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Tennessee Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Tennessee is lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Tennessee is higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #20

Tennessee
0.56
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #14

Tennessee
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #15

Tennessee
175.35
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 18,609 other weather extremes events from 1950 to 2010 were recorded in Tennessee. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:0Cold:23Dense Fog:0Drought:60
Dust Storm:0Flood:2,007Hail:4,425Heat:42Heavy Snow:132
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:25Landslide:0Strong Wind:245
Thunderstorm Winds:10,803Tropical Storm:3Wildfire:0Winter Storm:75Winter Weather:133
Other:636 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Tennessee.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 13 historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in Tennessee.

DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
1965-08-145N/A36.32-89.47
1973-11-304.7335.8-83.96
1981-08-0741035.95-89.12
1981-02-083.9535.62-89.6
1980-12-023.81136.21-89.43
1983-02-233.7136.19-89.6
1979-08-133.7535.24-84.38
1972-03-293.71036.2-89.61
1984-02-143.61036.13-83.74
1978-08-313.5436.09-89.42
1977-07-273.5735.42-84.42
1982-09-243.5835.68-84.25
1969-07-133.5N/A36.1-83.7

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 373 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in Tennessee.

DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
1998-04-16535°16'N / 87°35'W35°26'N / 87°12'W22.70 Miles1760 Yards0214.0M0Lawrence
 Brief Description: Many fine homes, some even brick, were completely leveled. Trees were uprooted or blown down, power lines were down, 75 utility poles were blown down around the county. People who were at their homes went to the basement, or in a closet, or in a bathroom. The EMA report of a one ton Dodge flatbed truck, which weighs almost 5000 pounds, being hurled 20 miles, could not be confirmed. Therefore this account should be discounted. However, the EMA director verfied a sedan being carried 1/2 mile. A tree was debarked by the flying debris. A 200 yard wide path of pasture land had grass pulled out. Clumps of dirt was pulled up from the ground. Several livestock was killed.
1952-02-13435°12'N / 86°18'W35°12'N / 86°17'W1.30 Miles100 Yards09250K0Moore
1952-02-13435°12'N / 86°17'W35°13'N / 86°05'W11.40 Miles100 Yards335250K0Franklin
1952-02-29435°09'N / 86°35'W2.00 Miles300 Yards21502.5M0Lincoln
1952-03-21436°01'N / 89°12'W36°05'N / 89°11'W4.70 Miles200 Yards210250K0Dyer
1952-03-21436°06'N / 89°16'W2.00 Miles200 Yards45250K0Dyer
1952-03-21435°00'N / 89°35'W35°07'N / 89°17'W18.70 Miles427 Yards750250K0Fayette
1952-03-21435°16'N / 88°59'W35°21'N / 88°49'W11.10 Miles177 Yards4142.5M0Hardeman
1952-03-22435°21'N / 88°49'W35°30'N / 88°31'W19.80 Miles177 Yards231002.5M0Chester
1952-03-22435°30'N / 88°31'W35°38'N / 88°17'W15.90 Miles177 Yards11432.5M0Henderson
1953-05-02435°31'N / 84°47'W35°31'N / 84°45'W2.30 Miles33 Yards48250K0Meigs
1953-05-02435°31'N / 84°45'W35°32'N / 84°43'W1.90 Miles33 Yards000K0Mcminn
1956-04-03435°35'N / 88°28'W35°42'N / 88°19'W11.60 Miles100 Yards3602.5M0Henderson
1970-04-19435°00'N / 88°23'W35°03'N / 88°16'W7.60 Miles100 Yards0025K0Hardin
1970-04-27436°27'N / 87°08'W36°27'N / 87°04'W3.30 Miles250 Yards002.5M0Montgomery
1970-04-27436°27'N / 87°04'W36°31'N / 86°39'W23.50 Miles250 Yards2752.5M0Robertson
1970-04-27436°31'N / 86°39'W36°33'N / 86°22'W15.80 Miles250 Yards1102.5M0Sumner
1971-02-21435°00'N / 88°57'W35°02'N / 88°55'W3.60 Miles100 Yards0025K0Hardeman
1971-05-07436°04'N / 88°47'W36°03'N / 88°42'W4.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Gibson
1971-05-07436°03'N / 88°42'W35°58'N / 88°12'W28.50 Miles100 Yards31372.5M0Carroll
1971-05-07435°58'N / 88°12'W35°53'N / 87°54'W17.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Benton
1974-04-03435°00'N / 86°30'W35°07'N / 86°19'W13.10 Miles800 Yards61002.5M0Lincoln
1974-04-03435°07'N / 86°09'W35°19'N / 86°05'W14.40 Miles800 Yards521250K0Franklin
1974-04-03435°00'N / 86°26'W35°07'N / 86°19'W10.40 Miles33 Yards000K0Lincoln
1974-04-03436°02'N / 85°34'W36°05'N / 85°28'W6.60 Miles700 Yards002.5M0White
1974-04-03436°05'N / 85°28'W36°11'N / 85°16'W13.10 Miles700 Yards10510K0Putnam
1974-04-03435°07'N / 86°19'W35°21'N / 86°04'W21.30 Miles33 Yards000K0Lincoln
1974-04-03436°31'N / 85°05'W36°35'N / 84°59'W7.20 Miles300 Yards562.5M0Pickett
1974-04-03436°11'N / 85°16'W36°15'N / 85°08'W8.70 Miles700 Yards000K0Overton
1974-04-03435°21'N / 86°04'W35°30'N / 86°00'W11.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Franklin
1974-04-03436°15'N / 85°05'W36°26'N / 84°50'W18.80 Miles200 Yards71502.5M0Fentress
1988-12-24435°55'N / 86°54'W36°02'N / 86°47'W6.00 Miles150 Yards1725.0M0Williamson
1995-05-18435°00'N / 87°29'W35°21'N / 87°10'W29.00 Miles1000 Yards3324.6M0Lawrence And Giles
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down near the Lawrence/Wayne County line near Deerfield and lifted near Campbellsville in Giles County. Two people were killed while outside their trailer in the extreme western part of Lawrence County and a third person was killed while inside a house near Deerfield. Thirty-four houses, 16 mobile homes and one business were destroyed. Ninety-eight houses, three mobile homes and two other buildings were damaged. The tornado pulled corn stalks that were two feet tall out fo the ground and destroyed 6 TVA steel high-tension-wire towers. Three of these towers were never found. A cancelled check from Etheridge was found in Cannon County, some 90 miles away. Seventy-five to 100 people were evacuated in Ethridge because of downed power lines. (F48H,M65H,M67H)
1997-01-24435°47'N / 86°30'W35°50'N / 86°23'W6.50 Miles300 Yards0184.7M0Rutherford
 Brief Description: This was one of those extraordinary cases where the National Weather Service had a 41 minute lead time on a tornado warning . The F4 tornado struck the Southridge Subdivision, near Barfield, TN, at 503 PM. The tornado caused 18 injuries and 4.7 million dollars in property damages. One person had to be hospitalized overnight. The last time an F4 tornado struck Middle Tennessee was on May 18, 1995. The path length of the tornado was 6.5 miles with its intensity reaching F4 and its maximum width of 300 yards. 44 homes were destroyed and 47 other homes were damaged in the Barfield area. There was also damage to a Middle School, Food Lion Supermarket and to the Chalet Apartments. The tornado first touched down on Yeargan Road, about 6 miles southwest of Murfreesboro, with an intensity of F1 and path width of 100 yards. At this location, a sheet metal roof was peeled back off a barn and a couple of trees were broken off. Also close by, a trailer was lifted off its foundation and overturned. Several trees were uprooted in the area. The tornado proceeded northeast and increased to F2 intensity with a width of 300 yards. As it struck the community of Barfield, an entire roof was lifted off a house, several homes were partially destroyed, and a barn was totally destroyed. The tornado crossed the West Fork of the Stones River and struck the Southridge Subdivision. At this time the tornado increased to a maximum intensity of F4 with its width remaining at 300 yards. About half a dozen homes were totally destroyed. The tornado then struck a large apartment complex just west of U.S. Hwy 231 on the south side of Murfreesboro. The tornado produced some structural damage and extensive roof damage as it weakened to F1 intensity and its width decreased to 150 yards. The tornado then crossed U.S. Hwy 231 and the Indian Wells Golf Course. Large trees were uprooted and structural damage occurred to several businesses as it approached I-24. The tornado continued moving to the northeast across I-24 snapping and uprooting trees as it narrowed to 50 yards wide. On the southeast side of Murfreesboro near the intersection of Elam Road and U.S. Hwy 41, and near Brandyville Road and East Rutherford Boulevard, the tornado uprooted numerous trees and damaged the roofs of several homes. It was at this point the track of the tornado ended as it lifted back into the clouds. Newspaper accounts told stories of people going to a basement, or an interior room of a house such as a bathroom or closet for safety. The low casualties from this tornado indicated all the preparedness activities of the National Weather Service for many years certainly paid off.
1997-03-01435°57'N / 89°40'W36°07'N / 89°11'W15.00 Miles200 Yards1152.0M0Dyer
 Brief Description: F13MH A tornado developed in Mississippi county Arkansas near the town of Lennie. Three mobile homes were damaged or destroyed and a cotton trailer was over turned. The tornado touched down again in Dyer county in Tennessee. The most severe damage with the tornado occurred in Dyer county. A thirteen-year-old girl was killed at her home which was destroyed by the tornado in the town of Finley. One hundred ninety building were damaged or destroyed in Dyer county including Dyer County High School. The tornado then continued into Gibson county where eight homes were damaged or destroyed. Numerous trees and power lines were knocked down as well.
1997-03-01436°06'N / 89°10'W36°08'N / 88°57'W10.00 Miles200 Yards00100K0Gibson
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in Mississippi county Arkansas near the town of Lennie. Three mobile homes were damaged or destroyed and a cotton trailer was over turned. The tornado touched down again in Dyer county in Tennessee. The most severe damage with the tornado occurred in Dyer county. A thirteen-year-old girl was killed at her home which was destroyed by the tornado in the town of Finley. One hundred ninety building were damaged or destroyed in Dyer county including Dyer County High School. The tornado then continued into Gibson county where eight homes were damaged or destroyed. Numerous trees and power lines were knocked down as well.
1998-04-16435°13'N / 88°01'W35°12'N / 87°38'W23.00 Miles1760 Yards364.0M0Wayne
 Brief Description: The tornado killed 3 people in Wayne county. 2 females, their ages 75 and 57, were killed in a modular home on Lay Creek Rd. Another female, age 69, was killed on Chalk Creek Road in a wooden frame home. The tornado left nothing but the foundation. A lumber yard was destroyed. Many trees were down in the path of the tornado. Many houses and mobile homes were destroyed. 34 homes were completely destroyed, 14 homes had major damage and 22 had minor damage. . F75MH, F57MH, F69PH
1998-04-16435°25'N / 87°13'W35°27'N / 87°06'W6.90 Miles800 Yards011.0M0Giles
 Brief Description: The most extensive damage was north of Yokley. There were downed trees and power lines, a ruptured gas tank, cars overturned, and homes damaged. 5 homes and 8 mobile homes were destroyed in Giles county.
1999-01-17435°35'N / 88°53'W35°38'N / 88°41'W16.00 Miles500 Yards610610.0M0Madison
 Brief Description: The tornado developed just east of Bemis and tracked northeast across the southern part of the city of Jackson. A shopping center suffered severe damage while a nearby funeral home was demolished except for the interior rooms. More than 200 homes were obliterated or heavily damaged while 300 other homes sustained lesser damage. The building housing the school buses for the county was destroyed and 55 school buses were damaged. A high-school baseball stadium was destroyed and the football stadium was damaged. F9PH, F81PH, F46OT, M43PH, M43MH, F29PH
1999-05-05435°34'N / 87°55'W35°38'N / 87°50'W6.00 Miles580 Yards30295K0Perry
 Brief Description: An F4 tornado struck the town of Linden, located about 70 miles southwest of Nashville. The tornado damaged many homes, schools and businesses and churches. There were 3 fatalities. A 14 year old girl was sucked out of her home by the tornado as she, her father, and her mother were headed to the basement. Her dad was also sucked out of the home, but was found unharmed in the yard. The 14 year old girl was found 5 hours later in the rumble of their home. Hollis Hinson, 47 year old male and Perry County Trustee, was killed in his home. His girlfriend, 47 year old school teacher Patti Haston, was also killed in Mr. Hinson's house. The home was lifted off the foundation and flung into the woods and down a nearby hill. Both had gone to the bathroom to escape the tornado's fury. Ms. Hinson was found dead in a bathtub. F14PH, F47PH, M47PH
2003-05-04435°31'N / 89°02'W35°38'N / 88°37'W26.00 Miles880 Yards116630.0M0Madison
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down in the southwest part of Madison county near Denmark and tracked east through the downtown section of Jackson. The tornado continued to move east and eventually crossed into Henderson county. Nine people were killed in mobile homes between Denmark and Jackson and two other persons were killed in an apartment complex in Jackson. Numerous buildings were destroyed, particularly in downtown Jackson. St. Luke Episcopal Church, one of the oldest churches in Tennessee built in 1844, was destroyed. The Carl Perkins Civic Center, Tennessee Supreme Court Building, the downtown Jackson Post Office and National Guard Armory were damaged. Also damaged was the Proctor and Gamble factory where Pringles Potato Chips are made and a Coca-Cola bottling plant was also damaged. Denmark Elementary School and Jackson Middle School were destroyed and 24 other schools in the county were damaged. The tornado caused severe damage to the local power and water utilities across the county. One of eight stone balls that were set up to commemorate the eight fatalities from the Jackson tornado of January 17, 1999 was blown across a street. M1PH, M7MH, M8MH, F22PH, F23MH, F25MH, M33MH, M39MH, F40MH, F44MH, M53MH
2003-05-04435°37'N / 88°38'W35°39'N / 88°21'W13.00 Miles880 Yards02010.0M0Henderson
 Brief Description: The same tornado that produced substantial damage to the city of Jackson continued into Henderson county and moved through the city of Lexington. Thirty-six homes were destroyed and nearly 1,000 homes were damaged. Seven commercial buildings were destroyed and another 73 were damaged including the Everett Horn Library.
2008-02-05435°40'N / 88°51'W35°43'N / 88°45'W8.00 Miles125 Yards051100.0M0KMadison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down at the Union University Campus near the U.S. Highway 45 Bypass in Jackson producing tremendous damage. Fifty one people were injured at Union University as two dormitories collapsed during the passage of the violent tornado. Eighty percent of the dorms were severely damaged or destroyed. Three academic buildings received major damage and 14 other campus buildings were damaged. Several hundred vehicles in the campus parking lots were also damaged or destroyed. The damage in the University area was rated EF-4 with maximum winds of 170 mph. The track was 125 yards wide. The damage at the university alone was estimated at $40,000,000. The tornado then tracked across the U.S. Highway 45 Bypass damaging several banks and businesses before hitting the Regional Hospital and adjacent doctors' offices. The tornado then moved across North Jackson inflicting significant damage to many subdivisions and businesses. The Chapel Creek, Indian Hills and Wyndhurst subdivisions were all struck by the tornado. The tornado also damaged the Jackson Oaks Senior Living Complex. The tornado continued to track northeast striking the Northside High School in the Oak Hill area. The tornado then moved through the Walnut Trace subdivision before crossing Old Medina Road and damaging more houses. The tornado then continued northeast causing EF-3 damage near the intersection of Christmasville Road and Ashport Road in Northeast Madison County before lifting. The Madison County Fire Station No. 11 was destroyed. The station's fire engine and pumper, water and brush trucks were all damaged. Several homes in the area were also damaged. The maximum winds were 145 mph in this area and the track was 100 yards wide. Along the track of this tornado over 70 structures were destroyed with over 500 more damaged. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05435°16'N / 88°17'W35°22'N / 88°02'W16.00 Miles880 Yards3517.6M0KHardin
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The initial tornado touchdown occurred west of the Tennessee River near the intersection of Coffee Landing Road and Towboat Lane about 740 pm CST. The tornado then quickly raced northeast causing extensive damage to homes and trees just east of the Tennessee River in the Oak Grove, Cerro Gordo and Swift Communities. The tornado destroyed 59 houses, 11 mobile homes, 11 public buildings, a vacant store and 11 farm buildings. Another 117 structures received varying degrees of damage. Four of the 11 public buildings belonged to the Sharon Baptist Church. The church lost its sanctuary, preschool, academy and student center, off Cravens Road in the Oak Grove area. Two of the five injuries occurred at the church while two more injuries occurred in homes in the Oak Grove area. All three deaths occurred in mobile homes. Two of the deaths occurred in the Cerro Gordo area while the third fatality occurred in northeast Hardin County in the vicinity of Nance Bend Road and Highway 128. The tornado continued northeast before lifting near the intersection of Highway 114 and Highway 128 around 757 pm CST. The path length was about 16 miles and the maximum width was one half mile. The highest estimated winds were around 170 mph. Utility restoration costs were estimated at around $200,000. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2009-04-10435°45'N / 86°51'W35°54'N / 86°16'W23.00 Miles750 Yards258100.0M0KRutherford
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF-4 Tornado...with maximum estimated wind speed around 170 mph, was reached in the Highland Park Drive Neighborhood as well as the Tomahawk Trace Area. Several well constructed homes were destroyed in those areas, hardwood trees were debarked, and vehicles were tossed considerable distances. There were two fatalities, a 30 year old women and her 9 week old daughter, and 58 injuries per newspaper reports, of which at least 7 were serious. Path length was 23.25 miles and maximum width was 750 yards. Gound surveys of the Murfreesboro tornado indicate that the actual initial touchdown was just north of the Eagleville Community in far Southwestern Rutherford County. Intermittent tree and roof damage was noted beginning at a residence near the intersection of Kelly Road and Highway 41A. Intermittent tree damage continued northeast, with the path becoming continuous along Rocky Grove Road between the Cedar Grove and Pleasant Hill Communities. The survey team then inspected continuous damage from Rocky Grove Road northeast to a residence on Newman Road approximately 2 miles north of the Windrow Community. Extensive tree damage was noted along the path...along with multiple instances of roof damage to homes. The most significant damage was on Patterson Road 1/2 mile west of Windrow. A brick home was completely destroyed and thrown almost completely off its foundation. Additional areas between Stones River Battlefield and Medical Center Parkway in Murfreesboro were surveyed. Two homes on Wilkinson Pike and two homes on Highland Park Drive were completely destroyed. One of the homes did appear to be properly anchored to it's foundation while three were not. Per a newspaper report, at Stones River Battlefield, a quarter mile swath of fallen and damaged trees streched one mile across the battlefield, along with numerous fences being destroyed, closing parts of the park to tourists. One particular fallen tree damaged a 60 foot section of the national cemetary wall and a cannon display. Additional information about the tornado included it tracked due northeast for the first 9 miles then began a steady turn to the right. By the time the tornado lifted it was moving to the east-southeast. Additionally, videos of the tornado indicated a multiple vortex appearance to the tornado and the aerial survey was able to detect focused areas of damage within the larger path. The aeriel survey revealed 12 to 15 homes which were completely destroyed and dozens others which suffered significant damage. A 2-story office building had the complete upper floor removed. Numerous large vehicles were picked up and tossed, including several semi trailers which wound up piled together near the intersection of Thompson Lane and Broad Street. Significant roof damage and some wall collapse on homes were also noted. Several well built homes suffered significant exterior and interior wall failure. Three other areas received significant damage. The first area was along Bushnell Drive just north of Compton Road. A well built 2-storty brick home was almost completely destroyed with just part of the kitchen wall remaining standing. The second area was near the intersection of Haynes Drive and Sulphur Springs Road. Three homes on Cornwall Court were completely destroyed and thrown clear of their slab foundations, however it did not appear any of the homes was properly anchored. The third area of enhanced damage was along Battleground Drive between D`Ann Drive and Tomahawk Trace. The National Weather Service Assessment team was joined by a Murfreesboro Code who assisted with assessing construction quality at this location. Three homes were completely blown clear of their foundations and destroyed. One home was not anchored/fastened to the foundation, however, the other 2 were very well constructed. Several trees were also debarked at this location. Additional information provided by the Rutherford County EMA through a newspaper report stated that over 845 homes were damaged, of these 117 were destroyed, 298 had major damage, 175 had minor damage, and another 255 were affected in some way. 519 Structures were also affected, including 77 destroyed, with an additional 300 plus homes and structures impacted in some way just outside of the city limits. Newspaper also reported an overturned truck caused traffic backup on Interstate 24 and multiple power lines down across the entire city. Power lines being down resulted in as many as 18,000 homes being without power after the storm. Newspaper also reported that two people were seriously injured and multiple homes were destroyed when the tornado passed through the Wilkinson Pike/Thompson Lane Areas. Large trees were also uprooted and utility poles were blown over. Multiple businesses in the Thompson Lane/Broad Street area were significantly damaged, including a Shell convenience store and Huddleston-Steele Engineering. Newspaper also reported continuous damage, detail of damage not provided, between Esquire Court and Wigan Drive and Tomahawk Trace to Highway 231 and then into the Compton Road area. Newspaper also reported that Murfreesboro Waste Department had gathered in excess of more the 2.7 million pounds of debris. And that total tonnage associated with the storm gathered at the Rutherford County Landfill was 5,071 tons. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong upper level storm system moved across Middle Tennessee triggering early morning severe thunderstorms along with a line of severe thunderstorms that moved west to east across the entire mid state from the late morning hours through mid afternoon. This resulted in 10 tornadoes across the mid state, with one being an EF4 Tornado in Murfreesboro in Rutherford County.
1952-02-13335°13'N / 86°36'W35°13'N / 86°28'W7.40 Miles350 Yards02250K0Lincoln
1952-02-13335°15'N / 85°50'W35°16'N / 85°45'W5.10 Miles400 Yards02250K0Grundy
1952-03-21335°57'N / 89°26'W36°08'N / 89°12'W18.10 Miles1000 Yards1030250K0Dyer
1952-03-21335°51'N / 88°40'W0.10 Mile100 Yards03250K0Carroll
1952-03-21336°01'N / 88°16'W36°04'N / 88°12'W5.10 Miles177 Yards019250K0Carroll
1953-03-14335°32'N / 88°58'W35°45'N / 88°37'W24.70 Miles100 Yards0325K0Madison
1956-02-17335°09'N / 87°18'W35°09'N / 87°07'W10.40 Miles1760 Yards0025K0Lawrence
1956-02-27336°28'N / 86°39'W36°33'N / 86°24'W15.00 Miles100 Yards0425K0Sumner
1957-04-04335°03'N / 88°36'W35°07'N / 88°30'W7.30 Miles50 Yards011250K0Mcnairy
1958-02-26335°14'N / 88°15'W0.10 Mile7 Yards00250K0Hardin
1959-03-26336°15'N / 85°59'W36°26'N / 85°43'W19.50 Miles440 Yards00250K0Coffee
1959-09-26335°43'N / 90°09'W35°47'N / 89°44'W23.70 Miles667 Yards07250K0Lauderdale
1961-03-13335°36'N / 85°55'W35°37'N / 85°45'W9.30 Miles250 Yards00250K0Warren
1963-01-10335°45'N / 86°56'W35°46'N / 86°55'W1.30 Miles400 Yards042.5M0Maury
1963-01-10335°46'N / 86°55'W35°47'N / 86°52'W2.70 Miles400 Yards000K0Williamson
1963-04-29335°49'N / 89°13'W35°50'N / 89°03'W9.30 Miles300 Yards36250K0Crockett
1964-03-04335°03'N / 88°16'W35°13'N / 88°08'W13.80 Miles300 Yards032.5M0Hardin
1964-03-04335°13'N / 88°08'W35°23'N / 88°00'W13.80 Miles300 Yards042.5M0Wayne
1965-04-15335°52'N / 85°05'W35°52'N / 84°58'W6.50 Miles200 Yards10250K0Cumberland
1965-04-15335°11'N / 84°52'W35°18'N / 84°45'W10.40 Miles600 Yards0502.5M0Bradley
1968-04-03335°20'N / 89°55'W35°23'N / 89°52'W4.50 Miles1760 Yards042.5M0Shelby
1968-04-03335°23'N / 89°52'W35°39'N / 89°35'W24.30 Miles1760 Yards4282.5M0Tipton
1970-04-24335°02'N / 90°02'W35°03'N / 89°44'W17.00 Miles50 Yards052.5M0Shelby
1970-04-24335°00'N / 90°02'W35°01'N / 89°51'W10.40 Miles50 Yards0132.5M0Shelby
1970-04-24335°04'N / 89°59'W35°04'N / 89°48'W10.40 Miles50 Yards032.5M0Shelby
1971-04-27335°59'N / 86°14'W36°00'N / 86°02'W11.20 Miles200 Yards03250K0Wilson
1971-04-27336°00'N / 86°02'W36°01'N / 85°58'W3.80 Miles200 Yards00250K0Dekalb
1972-04-21335°08'N / 87°32'W35°17'N / 87°13'W20.60 Miles200 Yards06250K0Lawrence
1972-04-21335°17'N / 87°13'W35°22'N / 87°02'W11.70 Miles200 Yards040K0Giles
1974-04-03335°06'N / 84°55'W35°14'N / 84°42'W15.40 Miles350 Yards1100250K0Bradley
1974-04-03335°14'N / 84°42'W35°15'N / 84°40'W2.70 Miles350 Yards003K0Polk
1974-04-03335°11'N / 84°52'W35°13'N / 84°42'W9.70 Miles500 Yards20250K0Bradley
1974-04-03335°13'N / 84°42'W35°16'N / 84°38'W5.40 Miles500 Yards10250K0Polk
1974-04-03335°16'N / 84°38'W35°19'N / 84°33'W6.10 Miles500 Yards050250K0Mcminn
1974-04-03335°50'N / 86°26'W35°59'N / 86°13'W15.90 Miles100 Yards003K0Rutherford
1974-04-03335°55'N / 86°03'W35°57'N / 85°58'W5.20 Miles100 Yards13250K0Cannon
1974-04-03335°57'N / 85°58'W36°03'N / 85°51'W9.40 Miles100 Yards020250K0Dekalb
1974-04-03335°15'N / 86°00'W35°18'N / 85°58'W4.10 Miles100 Yards0025K0Franklin
1974-04-03335°18'N / 85°58'W35°20'N / 85°56'W3.00 Miles100 Yards010K0Coffee
1974-04-03336°21'N / 85°23'W36°26'N / 85°15'W9.40 Miles400 Yards31202.5M0Overton
1974-04-03336°15'N / 84°40'W36°17'N / 84°37'W3.60 Miles350 Yards0625K0Morgan
1974-04-03336°29'N / 84°36'W36°35'N / 84°24'W13.00 Miles400 Yards021250K0Scott
1974-04-03336°17'N / 84°37'W36°22'N / 84°30'W8.60 Miles350 Yards050K0Scott
1974-04-08335°26'N / 84°37'W2.00 Miles440 Yards01250K0Mcminn
1976-05-13334°59'N / 88°15'W35°03'N / 88°14'W4.70 Miles200 Yards0025K0Hardin
1982-04-02336°02'N / 89°23'W36°02'N / 89°15'W8.00 Miles77 Yards012.5M0Dyer
1984-04-21335°07'N / 90°10'W35°09'N / 90°07'W3.00 Miles20 Yards032.5M0Shelby
1984-05-07336°17'N / 88°21'W36°15'N / 88°15'W6.00 Miles100 Yards0362.5M0Henry
1985-08-16335°14'N / 87°01'W35°26'N / 87°01'W12.00 Miles500 Yards01250K0Giles
1986-02-06335°14'N / 84°49'W35°14'N / 84°40'W5.00 Miles270 Yards052.5M0Bradley
1986-02-06335°14'N / 84°39'W35°18'N / 84°39'W2.00 Miles270 Yards002.5M0Polk
1986-02-06335°18'N / 84°39'W35°17'N / 84°36'W3.00 Miles270 Yards002.5M0Mcminn
1987-12-14335°12'N / 90°04'W35°21'N / 89°55'W13.00 Miles200 Yards0212.5M0Shelby
1988-01-19335°04'N / 89°27'W35°58'N / 88°03'W22.00 Miles200 Yards3242.5M0Fayette
1991-03-22335°03'N / 88°43'W35°14'N / 88°24'W22.00 Miles200 Yards44525.0M0Mcnairy
1993-02-21336°01'N / 84°15'W36°06'N / 83°58'W10.00 Miles150 Yards035.0M0Knox
 Brief Description: The tornado started near Oak Ridge, moved through the Bull Run Steam Plant and went through the town of Claxton. Fifty homes were damaged and six mobile homes were destroyed. Two business were destroyed and another 10 were damaged including a weapons plant. Twelve electric transmission towers were knocked down.
1993-02-21336°10'N / 85°36'W36°06'N / 85°26'W10.00 Miles100 Yards06500K0Putnam
 Brief Description: Eight homes were destroyed and 15 others were damaged. One person was trapped in a van after a tree was knocked down on top of it.
1994-04-15335°19'N / 85°00'W35°26'N / 84°29'W15.00 Miles880 Yards175.0M0Hamilton, Meigs, Bradley And Mcminn
 Brief Description: The tornado first touched in northern Hamilton County near the town of Grasshopper and moved northeast crossing into Meigs County just south of Birchwood. One man was killed in Birchwood when his mobile home collapsed on top of him. Two others were injured in the same area. In Hamilton County, eight homes, three mobile homes, one church, and 17 barns were damaged or destroyed. The tornado continued across southern Meigs County passing near the towns of East View and Brittsville. Three persons were injured in the county. About 25 mobile homes and six barns were damaged or destroyed. The tornado then clipped the northern part of Bradley County. Two persons were injured in the county. Ten mobile homes and 17 homes were damaged. Numerous trees were knocked down as well. The tornado then crossed into McMinn County where it moved through the towns of Lamontville, Riceville, Georgetown, and Englewood. The tornado was not on the ground during the entire trip in McMinn County, but was on the ground for much of its lifetime. When the tornado went through the town of Riceville, the local elementary school lost the roof off its concession stand and the bleachers were damaged. Numerous trees were knocked down in the county as well. One person was injured in McMinn County. M57H
1994-11-27335°04'N / 89°50'W35°19'N / 89°39'W16.00 Miles200 Yards32550.0M0Shelby And Fayette
 Brief Description: The tornado started just southwest of Germantown and moved northeast through the eastern part of Shelby County and then continued into the northwest part of Fayette County. Three persons were killed in Germantown when the tornado struck a home where 16 people had gathered for a family reunion. Twenty-five persons were injured in the Germantown area. Overall, 28 homes were destroyed and 300 other homes were damaged. Houston High School was badly damaged and a nearby church sustained significant damage. Thirty utility poles were blown down along with a several trees. Two mobile homes were destroyed in Fayette County. M44H,M11H,M48H
1994-11-27335°46'N / 89°28'W35°52'N / 89°10'W16.00 Miles100 Yards135.0M0Wayne
 Brief Description: The tornado first touched down about one mile west of the town of Woodville in Lauderdale County. The tornado then continued northeast in Crockett County. The towns of Chestnut Bluff and Crockett Mills were the hardest hit. One woman was killed as the tornado struck her house. Three other persons were injured. Twenty-seven homes were destroyed and eleven others were damaged. Several vehicles were destroyed as well. F75H
1995-05-18335°48'N / 85°12'W35°57'N / 85°02'W9.00 Miles100 Yards0202.0M0Cumberland
 Brief Description: The tornado first touched down in the southwest part of Cumberland County and moved northeast. Two business were destroyed. Eleven homes and 14 mobiles homes were destroyed. Many other homes were damaged. One house had a gas leak in it prompting emergency management officials to evacuate a handful of nearby residents. Other homes had roof damage. Numerous trees and power lines were knocked down.
1997-03-29335°03'N / 85°19'W35°03'N / 85°11'W8.00 Miles100 Yards04445.0M0Hamilton
 Brief Description: In Hamilton county...the tornado first touched down in the Tiftonia community just west of downtown Chattanooga around 1:10 am EDT. As the tornado moved due east across the southern part of the county, 50 homes were completely destroyed. Another 600 homes and one business were heavily damaged. Most of the damage was concentrated in the East Brainerd community. There, about half of the 180-unit Hickory Villa apartment complex was destroyed, and 18 of 23 townhomes of the Hickory Trace complex were destroyed. Two more apartment complexes, Hickory Valley and Ledford Apartments, were severely damaged. Around 20000 homes were without electricity after the storm. Most power had been restored by Monday morning. In Bradley county...the tornado destroyed 5 poultry farms, 4 homes, and 4 mobile homes. Another 45 homes, 16 mobile homes and 3 poultry farms were damaged.
1997-03-29335°09'N / 84°54'W35°09'N / 84°54'W4.00 Miles100 Yards0503.2M0Bradley
 Brief Description: In Hamilton county...the tornado first touched down in the Tiftonia community just west of downtown Chattanooga around 1:10 am EDT. As the tornado moved due east across the southern part of the county, 50 homes were completely destroyed. Another 600 homes and one business were heavily damaged. Most of the damage was concentrated in the East Brainerd community. There, about half of the 180-unit Hickory Villa apartment complex was destroyed, and 18 of 23 townhomes of the Hickory Trace complex were destroyed. Two more apartment complexes, Hickory Valley and Ledford Apartments, were severely damaged. Around 20000 homes were without electricity after the storm. Most power had been restored by Monday morning. In Bradley county...the tornado destroyed 5 poultry farms, 4 homes, and 4 mobile homes. Another 45 homes, 16 mobile homes and 3 poultry farms were damaged.
1998-04-16336°02'N / 89°19'W36°02'N / 89°15'W4.00 Miles100 Yards23250K0Dyer
 Brief Description: The tornado started west of Ro Ellen and moved east. One mobile home with two persons inside was destroyed. The two persons in the mobile home were killed. Two other mobile homes were destroyed. A brick home was destroyed with a truck thrown on top of the house. Several other homes were damaged. Numerous trees and power lines were blown down. Debris from this tornado such as old income tax forms and life insurance policies were found near Dyer, Tennessee in nearby Gibson county. This meant the debris travelled about 15 miles. M47MH, F47MH
1998-04-16336°00'N / 87°20'W36°00'N / 87°18'W2.00 Miles1300 Yards05500K0Dickson
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed or damaged 35 homes, destroyed 7 mobile homes, uprooted trees and demolished cars along a 2 mile path on Nails Creek Road. The Dickson Convention Center/Flea Port USA, on TN Route 46 South, lost a wall and part of a roof.
1998-04-16336°34'N / 87°08'W36°34'N / 87°01'W7.20 Miles400 Yards00400K0Robertson
 Brief Description: Part of a roof was blown off the Jo Byrns School in Adams. Many trees fell on homes.
1998-04-16336°04'N / 86°55'W36°13'N / 86°43'W14.70 Miles1320 Yards160100.0M0Davidson
 Brief Description: This Nashville tornado on April 16, 1998 took a very similar path to another F3 tornado that occurred on March 14, 1933, which killed 11 people in Nashville. The tornado touched down at 330 PM one mile west of Charlotte Pike and I-440. A tree fell on an ROTC student at Centennial Park. He was attending an ROTC picnic. He died later on May 4 from his injuries. The tornado went through downtown Nashville at 340 PM and on toward East Nashville, Donelson and Hermitage. The tornado blew out many windows on office buildings. The Nations Bank Office Towers were one of the hardest hit buildings in Nashville. Tennessee Performance Arts Center (TPAC) and the Tennessee Towers sustained damage. TPAC had over 100 windows blown out. NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts from the Tennessee Towers and was off the air for about 24 hours. 30 private airplanes were damaged at Cornelia Fort Airport. Estimated damage to the airplanes was 3 million dollars. 35 buildings in downtown Nashville were "red tagged", meaning these buildings were structurally unsound. Many signs in Davidson county were blown down or severely damaged. The tornado blew down 3 out of 10 construction cranes on the construction site of the Tennessee Oiler's Football Stadium near the Cumberland River. The tornado continued east and hit the residential section of East Nashville. At least 300 homes were damaged in East Nashville. Many homes lost a good part of their roofs, trees were uprooted, telephone poles were knocked down. St. Ann's Episcopal Church, which is well over 100 years old, received major damage. Uprooted trees, damaged roofs to many homes was the story across Donelson and Hermitage. Numerous windows were blown out from the Gaylord Building in Donelson. About half the trees, that is over a thousand trees, were blown down at Andrew Jackson's home, The Hermitage. The Hermitage is a 600 acre estate of the former President. Some of those trees were well over 200 years old, and a few of those trees that were destroyed were planted by Andrew Jackson himself. Mayor Phil Bredesen closed downtown Nashville of Friday, April 17. Many workers had an unscheduled holiday. The downtown area was reopened Monday, April 20. This gave time for cleanup crews to remove broken glass and repair downed power lines. Nashville Electric Service said 75,000 customers were without power. M22OU
1998-04-16336°32'N / 85°11'W36°37'N / 85°05'W8.60 Miles880 Yards0410.0M1.0MPickett
 Brief Description: 40 homes and 22 mobile homes were destroyed from this tornado. 95% of the trees were destroyed in the path of the tornado. 45 utility poles were blown down. 100 barns were destroyed, 2 green houses were heavily damaged, and there was damage to fences and pasture land. There were 4 people injured, but they were treated and released.
1998-04-16335°25'N / 87°04'W35°33'N / 86°54'W16.80 Miles800 Yards084.0M0Maury
 Brief Description: The heaviest damage was in the Culleola-Tice Town area. An 18 wheeler was blown over. Many homes were damaged, trees and power lines were down. Several trailers were destroyed or damaged.
1999-01-17335°46'N / 89°07'W35°49'N / 89°00'W10.00 Miles125 Yards041.6M0Crockett
 Brief Description: The tornado began just south of Alamo and tracked northeast damaging the south side of Alamo before moving into rural areas. Eleven conventional homes, five mobile homes and one commercial building were destroyed. Seventy-three other homes and buildings were damaged.
1999-01-17335°25'N / 89°11'W35°27'N / 89°07'W7.00 Miles200 Yards02100K0Haywood
 Brief Description: The tornado started southeast of Eurekaton in Haywood County and travelled northeast crossing into Madison County eventually reaching the north part of the city of Jackson. In Haywood county, seven houses, five mobile homes, five barns and seven sheds were destroyed. In Madison county, the tornado damaged or destroyed several homes in Mercer and Denmark. While moving toward Jackson, the tornado struck the south side of McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport damaging the ASOS equipment located at the airport. The new Tennessee National Guard armory and a hangar were flattened. Two UH-60 helicopters and two other helicopters were destroyed with four additional helicopters damaged. In Jackson, a total of 38 apartments were destroyed.
1999-01-17335°29'N / 89°04'W35°37'N / 88°51'W15.00 Miles600 Yards0025.0M0Madison
 Brief Description: The tornado started southeast of Eurekaton in Haywood County and travelled northeast crossing into Madison County eventually reaching the north part of the city of Jackson. In Haywood county, seven houses, five mobile homes, five barns and seven sheds were destroyed. In Madison county, the tornado damaged or destroyed several homes in Mercer and Denmark. While moving toward Jackson, the tornado struck the south side of McKellar-Sipes Regional Airport damaging the ASOS equipment located at the airport. The new Tennessee National Guard armory and a hangar were flattened. Two UH-60 helicopters and two other helicopters were destroyed with four additional helicopters damaged. In Jackson, a total of 38 apartments were destroyed.
1999-01-22336°03'N / 88°10'W36°14'N / 88°00'W15.00 Miles220 Yards151.0M0Benton
 Brief Description: This tornado resulted in the only fatality in Middle Tennessee from the severe weather outbreak of January 22,1999. The tornado killed a 50 year old woman who left her shelter in a brick ranch home located on Cedar Grove Road. She went outside to get her dogs inside her home, and that's when the tornado struck and killed her. Her husband remained inside the home and survived. There were 5 injuries from the tornado. A 1600 square foot frame home was moved 10 to 12 feet from its foundation. 12 homes were destroyed, 33 homes sustained damage and 5 businesses were damaged. Power lines and trees were blown down. The winds picked up a 7500 pound Cadillac, and hurled its engine 300-400 yards into a field. The chassis, its empty metal skin, was hurled even further. F50OU
1999-01-22336°32'N / 87°21'W36°35'N / 87°18'W4.30 Miles880 Yards0572.7M0Montgomery
 Brief Description: An F3 tornado struck Clarksville at 415 AM, travelled through the downtown area and dissipated near St. Bethlehem. There were 5 injuries, 2 of them were for broken bones. Clarksville has a population of 89,000 people is Tennessee's fifth largest city. 25,000 people were without power. The Tornado Warning was issued by the NWS at 354 AM CST. The NOAA Weather Radio alerted the sleepy resident s of Clarksville and urge them to take cover immediately. The tornado ripped apart a 5 block area of downtown Clarksville and teared up buildings in Austin Peay State University. Once the tornado ravaged the city, downtown Clarksville resembled bombed-out London during World War 2. Bricks and glass were strewn everywhere. The photo editor of the Leaf-Chronicle newspaper s, Fred Dye, said "It looked like somebody walked through with a broom and knocked over whatever was loose enough to knock down." The Montgomery county court house was in ruins. The City Fathers planned on rebuilding the court house. It was last rebuilt after a fire in 1878. The Leaf-Chronicle newspaper office was severely damaged. The newspaper had to set up a temporary office in Hopkinsville, KY. 22 buildings were heavily damaged at Austin Peay State University. Also, several old churches were heavily damaged in Clarksville. The Madison Street United Methodist Church lost its spires and roof. It will take about 2 years to rebuild the church. The Trinity Episcopal Church lost its roof. Police closed off downtown Clarksville from 6 PM-6 AM in order to prevent looting. The National Guard was on duty as well. On January 23, FEMA Director James Lee Whitt toured the devastation. He exclaimed, "Wow!" "It's like someone dropped a bomb on it. That's just what it look like." There was a total of 124 buildings destroyed and 562 buildings damaged. These figures included residential, commercial, government, public and buildings at Austin Peay.
2000-05-27336°19'N / 87°58'W36°19'N / 87°40'W17.20 Miles500 Yards001.3M0Houston
 Brief Description: The storm complex that produced a tornado in Benton county moved into Houston county and generated a tornado that hit Tennessee Ridge and Erin. The Houston county executive estimated 1.3 million dollars worth of damage. Roofs and walls of some well constructed homes were torn off. Many trees were snapped and blown down along with power lines. The Betty Ligon Pavillion in Erin was flattened. 50 people required shelter at Erin. A storage trailer was moved 50 feet at Tennessee Ridge.
2001-11-26336°15'N / 88°15'W36°17'N / 88°14'W5.00 Miles200 Yards2121.5M0Henry
 Brief Description: The tornado touched downed southeast of Paris and moved northeast. Ten homes and buildings were completely destroyed and 46 others were damaged. Two persons were killed when their mobile home was destroyed by the tornado. Numerous trees were knocked down. F32MH, M3MH
2002-04-28335°45'N / 86°22'W35°46'N / 86°19'W3.20 Miles350 Yards0312.3M0Rutherford
 Brief Description: 31 people were injured. Most of them were treated and released from the hospital. 6 people had to be hospitalized, and one person was seriously injured and had to be Life-Flighted to Vanderbilt hospital. 7 mobile homes were destroyed, and one mobile home had major damage and another mobile home had minor damage. 5 residences were destroyed, 10 residences had major damage and 36 residences had minor damage. 2 horse banrs were destroyed, and 6 horses/and or cattle were killed. The tornado touched down on W. Gum Road, just west of I-24. Interstate 24 was littered with tree limbs and debris at one point. The tornado lifted up around Mankin-McKnight Rd. This storm complex moved into Cannon county and produced another tornado near Bradyville. Damage assessment in Rutherford county by the Emergency Management Agency was placed at 2.3 million dollars.
2002-11-10336°02'N / 84°36'W36°03'N / 84°27'W8.30 Miles300 Yards728968K0Morgan
 Brief Description: A strong F3 tornado (with wind speeds estimated around 175 mph) touched down 4.4 miles south of Wartburg in the Mossy Grove community killing 5 people and injuring 28. This tornado then struck Joyner at 8:40 P.M. killing two more people for a total of 7 dead. The tornado damaged 63 homes while destroying 24 others. In addition, 18 mobile homes were damaged and 12 others were destroyed. M47PH, F36PH, F73PH, M55VE, F1VE, M45PH, F93PH
2002-11-10335°54'N / 85°06'W35°54'N / 84°54'W12.20 Miles900 Yards418500K0Cumberland
 Brief Description: An F3 tornado struck the Lake Tansi area and the southern sections of Crossville Sunday night, killing 4 people and injuring 18. 33 homes and mobile were destroyed and 128 homes and mobile homes were damaged. There was damage to one public building. The heaviest damage was along Lantana Drive, Dunbar Road, and Pigeon Ridge Road. 5 homes were damaged on U.S. Highway 127 and just south of Three Creek Road. One well built home lost an entire roof and several walls. The couple, their 3 children, and a guest, huddled under a mattress in the hallway. 50 acres of hardwoods were twisted and tangled. 100-year-old oak trees were snapped like wheat straws. Mobile homes on the Ballyhoo Campground and modular homes in Lake Tansi were destroyed. The four fatalities occurred in mobile homes. A couple was killed at 298 Lantana Drive when their mobile home was lifted off its foundation and placed on another trailer. Edward, 80 and Mary Laffer 75 were killed. Another couple died at 4040 Lone Wolf Circle. Robert, 55 and Sandy Scarbrough , 52, were killed and their bodies were found across Lake Mohawk. F75MH, M80MH, M55MH, F52MH 11 tornadoes were reported in Middle Tennessee in one of the worst tornadic outbreaks ever in November. 8 people...and possibly a ninth victim...were killed in Middle Tennessee alone. Damage estimate for the tornadoes in Tennessee was placed at $160 million. Primary losses were due to houses and cars. The toll on government owned infrastructure is about $6 million. The federal government is expected to reimburse the state and affected counties for 75% of the costs of responding to the disaster. The FEMA Public Assistance Program has obligated more than $3.6 million to assist local governments. These funds will be used to reimburse local governments for debris removal, the repair of public buildings and utilities, and overtime paid to police officers, firefighters and other emergency personnel. More than 900 families across the state applied for storm aid. This was the worst tornado disaster since the April3-4 outbreak in 1974. The United States Small Business Administration has approved more than 9.7 million dollars in disaster loans to assist disaster victims with repairing their property or replacing lost personal items. The 20 counties that are eligible for disaster assistance to individuals, households, and businesses were: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Carroll, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Fentress, Gibson, Henderson, Madison, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Roane, Rutherford, Scott, Sumner and Tipton and Van Buren.
2003-05-04335°29'N / 88°56'W35°35'N / 88°37'W14.00 Miles440 Yards00100K0Madison
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down south of where the tornado which struck the city of Jackson started. This tornado also moved east and eventually moved into Henderson county. Numerous homes were damaged or destroyed.
2003-05-04335°35'N / 88°37'W35°35'N / 88°30'W7.00 Miles440 Yards0025K0Henderson
 Brief Description: This tornado moved east from Madison County into Henderson county. Some homes were damaged.
2003-05-04336°25'N / 87°21'W36°24'N / 87°12'W11.50 Miles1000 Yards01750K0Montgomery
 Brief Description: A tornado affected the southeast part of Montgomery County and did damage from Roberts Road, to Fredonia and to Albright Road. 108 homes were damaged. Estimated loss is about 3/4 of a million dollars. The tornado destroyed 2 brick homes on state Highway 12 near Fredonia and a mobile home on Albright Rd. One woman was injured in the mobile home. The Frazier family in the brick home took their 3 children to the basement. Their brick home was ripped to pieces and blown into the nearby woods. A man on Roberts Road said 3 large oak trees were ripped out of the ground and thrown on top of his house. A neighbor's garage from about a 1/4 of a mile away landed on the back of his house. Montgomery County EMA reported 108 homes were damaged by the tornado.
2003-05-05335°16'N / 86°35'W35°16'N / 86°34'W1.60 Miles700 Yards0250K0Lincoln
 Brief Description: The Oak Hill Baptist Church on Wiley Hollow Road was heavily damaged. The church was established in 1883. The nearby residence of the pastor had major roof damage. One of the parishioners was going to take shelter at the church. The tornado carried his truck over the roof of the church and crashed it on top of a nearby tree and utility pole. Also, a frame home on U.S Highway 231 was completely leveled in Belleville and the debris was burned on the spot. There were 2 injuries. One was due to a tree falling on a truck.
2003-05-11335°57'N / 86°59'W35°57'N / 86°57'W1.00 Mile300 Yards012.2M0Williamson
 Brief Description: 43 homes were damaged and 3 homes were destroyed in Williamson County by the tornado. 28 units in the Executive House condominium complex in Franklin had to be evacuated after the roof was torn away. Crews worked Sunday to free people trapped inside their homes by fallen trees on Big East Fork Rd. Most of the damage to homes was roof damage and trees falling on houses. An 84-year-old grandmother was rescued from a demolished 3-story home at 1933 Old Hillsoboro Rd. She received a fractured pelvic bone.
2003-05-11335°57'N / 86°24'W35°58'N / 86°23'W1.00 Mile400 Yards001.8M0Rutherford
 Brief Description: At least 18 homes were destroyed and dozens more were damaged from the tornado. There was considerable damage at the Roanoke Subdivision. The old Bethel Missionary Baptist Church, located on Holly Grove Road which is just northeast of Walter Hill, will have to be torn down because of the tornado damage. The church has been at that location for more than 100 years.
2006-04-02336°07'N / 89°31'W36°08'N / 89°12'W18.00 Miles880 Yards167020.0M0Dyer
 Brief Description: A tornado spawned from the same parent supercell that produced damaging tornadoes west of the Mississippi River moved across Dyer County during the evening of April 2nd. The most affected areas were Millsfield, Maxey, and Newbern. The F3 tornado resulted in sixteen fatalities and 70 injuries. Seventy-one homes were destroyed and one hundred eighty-two were damaged. M37MH, F40MH, M13MH, M69PH, F87PH, M66PH, F63MH, F57PH, M27MH, F26MH, F47PH, M57PH, M0PH, F67PH, M77PH, M35MH
2006-04-02336°04'N / 89°02'W36°07'N / 88°44'W17.00 Miles880 Yards64225.0M0Gibson
 Brief Description: This tornado was also spawned by the same supercell that produced the killer Dyer County tornado. The F3 tornado tracked east across Gibson County. The tornado then continued east into Weakley County. The hardest hit area was the city of Bradford. There were six fatalities in Bradford along with forty-four injuries. Approximately two hundred fifty homes were damaged and seventy-five homes were destroyed. The Bradford Police Department was completely destroyed. Other businesses were also severely damaged. F61MH, F53PH, M28PH, F29PH, M5PH, M3PH
2006-04-02336°06'N / 88°44'W36°07'N / 88°34'W5.00 Miles200 Yards02500K0Weakley
 Brief Description: The tornado tracked east out of Gibson County into Weakley County. The most affected area was between Pillowville and Staffords Store. Four homes were destroyed and twenty-eight homes were damaged. At least two barns were leveled. Two people were seriously injured when their mobile home was destroyed. The tornado then continued further east into northern Carroll County.
2006-04-02336°03'N / 88°37'W36°04'N / 88°29'W9.00 Miles100 Yards001.0M0Carroll
 Brief Description: The tornado tracked east out of Weakley County into Carroll County. The tornado eventually lifted five miles south southeast of McKenzie. The area just south of McKenzie experienced the worst damage. Thirty-four homes, two apartments, one shop building, and nine farm buildings were damaged. Pilgrim's Rest Church, located near Christmasville, was destroyed. Grain silos were destroyed and numerous trees and power lines were downed. The tornado produce primarily F1 type damage in Carroll County.
2006-04-02336°11'N / 89°03'W36°08'N / 88°58'W8.00 Miles880 Yards2615.0M0Gibson
 Brief Description: This tornado was the second of two F3 tornadoes that affected Gibson County on April 2nd. The tornado touched down just south of the Obion and Gibson County line and tracked southeast. The tornado lifted just east of Rutherford near the intersection of China Grove Rd and Highway 105. Two fatalities occurred as a result of this tornado along with six injuries. Approximately two hundred fifty homes were damaged and six were destroyed. Cars were tossed into open fields. F57PH, F44PH
2006-04-07336°19'N / 86°46'W36°19'N / 86°41'W4.50 Miles880 Yards0710.0M0Davidson
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed many residential homes in Goodlettsville. Significant damage was done to the Metro Baptist Church with part of the roof blown off and front of church blown away. This tornado destroyed 25 homes, 13 homes or businesses with major damage and 31 with moderate damage/.
2006-04-07336°20'N / 86°39'W36°24'N / 86°22'W18.20 Miles200 Yards712169.0M0Sumner
 Brief Description: This is where the tornado struck hit the hardest in Sumner County. It entered Hendersonville from Goodlettsville at 1312 CST, and struck Gallatin at 1325 CST. An aerial survey determined this tornado had a path length of 22.75 miles from Davidson County and into Sumner County. 7 people died directly as a result of the tornado. One woman, who was 83 years old, died of a heart attack the day the tornado swept through Gallatin, and is considered an indirect death due to the tornado causing her heart attack. All 7 fatalities happened in Gallatin. There was extensive damage to homes and businesses. 700 homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed in Sumner County. The City of Hendersonville had 80 homes destroyed, As a result, Hendersonville city officials are considering installing tornado sirens in the city. Volunteer State Community College in southwest Gallatin was heavily damaged as were several car dealerships across the road. Vol State reopend 10 days after the tornado struck on Monday, April 17. There were about 400 faculty, staff and students on campus at the time the tornado struck. that day. Ms. Angie Jowers, public relations director for the college, stated that having routine tornado safety drills paid off on April 7th. Mr. Steve Doremus, spokesman for the Sumner County Schools, said that all 25,500 students were safe from the tornado because of routine tornado drills done in the county's 42 schools. Vol State school officials placed damage at the campus around $56 million. There was $69 million in damage in Sumner County alone. One estimate for damage done by tornadoes across Middle Tennssee on April 7 was placed at $391 million. Unfortunately, at night, looters came out to Gallatin. A nightly curfew was imposed for a while to curb the looting. The National Guard was called in to help with security matters and debris removal. By May 4, 2006, 23 people were arrested for looting in Gallatin. Several people died inside their homes. A NWS Storm Survey Team discovered that 1/2 million dollar brick homes were not built as well as one might have expected. Cinder blocks were filled with concrete, and boards were nailed to the cinder block as the base for the foundation. The strong winds caused some brick homes to move off the cinder blocks and collapse. This was observed in the Woodhaven Subdivision in Gallatin. M60PH, F39MH, M29BU, F46VE, F44VE, M57PH, F53PH
2006-04-07336°17'N / 87°17'W36°19'N / 87°10'W12.90 Miles880 Yards005.0M0Dickson
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down on Maple ValleyRoad in northern Dickson County as an F2. 3 mobile homes were leveled and demolished at this location. Numerous trees were uprooted and snapped. The tornado continued along Highway 49 and reached Bellsburg, TN as an F3. A one story brick home was demolished. No walls or roof were left standing, leaving only a basement and a garage. A truck was thrown into the basement by the tornado. The drywall, furniture, and appliances were hurled into the woods at least 100 yards. An aerial survey determined spotty rural damage to trees as this tornado continued into Cheatham County where it hit Greenbrier and then Ashland City. Dickson County had a total of 25 homes destroyed, 8 homes with major damage, and 24 homes and businesses with moderate damage.
2008-02-05335°22'N / 89°22'W35°24'N / 89°19'W4.00 Miles167 Yards10100K0KFayette
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down near Akin Road. Shortly after touchdown, the tornado crossed Yum Yum Road. A man sitting in his truck in a shed was killed when the tornado struck the shed. The truck tumbled at least 40 feet and was severely damaged. Other vehicles were tossed about from the tornado. Substantial damage to large trees in the area occurred as well. The tornado continued northeast and crossed into Haywood County, Tennessee. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05335°33'N / 89°04'W35°39'N / 88°56'W10.00 Miles440 Yards21410.0M0KMadison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado crossed into Madison County from Haywood County, Tennessee. The tornado struck the town of Huntersville and produced EF-3 damage. One home was totally destroyed on Huntersville-Denmark Road. One person was killed inside the home. Another home was destroyed in Huntersville. One person was killed in this home as well. Numerous homes were destroyed or damaged along the path in Huntersville area. The St. John No. 2 Baptist Church was severely damaged and the church bus was flipped upside down and tossed several hundred feet. The tornado lifted northeast of Huntersville near Interstate 40. A rest area along Interstate 40 was severely damaged. Thirteen tractor-trailers and several cars were also blown off of the Interstate due to the tornado. One car was tossed 75 yards from Interstate 40 into a farm field. Along the track of this tornado over 50 structures were destroyed and over 80 more were damaged. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05336°22'N / 86°20'W36°25'N / 86°16'W4.00 Miles880 Yards71410.0M0KSumner
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The Castalian Springs Post Office was completely destroyed. There were 85 homes destroyed in Sumner County. Also in Castalian Springs, a 180 year-old structure called Wynnewood, lost the top of its structure due to the tornado. The historic log structure served as a stagecoach stop. The structure had 3 chimneys and was 142 feet long, making it the longest log structure in Tennessee. Officials say it would take 2 years and $6 million to restore Wynnewood. It is Sumner County's sole historic landmark. Also, 102 trees were lost in the area by the tornado. The 11-month-old son of Kerri Stowell survived the storm and was found miraculously unharmed in a field across the street from their home in Castalian Springs. Unfortunately, Kerri Stowell was killed in the tornado. The tornado directly killed 7 people in Sumner County, and there was one indirect fatality when Mr. Lampkin, age 63, died of a heart attack while seeking shelter in his home. There were 14 people injured in Sumner County. This tornado continued into Trousdale and Macon Counties, and also into Kentucky. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-02-05336°27'N / 86°10'W36°37'N / 85°53'W19.00 Miles880 Yards134414.1M1.0MMacon
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Thirteen people were killed, and 44 folks were injured. Most of the fatalities occurred in Williams, just northwest of Lafayette. Also, 170 homes were destroyed, and 9 homes had major damage. There was one indirect fatality, a male 48 years of age, due to carbon monoxide poisoning in his home from a generator on Feb. 6, 2008. Pres. George W. Bush toured Macon County destruction on February 8th and promised relief to individuals. The logging industry in Macon County was hit hard. About a million dollars worth of trees were destroyed, which will take decades to replenish. It was estimated that the tornado outbreak did 10 million dollars worth of damage to trees in the state of Tennessee. One large brick home worth about 350 thousand dollars was poorly built. The bricks rested on cinder blocks that were not cemented. This was noticed on a storm survey. Schools were closed for over a week, and classes did not start again until Tuesday, February 19. FEMA spent 4.1 million dollars for housing displaced residents in trailers. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-04-11335°16'N / 87°24'W35°19'N / 87°13'W10.00 Miles100 Yards013.0M0KLawrence
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Many homes had roof damage especially on Coffee McGee Rd. An outbuilding was damaged on Crawfish Rd. Trees and utility poles were down along U.S. Highway 64 or Waynesboro Highway. Trees were down in Mt. Ararat Cemetery. The worst damage was a downed TVA electrical transmission tower east of U.S. Highway 43 on Hagan Rd. Metal debris was flung up and got stuck about a hundred feet above the ground in an electrical transmission tower. Numerous trees were snapped and uprooted. Newspaper article stated 56 homes had damage, with 12 homes being complete losses, and there were mainly mobile homes having comp;lete; There was one minor injury. EPISODE NARRATIVE: There were six confirmed tornadoes on April 11, 2008. Large hail and straight line winds were also reported.
2008-04-11335°19'N / 87°12'W35°21'N / 87°07'W5.00 Miles100 Yards001.0M0KGiles
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A low end EF3 tornado hit northwest Giles County near Liberty Hill. This was part of the same storm complex that hit Lawrence County. Numerous trees were snapped and uprooted. Many homes had roof damage. The hardest hit area was along Rhea Branch Rd. One residential home was completely leveled. Major damage occurred to the back of the Liberty Hill Baptist Church. A newspaper article stated that 8 homes were completely destroyed, and 30 other homes had serious damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: There were six confirmed tornadoes on April 11, 2008. Large hail and straight line winds were also reported.
2010-05-02334°59'N / 88°52'W35°03'N / 88°47'W7.00 Miles880 Yards12250K0KHardeman
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado crossed into Hardeman County from Tippah County, Mississippi. The tornado tracked northeast hitting Pocahontas before moving into McNairy County. One fatality occurred in Pocahontas when a single wide trailer was destroyed. Two injuries also occurred. In total, one home was completely destroyed. Thirteen homes sustained major damage with another five receiving very minor damage. Two mobile homes were destroyed with another two receiving minor damage. Numerous trees were snapped and debarked in the area. In addition, power lines were knocked down as well. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level disturbance slowly approached the Mid-South during the evening of April 30th, 2010 as a cold front became stationary to the west. This pattern remained in place through the evening hours of May 2nd, 2010. South to southwest winds pumped warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and created a very unstable atmosphere. Showers and thunderstorms developed in association with the front during the early evening hours and moved east into Eastern Arkansas shortly before midnight. Additional thunderstorms occurred in association with the upper level disturbance. Due to the unstable atmosphere, thunderstorms quickly became severe producing large hail, damaging winds, and flash flooding. The severe weather evolved into an outbreak by May 1st and 2nd. Historic rainfall and flash flooding in addition to large hail and damaging winds occurred during the early morning hours of May 1st with several tornadoes occurring during the afternoon hours of May 1st to early morning hours of May 2nd.
2010-05-02335°03'N / 88°47'W35°03'N / 88°46'W1.00 Mile880 Yards0010K0KMcnairy
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado crossed into McNairy County from Hardeman County. The tornado briefly traveled northeast before lifting near Highway 57. Several trees and power lines were knocked down in the area. This storm would later spawn a couple of tornadoes further northeast in McNairy County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level disturbance slowly approached the Mid-South during the evening of April 30th, 2010 as a cold front became stationary to the west. This pattern remained in place through the evening hours of May 2nd, 2010. South to southwest winds pumped warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and created a very unstable atmosphere. Showers and thunderstorms developed in association with the front during the early evening hours and moved east into Eastern Arkansas shortly before midnight. Additional thunderstorms occurred in association with the upper level disturbance. Due to the unstable atmosphere, thunderstorms quickly became severe producing large hail, damaging winds, and flash flooding. The severe weather evolved into an outbreak by May 1st and 2nd. Historic rainfall and flash flooding in addition to large hail and damaging winds occurred during the early morning hours of May 1st with several tornadoes occurring during the afternoon hours of May 1st to early morning hours of May 2nd.
1950-02-13235°45'N / 89°29'W0.20 Mile7 Yards9125K0Lauderdale
1951-11-14235°13'N / 87°02'W0.20 Mile7 Yards0025K0Giles
1952-02-13236°00'N / 88°07'W0.30 Mile300 Yards0025K0Benton
1952-02-29235°32'N / 85°51'W1.00 Mile400 Yards0025K0Warren
1952-02-29235°18'N / 84°40'W35°27'N / 84°28'W15.30 Miles587 Yards00250K0Mcminn
1952-03-21235°48'N / 88°47'W0.10 Mile150 Yards2225K0Gibson
1952-03-21235°56'N / 88°30'W0.10 Mile150 Yards18250K0Carroll
1952-03-21235°51'N / 87°41'W0.30 Mile500 Yards0025K0Humphreys
1952-03-22235°52'N / 87°35'W0.50 Mile40 Yards31025K0Hickman
1953-01-20235°42'N / 85°51'W0.50 Mile500 Yards0025K0Warren
1953-03-14235°28'N / 89°27'W35°40'N / 89°05'W24.80 Miles33 Yards0825K0Haywood
1953-03-14235°22'N / 88°47'W35°31'N / 88°30'W18.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Chester
1953-03-14235°31'N / 88°30'W35°34'N / 88°26'W5.10 Miles100 Yards0225K0Henderson
1953-03-14236°20'N / 88°46'W0.30 Mile600 Yards0125K0Weakley
1953-03-22235°56'N / 89°39'W36°09'N / 89°11'W30.10 Miles100 Yards00250K0Dyer
1953-05-02236°02'N / 84°04'W0.80 Mile100 Yards003K0Anderson
1954-04-28235°11'N / 88°15'W2.00 Miles300 Yards04250K0Hardin
1954-05-03236°24'N / 89°04'W36°26'N / 89°01'W3.60 Miles300 Yards003K0Obion
1955-02-01235°34'N / 86°26'W35°36'N / 86°16'W9.40 Miles1000 Yards00250K0Bedford
1955-03-04236°37'N / 86°36'W36°37'N / 86°35'W00250K0Robertson
1955-03-04236°37'N / 86°35'W36°38'N / 86°31'W3.80 Miles1000 Yards040K0Sumner
1955-03-05236°00'N / 86°10'W0025K0Wilson
1955-03-05236°28'N / 82°52'W36°30'N / 82°48'W4.30 Miles300 Yards06250K0Hawkins
1955-03-25236°01'N / 84°25'W36°12'N / 84°14'W16.30 Miles1760 Yards003K0Jefferson
1955-04-24236°25'N / 86°30'W36°32'N / 86°21'W11.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Sumner
1955-10-28235°03'N / 89°40'W0.20 Mile100 Yards00250K0Shelby
1956-03-07236°23'N / 85°23'W36°26'N / 85°20'W4.30 Miles50 Yards0025K0Overton
1957-01-22236°06'N / 86°52'W36°11'N / 86°37'W15.00 Miles100 Yards042.5M0Davidson
1957-01-22236°15'N / 86°21'W0.40 Mile13 Yards0025K0Wilson
1957-01-22235°34'N / 85°59'W35°35'N / 85°54'W4.70 Miles30 Yards00250K0Coffee
1957-04-01235°27'N / 88°52'W0.10 Mile7 Yards003K0Madison
1957-04-04235°32'N / 88°29'W0.10 Mile7 Yards0025K0Henderson
1957-04-08236°06'N / 85°06'W36°06'N / 85°03'W2.70 Miles10 Yards003K0Cumberland
1957-04-08236°17'N / 82°35'W36°19'N / 82°33'W3.00 Miles440 Yards003K0Washington
1957-07-04236°19'N / 88°51'W2.00 Miles200 Yards0025K0Weakley
1957-07-04236°20'N / 88°51'W2.00 Miles200 Yards0025K0Weakley
1957-11-08235°12'N / 87°01'W35°15'N / 86°58'W4.70 Miles133 Yards003K0Giles
1957-11-18236°16'N / 84°52'W36°25'N / 84°42'W13.90 Miles220 Yards0225K0Fentress
1957-12-19235°49'N / 88°55'W0.50 Mile10 Yards0025K0Gibson
1959-01-21235°14'N / 88°24'W35°16'N / 88°21'W4.10 Miles500 Yards03250K0Mcnairy
1960-03-30235°27'N / 86°47'W35°31'N / 86°40'W8.20 Miles33 Yards0125K0Marshall
1961-04-25236°26'N / 87°29'W36°28'N / 87°19'W9.40 Miles187 Yards0225K0Montgomery
1961-05-08235°20'N / 88°40'W35°23'N / 88°22'W17.20 Miles300 Yards00250K0Mcnairy
1963-03-11235°15'N / 87°26'W35°20'N / 87°17'W10.30 Miles300 Yards01250K0Lawrence
1963-03-11235°44'N / 86°32'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Rutherford
1963-03-11235°06'N / 87°44'W35°07'N / 87°36'W7.70 Miles100 Yards04250K0Wayne
1963-03-11235°07'N / 87°36'W35°12'N / 87°14'W21.40 Miles100 Yards010K0Lawrence
1963-03-11235°41'N / 85°46'W35°37'N / 85°43'W5.20 Miles100 Yards00250K0Warren
1963-03-11235°00'N / 85°43'W35°09'N / 85°32'W14.70 Miles200 Yards06250K0Marion
1963-03-11236°00'N / 83°07'W36°02'N / 83°01'W6.20 Miles200 Yards11250K0Cocke
1963-03-19236°36'N / 86°38'W36°34'N / 86°23'W14.00 Miles1000 Yards00250K0Robertson
1963-03-19235°11'N / 84°54'W35°12'N / 84°51'W3.30 Miles150 Yards03250K0Bradley
1963-03-19235°27'N / 84°39'W35°29'N / 84°36'W3.60 Miles200 Yards0125K0Mcminn
1963-04-29235°02'N / 87°13'W35°02'N / 87°08'W5.10 Miles50 Yards0025K0Giles
1964-03-04235°18'N / 89°42'W35°24'N / 89°39'W7.60 Miles200 Yards0325K0Shelby
1964-03-04235°28'N / 89°40'W35°33'N / 89°36'W6.80 Miles200 Yards0325K0Tipton
1964-08-12235°22'N / 85°24'W0.80 Mile33 Yards0625K0Sequatchie
1965-02-11235°05'N / 89°32'W0.10 Mile7 Yards0025K0Fayette
1965-03-17235°14'N / 87°20'W2.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Lawrence
1965-04-15236°21'N / 84°55'W36°25'N / 84°51'W5.90 Miles327 Yards0025K0Fentress
1965-04-15235°52'N / 84°05'W35°57'N / 84°00'W7.40 Miles200 Yards062.5M0Knox
1967-03-12236°08'N / 82°55'W36°15'N / 82°40'W16.00 Miles300 Yards15250K0Greene
1967-04-22236°12'N / 82°41'W0.20 Mile250 Yards00250K0Greene
1967-05-06235°53'N / 89°23'W35°54'N / 89°20'W3.00 Miles33 Yards02250K0Lauderdale
1967-05-07236°22'N / 86°12'W36°24'N / 86°08'W4.10 Miles200 Yards0025K0Trousdale
1967-12-11236°29'N / 88°54'W36°38'N / 88°54'W10.30 Miles7 Yards01250K0Obion
1968-09-17235°00'N / 90°00'W0.30 Mile10 Yards003K0Shelby
1969-01-23236°29'N / 88°02'W0.10 Mile7 Yards00250K0Stewart
1970-04-01235°29'N / 88°48'W0.10 Mile7 Yards0025K0Madison
1970-04-19235°07'N / 89°48'W0.30 Mile50 Yards00250K0Shelby
1970-04-24235°08'N / 88°34'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0325K0Mcnairy
1971-02-21235°09'N / 88°35'W1.50 Miles67 Yards0362.5M0Mcnairy
1971-05-24235°17'N / 89°37'W35°22'N / 89°27'W10.90 Miles100 Yards022250K0Fayette
1971-07-15236°23'N / 88°26'W36°17'N / 88°12'W14.70 Miles100 Yards08250K0Henry
1972-04-07236°18'N / 87°04'W36°15'N / 86°59'W5.70 Miles200 Yards00250K0Cheatham
1972-04-07236°15'N / 86°59'W36°10'N / 86°40'W18.50 Miles200 Yards015250K0Davidson
1972-05-14236°22'N / 84°48'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0325K0Fentress
1972-06-28236°00'N / 85°02'W0.10 Mile40 Yards0025K0Cumberland
1973-03-15235°55'N / 85°30'W0.10 Mile100 Yards13250K0White
1973-05-23236°20'N / 89°07'W36°26'N / 89°00'W9.50 Miles100 Yards00250K0Obion
1973-05-27235°20'N / 89°46'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Shelby
1973-05-27235°00'N / 86°20'W00250K0Lincoln
1973-11-26236°10'N / 88°48'W0.50 Mile27 Yards0025K0Weakley
1973-11-27235°25'N / 89°30'W35°35'N / 89°19'W15.40 Miles440 Yards01250K0Fayette
1973-12-13235°11'N / 84°39'W0.80 Mile880 Yards03250K0Polk
1974-03-21235°00'N / 84°45'W0.80 Mile300 Yards07250K0Polk
1974-04-01236°07'N / 86°51'W36°12'N / 86°41'W10.90 Miles440 Yards1123K0Davidson
1974-04-03235°47'N / 83°55'W0.50 Mile50 Yards02250K0Blount
1974-04-03235°40'N / 84°10'W35°40'N / 84°09'W02250K0Loudon
1974-04-03235°31'N / 84°21'W1.00 Mile200 Yards00250K0Monroe
1974-04-03236°08'N / 86°44'W36°09'N / 86°39'W4.70 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Davidson
1974-04-03236°16'N / 86°12'W36°24'N / 85°58'W15.80 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Wilson
1974-04-03236°31'N / 84°52'W36°36'N / 84°46'W7.90 Miles400 Yards0025K0Fentress
1974-04-03235°31'N / 85°46'W35°36'N / 85°39'W8.70 Miles100 Yards11250K0Warren
1974-04-03235°56'N / 85°20'W35°57'N / 85°17'W3.30 Miles300 Yards0825K0White
1974-04-03235°57'N / 85°17'W36°01'N / 85°04'W12.90 Miles300 Yards020250K0Cumberland
1975-04-24236°03'N / 85°12'W1.50 Miles440 Yards14250K0Cumberland
1976-02-18235°57'N / 83°13'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0102.5M0Cocke
1977-03-28236°31'N / 86°02'W0.30 Mile50 Yards00250K0Macon
1978-08-29235°01'N / 90°00'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0262.5M0Shelby
1979-03-22235°17'N / 90°03'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0325K0Shelby
1979-05-03235°53'N / 89°14'W35°54'N / 89°09'W4.70 Miles73 Yards0025K0Crockett
1979-05-03235°54'N / 89°09'W35°55'N / 89°04'W4.70 Miles73 Yards05250K0Gibson
1980-03-24235°51'N / 86°23'W35°52'N / 86°21'W1.90 Miles150 Yards02250K0Rutherford
1980-04-28235°15'N / 84°20'W35°16'N / 84°17'W3.30 Miles50 Yards01250K0Monroe
1980-06-29235°01'N / 86°49'W1.00 Mile40 Yards0025K0Lincoln
1980-07-05236°23'N / 86°32'W36°17'N / 86°31'W6.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Sumner
1980-07-06236°35'N / 83°15'W36°25'N / 83°13'W11.50 Miles300 Yards00250K0Hancock
1981-10-17235°15'N / 89°06'W1.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Hardeman
1982-04-02236°13'N / 89°04'W36°18'N / 88°58'W6.00 Miles77 Yards00250K0Obion
1982-04-02236°18'N / 88°58'W36°22'N / 88°54'W5.50 Miles77 Yards00250K0Weakley
1982-12-25235°17'N / 89°58'W2.00 Miles77 Yards00250K0Shelby
1984-05-06236°35'N / 86°31'W2.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Sumner
1984-05-06236°36'N / 86°31'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Sumner
1984-05-07236°28'N / 86°57'W36°29'N / 86°54'W3.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Robertson
1984-05-07235°44'N / 84°21'W1.00 Mile70 Yards00250K0Loudon
1985-04-30235°32'N / 89°27'W35°31'N / 89°18'W8.00 Miles150 Yards000K0Haywood
1985-06-04236°16'N / 86°27'W36°13'N / 86°22'W5.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Wilson
1985-08-16235°20'N / 87°03'W35°25'N / 87°03'W5.00 Miles60 Yards003K0Giles
1985-08-16235°06'N / 86°43'W35°12'N / 86°45'W7.00 Miles70 Yards003K0Lincoln
1988-01-19235°39'N / 89°13'W35°41'N / 89°10'W3.00 Miles60 Yards16250K0Haywood
1988-01-19235°49'N / 88°54'W35°51'N / 88°49'W4.00 Miles60 Yards10250K0Gibson
1988-06-18235°05'N / 86°27'W35°00'N / 86°21'W7.00 Miles73 Yards0025K0Lincoln
1988-11-04235°15'N / 87°50'W35°25'N / 87°39'W13.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Wayne
1988-11-19235°25'N / 88°54'W35°25'N / 88°50'W3.00 Miles90 Yards00250K0Hardeman
1988-11-19235°25'N / 88°50'W35°27'N / 88°49'W3.00 Miles90 Yards00250K0Chester
1988-11-19235°27'N / 88°49'W35°31'N / 88°44'W6.00 Miles90 Yards01250K0Madison
1989-05-22235°03'N / 87°09'W35°09'N / 87°00'W9.00 Miles100 Yards12250K0Giles
1989-06-04235°21'N / 89°54'W35°26'N / 89°48'W7.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Shelby
1989-11-15235°58'N / 88°58'W35°59'N / 88°52'W5.00 Miles80 Yards0025K0Gibson
1991-03-22236°14'N / 88°05'W36°14'N / 87°58'W7.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Benton
1991-03-22235°29'N / 87°38'W35°33'N / 87°34'W5.00 Miles50 Yards11425.0M0Lewis
1993-02-21235°47'N / 84°34'W35°45'N / 84°31'W10.00 Miles100 Yards00500K0Blount And Loudon
 Brief Description: The tornado that went through Loudon County continued across Blount County through the town of Friendsville and ending just west of Maryville. One large home was destroyed and several other were damaged. Numerous trees were snapped.
1994-06-26235°20'N / 89°09'W4.00 Miles50 Yards06500K0Grundy
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down several just west of Altamont. One house and several mobile homes were destroyed. Numerous trees were uprooted.
1994-06-26235°20'N / 85°19'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00500K0Sequatchie
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near Lewis Chapel. A church and a mobile home and another mobile home were destroyed. Two other homes were damaged. Several trees were blown down as well.
1995-04-21235°03'N / 85°17'W10.00 Miles75 Yards000.1M0Hamilton
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down over parts of suburban Chattanooga. The tornado most of its damage in a 16-block area. Overall 80 buildings were damaged. Of the 80 buildings damaged, 50 of them were homes and 30 of the buildings were businesses. Several apartments suffered roof damage and 43 persons were evacuated.
1995-05-18236°26'N / 89°28'W36°33'N / 89°11'W15.00 Miles150 Yards000.1M5KLake
 Brief Description: The tornado first tocuhed down about seven miles north of Tiptonville and continued to move northeast through the Reelfoot Lake area. The tornado then moved into Obion County near the town of Walnut Log and eventually moved into Fulton County, Kentucky. Two horses were killed when they were picked up by the tornado. One house had part of its roof torn off, lost part of his carport and had several windows broken. Another house lost part of its siding. Several boats and boat trailers were destroyed. A barn and six grain silos were destroyed. Some cotton trailers were blown over. Several trees and power lines were knocked down. Some crops were damaged as well.
1995-05-18236°18'N / 86°43'W36°24'N / 86°27'W5.00 Miles75 Yards0283.0M0Sumner
 Brief Description: The tornado first touched down near Goodlettsville and moved northeast. The tornado struck near the Rivergate Mall. At least two dozen business were damaged. Nearly 500 cars were damaged beyond repair at a nearby auto dealership. In Sumner County, 35 apartments were destroyed along with three mobile homes. Several business were damaged. An elementary school in Westmoreland lost a large area of roofing above the gymnasium. The Gallatin Civic Center suffered major damage to its swimming pool. Several high tension towers were bent. Numerous trees and power lines were knocked down.
1996-04-20235°26'N / 87°23'W35°26'N / 87°23'W0.50 Mile200 Yards0121.3M0Lawrence
 Brief Description: A strong line of thunderstorms entered middle Tennesee Saturday morning, April 20. The storms moved from northwest to southeast. Some of these storms produced tornadoes, but a significant part of the damage occurred from straight line winds. Many homes...mobile homes and businesses were damaged. Damage estimates from the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) was placed at 1.25 million dollars across middle Tennessee during this storm event. The tornado started at Barnesville and then went back up as a funnel cloud. It touched down again at Summertown, Waco and Cornersville. Areas east of Cornersville toward Bell Buckle received straight line wind damage. The distance from Barnesville to Cornersville is about 33 miles. Lengths and widths are estimated at Barnesville, Summertown, Waco and Cornersville. Cornersville was the hardest hit. An eyewitness saw the funnel come down and take the roof off a basement house about 1/2 mile south of Barnesville on Barnesville Rd. The tornado went up as a funnel cloud but came down again later as a tornado at Summertown and did some damaged to 25 homes...2 severe. Trees were uprooted, including a large oak tree and a cherry tree with a diameter of 12 to 14 inches. The tornado went up as a funnel cloud, and touched down briefly at Waco, in Giles county. The tornado damaged a brick structure that was used as a store. The building lost its roof and most of its walls. A mobile home was leveled across the street. Straight line winds appeared to have damaged a cabinet and wood shop business at the junction of highway 31 and highway 129. Storm damage estimate for Giles county is about $400,000. The tornado came down again for the final time at Cornersville, at 0615 CST, and was on the ground for an estimated 1.5 miles. Its width was estimated about 1/4 mile. The tornado started at 1.5 miles northwest of the junction of U.S. Route 31A and Coleman Rd. or 1.3 miles southwest of Cornersville. The tornado damage ends near the junction of Coleman Rd. and U.S. Route 31A. The tornado demolished a mobile home park. 7 mobile homes were totally destroyed and 10 others damage. 7 people were injured in the mobile home park, one critically. Another person was injured in Marshall county. 2 high tension towers were bent in half and telephone poles were snapped along Coleman Rd. The Cornersville School auditorium was damaged, but it was not from the tornado. There were 2 injuries in Coffee county and 2 injured in Bedford county, for a total of 12 injuries from the storm. TEMA estimates of the number of homes, mobile homes and businesses that were destroyed or sustained severely damage from the tornado and the straight line winds for the following counties are in the respective order: Marshall County...5, 10, 14 Lawrence County...10, 1. and zero. Coffee County...4, 10, 1. Giles County...6, 2, 2. Bedford County...0, 4, 0.
1996-04-20235°26'N / 87°18'W35°23'N / 87°14'W1.00 Mile440 Yards0000Lawrence
1996-04-20235°23'N / 87°14'W35°23'N / 86°55'W1.00 Mile440 Yards0000Giles
1996-04-20235°23'N / 86°55'W35°21'N / 86°51'W1.50 Miles440 Yards0000Marshall
1996-11-07235°03'N / 86°18'W35°08'N / 86°12'W7.90 Miles175 Yards01500K10KFranklin
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed one home and six mobile homes, damaged close to a dozen other homes and mobile homes, and heavily damaged numerous farm buildings and storage sheds during its trek through Franklin county. Storm damage was estimated to be about 1/2 million dollars. The tornado stayed generally south of U.S. Route 64. The tornado first touched down west of Huntland on McClure Cemetery Road where it destroyed a mobile home and damaged two other homes. The tornado continued east and destroyed 2 mobile homes and a storage building on Indian Creek Road. The tornado continued east and crossed Main Street in Huntland and destroyed a large hay barn. The tornado treked northeast to Old Salem and took the roof off the Old Salem Church of Christ on Bean Creek Rd. The most extensive damage was in Maxwell. 2 moble homes were destroyed. One of these mobile homes were lifted off its moorings and thrown 40 feet and then hit a tree. The occupant of the mobile home sustained a broken nose, multiple cuts and bruises. The tornado continued northeast to Belvidere where it destroyed some farm buildings. The tornado went up into the clouds, but reappeared in Decherd where it damaged a home. The tornado went back up into the clouds, but touched down briefly at Oak Grove, where it did some damage and again at Alto. The tornado destroyed a house at Alto on Rutledge Hill Rd. There were numerous trees and power lines down along the track of the tornado. Path length and width of the tornado are approximations.
1997-01-24235°59'N / 86°32'W35°59'N / 86°27'W4.80 Miles440 Yards00500K0Rutherford
 Brief Description: The tornado downed trees, ripped off roofs from homes located at Waller Estates and Young Subdivision. Smyrna Middle School sustained roof damage. 4 apartments, 2 mobile homes and 3 homes were damaged in the Smyrna area. One person hid in a bathtub when the tornado struck. Another person left his mobile home and went into a ditch. The tornado width and length are approximations.
1997-01-24235°08'N / 86°47'W35°11'N / 86°44'W4.20 Miles200 Yards00250K0Lincoln
 Brief Description: Hot Rock area was hardest hit. 3 homes were totally destroyed and 9 more were damaged by the tornado. 14 outbuildings and one house trailer were damaged. Tornado path width and length are approximations.
1997-01-24235°29'N / 86°38'W35°31'N / 86°36'W2.80 Miles400 Yards03250K0Bedford
 Brief Description: Most of the damage from the tornado occurred in Wheel and just to the east of Wheel. 1 home was destroyed and 3 homes were damaged. Also a general store was damaged along with one mobile home. 2 mobile homes were destroyed. There were 3 minor injuries. Tornado path width and length are approximations.
1997-01-24236°02'N / 86°22'W36°06'N / 86°10'W10.70 Miles440 Yards002.0M0Wilson
 Brief Description: A tornado in Wilson county started near Vine at Fall Creek Rd. and Hwy 231. The tornado moved northeast and affected the area of Norene especially on Sherrilltown Rd. and Phillips Rd. Storm damage for Wilson county was 2 million dollars. The tornado went from Norene to 2 miles west of Watertown. 100 hogs were killed near Norene on Blue Well Rd. when a barn collapsed on the hogs. 7 homes and 7 mobile homes were destroyed. 40 other homes sustained damage. A dozen barns were destroyed.
1997-01-24236°05'N / 86°02'W36°06'N / 86°00'W2.00 Miles220 Yards015K0De Kalb
 Brief Description: One woman was injured by flying glass when the tornado turned her car around on US RT 70 at Alexandria and the windows popped out. Tornado path width and length are approximations.
1997-01-24236°07'N / 86°02'W36°12'N / 85°48'W14.00 Miles440 Yards061.0M0Smith
 Brief Description: 6 people were injured, none seriously, in the tornado that struck Smith county. 11 vehicles were destroyed and 7 vehicles damaged, 5 livestock killed, 22 outbuildings destroyed and one cattle trailer was destroyed. 7 houses and 7 mobile homes were destroyed and 43 buildings received some damage from the tornado. Most of the damage occurred in the Brush Creek area. Numerous trees and power lines were down in southern Smith county. Tornado path length and width are approximations.
1997-01-24235°52'N / 86°02'W35°55'N / 86°00'W3.20 Miles440 Yards02150K0Cannon
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed 1 home and damaged 10 others. 2 mobile homes were damaged. 2 people were injured, but they were treated and released. Many barns and outbuildings were damaged. Numerous trees were down on State Rt 53 causing portions of the road to be blocked. Tornado path width and length are approximations.
1997-01-24235°58'N / 85°51'W36°02'N / 85°45'W7.30 Miles440 Yards00250K0De Kalb
 Brief Description: The tornado caused structural damage to 12 homes. 3 barns were also damaged along with many sheds and outbuildings. Most of the damage to homes were on Allens Ferry Rd., Cordell Love Rd. and Big Hurricane Rd. Tornado path width and length are approximations.
1997-01-24236°15'N / 85°32'W36°17'N / 85°29'W3.20 Miles70 Yards00500K0Jackson
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed 4 homes and damaged 6 others. It also destroyed 6 mobile homes and damaged 2 others. Numerous barns and outbuildings were destroyed. Most of the damage occurred on Mayberry School Road and Dodson Branch Road. The tornado path length and width are approximations.
1997-03-01235°26'N / 87°31'W35°28'N / 87°27'W3.90 Miles440 Yards00100K0Lewis
 Brief Description: 5 homes were damaged and a barn was destroyed. Path length and width of tornado are approximations.
1997-03-01235°24'N / 87°40'W35°26'N / 87°37'W2.90 Miles440 Yards02100K0Wayne
 Brief Description: 2 houses were damaged and 2 trailers were destroyed in Wayne county. There were 2 injuries in Wayne county. The damage was on Buttermilk Ridge. The tornado started in Wayne county, clipped the northwest corner of Lawrence county and dissipated in Lewis county.
1997-03-01235°22'N / 87°34'W35°23'N / 87°32'W1.20 Miles440 Yards00100K0Lawrence
 Brief Description: 2 houses were damaged and 1 trailer destroyed in Lawrence county. The tornado started in Wayne county, clipped the northwest corner of Lawrence county and dissipated in Lewis county.
1997-03-01235°04'N / 88°38'W35°11'N / 88°36'W5.00 Miles200 Yards00300K0Mcnairy
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near the town of Ramer and moved northeast toward the town of Selmer. Forty-eight homes and two businesses were damaged or destroyed. One farm which housed emus was damaged and nine emus were killed. Several trees were uprooted or shredded.
1997-03-01235°46'N / 89°09'W35°49'N / 89°05'W5.00 Miles100 Yards005K0Crockett
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in Crockett County near the town of Alamo. A long porch from a brick house was ripped off. The tornado continued northeast into Gibson county. Several business were damaged and a storage shed was destroyed as the tornado moved through the county. The tornado then reached Carroll county where it reached its peak intensity. Significant damage occurred in the town of McKenzie. Sixty-seven homes and ten businesses were damaged or destroyed. Four people were injured as well.
1997-03-01235°49'N / 88°56'W35°58'N / 88°42'W15.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Gibson
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in Crockett County near the town of Alamo. A long porch from a brick house was ripped off. The tornado continued northeast into Gibson county. Several business were damaged and a storage shed was destroyed as the tornado moved through the county. The tornado then reached Carroll county where it reached its peak intensity. Significant damage occurred in the town of McKenzie. Sixty-seven homes and ten businesses were damaged or destroyed. Four people were injured as well.
1997-03-01235°58'N / 88°40'W36°08'N / 88°31'W10.00 Miles100 Yards002.0M0Carroll
 Brief Description: A tornado developed in Crockett County near the town of Alamo. A long porch from a brick house was ripped off. The tornado continued northeast into Gibson county. Several business were damaged and a storage shed was destroyed as the tornado moved through the county. The tornado then reached Carroll county where it reached its peak intensity. Significant damage occurred in the town of McKenzie. Sixty-seven homes and ten businesses were damaged or destroyed. Four people were injured as well.
1997-03-28236°22'N / 85°20'W36°24'N / 85°13'W5.90 Miles440 Yards02250K0Overton
 Brief Description: A trailer was overturned and destroyed. 3 people were trapped inside and 2 of them sustained minor injuries. Several homes were damaged in the Goose Creek area near Alpine. A few barns were damaged near Livingston and another barn was damaged near Alpine. Many trees and power lines were down. Path length and width are approximations.
1997-03-28235°28'N / 85°33'W35°29'N / 85°27'W6.00 Miles440 Yards00100K0Sequatchie
 Brief Description: The tornado started in the Savage Gulf State Natural area and went about 6 miles. It damaged 5 structures...including a grocery store in the Savage Gulf State Natural Area. The Tennessee Nitrate Technologies were completely destroyed near the junction of RT 111 and RT 8. The tornado dissipated on Mc Carver Loop Road. Tornado path length and width are approximations.
1997-05-02235°01'N / 86°16'W35°00'N / 86°15'W0.90 Mile150 Yards0060K100KFranklin
 Brief Description: A half dozen farm related buildings sustained damage. About 100 big trees were blown down in an apple orchard on White Gap Road. The trees were lying in different directions.
1998-04-03236°28'N / 87°24'W36°32'N / 87°19'W6.40 Miles200 Yards00100K0Montgomery
 Brief Description: 67 homes were damaged in the Hilltop area, and about 7 homes received major damage. Most of the damage was to roofs. Trees were blown down.
1998-04-03236°24'N / 86°56'W36°27'N / 86°48'W5.60 Miles200 Yards03500K0Robertson
 Brief Description: 30 homes were damaged and 7 trailers were totally destroyed. Most of the damage was on Hwy 431 in Coopertown, Reader School Rd. and also along Hwy 41 near Greenbrier. Many trees and power lines were down. One mobile home was hurled 100 yards across Hwy 431and totally destroyed. 3 were slightly injured in the mobile home.
1998-04-03236°27'N / 86°29'W36°24'N / 86°19'W15.80 Miles200 Yards00200K0Sumner
 Brief Description: The tornado downed trees, power lines and took off roofs to many homes. Areas just south of Cottontown were hardest hit. Homes were also damaged just north of Gallatin on RT 109 and Douglas Lane.
1998-04-03236°28'N / 85°46'W36°30'N / 85°36'W10.00 Miles200 Yards00100K0Jackson
 Brief Description: 3 barns were completely destroyed, several houses, a church, and other barns lost roofs.
1998-04-16235°49'N / 89°14'W35°52'N / 89°10'W5.00 Miles100 Yards02172K0Crockett
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down in Maury City and moved northeast toward Crockett Mills. One mobile home was destroyed. Seven houses were damaged. Five farm sheds were destroyed. Several trees were blown down.
1998-04-16236°34'N / 87°09'W36°34'N / 87°09'W1.10 Miles200 Yards0010K0Montgomery
 Brief Description: Many trees and power lines were blown down at Port Royal and Sandlerville Road. Homes were damaged. A TVA transmission line tower fell. This tornado moved into Robertson county.
1998-04-16236°26'N / 85°50'W36°26'N / 85°51'W3.00 Miles800 Yards005K0Macon
 Brief Description: Many trees and power lines were blown down. A roof was damaged to a house and also to a barn on White Springs Road from large tree branches.
1998-04-16236°14'N / 86°34'W36°18'N / 86°16'W18.50 Miles880 Yards001.0M0Wilson
 Brief Description: This tornado was the same one that struck downtown Nashville. The tornado was seen moving from west to east about a mile south of the NWS office. The tornado caused many trees to be uprooted, power lines were knocked down, signs damaged or blown down, and there was roof damage to homes. The Mt. Juliet Little League field was littered with aluminum and lumber blown from Marvin's Lumber Yard. Part of a roof was taken off First Bank in Mt. Juliet. The tornado continued into southern Trousdale county.
1998-04-16236°11'N / 86°41'W36°14'N / 86°34'W7.40 Miles880 Yards0050K0Davidson
 Brief Description: Trees were blown down. There was some damage to homes from fallen trees. This tornado was not as strong as the first. It started between downtown and Nashville International Airport and continued into Wilson county.
1998-04-16236°19'N / 86°17'W36°22'N / 86°07'W8.90 Miles400 Yards0000Trousdale
 Brief Description: Downed trees in rural areas.
1998-04-16236°13'N / 86°34'W36°16'N / 86°14'W20.30 Miles880 Yards003.0M0Wilson
 Brief Description: This tornado travelled just south of Lebanon Pike and did damage to homes and businesses in West Lebanon. The TRW plant received some damage on HWY 70 Bypass. Trees were uprooted and homes sustained roof damage. There was extensive agricultural losses. Approximately $60,000 worth of fencing was destroyed or damaged. 20 hogs were killed. Farmers lost 26 outbuildings, and 21 vehicles were damaged.
1998-04-16236°08'N / 86°50'W36°09'N / 86°49'W1.00 Mile800 Yards00500K0Davidson
 Brief Description: EMA official reported a tornado touchdowns at 12th and Charlotte and 6th and Union. Damage was mainly blown out windows and downed trees and power lines.
1999-01-17235°52'N / 89°26'W35°52'N / 89°22'W3.50 Miles75 Yards0112.0M0Lauderdale
 Brief Description: The tornado formed just west of Halls and travelled east. A mobile home park was damaged west of Halls with eight homes ripped apart. In Halls, several homes sustained damage to roofs, porches and siding. The tornado moved through the north end of the business district flattening two business with several other buildings including a church suffering major damage. As the tornado exited Halls, it damaged roofs, toppled trees and demolished a solitary mobile home. A total of 49 structures were damaged or destroyed.
1999-01-22236°06'N / 87°42'W36°07'N / 87°38'W4.00 Miles220 Yards01500K0Humphreys
 Brief Description: Downed trees were reported from Gorman to McEwen. The hardest hit area was McEwen with 4 homes totally destroyed, 8 homes having severe damage, and 38 homes receiving minor damage. 8 to 10 outbuildings were destroyed and 60 trees were lost. 8 cars or trucks were damaged or destroyed. A man suffered a broken neck in his trailer.
1999-05-05236°23'N / 86°28'W36°24'N / 86°27'W0.70 Mile220 Yards0171.0M0Sumner
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down and struck the Rucker Stewart M.S. in the Gallatin city limits, continued northeast and hit the Greenwood Apartments and finally the Gallatin Post Office. The damage to the school and the post office was mainly roof damage. However, the Greenwood Apartments were the hardest hit. 40 families or 100 people were temporarily homeless. 3 apartment buildings were condemned. 17 people were treated at the Sumner Regional Medical Center and released. There were no serious injuries.
2000-05-25235°44'N / 87°25'W35°44'N / 87°25'W7.80 Miles440 Yards0350K0Hickman
 Brief Description: The tornado demolished a home on Mobley Ridge Road, injuring 3 people. Many trees were blown down ...especially on the Natchez Trace Parkway. 33 homes were damaged and 3 barns were destroyed.
2000-05-25235°33'N / 86°58'W35°32'N / 86°56'W2.50 Miles220 Yards0000Maury
 Brief Description: The tornado started near Goose Creek Road and Old Highway 50. Many large trees...including well established oak trees...were uprooted. A garage was demolished near Fountain Heights.
2001-05-31235°55'N / 86°12'W35°58'N / 86°06'W6.30 Miles440 Yards1280K0Cannon
 Brief Description: The heaviest damage was at Marshall Creek Road. 2 homes were also damaged on Hughes Road. A farm house...where there was one fatality...was demolished on Marshall Creek Rd. There was destruction to a 2 story Cape Cod home, built in 1998, across the street. Bradley Jackson, age 64, was eating dinner when the tornado struck. His wife went into a closet. She was injured. Mr. Jackson was sucked out of his home and slammed against a silo 100 yards away and was killed. The couple's daughter Mrs. Felicity Vaughter, who lived across the street in a modular home, was injured. The modular home was ripped up and blown 30 to 50 yards. A washing machine landed on Mrs. Vaughter and paralyzed her. She was 3 months pregnant and lost her baby. M64PH
2001-10-24235°30'N / 86°04'W35°30'N / 86°04'W0.20 Mile20 Yards003.0M0Coffee
 Brief Description: Roof and one wall to a factory was blown off at Manchester Industrial Park. There was structural damage to other buildings in the Joint Industrial Park. Also, several trees were down. One estimate for damage from the combination of straight line winds and the tornadoes, which extended from the commercial vehicle weigh station at I-24 to the Manchester Industrial Park, continuing to Old Airport Road and the Ashbury community, were in the several millions of dollars.
2002-04-28235°43'N / 86°10'W35°43'N / 86°09'W0.90 Mile30 Yards0000Cannon
 Brief Description: One residence was destroyed along with 3 mobile homes. 6 other mobile homes had minor damage.
2002-11-09235°31'N / 89°54'W35°36'N / 89°38'W17.00 Miles440 Yards016.0M0Tipton
 Brief Description: The tornado moved into Tipton county from Mississippi county in Arkansas and moved northeast. The tornado produced significant damage across the county. One man was injured was injured by bricks blown down from the facade of a building in downtown Covington. Across the county, twenty-eight mobile homes, five houses and one business were destroyed. Approximately 275 homes and business were damaged. Numerous trees and power lines were blown down.
2002-11-09235°44'N / 89°03'W35°45'N / 89°03'W4.00 Miles220 Yards00750K0Crockett
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down just northeast of Bells and tracked northeast. Six mobile homes and four houses were destroyed. Another 62 homes and several businesses were damaged. Many trees and power poles were blown down.
2002-11-09235°52'N / 88°34'W35°57'N / 88°32'W10.00 Miles220 Yards26500K0Carroll
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down near the town of Terry and tracked northeast. The tornado hit a mobile home park near the town of Leach. Two persons were killed in one of mobile homes in the park. Three houses, two businesses and a farm building were destroyed. Forty homes and other buildings were damaged. M42MH, F65MH
2002-11-10236°35'N / 86°35'W36°35'N / 86°32'W2.60 Miles900 Yards06500K0Sumner
 Brief Description: One person was hospitalized due to injuries from the tornado. The other 5 people were treated and released for their injuries. 7 homes were destroyed, 15 homes had major damage and 14 had minor damage. 5 mobile homes were destroyed, 3 with major damage and 2 with minor damage. One business was destroyed and 3 other businesses were damaged. Several goats and cattle were killed. The heaviest damage was at 404 Glen Have Rd. 2 mobile homes were destroyed and blown off their foundation. 18 outbuildings, 16 barns and 2 churches were damaged. A Chrysler Cirrus LX sedan was flipped and pushed 20 feet. A Ford Ranger truck flipped and rolled 90 feet. A 6 inch by 6 inch board was hurled through the roof of a modular home. Kirby Building Services located at 124 Kirby Road in the industrial park area, sustained 50 percent damage according to the Portland Fire Dept. 11 tornadoes were reported in Middle Tennessee in one of the worst tornadic outbreaks ever in November. 8 people...and possibly a ninth victim...were killed in Middle Tennessee alone. Damage estimate for the tornadoes in Tennessee was placed at $160 million. Primary losses were due to houses and cars. The toll on government owned infrastructure is about $6 million. The federal government is expected to reimburse the state and affected counties for 75% of the costs of responding to the disaster. The FEMA Public Assistance Program has obligated more than $3.6 million to assist local governments. These funds will be used to reimburse local governments for debris removal, the repair of public buildings and utilities, and overtime paid to police officers, firefighters and other emergency personnel. More than 900 families across the state applied for storm aid. This was the worst tornado disaster since the April3-4 outbreak in 1974. The United States Small Business Administration has approved more than 9.7 million dollars in disaster loans to assist disaster victims with repairing their property or replacing lost personal items. The 20 counties that are eligible for disaster assistance to individuals, households, and businesses were: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Carroll, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Fentress, Gibson, Henderson, Madison, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Roane, Rutherford, Scott, Sumner and Tipton and Van Buren.
2002-11-10235°29'N / 86°19'W35°30'N / 86°16'W3.00 Miles500 Yards03100K0Bedford
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado struck near Bugscuffle and caused very minor injuries. A second floor was torn off 2 late model frame houses. Several houses had roofs stripped and a couple of barns were demolished. This tornado went into Coffee county. TEMA reported 5 homes destroyed, 6 damaged, one mobile home destroyed and a TVA 500 KV tower was destroyed. 11 tornadoes were reported in Middle Tennessee in one of the worst tornadic outbreaks ever in November. 8 people...and possibly a ninth victim...were killed in Middle Tennessee alone. Damage estimate for the tornadoes in Tennessee was placed at $160 million. Primary losses were due to houses and cars. The toll on government owned infrastructure is about $6 million. The federal government is expected to reimburse the state and affected counties for 75% of the costs of responding to the disaster. The FEMA Public Assistance Program has obligated more than $3.6 million to assist local governments. These funds will be used to reimburse local governments for debris removal, the repair of public buildings and utilities, and overtime paid to police officers, firefighters and other emergency personnel. More than 900 families across the state applied for storm aid. This was the worst tornado disaster since the April3-4 outbreak in 1974. The United States Small Business Administration has approved more than 9.7 million dollars in disaster loans to assist disaster victims with repairing their property or replacing lost personal items. The 20 counties that are eligible for disaster assistance to individuals, households, and businesses were: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Carroll, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Fentress, Gibson, Henderson, Madison, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Roane, Rutherford, Scott, Sumner and Tipton and Van Buren.
2002-11-10235°27'N / 86°13'W35°32'N / 86°06'W2.00 Miles500 Yards0050K0Coffee
 Brief Description: The F2 tornado blew down a tree and a light pole at 3737 Woodbury Highway at mile marker 9 on Woodbury Highway. Also, two fully loaded tracker trailer trucks were blown around on I-24 near Busy Corner or mile marker 105. One truck was in the east bound lane and the other tracker trailer truck in the west bound lane of I-24. 11 tornadoes were reported in Middle Tennessee in one of the worst tornadic outbreaks ever in November. 8 people...and possibly a ninth victim...were killed in Middle Tennessee alone. Damage estimate for the tornadoes in Tennessee was placed at $160 million. Primary losses were due to houses and cars. The toll on government owned infrastructure is about $6 million. The federal government is expected to reimburse the state and affected counties for 75% of the costs of responding to the disaster. The FEMA Public Assistance Program has obligated more than $3.6 million to assist local governments. These funds will be used to reimburse local governments for debris removal, the repair of public buildings and utilities, and overtime paid to police officers, firefighters and other emergency personnel. More than 900 families across the state applied for storm aid. This was the worst tornado disaster since the April3-4 outbreak in 1974. The United States Small Business Administration has approved more than 9.7 million dollars in disaster loans to assist disaster victims with repairing their property or replacing lost personal items. The 20 counties that are eligible for disaster assistance to individuals, households, and businesses were: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Carroll, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Fentress, Gibson, Henderson, Madison, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Roane, Rutherford, Scott, Sumner and Tipton and Van Buren.
2002-11-10235°30'N / 86°13'W35°34'N / 86°01'W12.30 Miles450 Yards224250K0Coffee
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado killed 2 people and injured 24 others. The 2 people were inside their mobile home when the tornado struck. The mobile home was in the New Union Heights subdivision, off state Highway 53 north of Manchester. The boy was moved from his mobile home to the Hillcrest Baptist Church. He died in the church at 705 PM CST. A relative of the boy, a 43-year-old male, was also killed. He was impaled on the upright lid of a washing machine. 24 homes were destroyed, 51 other homes were damaged. 9 mobile homes were destroyed and 5 were damaged. 14 outbuildings also were damaged. M10MH, M43MH 11 tornadoes were reported in Middle Tennessee in one of the worst tornadic outbreaks ever in November. 8 people...and possibly a ninth victim...were killed in Middle Tennessee alone. Damage estimate for the tornadoes in Tennessee was placed at $160 million. Primary losses were due to houses and cars. The toll on government owned infrastructure is about $6 million. The federal government is expected to reimburse the state and affected counties for 75% of the costs of responding to the disaster. The FEMA Public Assistance Program has obligated more than $3.6 million to assist local governments. These funds will be used to reimburse local governments for debris removal, the repair of public buildings and utilities, and overtime paid to police officers, firefighters and other emergency personnel. More than 900 families across the state applied for storm aid. This was the worst tornado disaster since the April3-4 outbreak in 1974. The United States Small Business Administration has approved more than 9.7 million dollars in disaster loans to assist disaster victims with repairing their property or replacing lost personal items. The 20 counties that are eligible for disaster assistance to individuals, households, and businesses were: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Carroll, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Fentress, Gibson, Henderson, Madison, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Roane, Rutherford, Scott, Sumner and Tipton and Van Buren.
2002-11-10235°45'N / 85°28'W35°45'N / 85°25'W2.90 Miles100 Yards0075K0Van Buren
 Brief Description: EMA reported a frame house was demolished at intersection of Highway 111 and Highway 30. 11 tornadoes were reported in Middle Tennessee in one of the worst tornadic outbreaks ever in November. 8 people...and possibly a ninth victim...were killed in Middle Tennessee alone. Damage estimate for the tornadoes in Tennessee was placed at $160 million. Primary losses were due to houses and cars. The toll on government owned infrastructure is about $6 million. The federal government is expected to reimburse the state and affected counties for 75% of the costs of responding to the disaster. The FEMA Public Assistance Program has obligated more than $3.6 million to assist local governments. These funds will be used to reimburse local governments for debris removal, the repair of public buildings and utilities, and overtime paid to police officers, firefighters and other emergency personnel. More than 900 families across the state applied for storm aid. This was the worst tornado disaster since the April3-4 outbreak in 1974. The United States Small Business Administration has approved more than 9.7 million dollars in disaster loans to assist disaster victims with repairing their property or replacing lost personal items. The 20 counties that are eligible for disaster assistance to individuals, households, and businesses were: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Carroll, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Fentress, Gibson, Henderson, Madison, Marshall, Montgomery, Morgan, Roane, Rutherford, Scott, Sumner and Tipton and Van Buren.
2002-11-10236°12'N / 84°12'W36°12'N / 84°05'W5.50 Miles75 Yards00213K0Anderson
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado produced a damage path 75 yards wide for a distance of 5.5 miles from near Briceville to Medford. The Medford community received the brunt of the damage, which was concentrated along Highway 25W, Leinart Road, Bryant Circle and Old and New Clear Branch roads. In all, 32 homes were damaged while 3 were totally destroyed. In addition, 9 mobile homes were damaged.
2003-05-04236°21'N / 88°51'W36°21'N / 88°51'W4.00 Miles250 Yards00750K0Weakley
 Brief Description: The tornado touched on the south side of the city of Martin and tracked northeast. One business was destroyed. At Martin Westview High School, two storage buildings were blown away. At Martin Middle School, the gymnasium roof was ripped off. At Martin Elementary School, part of the roof was blown off. Many trees and power lines were knocked down.
2003-05-04236°13'N / 88°25'W36°18'N / 88°10'W17.00 Miles200 Yards003.0M0Henry
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down southwest of Paris and moved northeast through the south side of the city. Five homes were destroyed and over 150 other homes were damaged. Three commercial building were destroyed and nineteen others including a school were damaged.
2003-05-04236°00'N / 89°25'W36°07'N / 89°16'W15.00 Miles200 Yards01050.0M0Dyer
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down just southwest of Dyersburg and tracked northeast through the middle of the city. Over 70 homes were destroyed and more than 300 were damaged. Eight commercial buildings were destroyed and nearly 20 were damaged.
2005-11-15236°15'N / 88°23'W36°29'N / 88°09'W20.00 Miles200 Yards0136.5M0Henry
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down southwest of Paris and moved northeast skirting by the northern edge of Paris. Thirty homes were destroyed and several manufacturing plants were demolished. Over 100 homes were damaged.
2005-11-15236°08'N / 88°06'W36°09'N / 88°03'W1.20 Miles150 Yards00400K0Benton
 Brief Description: Home destroyed. Roof was gone and walls left standing on a home on French Store Rd. Residents and businesses who suffered damage from the tornadoes on Novemeber 15, 2005 are eligible for low interest loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). Counties declared eligible for the loans are: Benton, Henry, Montgomery, Carroll, Cheatham, Dickson, Houston, Robertson, Stewart, and Weakley. The SBA offer loans to renters and home owners to repair or replace personal property, such as furniture or clothing, damaged by the storms. Loans up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair damage to their primary residence. Loans of $1.5 million are available for businesses and non-profit organizations to repair damage to real estate, machinery or equipment, and inventory. Economic Disaster Loans are also available for small businesses that are unable to pay their bills or meet operating expenses.
2005-11-15236°15'N / 87°47'W36°16'N / 87°46'W0.50 Mile200 Yards00650K0Houston
 Brief Description: Well built modular home was destroyed at intersection of Waverly Road and Long Branch Road. Other homes in the area were damaged. Damage was estimated to be $650K by the EMA Director.
2005-11-15236°29'N / 87°19'W36°30'N / 87°18'W1.00 Mile400 Yards00500K0Montgomery
 Brief Description: Well built brick home lost roof. Very large oak trees snapped around home. This storm complex came from Houston County. Total damage from tornadoes in Montgomery County is about $1.6 million from the EMA Office.
2005-11-15236°11'N / 87°26'W36°11'N / 87°25'W1.00 Mile200 Yards0020K0Dickson
 Brief Description: Damage to homes. This storm complex came from Humphreys County.
2005-11-15235°11'N / 87°45'W35°15'N / 87°40'W6.00 Miles100 Yards01100K0Wayne
 Brief Description: The NWS Storm Survey found that a tornado first touched down just south of Collinwood along Highway 13 near Shackelford Funeral Home. The tornado moved northeast and damaged several homes and snapped off numerous large trees along Ayers Rd. A barn was destroyed near the intersection of Ayers Road and Millrock. Several homes near this intersection received significant structural damage. Two trailer homes were damaged and were moved off their foundations. The tornado contiued to move northeast and did significant damage to the Millrock Baptist Church. Along Shawnette Road, more homes were damaged and numerous trees were blown down. Between Little Shawnette Road and Double Branch Road, a home was nearly destroyed. This was the last evidence of damage from the tornado in Wayne County. One injury occurred while a woman was inside her house on Shawnettee Road when the tornado moved the house off the foundation.
2006-04-02235°36'N / 89°18'W35°36'N / 89°17'W0.80 Mile30 Yards00400K0Haywood
 Brief Description: A F2 intensity tornado briefly touched down in the Hickory Trail subdivision just west of the city of Brownsville. One home was completely destroyed. One home was moved off of its foundation. Twenty-four homes experienced partial roof damage.
2006-04-07235°48'N / 88°24'W35°49'N / 88°23'W3.00 Miles50 Yards005K0Henderson
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down near the Parker Cross Roads community and tracked northeast into Carroll County. Damage in Henderson County was limited to scattered tree damage. The tornado began as a F0 in Henderson County and strengthened into a F2 tornado as it moved towards Yuma in Carroll County.
2006-04-07235°50'N / 88°22'W35°52'N / 88°18'W6.00 Miles100 Yards052.0M0Carroll
 Brief Description: The tornado moved out of Henderson County and continued northeast into Carroll County. The town of Yuma was significantly affected by this tornado with the highest concentration of damage occurring in the residential area between Yuma Baptist Church and the south side of Highway 424. There were five injuries as a result of the tornado. Fifteen homes were destroyed and twenty-nine homes were damaged. The Yuma Community Center, a former school building, was destroyed. The Yuma Church of Christ sustained significant roof damage. Numerous trees and power lines were also knocked down. The tornado continued to travel northeast past Yuma and eventually lifted at the Natchez Trace State Park near Hester Trail Road.
2006-04-07235°53'N / 88°11'W35°53'N / 88°01'W6.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Benton
 Brief Description: One home was destroyed, and 15 other homes and businesses had major damage. One home lost its entire roof on Conley Branch Rd. Other homes had roof damage. Numerous large trees were snapped, uprooted or blown down.
2007-11-14235°03'N / 85°41'W35°02'N / 85°39'W2.00 Miles200 Yards092.5M0KMarion
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Nine injuries resulted from the EF2 rated tornado which heavily damaged the roof of the Kimball Baptist Church as well as damaging several vehicles in the church parking lot. The tornado also destroyed several modular homes between Main Street and Interstate 24. Peak wind speed was estimated at 130 mph with a path width of 200 yards. Path length was 2 miles. EPISODE NARRATIVE: High shear with moderate instability in the warm sector ahead of strong late Fall cold front. The Event was characterized by a few wind damage reports and an EF 2 tornado (Marion County) all across Southeast Tennessee.
2008-01-10235°19'N / 87°35'W35°20'N / 87°34'W1.00 Mile400 Yards00200K0KWayne
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A National Weather Service Storm Survey indicated that an EF2 tornado with wind speeds of 111-135 MPH struck Wayne County. The worst damage was at 9110 Buttermilk Ridge Rd. A 30 foot by 30 foot metal barn was completely destroyed. Other metal barns received considerable damage with most of the roof blown off. Some homes lost shingles on their roofs. A dog house that was anchored onto a concrete platform was blown away. Several trees were snapped at the trunk. A wooden plank was planted into the ground. Sheets of metal from the barn were carried about a half mile away into some trees on the Natchez Trace Parkway...just across into Lawrence county. Trees were lying in different directions on the Natchez Trace Parkway. Numerous trees were also uprooted at this location on the Natchez Trace. The EMA Director assessed the damage by the tornado at 200,000 dollars. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Squall line type thunderstorms, with some bow echoes, occurred on January, 10. Isolated supercells spawned a tornado in Wayne County.
2008-02-05235°18'N / 89°45'W35°23'N / 89°40'W7.00 Miles150 Yards011.0M0KShelby
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down one quarter mile east of Brunswick Road interchange along Highway 385 in the Salem Estates Subdivision. The tornado tracked non-continuously northeast to the Tipton County line, near the Collierville-Arlington Road. Damage sustained in the Salem Estates subdivision was rated an EF-0. One roof of a home was partially removed along with several blown out windows. In addition, some minor tree damage occurred in this area. Further northeast, along Moose Road west of Beaver Creek, the tornado intensified and produced EF-2 damage. Significant tree damage occurred from the tornado in this area. In addition, two power line support towers were knocked down and one was twisted. Significant damage occurred further northeast along Osborntown Road as extensive tree damage was observed. Large trees were snapped and uprooted. In addition, two large well constructed new homes were heavily damaged. One home had more than half of its roof removed along with all windows blown out. Brick was also dislodged from portions of the structure. The second home received extensive damage with the entire second story being removed from the tornado. Inside walls were compromised and debris was deposited inside the home and in the front yard. One minor injury occurred from this segment of EF-2 rated damage. Additional damage occurred further northeast across Macedonia Road producing additional tree damage and minor damage to one home and one mobile home. Damage also occurred just south of where the tornado crossed into Tipton County where five homes sustained light to moderate damage along Collierville-Arlington Road. This damage has been rated EF-1. One of the homes sustained significant damage to portions of the roof and adjoining levels. The other four homes had damage to the roofs and windows. Large trees, some up to 3 feet in diameter were snapped and uprooted. The tornado then tracked into Tipton County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05234°59'N / 89°59'W35°03'N / 89°51'W8.00 Miles440 Yards313100.0M0KShelby
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado continued northeast from DeSoto County, Mississippi. After the tornado crossed into Tennessee, several warehouses sustained damage. The DSC warehouse near Clarke Road was struck causing EF-2 damage. Three people were killed inside the warehouse. Hardy Bottling Company sustained substantial damage as well. Tractor-trailers were tossed about in the area. Windows were shattered in the Willow Lake Business Park and utility poles and trees were snapped in the area. A utility substation sustained severe damage along Clarke Road causing major power outages in the area. The tornado then continued northeast and struck homes along Maple Tree Drive and Pinbranch Court. Five homes received major damage and had to be condemned. Other homes sustained roof damage. The tornado continued northeast and struck the Hickory Ridge Mall causing a wall to collapse at the Sears Department Store. Six injuries occurred at the mall. This damage was estimated at EF-1. The tornado then struck a Taco Bell along Winchester Road before lifting. Thirteen people in all were transported to an area hospital due to injuries sustained from the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05235°24'N / 89°19'W35°33'N / 89°04'W17.00 Miles600 Yards00200K0KHaywood
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado crossed into Haywood County from Fayette County. The tornado produced EF-2 damage in Dancyville. One home was destroyed and another suffered severe damage. A church also had major damage and numerous large trees were uprooted. The tornado continued northeast and caused destruction in Hillville. Two mobile homes were totally destroyed and one house had major damage. A convenience store also suffered roof damage. In addition, an outbuilding was completely flattened and large trees were uprooted or snapped. Several other homes had minor damage along the path. The tornado continued northeast eventually crossing into Madison County. Cleanup costs incurred by Haywood County totaled $168,980. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05235°46'N / 88°41'W35°46'N / 88°40'W00200K0KMadison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A brief EF-2 tornado touchdown occurred in Spring Creek along Highway 152 about one quarter mile west of Highway 70. One home suffered total roof loss and a partial failure of the front exterior wall. Three additional homes received extensive roof damage. Large trees were snapped and uprooted. Maximum winds were estimated at 125 mph with a maximum width of 150 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system tracked from Northern Arkansas into Southern Missouri during the evening hours of February 5th, 2008. Supercells developed out ahead of the system during the late afternoon into the early evening. The storms produced tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds. As the supercells moved east during the evening, a cold front moved into West Tennessee. A squall line developed along the front and produced another round of large hail and damaging winds. The front continued to push east into the overnight hours.
2008-02-05236°15'N / 88°00'W36°18'N / 87°57'W4.00 Miles440 Yards0010.0M0KBenton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado came out of northern Benton County and caused damage in Houston County. Trees were uprooted and snapped, and homes were damaged along Highway 147 from the Tennessee River to just west-northwest of McKinnon. There were 20 power poles down on Danville Rd. Worst damage was from Big Sandy to Faxon to Grannys Branch. Fourteen homes were destroyed, and one other had major damage. About half of these homes were mobile homes. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-02-05236°18'N / 87°57'W36°19'N / 87°55'W2.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0KHouston
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Trees were down. Homes were damaged. TEMA reported 10 homes had major damage, 2 mobile homes were destroyed and 20 mobile homes had major damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-02-05235°48'N / 87°17'W35°51'N / 87°12'W5.00 Miles300 Yards01500K0KHickman
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Extensive damage in the Brushy Community. Trees were down, and homes were damaged. One person was injured. TEMA reported 7 homes were destroyed, and 38 homes had major damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-02-05235°51'N / 87°12'W36°02'N / 86°56'W20.00 Miles300 Yards000.3M0KWilliamson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Homes damaged in Leaper Fork area. One house collapsed and another hit on Cold Water Rd. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-02-05236°25'N / 86°16'W36°27'N / 86°10'W6.00 Miles880 Yards251K0KTrousdale
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Tornado ripped a gas plant and caused a gas leak and fire at the Columbia Gulf Transmission Company at 5422 Green Grove Road in Hartsville, TN. The fire eventually burned itself out. Two people were killed, and 5 people were injured. Ten homes were destroyed, and 23 homes had major damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The Super Severe Weather Outbreak on Feb. 5, 2008 produced supercelluar thunderstorms, well in advance of a multicell line of thunderstorms. The whole episode lasted about 6 hours. This occurred ironically while many states, including Tennessee, were participating in the Super Tuesday Primary Election. Fortunately, polls had already closed in the mid state when these tornadoes struck.
2008-04-11235°31'N / 86°26'W35°35'N / 86°19'W7.00 Miles200 Yards00100K0KBedford
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A low end EF2 tornado leveled 2 barns, took part of a roof and the back walls of a residential home at 2309 Fairfield Pike. Trees were snapped and uprooted. Other homes had roof damage. Utility poles were bent along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: There were six confirmed tornadoes on April 11, 2008. Large hail and straight line winds were also reported.
2008-05-02235°57'N / 89°40'W35°58'N / 89°39'W1.00 Mile40 Yards0040K0KDyer
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado briefly touched down along Chic Road, just west of the Moss Island State Wildlife Management Area. The tornado traveled northeast for roughly one mile, crossing the Great River Road before lifting. A mobile home was destroyed and several power lines were knocked down. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front approached the Midsouth during the afternoon hours of May 2nd, 2008, Numerous showers and thunderstorms developed ahead and along the front. Storms quickly became severe and produced large hail, damaging winds, flash flooding, and a few tornadoes. The severe weather continued into the early morning hours of May 3rd, 2008 with the passage of the front.
2009-04-10235°21'N / 85°22'W5.00 Miles175 Yards00100K0KSequatchie
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An F2 tornado with maximum wind speeds of 120 mph occurred around 2 miles south of Dunlap. The tornado initially touched down along Frank Tate Road with a maximum wind speed of 90 mph (EF-1) and a width of 100 yards. The tornado continued in a northeast path and increased in size to an EF-2 with a maximum wind speed of 120 mph and a width of 175 yards. Several large hardwood trees were snapped off near the trunk base with extensive damage occurring in a concentrated path. The tornado continued its northeast movement and finally weakened to a EF-1 with a maximum wind speed of 100 mph as it dissipated at the foothill of Signal Mountain. A school and several homes suffered minor to moderate wind damage along the nearly 5 mile of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front tracked across east Tennessee during the afternoon and evening hours. The resulting squall line triggered numerous thunderstorm wind damage reports along with large hail. Three tornadoes were also reported. One person was injured.
2009-05-08236°27'N / 83°34'W2.00 Miles100 Yards000K0KClaiborne
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF-2 tornado with maximum wind speed of 110 miles an hour occurred around five miles southwest of Tazewell. The tornado initially touched down along Cole Road and quickly produced 110 mph winds. It lifted the roof off of a home on Cole Road moved east across the road and moved east across the road and destroyed two large wooden barns carrying debris up to a half mile away. Several trees were also snapped off at mid trunk level. The tornado continued in a 2.2 mile path and dissipated near Neely Road. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A highly organized mesoscale convective vorticity maximum with strong low to mid tropospheric flow coupled with moderate instability resulted in the development of discrete supercellular thunderstorms. These storms produced a long-lived tornado across Northeast Tennessee late in the afternoon and another long duration tornado across Southwest Virginia later in the evening.
2009-05-08236°21'N / 84°25'W5.00 Miles200 Yards0090K0KScott
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF2 tornado with a maximum wind speed of 135 miles an hour occurred around five miles southeast of Huntsville. The tornado initially touched down just west of the Fairview community with a maximum wind speed of 90 mph (EF-1) and a width of 100 yards. The tornado continued along an east path and increased in size and intensity to an EF-2 with a maximum wind speed at 135 mph and a width of 200 yards. Several large hardwood trees were snapped off near trunk level and a free standing cell phone tower was collapsed and twisted by the tornado winds. Extensive damage occurred in a concentrated path at least 80 yards in length at the 135 mph EF-2 level. The tornado continued east and finally weakened to an EF-1 with a maximum wind speed of 100 mph as it dissipated at the foothill of Gray Mountain. At least seven homes suffered minor to moderate wind damage along the 4.5 mile path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A highly organized mesoscale convective vorticity maximum with strong low to mid tropospheric flow coupled with moderate instability resulted in the development of discrete supercellular thunderstorms. These storms produced a long-lived tornado across Northeast Tennessee late in the afternoon and another long duration tornado across Southwest Virginia later in the evening.
2010-04-25235°37'N / 84°08'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0020K0KBlount
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The NWS storm survey determined a tornado tracked from Loudon County for one-half of a mile along Thompson Bridge road. It was classified as an EF2 tornado with winds estimated at 110 mph with a path width of 100 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong low pressure system along with an associated cold front tracked across the area triggering thunderstorms during the evening and overnight hours. A tornado touched down in eastern Monroe County, then tracked across southern Loudon County and finally dissipated in western Blount County. Another weak tornado touched down briefly in Polk County.
2010-05-02235°53'N / 87°30'W35°54'N / 87°27'W4.00 Miles250 Yards00200K10KHickman
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Hundreds of hardwood trees were snapped, several barns were destroyed, and a brick home suffered significant roof damage along the tornado's 3.9 mile track. The last evidence of damage was along Keys Branch Road. Maximum wind speeds in the tornado were estimated to be around 110 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A frontal boundary setup across Western and Middle Tennessee late Friday night (April 30), and remained through the weekend. A persistent southerly flow fed moisture into the area and precipitable water values rose to almost 2 inches, based on data from KOHX upper air soundings. As a series of shortwaves moved through, a band of showers and thunderstorms developed and remained nearly stationary for much of the day on Saturday, May 1st and Sunday, May 2nd, resulting in widespread record flooding across much of Middle Tennessee. Some of these thunderstorms became severe also, resulting in thunderstorm wind damage and seven confirmed tornadoes across Middle Tennessee.
2010-05-02235°47'N / 87°42'W35°51'N / 87°33'W9.00 Miles600 Yards01600K10KHickman
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Thousands of hardwood trees were snapped and uprooted along the tornado's 9.15 mile track. Some trees were reduced down to stubs. The tornado was strongest as it crossed highway 50. A brick home suffered considerable structural damage and a woman was injured. Several barns were completely destroyed. The tornado was nearly 1/3 of a mile wide at this point. The last evidence of damage was near the intersection of Dodd Hollow and Piney Roads where a few trees were snapped. Maximum wind speeds in the tornado were estimated to be around 125 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A frontal boundary setup across Western and Middle Tennessee late Friday night (April 30), and remained through the weekend. A persistent southerly flow fed moisture into the area and precipitable water values rose to almost 2 inches, based on data from KOHX upper air soundings. As a series of shortwaves moved through, a band of showers and thunderstorms developed and remained nearly stationary for much of the day on Saturday, May 1st and Sunday, May 2nd, resulting in widespread record flooding across much of Middle Tennessee. Some of these thunderstorms became severe also, resulting in thunderstorm wind damage and seven confirmed tornadoes across Middle Tennessee.
2010-05-02235°22'N / 88°21'W35°22'N / 88°21'W1.00 Mile880 Yards02100K0KHardin
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado tracked northeast into Hardin County from McNairy County and hit the town of Milledgeville. One house sustained major damage while another sustained roof damage. Minor damage occurred to a shed. Several trees were knocked down in the area. Two injuries occurred from the tornado. This storm went on to produce a tornado in Henderson and Decatur Counties. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level disturbance slowly approached the Mid-South during the evening of April 30th, 2010 as a cold front became stationary to the west. This pattern remained in place through the evening hours of May 2nd, 2010. South to southwest winds pumped warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and created a very unstable atmosphere. Showers and thunderstorms developed in association with the front during the early evening hours and moved east into Eastern Arkansas shortly before midnight. Additional thunderstorms occurred in association with the upper level disturbance. Due to the unstable atmosphere, thunderstorms quickly became severe producing large hail, damaging winds, and flash flooding. The severe weather evolved into an outbreak by May 1st and 2nd. Historic rainfall and flash flooding in addition to large hail and damaging winds occurred during the early morning hours of May 1st with several tornadoes occurring during the afternoon hours of May 1st to early morning hours of May 2nd.
2010-05-02235°48'N / 88°54'W35°49'N / 88°51'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00500K0KGibson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down on the south side of Humboldt and several houses received roof, siding and garage door damage. One home in Humboldt received partial roof loss and garage damage while the storage shed and wooden swing set were completely destroyed. Several power poles were knocked down before a winery received tree and vine damage. Some tiles were stripped off the business home at the winery. One rural home suffered more extensive damage near the end of the track with partial roof loss, porch removal and brick veneer ripped off the northeast corner of the home. Windows were also blown out on the home with a large well built brick supported carport completely destroyed. A well built 40 foot by 40 foot wood and metal shed on the property was completely destroyed with the wood support beams snapped off one foot above the concrete slab. A tour bus nearby was lifted and turned 180 degrees. A semi trailer on the property was also flipped over. Numerous large trees along the path were either uprooted or damaged. A few smaller trees were snapped off one to two feet above the ground. Several power lines were also knocked down before the tornado lifted near Pleasant Hill Road. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level disturbance slowly approached the Mid-South during the evening of April 30th, 2010 as a cold front became stationary to the west. This pattern remained in place through the evening hours of May 2nd, 2010. South to southwest winds pumped warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and created a very unstable atmosphere. Showers and thunderstorms developed in association with the front during the early evening hours and moved east into Eastern Arkansas shortly before midnight. Additional thunderstorms occurred in association with the upper level disturbance. Due to the unstable atmosphere, thunderstorms quickly became severe producing large hail, damaging winds, and flash flooding. The severe weather evolved into an outbreak by May 1st and 2nd. Historic rainfall and flash flooding in addition to large hail and damaging winds occurred during the early morning hours of May 1st with several tornadoes occurring during the afternoon hours of May 1st to early morning hours of May 2nd.
2010-05-02235°07'N / 88°41'W35°22'N / 88°21'W25.00 Miles880 Yards0107.3M0KMcnairy
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down near the intersection of Sulphur Springs Road and Steadman Road, southwest of Selmer, and tracked northeast. This tornado was spawned from the same cell that produced a tornado from near Ashland, Mississippi to near Pocahontas, Tennessee and just west of Ramer, Tennessee in McNairy County. Tree and minor roof damage was noted at the beginning of the track. The tornado tracked further to the northeast and hit northern parts of Selmer. A carport failed due to fallen trees at the Christmas Tree Farm. A large home was moved off the foundation as well as a double wide mobile home. A single wide trailer was destroyed and wrapped around a tree. Total collapse of a few buildings occurred as well. Large trees were knocked down and minor roof damage was noted. The tornado then tracked further to the northeast and hit Bethesda and Purdy. Two churches were destroyed. A brick home sustained major roof damage while a horse barn was completely destroyed. The tornado tracked further to the northeast and hit the town of Good Hope. Two homes were destroyed. The tornado continued to the northeast crossing into Hardin County just to the southwest Milledgeville. At least ten injuries occurred in McNairy County from the tornado. In total, 22 homes were completely destroyed with 59 homes sustaining major damage. At least minor damage occurred to 219 homes. Fifteen mobile homes were destroyed and eleven sustained major damage. Twenty mobile homes received minor damage. Several other buildings and outbuildings were damaged or destroyed as well. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An upper level disturbance slowly approached the Mid-South during the evening of April 30th, 2010 as a cold front became stationary to the west. This pattern remained in place through the evening hours of May 2nd, 2010. South to southwest winds pumped warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and created a very unstable atmosphere. Showers and thunderstorms developed in association with the front during the early evening hours and moved east into Eastern Arkansas shortly before midnight. Additional thunderstorms occurred in association with the upper level disturbance. Due to the unstable atmosphere, thunderstorms quickly became severe producing large hail, damaging winds, and flash flooding. The severe weather evolved into an outbreak by May 1st and 2nd. Historic rainfall and flash flooding in addition to large hail and damaging winds occurred during the early morning hours of May 1st with several tornadoes occurring during the afternoon hours of May 1st to early morning hours of May 2nd.
2010-10-26235°07'N / 85°11'W1.00 Mile100 Yards06200K0KHamilton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: NWS storm survey determined an EF2 tornado with maximum wind speed of 125 mph and a length of 1.2 miles with a path width of 100 yards touched down in the vicinity of the Chickamauga Dam. Damage from the storm included a roof torn off an apartment complex, a cement plant demolished, several vehicles on Highway 153 damaged and numerous trees and powerlines downed. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front tracked through the region triggering scattered severe thunderstorms during the afternoon and evening hours. Storm reports contained mainly damaging thunderstorm wind, but an EF2 tornado formed in Hamilton County. Six people were injured. Tornadoes also formed in Bradley, Loudon and Marion Counties.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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