06-12233°15'N / 100°39'W33°14'N / 100°41'W2.00 Miles1200 Yards00150K15KKent
 Brief Description: The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX conducted a damage survey in Kent County, approximately 8 miles to the northeast of Clairemont. In collaboration with the Center for Severe Weather Research in Boulder, CO and Texas Tech University meteorologists assessing the tornadoes across the county with Doppler-On-Wheels (DOW) data, a better understanding of the wind fields and tornado timing was achieved. The area of assessed damage was bounded by a triangle comprised of FM2320 to the south, FM1228 to the east, and CR112 to the west. There was a damage path characterized by tree damage across the zone. The path of the damage was oriented from a northeast-east to southwest-west direction. DOW data confirmed the large, wedge tornado initially propagated to the east and northeast, became nearly stationary, then rotate southward around the west side of the parent mesocyclone. The tornado moved to the southwest, then south and crossed FM1228 from the north/northeast to the south/southwest. The path of the tornado was between 0.6 to 0.7 miles wide. In assessing the damage, a circulatory patter was evident in a wheat field owned by a private farmer, with all of the wheat laying down to the south. Along this quadrant of the circulation, large farm equipment (tractors and cotton trailers) were tossed and mangled. An 80,000 lb box car was shaken by the tornado and the associated strong wind but was not moved from its location, however the contents inside were disturbed. The farm vehicles were tossed briefly a few times as there were scar marks and impact marks in the field as the equipment was blown to the south. The front-end of one tractor was snapped off after the second impact with the ground, as the vehicle was likely too heavy to remain airborne and was dragged and rolled by the tornadic wind and circulation. On the east side of the circulation, there were tree branches not grown in that immediate area that were stripped clean of bark. A cotton trailer (lighter than the other equipment) was lifted from its original location and was tossed to the north and mangled upon impact. The equipment was tossed approximately 3/10 of a mile within the circulation. It was evident from the damage pattern and debris, the circulation was multi-vortex in nature. The DOW measured wind speeds ranging from 45, 65 and 90 meters per second at various stages of the tornado life cycle at heights between 3 and 50 meters above ground level.
2006-03-19229°13'N / 99°43'W29°13'N / 99°41'W2.00 Miles50 Yards001.5M0Uvalde
 Brief Description: The most severe level of damage was located approximately 5 miles to the east of the Uvalde airport along Agape Road. This was due to a combination of both severe thunderstorm winds and a strong tornado. The wind damage, which had ended just south of Uvalde, once again was observed beginning just west of the Agape area by the team. The damage continued toward the east nearly one quarter mile to the Agape compound. Roof damage was noted at the first buildings, along with widespread damage to trees. Continuing to the east, the team found a mobile home that had been completely destroyed with the debris deposited about 30 yards to the south. This was the first time damage had been thrown in any direction except to the east and is believed to be just east of the starting point of the tornado. About 50 yards further to the east, an asphalt road was observed to have chunks of the topping removed and tossed toward the southeast. Very nearby, a large three-story concrete and steel-beam gymnasium valued at one million dollars had been gutted by the storm. The windward, west side was not blown inward as would have occurred with severe thunderstorm winds. Instead, it was pulled outward. A 40-foot steel beam had been bolted in a dozen different places to the building. The beam was pulled from the building and thrown back 15 feet to the northwest. Although many of the supporting steel beams held, several were pulled away and tossed. Concrete blocks, filled solid with concrete in their construction, had been ripped out of the building and lay tossed and strewn over the area. Much of the wall structure was destroyed. Pieces of sheet metal were strewn to the east and southeast for nearly one half mile. Additional damage to vegetation stretched for another 2 miles east of the gymnasium. Some of this damage was clearly due to severe thunderstorm winds and some of the damage was due to the tornado. Based on the level of damage of the mobile home and the gymnasium, the tornado was rated F2. The path width was estimated at 50 yards and the path length was estimated at 2 miles. From the reports available, it is thought the tornado developed about 1020 pm CST and dissipated around 1025 pm CST. It is the strongest tornado in South Central Texas since the evening of October 12, 2001, when an F3 tornado struck Stonewall, and an F2 tornado struck Hondo.
2006-04-29230°36'N / 95°09'W30°36'N / 95°09'W1.00 Mile30 Yards04100K0San Jacinto
 Brief Description: Tornado in the Coldspring Terrace Subdivision along Lake Livingston. Four injuries in two homes that received major damage.
2006-05-05232°28'N / 102°03'W32°28'N / 102°03'W6.10 Miles250 Yards0000Martin
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in Martin County in open fields north of County Road D4800 and east of County Road D2651. Based on spotter reports, the tornado was visible at 8:02 pm CDT just south of CR D4800 and west of Farm to Market Road 829 (FM 829), south-southeast of Patricia. According to spotter reports, it took on a stove-pipe like shape and continued to move to the east-southeast along FM 829. A few minutes later, the tornado pulled an oil pump jack and well head from the ground. The pump jack was estimated to weigh about 35,000 pounds by an oil company representative. The well head was anchored in the ground by an additional 35,000 pounds of weight from pipe below the ground. Southward along FM 829, four power poles were snapped four to five feet above ground and an additional six poles farther south were blown over to the east due to rear flank downdraft winds. Another couple of minutes later, an oil heater treater weighing approximately 12,000 pounds was blown over. The damage survey team classified the damage that occurred between 8:02pm CDT and 8:07pm CDT, when the oil heater treater was blown over, as F2 intensity damage. After blowing over the oil heater, the tornado became rain-wrapped and crossed County Road 4600, just west of County Road D3401. Five power poles were knocked down on County Road D3401. Based on information received from both spotters and chasers, the tornado dissipated at 8:14pm CDT, just west of Texas Highway 137. During the remainder of the tornado's path, it remained mainly over open country. The damage survey team calculated the width of the tornado to be 130 yards near the end of its life. However, the track was estimated to be between 200 and 300 yards during earlier stages of its life. The path length was calculated to be just over six miles long.
2006-05-05231°33'N / 97°09'W31°33'N / 97°09'W2.60 Miles150 Yards003.0M0Mclennan
 Brief Description: A tornado was reported on Waco Drive by the media, just north of the damage swath produced by the downburst. A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Fort Worth found that a tornado formed south of New Road and just west of Spur 298 (Franklin Avenue), or just north of Richland Mall. The tornado reached its peak intensity of lower F2 and did the most damage just east of Spur 298. Several commercial buildings had large sections of their roofs and walls damaged. A Coca-Cola Bottling Plant lost much of its roof and most of its inventory was damaged. A spokesman for the company stated that the tornado did well over $1 million worth of damage. An owner of an auto repair shop which was badly damaged estimated damages at $600,000. A horse barn owned by Baylor University was leveled and two horses killed. Numerous trees were downed and power lines snapped in and east of this area. The circulation weakened as it approached Interstate 35, and the tornado dissipated approximately three-fourths of a mile east of Interstate 35. A countywide disaster declaration was issued by the McLennan County judge.
2006-05-09234°25'N / 100°12'W34°25'N / 100°12'W1.50 Miles175 Yards015.7M0Childress
 Brief Description: A tornado resulted in significant (F2) damage along a one and half mile path through the north side of Childress during the evening hours of the 9th. The tornado developed in a residential are of northwest Childress at 20:30 CST. Damage in the neighborhood was characterized as weak, with numerous downed trees, street signs, and damaged roofs. A resident was injured when a tree fell and struck him, breaking his arm and causing minor lacerations. The tornado then moved east toward the high school. Damage to the high school was extensive. A local television network, KVII-TV in Amarillo, operates an automated weather station on the campus as part of a regional school net. The instrument measured a 109 MPH wind gust as the tornado ripped through the facility at 20:32 CST. Damage at Childress High School was rated F1, with large brick walls blown inn and portions of the building's roof removed. The gymnasium was declared a total loss. The tornado intensified as it continued to move east across Fair Park. A large industrial building used to house city owned emergency vehicles was completely destroyed, with extensive damage to the fleet of vehicles that were parked inside. A tennis court was destroyed by wind-blown debris, and numerous large trees were uprooted. A large stone picnic table was blown northward along the wind fields convergent axis associated with center of the tornado's path. A well-built metal bridge that spanned Park Lake was blown a considerable distance downwind. Damage along the tornado's path through the park justified a significant rating (F2) on the Fujita Tornado Damage Intensity Scale. This given the magnitude of damage observed at the industrial building site, where large steel beams were completely torn from their bolted fixtures. The damage survey indicated that the tornado quickly weakened as it continued to move east of the park, and into more rural areas in the northeastern outskirts of the city. May 9 Severe Thunderstorm and Significant Tornado Event Summary...Two isolated supercell thunderstorms developed east of a dryline that was roughly oriented along the Caprock Escarpment during the late afternoon and early evening hours of the 9th. These storms evolved into splitting supercells, and resulted in large hail up to two inches in diameter in Dickens and Motley Counties. The anticyclonic member from one of the mentioned storms propagated northward over Childress County during the early evening hours. The storm effectively lowered temperature-to-dewpoint depressions and locally backed the near-surface winds. A classic supercell subsequently propagated southeastward out of the Texas Panhandle and over Hall County. This storm interacted with the "outflow boundary" left by the departing anticyclonic storm. The southeastward propagating storm rapidly became tornadic near the northwestern corner of Childress. Large hail, damaging RFD winds, and the significant (F2) tornado resulted in nearly $6 million in damages and injured one. A school net weather instrument located at the heavily damaged Childress High School measured a peak wind gust of 109 MPH as the tornado destroyed the school's gymnasium. A second round of isolated severe storms produced large hail over the extreme southeastern Texas Panhandle as clean-up crews worked in the damaged areas.
2006-12-29231°19'N / 96°38'W31°36'N / 96°31'W20.00 Miles400 Yards1201.0M0KLimestone
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey was conducted by a team from the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Fort Worth, and they found that a tornado formed near Kosse. The first sign of damage found by the survey team was uprooted trees along CR 662. The tornado took a north-northeast track and several areas of large uprooted trees were found along CR 660, CR 656, CR 644, FM 1246 and FM 147. Damage to barns, sheds, and roofs was also found in this stretch. Substantial damage was found along CR 635 were a home was struck, resulting in one fatality and several injuries. Portions of the roof were removed and an adjacent barn was heavily damaged. A barn was destroyed along the adjacent road CR 633. The next significant damage was along Highway 164 just west of Groesbeck, where several homes, barns, and trees suffered considerable damage. Numerous livestock were killed along the path. A total of about sixty homes and businesses were damaged in Limestone County, and it has since been designated a disaster area by the Governor. The tornado then continued north into Fort Parker State Park. Lack of damage here indicated that the tornado dissipated nearby. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A rare winter tornado outbreak occurred on December 29 over portions of North Texas, spawning almost two dozen tornadoes. Very high shear and low instability created an environment favorable for tornadoes. A strong surface low pressure system and warm front located in southern North Texas increased the probablitity for low-level rotation. In addition to tornadoes, severe reports of large hail and flash flooding were widespread.
2006-12-29231°46'N / 97°30'W31°52'N / 97°28'W7.00 Miles300 Yards00400K0KBosque
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The National Weather Service in Fort Worth conducted a damage survey and concluded a tornado formed east of Clifton. The tornado took a northeast track and went on to damage trees along CR 3355 just south of FM 708. The tornado also heavily damaged a turkey farm at the intersection of CR 3355 and FM 708. Debris from the turkey farm was scattered over a quarter mile northeast of the farm. The tornado continued northeast and heavily damaged two barns on CR 3440 south of the Womack community. Trees and fences were damaged along CR 3410 and CR 3415 just south and east of Womack. The tornado then crossed FM 219 east of Womack and dissipated near the intersection of FM 219 and Highway 22. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A rare winter tornado outbreak occurred on December 29 over portions of North Texas, spawning almost two dozen tornadoes. Very high shear and low instability created an environment favorable for tornadoes. A strong surface low pressure system and warm front located in southern North Texas increased the probablitity for low-level rotation. In addition to tornadoes, severe reports of large hail and flash flooding were widespread.
2006-12-29232°05'N / 97°24'W32°12'N / 97°20'W8.00 Miles587 Yards00500K0KHill
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The National Weather Service in Fort Worth conducted a damage survey and found that a tornado developed west of FM 933 and south of CR 1145. Tree damage was noted as the tornado crossed FM 933 and FM 67 one mile southeast of Blum. The tornado apparently increased in size and intensity after crossing FM 67. A large grain silo was toppled over on CR 1137, roughly 1.5 miles northeast of Blum. Extensive tree and power pole damage was also noted. The path width was over a quarter of a mile at this time. As the tornado crossed County Roads 1136 and 1133, widespread tree damage was noted, as was structural damage to roofs and windows. The tornado then moved across FM 2488 just south of the Johnson County line, where a well-engineered home lost portions of roof decking and a large barn was destroyed. Portions of the barn's metal skin were carried over a mile to the north-northeast. The tornado then crossed into Johnson County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A rare winter tornado outbreak occurred on December 29 over portions of North Texas, spawning almost two dozen tornadoes. Very high shear and low instability created an environment favorable for tornadoes. A strong surface low pressure system and warm front located in southern North Texas increased the probablitity for low-level rotation. In addition to tornadoes, severe reports of large hail and flash flooding were widespread.
2006-12-29232°10'N / 97°19'W32°22'N / 97°14'W15.00 Miles587 Yards0122.0M0KJohnson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The National Weather Service in Fort Worth conducted a damage survey and found that the tornado which originated in Hill County continued on its destructive northeast path into Johnson County. Damage to sheds and vegetation was noted along County Roads 1205 and 1204. The most significant damage to structures was found near FM 916, CR 1202, and CR 1205, northeast to near Highway 171. Several structures were unroofed while others suffered partial roof loss. Major damage to trees was also noted here. Damage to homes and trees continued along the track near CR 421, CR 423, and CR 415 just north of Highway 4. The tornado then crossed FM 2415. The last observed damage was along the south shore of Lake Alvarado. County officials reported that twenty-two residences were destroyed, twenty were heavily damaged, and twenty more had minor damages. Ten people were taken to local hospitals. Most were for minor injuries, but two suffered more serious injuries and were released from the hospital the next day. The Governor designated Johnson County a disaster area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A rare winter tornado outbreak occurred on December 29 over portions of North Texas, spawning almost two dozen tornadoes. Very high shear and low instability created an environment favorable for tornadoes. A strong surface low pressure system and warm front located in southern North Texas increased the probablitity for low-level rotation. In addition to tornadoes, severe reports of large hail and flash flooding were widespread.
2007-03-23233°43'N / 102°50'W33°44'N / 102°49'W2.00 Miles150 Yards00175K0KCochran
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The Levelland Fire Department reported a second tornado west-northwest of Morton shortly before 22:30 CST. A National Weather Service damage survey found evidence of a strong tornado that developed west of Morton and crossed Texas Highway 114 as it tracked north-northwestward through north-central Cochran county. The tornado impacted the Star Route Gin, which sustained severe damage including the partial collapse of the structure. Concrete anchors were pulled out of the ground and portions of the steel roof beams were heavily damaged. The tornado continued north-northwestward across Farm to Market Road 596 where the tornado destroyed at least three irrigation systems and snapped more than one dozen utility poles. Damage at the Star Route Gin and the snapped utility poles support an EF-2 rating. No injuries were reported and damage estimates totaled $175,000. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An active round of severe thunderstorms, including damaging tornadoes, affected a large portion of the Southern Plains of the U.S. during the afternoon and evening hours of the 23rd. Supercell thunderstorms with a history of producing deadly tornadoes propagated northeastward from the plains of eastern New Mexico into the extreme southwestern Texas Panhandle and the western South Plains of west Texas during the evening hours. As these storms moved eastward across the state line, convective modes transitioned from classic supercells toward mini-bow segments and line-echo-waves. Despite the linear nature of the storms, extreme wind shear resulted in at least five tornadoes across the western South Plains region. Tornadoes were initially observed in the extreme southwestern Texas Panhandle and the northwestern South Plains around 20:00 CST. The hardest hit area was the Bovina vicinity in Parmer County, where a weak tornado struck the city resulting in minor structural damage. Severe storms producing widespread wind damage and at least one strong tornado then impacted portions of Cochran, southern Bailey, and Lamb Counties during the late evening hours. Two cotton gins in Cochran County were severely damaged, and power outages were widespread. No injuries were reported during the severe weather outbreak on the 23rd, but property damage estimates totaled more than $400,000.
2007-03-28234°30'N / 101°03'W34°38'N / 100°55'W12.00 Miles300 Yards00125K0KBriscoe
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Many storm chasers observed a large multiple vortex tornado that developed north of Quitaque shortly after 17:30 CST. The tornado initially touched down immediately north of Texas Highway 256, and tracked northeastward across the Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red River. The tornado cut a twelve mile long path through the mesquite thickets of eastern Briscoe County, however, it continued across northwestern Hall County and into extreme southern Donley County before ending at 17:09 CST. The total path length was nearly twenty miles in length. Despite the rural nature of the area, a few structures sustained significant damage. A trailer house was destroyed about five miles south of the river. The trailer was vacant when the tornado struck, but frequently served to house deer hunters. A single-story residence also was impacted by the tornado near Antelope Flat. The roof was totally blown off of the home. A forty by twenty-four foot barn used to store all-terrain vehicles also was destroyed at the homestead. At least two wind mills were additionally destroyed. The destruction of the trailer house, the complete loss of the roof to the home, and the destruction of the large barn all support an EF2 rating. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A second supercell thunderstorm initiated along the dryline over eastern Hale and western Floyd County. This storm produced large hail and a family of tornadoes as it tracked northeastward. The most significant tornado to impact the South Plains region on the 28th developed as this storm tracked over the Caprock Canyons State Park area north of Quitaque (Briscoe County). This tornado damaged at least three structures as it cut a nearly twenty mile path across eastern Briscoe County, northwestern Hall County, and southern Donley County.
2007-03-28234°38'N / 100°57'W34°43'N / 100°55'W5.00 Miles300 Yards0050K0KHall
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The long-lived tornado that impacted eastern Briscoe County moved through rural areas of northwestern Hall County, just west and northwest of Brice. Although the tornado was large and had a history of causing significant damage, no man-made structures were affected in Hall County. The tornado was roping out when it crossed the Hall and Donley County line west of Texas Highway 70 at 17:05 CST. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A second supercell thunderstorm initiated along the dryline over eastern Hale and western Floyd County. This storm produced large hail and a family of tornadoes as it tracked northeastward. The most significant tornado to impact the South Plains region on the 28th developed as this storm tracked over the Caprock Canyons State Park area north of Quitaque (Briscoe County). This tornado damaged at least three structures as it cut a nearly twenty mile path across eastern Briscoe County, northwestern Hall County, and southern Donley County.
2007-03-28234°55'N / 100°44'W34°59'N / 100°43'W4.00 Miles528 Yards0063K0KDonley
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The initial phase of this tornado was fairly weak with minor damage occurring to a tin roof...fences and small tree limbs. The tornado became progressively stronger...resulting in the total removal of deer blinds and considerable loss of metal roofing to a home and the detached garage. The worst damage occurred near the end of the tornado. Numerous large tree limbs were downed and several tree trunks were snapped at the base. A large barn was completely swept away...with portions of the structure found up to five hundred yards away. Several power poles were snapped and carried over twenty yards. A large hitch trailer was carried away from beside the barn and deposited in a nearby tree. A van was also displaced into a grove of trees near ground level. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-03-28235°07'N / 100°46'W35°10'N / 100°43'W5.00 Miles200 Yards000.2M0KDonley
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado developed in northern Donley County near where Farm to Market Road 291 ends and then traveled northeast to near the Donley County and Gray County line and dissipated at 1924 CST about eleven miles east of Jericho. The tornado developed over ranch land initially causing sporadic damage to trees and fences. The first continuous track of damage encountered was to a newly constructed home...which sustained total roof loss as the roof was lifted...destroyed...and scattered over a mile northward. The house walls were constructed of reinforced concrete and were left intact...suffering only windblown hail damage to their stucco exterior. A few power poles were also snapped in the vicinity of the home. On a ranch to the north of the home...significant damage to hardwood trees was encountered ranging from snapped large branches to snapped trunks. Power poles were also snapped on the property and fencing was destroyed in several locations. The worst damage on this ranch was sustained in an area of dense tree coverage...where treetops were sheared off...intact trees were defoliated and large trunks were snapped. Two hundred yards of barbed wire fencing had been rolled into a ball. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-03-28235°12'N / 100°34'W35°15'N / 100°33'W4.00 Miles200 Yards0074K0KGray
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Major damage associated with this tornado included a Texas Department of Transportation meteorological tower which was bent at a ninety degree angle to the ground one mile southeast of McLean. Approximately five hundred yards to the north northeast of this tower...a metal veterinary clinic had a Texas Department of Transportation Highway sign impact the building and penetrate the metal siding and also lost part of the tin from the roof. One hundred yards to the north and slightly west of the veterinary clinic was a house that suffered extensive roof damage. A small section of the roof was destroyed...indications throughout the house show that the entire roof structure attempted to be lifted from the walls. The West Texas Mesonet station one mile east of McLean at 1935 CST measured a wind gust of one hundred and ten knots. A large barn was also destroyed along with some tree damage occurred just northeast of McLean during the final stages of the tornado. Minor damage was encountered along County Road Y...where metal roofing was lost from a large metal shed. Metal lawn and porch furniture was mangled and relocated...a large satellite dish suffered minor damage to its mesh lining...and a few large branches were snapped from nearby trees. An empty fertilizer bin disappeared. The tornado dissipated north of County Road Y. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the evening hours produced numerous tornadoes and large hail across the southern...central and eastern Texas panhandle. Heavy rains caused flash flooding in the eastern Texas panhandle during the late night and early morning hours. One man was killed by a tornado in the northeastern Texas panhandle and another person was injured.
2007-03-31229°23'N / 96°52'W29°22'N / 96°52'W0475K0KLavaca
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: To the southeast of Hallettsville, and southeast of the first tornado, a second tornado touched down near 0345 CST. This was just off FM530 on Road 16C, near the community of Light Chapel. This tornado touched down just south of a mobile home and began moving toward the northeast. A father, along with two sons and a daughter, had just arrived home less than an hour before the touchdown and had fallen asleep when the storm struck. The father reported feeling a jolt that awakened him as severe thunderstorm winds ahead of the tornado struck the mobile home. He reported that it became quiet again and then the mobile home exploded as the tornado stuck. He and his three children were blown and tossed almost 150 feet, coming to rest on the top of the former south wall of his mobile home. Broken glass was everywhere, but, in spite of cuts and bruises, they took shelter in a small nearby roofless shack as hail continued to fall. He then walked, carrying an injured son and daughter, to a neighbor???s house to call for help. His truck, parked under an awning just south of the mobile home was rolled and crushed. Had he and his children arrived only a few minutes later at their home, they could easily have been killed. That all have recovered except for minor bruises and cuts can only be considered a miracle. The father???s comments were that it???s all okay ??? we???re okay. What was destroyed is just ???stuff.??? Based on the destroyed mobile home, which had been tied down, and the rolled and twisted metal frame, the tornado was rated EF-2 on the Enhanced Fujita Scale. Winds were estimated at 115 mph. The tornado path length was placed at four-tenths of a mile with a path width of 75 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: In the early morning hours of March 31, both supercells and short bow echoes began to form along the north-south aligned cold front after it crossed the IH-35 corridor. Moving into the eastern portion of South Central Texas, these storms produced heavy rainfall, large hail, and two tornadoes.
2007-04-21234°03'N / 102°13'W34°14'N / 102°03'W15.00 Miles1230 Yards01810K50KLamb
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The development of this significant tornado was witnessed by storm chasers between Fieldton and Otlon at 17:57 CST. A National Weather Service damage survey team noted that the first damages to occur as a result of the tornado included five medium voltage power poles downed just east of the intersection of Farm to Market Road 168 and County Road 162. Just east of this location, the tops of five power poles were blown off to the north and two center pivot irrigation systems were overturned. One irrigation system was blown toward the west and another toward the northeast. Farther to the northeast along the tornado's path, along County Road 152 just east of Farm to Market Road 168, two power poles were sheared off above the ground. At this location, a historic multi-story house that was originally constructed in 1913 suffered severe roof damage. A portion of the roof was blown off of the structure toward the southeast. The owners of the home were within days of completing a two year-long renovation. In addition, the skirting was removed from a mobile home across the street from the historic home. Several outbuildings near the residence also sustained minor damage. The tornado continued northeastward and destroyed several more center pivot irrigation systems and snapped utility poles three to five feet above the ground along County Road 321. The tornado's damage path was measured at seven-tenths of a mile wide in this area. As the tornadic circulation crossed U.S. Highway 70 two miles east of Olton, four homes were heavily damaged. Two well-built brick structures suffered total roof losses. The resident of one home, and elderly woman, suffered minor injuries while seeking shelter under a kitchen table. A number of light-weight medal structures were destroyed, along with three vehicles and several pieces of farm equipment. One family pet, a dog, was killed at one of the residences. The tornado killed an unknown number of live-stock as it continued northeast of U.S. Highway 70. The damaging tornado crossed the Lamb and Hale County line at 18:10 CST. The damages sustained by two of the well-built single-family residences, light-weight medal structures, and numerous utility poles support an EF-2 rating. Winds were estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
2007-04-21234°13'N / 102°05'W34°19'N / 102°02'W5.00 Miles1230 Yards00200K0KHale
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The large tornado tracked across northwestern Hale County between 18:10 and 18:18 CST. Local newspaper reports indicate that the most notable damage along the tornado's path in northwestern Hale County occurred to numerous center pivot irrigation systems. At least ten irrigation systems were reportedly destroyed in fields west and northwest of Halfway. Damage caused by the tornado east of Olton (Lamb County) supported an EF-2 rating with winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
2007-04-21235°47'N / 102°07'W36°03'N / 102°00'W20.00 Miles1320 Yards0141.3M0KMoore
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado formed ten miles west southwest of Dumas at 1816 CST and tracked northeast for about twenty miles before exiting Moore county one half of a mile north of Cactus at 1840 CST. The tornado continued in Sherman county for about another four miles...before dissipating at 1852 CST. In Moore county...evidence suggested that the tornado was about three quarters of a mile wide as it passed through the town of Cactus. The most significant damage occurred across the northwest half of Cactus...but most homes and businesses received some damage as a result of this tornado. It is estimated that at least ten mobile homes were demolished and many more left uninhabitable. Fourteen people were injured in Cactus...however there were no fatalities. On April 25...Governor Rick Perry declared a State of Emergency in two proclamations for Moore county as a result of the Cactus tornado. The Governor also requested President Bush to declare a Presidential Disaster Declaration for the county. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Numerous severe thunderstorms producing large hail...damaging winds...and tornadoes moved north and northeast across the western and central Texas panhandle during the evening hours. The only injuries occurred in Cactus from a tornado...however no fatalities were reported.
2007-04-21234°19'N / 102°05'W34°25'N / 102°00'W8.00 Miles1230 Yards00200K0KCastro
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The large tornado caused damage to center pivot irrigation systems and utility lines as it tracked over southeastern Castro County between 18:18 and 18:33 CST. Local newspapers reported that numerous irrigation systems were destroyed, and utility poles were downed along Texas Highway 194 and Farm to Market Road 145 southeast and east of Hart. Damage caused by the tornado east of Olton (Lamb County) supported an EF-2 rating with winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
2007-04-21234°27'N / 101°59'W34°27'N / 101°58'W1.00 Mile1230 Yards0030K0KSwisher
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The tornado was in the final stages of its life cycle as it crossed into extreme southwestern Swisher County at 18:33 CST. Storm chasers documented an extended rope-out phase before the tornado finally dissipated over cotton fields in southwestern Swisher County at 18:36 CST. Reports in local newspapers indicated that at least one center pivot irrigation system was heavily damaged west of Kress. Damage caused by the tornado east of Olton (Lamb County) supported an EF-2 rating with winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
2007-04-21235°40'N / 101°55'W35°51'N / 101°52'W12.00 Miles704 Yards008K0KMoore
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado developed approximately one to two miles south of Farm to Market Road 1913 about three miles east of Four Way...and likely dissipated near State Highway 152 five miles east of Dumas. Visible damage was limited to five single power poles snapped...fence downed...and large round hay bales were tossed around. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Numerous severe thunderstorms producing large hail...damaging winds...and tornadoes moved north and northeast across the western and central Texas panhandle during the evening hours. The only injuries occurred in Cactus from a tornado...however no fatalities were reported.
2007-04-21234°31'N / 101°46'W34°34'N / 101°47'W3.00 Miles200 Yards032.0M0KSwisher
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A strong tornado delivered a crippling impact on the local economy of Tulia, Texas, when it devastated industrial and residential sections of the small community of 5,000 residents around 19:00 CST on the 21st. A two block wide swath of damage paralleled U.S. Highway 87 in west Tulia for fifteen blocks. Three persons were treated at area hospitals for injuries, almost thirty homes sustained damage or were destroyed along with twenty businesses, and approximately five hundred people were displaced or made homeless. Local officials and newspaper accounts indicated that several of the businesses that were heavily damaged during the tornado served as staples to the Tulia economy prior to the storm. U.S. President George W. Bush declared Swisher County a federal disaster area on May 1, 2007. This destructive tornado developed near a power plant at the intersection of Broadway Street and U.S. Highway 87 in west Tulia at 18:57 CST. The tornado moved north and caused extensive damage to a local supermarket at the intersection of U.S. Highway 87 and Sixth Street. A large portion of the roof was removed on the east side of the structure, and one exterior wall collapsed inward. Smaller sections of two additional exterior walls additionally collapsed. A local auto dealership, located near the supermarket, also sustained a large amount of structural and inventory damage. Forty-one vehicles were damaged by flying debris, and a motor home on the property was overturned. A large overhead door on the east side of the structure's show room failed, resulting in the failure of the west wall. A large storage container was blown into the southwest corner of the building and caused the partial collapse of the roof. Several large metal industrial-style buildings sustained major damage due to the failure of large overhead doors and buckling of roof purlins on the south side of the buildings. One such structure collapsed onto a collection of classic cars, and resulted in a $250,000 loss. Two storm chasers escaped injuries when they were struck by the tornado along the industrial stretch of U.S. Highway 87. Their vehicle was blown into a brick building, and then a tractor-trailer was blown broadside against the chase vehicle. Damage also was observed to the north and northeast of the industrial area, with severe damage in residential areas including a mobile home community between Eighth and Ninth Streets just west of Highland Elementary School. Five mobile homes were damaged, with two others completely destroyed. The most significant residential damage occurred in a subdivision along Northwest Ninth Street through Northwest Eleventh Street. Across this area, a number of homes suffered roof losses. Roofs were totally removed from at least two single-family homes on Tenth Street near Airport Road, with partial exterior wall collapses also noted. The tornado dissipated near the Tulia Municipal Airport at 19:01 CST. Meteorologists from the National Weather Service in Lubbock, Texas, Texas Tech University, and engineers from numerous private and governmental agencies surveyed the Tulia damage. All indications suggest that the maximum winds with the Tulia tornado were between 125 and 135 mph. This makes the Tulia tornado an EF-2 tornado on the Enhanced Fujita scale for tornado intensity. The total economic loss is estimated at $2.0 million. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
2007-04-21235°10'N / 101°07'W35°21'N / 101°12'W12.00 Miles440 Yards0072K0KCarson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado formed nine miles east northeast of Claude at 2035 CST and entered Carson county at 2037 CST one and a half miles southwest of Groom. The tornado tracked north and traveled about another ten miles before dissipating at 2110 CST ten miles east of Panhandle. In Carson county...the tornado plowed through a storage area for tractors and other farm equipment. Tractors...turbines...vehicles...cotton presser box cars similar to railroad cars were moved and thrown about in the tornado for considerable distances. Power poles were also damaged. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Numerous severe thunderstorms producing large hail...damaging winds...and tornadoes moved north and northeast across the western and central Texas panhandle during the evening hours. The only injuries occurred in Cactus from a tornado...however no fatalities were reported.
2007-05-23236°10'N / 100°31'W36°13'N / 100°29'W7.00 Miles440 Yards0023K0KLipscomb
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado developed just north of County Road Z and just east of State Highway 23 or about nineteen miles south of Booker at 2140 CST. The tornado traveled north northeast causing damage to trees...power poles...barns...and full oil drums. The tornado was confirmed by photographs. The tornado dissipated about twelve miles west of Lipscomb or north of Farm to Market Road 3260 and east of State Highway 23. No injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the afternoon and evening hours produced numerous tornadoes...large hail...prolonged flooding and flash flooding...and damaging winds across the central and northeastern Texas Panhandle. No injuries were reported.
2007-05-23236°18'N / 100°19'W36°23'N / 100°16'W8.00 Miles528 Yards0036K0KLipscomb
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado developed over open country about eight miles south of Darrouzett and traveled northeast and then north for about eight miles. The tornado crossed Uncle Sam Road just west of State Highway 305 and then near the intersection of County Road J and U.S. Highway 305. Severe damage was reported to recently built barns of which the contents were vacated and relocated downstream...damage to many power poles...trees...outbuildings...and a four thousand pound combine...which was lifted over a fence. No injuries were reported. The tornado dissipated at 2226 CST about four miles southeast of Darrouzett just south of where County Road 17 ends...or just southeast of the intersection of State Highway 305 and State Highway 15. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms during the afternoon and evening hours produced numerous tornadoes...large hail...prolonged flooding and flash flooding...and damaging winds across the central and northeastern Texas Panhandle. No injuries were reported.
2007-07-21229°26'N / 97°58'W29°28'N / 97°58'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0050K0KGuadalupe
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: At approximately 4:25 am CST a tornado estimated to be an EF-2 touched down about 9 miles south of Seguin and 1/4 mile southeast of CR411. The tornado moved northward along SH123 for nearly 1 mile before turning slightly to the north northwest and crossing CR410. It damaged three outbuildings, a residence and a store, but no one was injured. The tornado ranged in width from 50 yards up to 150 yards. The total track length was approximately 2 miles. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Thunderstorms associated with a persistent upper level low produced heavy rain and flash flooding through the morning on July 21.
2007-09-05231°50'N / 96°26'W31°55'N / 96°25'W6.00 Miles80 Yards0040K0KNavarro
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado formed roughly two miles east-southeast of the first tornado. Damage was first noted along CR 2410 just north of the Freestone County line. Trees were uprooted and trunks and large limbs snapped as the tornado moved northeast. A barn was destroyed roughly one mile west of Interstate 45, and two metal transmission line towers were damaged 1/2 miles west of the interstate. The tornado dissipated shortly after crossing Interstate 45. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level low lingered in the area creating conditions ripe for flooding. Several instances of flash flooding were reported as a large area of rain persisted through mid-morning.
2008-04-10233°25'N / 94°14'W33°29'N / 94°11'W6.00 Miles200 Yards011.0M0KBowie
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Most of the tornado damage was north of interstate 30 with some structures showing EF2 damage. In particular, the cinderblock and brick lawnmower business just north of Hwy 82 was completely destroyed with roofing debris and lawnmower parts thrown to the west and north of the building location. A brick home several hundred yards from the lawnmower business sustained significant damage to its roof and exterior walls. A metal shop building built with large metal I-beams was completely destroyed. I-beams were twisted and thrown in a northerly and westerly direction up to 200 yards from the building location with concrete still attached. The trees between the large metal building and the interstate were uprooted or snapped in a convergent pattern...indicative of tornadic winds. In total...12 structures were damaged or destroyed between Hwy 82 and the interstate and numerous trees were downed. Three tractor trailers were flipped on interstate 30 which resulted in the interstate being shut down and there was one injury. Further south of Hwy 82 on the Lonestar Army Ammunition Depot, numerous trees were snapped or uprooted and damage to parts of the Depot were reported...although it was not surveyed. North of interstate 30 along the service road...an outbuilding sales business lost several buildings and had many others damaged. Along Farm to Market 2253, numerous trees were snapped and uprooted on either side of the road and several sheds and barns were damaged or destroyed. A greenhouse was severely damaged near the end of the track. Some homes were also damaged from fallen trees. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong pressure gradient initially across northeast Texas and northwest Louisiana during the pre dawn hours of April 10th produced non-thunderstorm wind gusts responsible for downing trees and power lines. Later that morning...a squall line entered northeast Texas and southeast Oklahoma producing mostly wind damage along with some large hail and an isolated tornado in Bowie County Texas.
2008-04-23232°33'N / 97°24'W32°33'N / 97°24'W001.0M0KTarrant
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Fort Worth found that a tornado touched down in the town of Crowley near Sharondale Drive and Morfield Drive. Damage was mostly confined to these two streets where two houses lost significant portions of their roofs and received damage to external walls. Two houses had portions of roof decking removed and several metal storage buildings were damaged. Several additional homes suffered minor roof damage and nearby trees had large limbs broken off. This tornado was rated an EF-2 with maximum sustained winds of 110-115 MPH. EPISODE NARRATIVE: North Texas was impacted with a linear mesoscale convective system as well as discrete supercell thunderstorms during the afternoon and evening hours. An EF-2 tornado destroyed several homes in the town of Crowley and several other brief tornadoes were reported as well. Other severe reports included large hail and damaging winds.
2008-12-08233°42'N / 96°36'W33°43'N / 96°33'W4.00 Miles125 Yards03750K0KGrayson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: According to a damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Fort Worth, a lower EF-2 tornado affected areas of south and southwest Denison. Trees and power lines were downed. Dozens of homes, storage shelters, and businesses were damaged. About 500 homes in the area were without power. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A dry line moved across north Texas as an upper level trough moved through the Desert Southwest. A line of thunderstorms developed and became severe as the night wore on. Two tornadoes and several downbursts caused significant damage across Grayson County. Strong winds followed behind a cold front and caused damage to power lines.
2009-04-09233°03'N / 94°29'W33°03'N / 94°12'W17.00 Miles190 Yards00750K0KCass
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This storm developed about 5 miles northwest of Linden in central Cass County near CR 1459 around 8:05 pm. Numerous trees were downed, with a tree crushing a truck, and another tree falling through the roof of a house. This tornado intensified along CR 1399, where a two-story home was nearly destroyed. The storm continued east across Highway 8 about 2 miles north of Linden, where the roof of a two story house was torn off, and a portable building behind the home was blown nearly 400 yards east across Highway 8 into some nearby woods. The tornado lifted around 8:31 pm near the intersection of CR 2328 and Highway 43 about a mile and a half north of Bivins. This tornado was rated an EF2, with winds around 125 mph. The path length was nearly 16 miles long, with a path width of 190 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong upper level storm system along with a surface dry line/front over northeast Texas moved east during the evening hours of April 9th into the early morning hours of April 10th causing long lived supercell thunderstorms. These thunderstorms caused long track tornadoes to occur across southeast Oklahoma, southwest Arkansas, northeast Texas, and north Louisiana.
2009-04-16232°18'N / 101°34'W32°25'N / 101°27'W11.00 Miles450 Yards0083K0KHoward
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: At 1953 CST, a trained weather spotter reported a tornado about 5 miles northwest of Big Spring. The NWS Storm Survey confirmed two snapped power poles, minor tree damage and an empty oil pump storage tank knocked over near this location. The tornado then tracked north northeastward and bent an 80 foot aluminum radio tower in half towards the east and snapped two additional power poles due to damaging northerly winds on its northwest flank; this occurred sometime around 2000 CST. At 2005 CST, another trained spotter reported a tornado near the town of Fairview, TX. The damage survey concluded this was a valid report, as the tornado began to turn right snapping multiple power poles and damaging a 12???X10??? storage shed anchored 2-3 feet in the ground along the way. The storage shed was tossed east northeast approximately 30 yards, indicating the tornado passed north of the residence. As the tornado continued eastward just north of Farm to Market Road 2230 east of Fairview, a significant line of power pole damage (2 miles) was observed. There were a total of 28 poles snapped towards the south around 2015 CST. Twenty of these were distribution poles and 8 of these were larger transmission poles. The tornado then possibly weakened and turned left to the northeast. On its way, it damaged another storage shed and a home's north side windows approximately 4 miles northeast of Fairview. The last approximated time for tornadic wind damage was around 2030 CST. The path recorded for this event is not the exact path the tornado actually took. Please see attached image. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A mid to upper level closed low was located over southwest Utah the day of the event. Near the surface, a quasi dryline was located from a line near the mountains of west Texas to the eastern NM/TX border. Dewpoints in the low to mid 50 F range resulted in moderate surface based instability east of the dryline during the early evening hours. The upper dynamics combined with the surface convergence along the dryline led to the development of severe weather as the deep layer shear increased with the approach of the aforementioned feature. There was also a brief window for tornadic storms as low level profiles became increasingly backed east of the dryline as height falls increased ahead of the upper trough just west of the region. A tornado watch was issued from 1642-2400 local.
2009-04-29230°26'N / 102°03'W30°26'N / 102°03'W005K0KTerrell
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Although a tornado was never reported during the time of issuance, later public reports and a NWS Storm Survey indicated in fact there was a tornado. Based on radar estimates, tornadic damage began sometime around 4 PM CST about 28 miles north of Dryden, TX. This is where a 30 gallon fiberglass tank was destroyed, in addition to another chemical tank. Pieces of the fiberglass tank were found downwind. A set of metal stairs that appeared to have been welded to the tank were also found downwind and were no longer attached to the tank. As the tornado tracked southeastward, its debris field of rocks, gravel and tree limbs stripped the paint off of a recently painted 300 gallon storage tank. The tornado continued on its path and weakened after stripping some cedar trees sometime around 404 PM CST. Please see the attached images for damage photos and a detailed image of the tornado's damage path. EPISODE NARRATIVE: During the afternoon of April 29, 2009, a surface low developed near Raton Mesa with a dryline extending from the eastern NM/TX border to the Davis Mountains of west Texas. Strong daytime heating resulted in mixed layer CAPE values near 3000 j/kg. As a strong southern stream mid-level jet max approached, favored kinematic profiles lead to the rapid development of supercells across southwest Texas. Although coverage remained fairly isolated due to weak upper level support, upslope/backed flow did result in at least one tornado being observed.
2009-05-15235°33'N / 100°54'W35°30'N / 100°53'W3.00 Miles880 Yards0150K0KGray
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An official National Weather Service storm damage survey team determined that a multiple vortex tornado touched down four miles east northeast of Pampa at 1609 CST. This tornado then moved southeast to five miles east southeast of Pampa where it lifted at 1617 CST. At least one home sustained significant damage from the tornado. In addition...at least four other homes sustained significant damage from downburst winds in close proximity to the tornado...one to three miles east of Pampa along and near U.S. Highway 60. Several other structures and vehicles were also damaged...including a semi truck and a motor home. One injury occurred to the semi truck driver. Trees and power poles also sustained considerable damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms producing five tornadoes...large hail and damaging winds moved across the eastern sections of the Texas Panhandle during the late afternoon and evening hours. One person was injured by a tornado...although no fatalities occurred. Numerous homes and windshields were damaged by the hail while the high winds knocked over eighteen wheelers...power poles and trees. The high winds also caused numerous power outages.
2009-06-13233°12'N / 99°57'W33°10'N / 99°54'W4.00 Miles440 Yards001.0M0KHaskell
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A National Weather Service survey team found a quarter mile wide EF2 tornado that tore the roof off of four homes and desroyed several outbuildings, irrigation sprinklers, and power poles. EPISODE NARRATIVE: On June 13, thunderstorms developed along an outflow boundary across Northwest Texas. A supercell thunderstorm moved southeast across Haskell County and produced a strong tornado. There was significant damage near Rule. Also, large hail and widespread 60 to 70 mph winds were reported with this severe storm.
2009-12-23231°55'N / 94°22'W31°58'N / 94°21'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0KShelby
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Several homes and metal outbuildings were damaged closer to the Timpson, Texas area. A travel trailer and barn was completely destroyed. Numerous trees snapped along the path as well. This tornado continued into southern Panola County, Texas. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong upper level storm system moved its way out of the southern Great Basin and into the Southern Plains during the afternoon hours of December 23rd. Strong southerly flow was found ahead of this storm system with dewpoint temperatures in the lower to middle 60s noted northward to the Interstate 20 corridor of northeast Texas and northern Louisiana. Impressive deep layer shear was noted in the warm sector across the region which was conducive for discrete storm cells during the afternoon and evening across northeast Texas. These storms spawned tornadoes and produced large hail across portions of northeast Texas. The storm system moved eastward during the predawn hours of December 24th with again, numerous storms producing tornadoes across southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana. In addition to all the storm damage...these storms were prolific rain makers with numerous reports of flash flooding across the region as well.
2009-12-23231°58'N / 94°21'W32°03'N / 94°18'W7.00 Miles200 Yards000K0KPanola
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado was a continuation from northern Shelby, County, near Timpson, Texas. This tornado continued into southern Panola, County where it downed and snapped numerous trees. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong upper level storm system moved its way out of the southern Great Basin and into the Southern Plains during the afternoon hours of December 23rd. Strong southerly flow was found ahead of this storm system with dewpoint temperatures in the lower to middle 60s noted northward to the Interstate 20 corridor of northeast Texas and northern Louisiana. Impressive deep layer shear was noted in the warm sector across the region which was conducive for discrete storm cells during the afternoon and evening across northeast Texas. These storms spawned tornadoes and produced large hail across portions of northeast Texas. The storm system moved eastward during the predawn hours of December 24th with again, numerous storms producing tornadoes across southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana. In addition to all the storm damage...these storms were prolific rain makers with numerous reports of flash flooding across the region as well.
2009-12-23232°29'N / 94°41'W32°34'N / 94°37'W7.00 Miles200 Yards001.0M0KHarrison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF2 tornado touched down on the East side of Longview, just west of the intersections of E Cotton Street. and Industrial Drive. The tornado then tracked north northeast causing damage to several industrial buildings along Industrial Drive, it crossed Industrial Drive just south of Hwy. 80 causing significant damage to the Fed Ex building and other surrounding industrial businesses. The tornado then crossed Hwy. 80, causing significant tree and roof damage to several homes in a residential neighborhood. The track continued north northeast as the tornado crossed Loop 281 just south of Page Road. The tornado caused major roof damage to a home on Page Road before continuing northward. The storm continued to cause tree and roof damage in a residential area before crossing Peter Bonner Road near Sandy Lane. More tree and roof damage was observed as the storm tracked into a rural area, ending south of FM 449 on Keasler Road around 4:56 PM. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong upper level storm system moved its way out of the southern Great Basin and into the Southern Plains during the afternoon hours of December 23rd. Strong southerly flow was found ahead of this storm system with dewpoint temperatures in the lower to middle 60s noted northward to the Interstate 20 corridor of northeast Texas and northern Louisiana. Impressive deep layer shear was noted in the warm sector across the region which was conducive for discrete storm cells during the afternoon and evening across northeast Texas. These storms spawned tornadoes and produced large hail across portions of northeast Texas. The storm system moved eastward during the predawn hours of December 24th with again, numerous storms producing tornadoes across southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana. In addition to all the storm damage...these storms were prolific rain makers with numerous reports of flash flooding across the region as well.
2010-01-20232°03'N / 95°41'W32°04'N / 95°40'W1.00 Mile200 Yards0030K0KHenderson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A NWS Storm Survey concluded a tornado touched down about 3 miles south of the town of Larue and tracked northeast for about a mile. A total of seven homes were damaged, and the exterior walls collapsed on some structures. The Larue Church of Christ suffered extensive damage. This tornado was rated an EF-2 with estimated maximum winds around 130 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe storms developed in an area of strong low-level lift ahead of an approaching upper level low pressure system and a slowly advancing cold front. Severe weather reports were limited to east of Interstate 35, and five tornadoes were confirmed in Henderson, Van Zandt, and Hopkins counties. Two tornadoes were rated EF-2s, one was rated an EF-1, and the remaining two were EF-0s. The Van Zandt County tornado was a long track tornado that traveled over 15 miles.
2010-01-20232°34'N / 95°52'W32°39'N / 95°37'W15.00 Miles100 Yards001.0M0KVan Zandt
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A NWS survey team found evidence of a long track tornado in Van Zandt County. The tornado touched down near CR 859 north of Highway 64 on the northwest side of Canton and traveled approximately 15 miles in a northeast direction. Numerous structures were damaged along the track of the tornado which ended near the Silver Lake community in the extreme Northeast corner of the county. Along the damage path, a single family home lost its entire roof and part of its exterior walls. A number of large trees were uprooted and several sheds and outbuildings suffered extensive damage. A small church was destroyed in the community of Starr. A total of 150 homes suffered damage, but only one injury was reported. Based on the damage, the tornado was rated an EF-2 with peak winds in the 110 to 120 mph range. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe storms developed in an area of strong low-level lift ahead of an approaching upper level low pressure system and a slowly advancing cold front. Severe weather reports were limited to east of Interstate 35, and five tornadoes were confirmed in Henderson, Van Zandt, and Hopkins counties. Two tornadoes were rated EF-2s, one was rated an EF-1, and the remaining two were EF-0s. The Van Zandt County tornado was a long track tornado that traveled over 15 miles.
2010-04-22234°09'N / 100°39'W34°10'N / 100°31'W8.00 Miles1300 Yards00100K0KMotley
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Multiple storm chasers observed a large and rain-wrapped tornado that moved east-northeastward across the Motley and Cottle County line south-southeast of Northfield and southwest of Cee Vee during the 18:00 CST hour on the 22nd. Doppler radar, along with post-storm ground and aerial surveys, suggest that the tornado developed at approximately 18:20 CST 9 miles south-southwest of Northfield, just east of Farm to Market Road 94. Storm chasers first obtained a visual confirmation of the tornado at 18:37 CST as it partially emerged from obscuring rain curtains. Photographs show a very large wedge-shaped tornado, with only the southern portion of the vortex visible through the wrapping precipitation. The tornado's track across northeastern Motley County remained over uninhabited ranch land. A National Weather Service cooperative observer, however, reported a loud roar as the tornado passed south of her home south of Northfield. Surveys of adjacent ranch land, conducted by private land owners as well as National Weather Service and Texas Tech University West Texas Mesonet meteorologists, revealed that the tornado destroyed four windmills, severely damaged mesquite trees, and snapped at least a half dozen wooden utility poles. The damage path was measured to be three-quarters of a mile wide. The tornado again became totally obscured by rain and hail within the parent high precipitation supercell storm before it crossed the Motley and Cottle County line approximately 8.25 miles south-southeast of Northfield at 18:42 CST. It likely dissipated just a few minutes later at approximately 18:45 CST southwest of Cee Vee in northwestern Motley County. The total path length of the tornado across portions of Motley and Cottle Counties was approximately 9 miles, with a 25-minute duration. Enhanced-Fujita Scale damage indicators for both free-standing metal towers and metal electrical transmission line poles were considered to gauge expected wind speeds for the destroyed windmills. The lower bounds for degrees of damage 2 and 5 respectively were accepted, yielding estimated wind speeds between 110 and 115 mph. Winds of at least this magnitude are additionally supported by the expected value for snapped wooden utility poles, which were additionally observed along the damage path. Therefore an EF-2 rating was assigned for this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Scattered thunderstorms developed over the central and eastern South Plains region of west Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 22nd. These storms resulted in significant severe weather, including strong tornadoes, as they impacted portions of the extreme southeastern Panhandle and the Rolling Plains. The severe weather over the South Plains of west Texas on the 22nd was part of a larger tornado outbreak that impacted areas from west Texas northward through western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Thunderstorms initiated over the central South Plains along and east of a dryline late in the day. These storms, some exhibiting supercell characteristics, initially became severe and produced large hail and damaging winds before 18:00 CST. By 18:20 CST, the first of three tornadoes, two of which were long-lived and significant, developed over northeastern Motley County. The parent supercell thunderstorm produced two damaging and rain-wrapped tornadoes over portions of Motley and Cottle Counties. The initial tornado south of Northfield crossed the Motley and Cottle County line southwest of Cee Vee. This three-quarter mile wide EF-2 tornado destroyed windmills and utility poles as it tracked through rural ranchlands. The second tornado heavily damaged or destroyed three farmsteads south and southeast of Cee Vee (Cottle County). Winds were estimated at approximately 140 mph where one home was destroyed east of that community. No injuries were reported. A second supercell thunderstorm developed south of the initial tornadic storm, and became tornadic near Swearingen (Cottle County) shortly after 21:00 CST. In addition to tornadoes, numerous reports of large hail up to the size of baseballs were received. Another Cottle County home was heavily damaged by thunderstorm winds just north of Paducah as convection organized into a linear complex late in the evening. Also, training thunderstorms repeatedly moved over the Tahoka area in Lynn County. This resulted in areas of flooding and portions of two U.S. Highways were rendered impassable. In all, property damages were estimated at $530,000. No injuries were reported.
2010-04-22234°10'N / 100°31'W34°11'N / 100°30'W2.00 Miles1300 Yards000K0KCottle
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Multiple storm chasers observed a large and rain-wrapped tornado that moved east-northeastward across the Motley and Cottle County line south-southeast of Northfield and southwest of Cee Vee during the 18:00 CST hour on the 22nd. Doppler radar, along with post-storm ground and aerial surveys, suggest that the tornado developed at approximately 18:20 CST south-southwest of Northfield in Motley County. Storm chasers first obtained a visual confirmation of the tornado at 18:37 CST as it partially emerged from obscuring rain curtains, while still in rural areas of northeastern Motley County. Photographs from that time show a very large wedge-shaped tornado. The tornado's maximum intensity, per post storm surveys by private land owners and meteorologists from the National Weather Service and Texas Tech University West Texas Mesonet, occurred in northeastern Motley County where four windmills were destroyed, mesquite trees were severely damaged, and where a number of wooden utility poles were snapped. The damage path was measured to be three-quarters of a mile wide near the Motley and Cottle County line. The tornado again became totally obscured by rain and hail within the parent high precipitation supercell storm before it crossed the Motley and Cottle County line approximately 4.8 miles west-southwest of Cee Vee at 18:42 CST. Doppler radar velocity data shows subtle evidence that a mesocyclone occlusion may have occurred, and that the tornado likely dissipated just a few minutes later at approximately 18:45 CST 3.5 miles southwest of Cee Vee. A second tornado, however, quickly developed in a cyclic fashion just southeast of the initial tornado as a new mesocyclone became dominant. The total path length of the tornado across portions of Motley and Cottle Counties was approximately 9 miles, with a 25-minute duration. Enhanced-Fujita Scale damage indicators for both free-standing metal towers and metal electrical transmission line poles were considered to gauge expected wind speeds for the destroyed windmills observed in northeastern Motley County. The lower bounds for degrees of damage 2 and 5 respectively were accepted, yielding estimated wind speeds between 110 and 115 mph. Winds of at least this magnitude are additionally supported by the expected value for snapped wooden utility poles, which were additionally observed along the damage path. Therefore an EF-2 rating was assigned for this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Scattered thunderstorms developed over the central and eastern South Plains region of west Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 22nd. These storms resulted in significant severe weather, including strong tornadoes, as they impacted portions of the extreme southeastern Panhandle and the Rolling Plains. The severe weather over the South Plains of west Texas on the 22nd was part of a larger tornado outbreak that impacted areas from west Texas northward through western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Thunderstorms initiated over the central South Plains along and east of a dryline late in the day. These storms, some exhibiting supercell characteristics, initially became severe and produced large hail and damaging winds before 18:00 CST. By 18:20 CST, the first of three tornadoes, two of which were long-lived and significant, developed over northeastern Motley County. The parent supercell thunderstorm produced two damaging and rain-wrapped tornadoes over portions of Motley and Cottle Counties. The initial tornado south of Northfield crossed the Motley and Cottle County line southwest of Cee Vee. This three-quarter mile wide EF-2 tornado destroyed windmills and utility poles as it tracked through rural ranchlands. The second tornado heavily damaged or destroyed three farmsteads south and southeast of Cee Vee (Cottle County). Winds were estimated at approximately 140 mph where one home was destroyed east of that community. No injuries were reported. A second supercell thunderstorm developed south of the initial tornadic storm, and became tornadic near Swearingen (Cottle County) shortly after 21:00 CST. In addition to tornadoes, numerous reports of large hail up to the size of baseballs were received. Another Cottle County home was heavily damaged by thunderstorm winds just north of Paducah as convection organized into a linear complex late in the evening. Also, training thunderstorms repeatedly moved over the Tahoka area in Lynn County. This resulted in areas of flooding and portions of two U.S. Highways were rendered impassable. In all, property damages were estimated at $530,000. No injuries were reported.
2010-05-18235°54'N / 101°28'W35°58'N / 101°29'W5.00 Miles300 Yards0040K0KHutchinson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down three miles south southwest of Pringle or six miles northwest of Stinnett at 1844 CST. The tornado was on the ground for about five miles with a maximum path width of three hundred yards. The tornado moved to the north dissipating at 1900 CST three miles northwest of Pringle. The National Weather Service survey team found significant damage to a farm located on County Road J between County Road 8 and County Road 9. A large portion of the roof was removed from the residence with considerable damage to several small sheds in the vicinity. Numerous trees were stripped with many broken large branches. A pickup truck behind the residence was flipped upside down with the cab smashed. Several power poles were snapped along County Road J just to the east of the residence with additional damage sustained to a few irrigation pivots. A storage bin and large fuel tank were found up to fifty yards to the east northeast of their original locations. One resident was home at the time but no injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms producing many tornadoes along with large hail and strong thunderstorm wind gusts tracked across much of the Texas Panhandle from the early evening hours into the early morning hours. No injuries were reported...however a few of the tornadoes caused some damage.
2010-05-23231°00'N / 103°25'W30°58'N / 103°23'W4.00 Miles300 Yards0024K0KReeves
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A spotter report from a NWS employee and a damage survey both determined that at approximately 1756 CST, a tornado developed about 11 miles southeast of Verhalen, TX. It then moved southeastward damaging a total of 12 powers poles. All but two of these poles were broken into 3 or 4 pieces each. The broken poles were indicative of EF-2 type damage. At 1802 CST, a Pecos County Sherriff???s Deputy took a photo of the tornado near the Pecos and Reeves County line. Finally, at 1806 CST the NWS employee captured the tornado in its dissipating stage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: With persistent low level southeast flow in place across the area and a surface dryline in place from southeast New Mexico across portions of southwest Texas, isolated supercell thunderstorms developed across southern Reeves County and northwest Pecos County. For the second straight evening, these thunderstorms produced tornadoes across the area.
2010-06-02228°03'N / 97°07'W28°00'N / 97°06'W4.00 Miles500 Yards00250K0KAransas
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An NWS survey team concluded a tornado touched down 4 miles west of Rockport. The tornado was on the ground for roughly 3.75 miles, traveling southeast and ending near Bypass 35 and 16th streets. The maximum wind speed was estimated at 120 mph, an EF-2, and had a maximum width of almost 3/10 of a mile. Several homes were damaged, an RV flipped, and 4 boats damaged. A home weather station recorded a peak wind gust to 103 mph before failing. Over 20 large tension poles were snapped completely off along Hwy 1069. Hundreds of trees and tree limbs were snapped. Vehicles at a salvage yard were moved several yards, and a garage was completely destroyed. An 18 wheeler was flipped over along Bypass 35. EPISODE NARRATIVE: During the late afternoon on June 2, 2010, thunderstorms developed over central Texas and the Sierra Madre of Mexico. A very unstable air mass was present over South Texas (CAPE values from 4500 to 5500 J/kg). At 7 pm CDT, the first line of thunderstorms entered the Rio Grande Valley and produced hail up to the size of nickels, localized flooding and strong winds. The second line of thunderstorms extended across much of Central Texas and began accelerating and tracking southward from Tilden to Goliad by late in the evening. The two lines of thunderstorms merged around Tilden and Choke Canyon Reservoir near 1000 pm CDT causing intensification to the convective complex of storms. This was evident by severe storms over Live Oak and Bee counties with increased reflectivity and cloud to ground lightning between 1030 and 1100 pm CDT. At the same time, the northern line of thunderstorms continued through the Victoria Crossroads area and slowly weakened. The strongest portion of the solid line of thunderstorms continued southeastward into the central Coastal Bend. Reports of trees down and power outages increased from along I-37 to Corpus Christi from the most intense portion of the line of thunderstorms. WSR-88D detected small areas of rotation over Aransas, San Patricio and Nueces Counties between 1100 and midnight CDT when tornado warnings were issued. Wind gusts of 60 mph were common from automated weather stations as the storms slammed the lower Coastal Bend. Power outages from the wind were significant by midnight and there were many reports of trees and power lines down, and rescue operations for recreational trailers that were tipped over on the base of Navy Corpus Christi and a flipped 18-wheeler. In this area, automated sensors measured wind as high as 80 mph. The lightning was intense and continuous at times, which caused additional damage to a few structures. The line of thunderstorms produced widespread 1 to 2 inches of rain across South Texas with locally higher amounts. Total cloud to ground lightning strikes observed by the National Lightning Detection Network were near 38,000 from 800 pm to 200 am CDT. In Nueces County up to 31,000 residence had interruption to their power according to AEP.
2010-09-08232°46'N / 96°52'W32°48'N / 96°52'W3.00 Miles516 Yards01750K0KDallas
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Minor roof damage on the order of EF0 damage was noted along much of the path of this tornado, but EF2 damage was observed near the intersection of Irving Blvd and Mockingbird Lane in west Dallas. Near the intersection, substantial damage occurred to a warehouse. An exterior wall of the warehouse collapsed causing part of the roof to collapse. In addition, a tractor trailer traveling on Mockingbird Lane in front of the warehouse was blown into the warehouse, and the driver sustained minor injuries. Additional stores in the industrial area near the intersection sustained roof damage and holes were ripped into some roofs. Local broadcast media recorded this tornado live as it moved north through the western portions of the city of Dallas. Maximum wind speeds were estimated to be 115 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The remnants of Tropical Storm Hermine moved through the western portions of north Texas dropping several inches of water in some locations and producing 8 tornadoes. Significant flash flooding occurred during the late evening hours of September 7th through September 8th. Up to 12 inches of rain fell across the area with the highest totals along the Interstate 35 corridor. Numerous high water rescues and evacuations were conducted across the region. On September 8th, an EF2 tornado moved through the western city limits of Dallas, injuring one person. Just prior to the Dallas tornado, an EF1 tornado moved through Seagoville in the southeastern portions of Dallas County. Two fatalities occurred during the event due to the flooding.
2010-10-24232°11'N / 96°33'W32°15'N / 96°27'W7.00 Miles480 Yards041.0M0KNavarro
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A strong EF2 tornado hit the town of Rice damaging several homes, derailing train cars, damaging a school, and overturning cars on the interstate. The tornado began about 4 miles outside the town limits of Rice and first damaged two homes near NW 050 road. One of the homes was completely destroyed. About a mile and half later, the tornado struck another home causing the exterior walls to collapse and taking the roof off the home. Next, the tornado entered the town of Rice and moved over a train track derailing 11 train cars. One of the train cars ended up in the nearby baseball field of the high school. The baseball field and nearby football stadium was also damaged, and the softball field was completely destroyed. Power poles and bleachers were damaged at the football and baseball field. At the softball field, the fences, dugouts, scorekeepers stand, scoreboard, light poles, and bleachers were all destroyed. The tornado then damaged an intermediate school causing one wall to lean and peeling the roof off the gymnasium. Next, the tornado crossed Interstate 45 where it overturned a few cars and trapped some people. One 18 wheeler carrying a dump truck lost the dump truck which fell onto a car traveling in the other direction. The driver of the car sustained minor cuts. East of the interstate, the tornado damaged 4 more homes causing mainly roof damage to the homes. The roof damage east of the interstate was mostly EF1 intensity. A total of 4 persons were injured during this tornado. All were transported to area hospitals with minor, non-life threatening injuries. In addition to the structural damage, trees were snapped along the path of the tornado. The maximum sustained winds were estimated to be 135 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed along and east of Interstate 35 in association with a dryline across north Texas. The storms produced large amounts of hail which damaged hundreds, if not thousands, of roofs. In Hunt County alone, emergency officials estimated nearly 500 homes had some form of roof damage. In addition, a strong EF2 tornado moved through Rice damaging the new intermediate school, several homes, derailing train cars and overturning vehicles on Interstate 45. A second EF0 tornado damaged 10 homes near Lone Oak.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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