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Stockham, NE Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Stockham is about the same as Nebraska average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Stockham is much higher than Nebraska average and is much higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #504

Stockham, NE
0.01
Nebraska
0.04
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Stockham, NE
0.0000
Nebraska
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #13

Stockham, NE
345.44
Nebraska
205.07
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 3,666 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Stockham, NE were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:8Cold:31Dense Fog:0Drought:4
Dust Storm:2Flood:144Hail:2,033Heat:11Heavy Snow:8
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:12Landslide:0Strong Wind:34
Thunderstorm Winds:1,148Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:0Winter Storm:81Winter Weather:12
Other:138 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Stockham, NE.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Stockham, NE.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Stockham, NE.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 120 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Stockham, NE.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
5.61964-05-05540°36'N / 98°16'W40°51'N / 97°50'W28.40 Miles880 Yards0025K0Clay
9.71990-03-13440°38'N / 97°50'W40°43'N / 97°42'W15.00 Miles440 Yards0025.0M0Fillmore
9.82008-05-29240°51'N / 98°02'W40°52'N / 97°53'W8.00 Miles1000 Yards0020K100KHamilton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado started southwest of Aurora and moved southeast. The parent supercell had produced a rear flank downdraft (RFD) that was traveling down Interstate 80. As the tornado interacted with this RFD about a mile north of the Interstate, it rapidly increased in size and strength and started to move eastward. At this point the tornado damaged several homes and brought down a self standing cell tower. One home along Highway 14 sustained considerable damage. The tornado then moved to the northeast and dissipated just southwest of the village of Hampton. To the west of Hampton, several empty rail cars were blown off the tracks by what appeared to be inflow winds into the tornado. A major high voltage power line was brought down by the tornado as well as many power lines and poles in the rural areas. Also many center pivot irrigation systems were blown over along the tornadoes path. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A significant severe weather outbreak occurred during the late afternoon and evening of May 29th. Several tornadoes were reported from near Elwood to north of York. Two tornadoes caused damage in the city of Kearney and one occurred just to the south of town. Another tornado damaged homes and power poles near Aurora. Another tornado started in north-central Kansas and entered south-central Nebraska near Hubbell. Very strong winds moved down a portion of Interstate 80 and pushed cars and trucks off of the roadway near Aurora. Other areas of south-central Nebraska received heavy rains and hail. Hail to the size of baseballs was reported near Arapahoe in Furnas County. These storms also produce a lot of rainfall over areas that had fairly wet ground. Several areas of flooding were noted in the Platte and Republican River valleys.
12.91992-06-15240°54'N / 97°54'W0.10 Mile30 Yards002.5M0Hamilton
13.71967-06-13240°48'N / 98°10'W41°00'N / 97°55'W18.80 Miles33 Yards000K0Hamilton
13.82009-06-17240°52'N / 98°10'W40°52'N / 98°04'W5.00 Miles450 Yards00250K75KHamilton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large tornado touched down west of Aurora on Highway 34, then traveled east approximately 5 miles before lifting. In its path, it destroyed a house and several outbuildings, power poles, trees, and overturned about a dozen railcars. The occupants were able to seek shelter before the tornado struck. Numerous storm chasers documented this storm. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Early on in the afternoon, a few scattered thunderstorms developed across eastern portions of South Central Nebraska, with one severe thunderstorm across Thayer County, where quarter to baseball size hail was reported. The main show came later during the early evening hours, after a surface warm front had moved north into the area. Near the front, good instability and shear was present, as was moisture. Scattered thunderstorms developed along the edge of the mid level cap near the surface front, and with the environment present, some became strong to severe. The main storm of the day developed in Buffalo County, then moved east across Hall and Hamilton Counties. In each of these counties, this storm produced a tornado, with the largest occurring in Hamilton County, along Highway 34 near the town of Aurora. This tornado caused EF2 damage to a home in its path, before dissipating a few miles west of Aurora. Other damage caused by this storm included downed power poles and derailed train cars, as well as roof damage to the Iams plant caused by strong inflow winds. Weaker tornadoes were reported on the south side of Grand Island in Hall County, as well as north of Gibbon in Buffalo County, where EF1 damage occurred at a few farmsteads. Penny to tennis ball size hail was also reported across the area, causing damage to crops, with one report of broken house windows in Valley County.
14.41982-06-14240°44'N / 98°16'W40°51'N / 98°08'W10.00 Miles30 Yards002.5M0Hamilton
15.81953-06-07240°47'N / 98°10'W40°52'N / 98°15'W6.60 Miles33 Yards0025K0Hamilton
15.91990-03-13440°21'N / 98°11'W40°38'N / 97°50'W28.00 Miles440 Yards0325.0M0Clay
17.11986-09-18240°41'N / 98°16'W1.00 Mile40 Yards0025K0Clay
19.11957-05-20240°46'N / 98°22'W40°58'N / 98°08'W18.20 Miles33 Yards000K0Hall
19.71982-05-26241°00'N / 97°59'W0.80 Mile30 Yards00250K0Hamilton
19.72004-05-22240°27'N / 98°16'W40°29'N / 97°59'W20.00 Miles700 Yards004.5M1.0MClay
 Brief Description: A large tornado moved out of Adams county and into central Clay county. Approximately 15 residences were hit by the tornado. Thirty-eight cars of a forty-nine car Union Pacific train were derailed southeast of Glenvil. Over 100 center irrigation pivots were damaged or destroyed across Clay County. One of the worst severe weather outbreaks in recent years struck south-central Nebraska the afternoon and evening of May 22. No less than 17 different tornadoes rolled across south-central Nebraska. Dozens of homes were damaged and a few completely destroyed. Over 250 center irrigation pivots were damaged or destroyed in south-central Nebraska alone. Large hail and strong straight-line winds of up to 80 mph also wreaked havoc on the region. Several million dollars in property damage was reported. Hundreds of power poles were snapped resulting in dozens of miles of downed electrical line.
19.91998-05-15240°40'N / 97°34'W40°41'N / 97°34'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00750K150KFillmore
 Brief Description: Midday thunderstorms spawned a tornado south of York damaging a farmstead significantly. The tornado set down two miles north of Fairmont and was on the ground for seven miles before lifting just east of McCool Junction. The tornado nearly destroyed at least one farmstead and caused damage to power poles and lines and center pivot systems. A semi tractor trailer was overturned three miles southeast of York. The driver sustained minor injuries. The same storm also produced a brief tornado south of Benedict destroying two hog confinement facilities but no hogs were injured.
20.01954-07-30240°52'N / 97°37'W1.50 Miles880 Yards0025K0York
20.11957-04-25340°22'N / 97°57'W40°39'N / 97°24'W34.70 Miles220 Yards00250K0Clay
20.22001-09-22340°26'N / 97°58'W40°25'N / 97°58'W9.00 Miles1250 Yards001.3M1.5MClay
 Brief Description: Tornado exited Clay county and entered Fillmore county. A cold front sagging south into a very unstable airmass was the trigger for severe thunderstorms which produced two tornadoes and some hail across the region. Within an hour of the initial thunderstorm development, the first tornado set down southwest of Saronville in Clay county. This rope-like tornado was witnessed by many people, including numerous storm chasers, in Clay county. The tornado drifted slowly south across farmland and damaged two pivots and did some minor crop damage. The second tornado, which was rated an F3, was on the ground for about 30 minutes. The tornado basically followed state highway 74 from north of Edgar in southeast Clay county, to northwest of Shickley in far southwest Fillmore county. Along its path, 14 irrigation pivots were destroyed, at least 15 grain bins were lost and two farmsteads sustained extensive damage. One farmhouse was deemed a total loss, while another incurred broken windows, damaged siding and minor roof damage. Over 10,000 acres of corn and soybeans suffered an average yield loss of 30 percent.
20.41980-06-03240°51'N / 98°18'W40°51'N / 98°17'W000K0Hall
20.51964-05-05540°51'N / 97°50'W41°03'N / 97°34'W19.40 Miles880 Yards2302.5M0York
21.51975-06-02240°40'N / 98°33'W40°23'N / 97°59'W35.50 Miles300 Yards00250K0Adams
21.61980-06-03240°54'N / 98°18'W40°51'N / 98°18'W3.40 Miles33 Yards000K0Hall
21.71968-07-30240°50'N / 97°35'W40°50'N / 97°32'W0025K0York
21.91964-05-05540°33'N / 98°22'W40°36'N / 98°16'W6.10 Miles880 Yards2202.5M0Adams
22.21980-06-03240°54'N / 98°17'W40°54'N / 98°18'W0182.5M0Hall
23.61980-06-03440°54'N / 98°21'W40°54'N / 98°18'W000K0Hall
23.71976-04-15240°22'N / 98°06'W40°23'N / 97°53'W11.10 Miles100 Yards00250K0Clay
24.11990-03-13440°43'N / 97°42'W41°02'N / 97°22'W23.00 Miles440 Yards0225.0M0York
24.31980-06-03440°55'N / 98°18'W40°55'N / 98°21'W3110250.0M0Hall
24.31978-04-05240°27'N / 98°16'W40°28'N / 98°15'W002.5M0Clay
24.71991-04-11240°21'N / 98°10'W40°26'N / 98°07'W6.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Clay
25.01974-04-20340°19'N / 97°44'W40°36'N / 97°29'W23.40 Miles33 Yards0025K0Nuckolls
25.01980-06-03440°55'N / 98°21'W40°54'N / 98°21'W1.10 Miles33 Yards000K0Hall
25.31980-06-03340°56'N / 98°21'W40°55'N / 98°20'W000K0Hall
26.01956-05-10240°35'N / 98°30'W40°44'N / 98°22'W12.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Adams
26.61956-06-06240°33'N / 97°40'W40°22'N / 97°28'W16.20 Miles33 Yards03250K0Fillmore
26.71980-06-03340°58'N / 98°21'W40°56'N / 98°21'W2.30 Miles500 Yards14025.0M0Hall
27.61960-08-23240°31'N / 98°24'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Adams
27.61978-05-30240°37'N / 97°27'W40°40'N / 97°24'W3.80 Miles30 Yards00250K0Fillmore
27.91990-03-13340°21'N / 97°37'W40°37'N / 97°24'W23.00 Miles180 Yards002.5M0Fillmore
27.91977-05-19240°49'N / 98°36'W40°58'N / 98°15'W20.80 Miles50 Yards00250K0Hall
28.91957-04-25440°35'N / 97°34'W40°42'N / 97°14'W19.10 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Fillmore
29.11980-06-03341°01'N / 98°24'W40°55'N / 98°23'W6.40 Miles700 Yards1252.5M0Hall
29.11990-03-13340°53'N / 98°28'W41°02'N / 98°20'W17.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Hall
29.51967-06-13240°42'N / 98°59'W41°13'N / 97°50'W69.70 Miles33 Yards000K0Buffalo
30.01990-03-13341°02'N / 98°20'W41°06'N / 98°14'W4.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Howard
30.11964-04-25240°01'N / 97°55'W40°36'N / 97°34'W44.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Nuckolls
30.51978-04-05240°21'N / 98°26'W40°27'N / 98°16'W11.00 Miles80 Yards002.5M0Adams
30.71957-06-21340°54'N / 97°28'W40°54'N / 97°21'W5.40 Miles33 Yards00250K0York
30.81990-03-13440°18'N / 98°16'W40°21'N / 98°11'W7.00 Miles440 Yards0325.0M0Nuckolls
30.81990-03-13340°19'N / 97°40'W40°21'N / 97°37'W2.00 Miles180 Yards002.5M0Thayer
31.71973-10-09240°54'N / 98°30'W1.00 Mile33 Yards05250K0Hall
32.41965-05-08340°10'N / 97°34'W40°43'N / 97°19'W40.10 Miles33 Yards000K0Thayer
32.61993-05-07240°42'N / 98°34'W40°44'N / 98°34'W1.00 Mile150 Yards005.0M0Hall
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down near Prosser. Equipment at a sand and gravel pit was damaged and five foot diameter cottonwood trees were uprooted. The tornado moved into southern Hall county and lifted.
32.61990-03-13341°06'N / 98°14'W41°11'N / 98°12'W6.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Merrick
32.82001-10-09341°05'N / 97°50'W41°15'N / 97°39'W16.00 Miles1500 Yards001.8M800KPolk
 Brief Description: A strong tornado entered Polk County from Hamilton County. A powerful upper level low pressure system plowing into an unstable airmass triggered widespread severe weather across south-central Nebraska during the late afternoon and evening hours. As many as nine tornadoes were confirmed and many reports of hail were received. The tornado damage was confined to an area located north and east of Grand Island, which included Merrick, Nance, Polk, Greeley, and Hamilton counties. The tornadoes got going west of Marquette. One twister set down in Hamilton county and crossed the Platte River southeast of Chapman. Damage to outbuildings was of most significance. Other tornadoes were reported in the Marquette area, with one tornado on the ground for 12 miles from south of Marquette to southeast of Hordville. This tornado was rated an F1 and produced minor structural damage to buildings and grain bins at several farms. Power lines were lost and several trees were blown over. Numerous center pivot irrigation systems were damaged. Just before 6 pm CDT, the most damaging tornado of the day developed near the Polk and Hamilton county line, and proceeded northeast across western Polk county, leaving a path of destruction in its wake. Storm chaser reports indicated this tornado frequently became multi-vortex in nature and produced a wide swath of damage. Three miles north of Polk, a home was completely ripped from its foundation and blown into some nearby trees. The tornado was rated an F3 at this point. Along its 18 mile path, the tornado damaged over 20 center pivots, and nearly every farmstead in the path of the tornado sustained damage to the home, outbuildings, machinery or grain bins. This tornado lifted southwest of Silver Creek. Just prior to the F3 tornado in Polk county, an F2 tornado was ripping up a farmstead in northern Merrick county. This tornado was responsible for tearing the roof from a home, destroying two large metal outbuildings and damage to a half-dozen vehicles. The tornado moved north and destroyed a barn on the Nance and Merrick county line, but narrowly missed the home. Window and siding damage was noted at the home. Later that evening, one final tornado was reported. This tornado moved from south of Silver Creek to northeast of Silver Creek just before sunset. The tornado clipped the southeast side of town, resulting in damage to the post office, several cars, trees, and 13 residences in town. Fortunately, most of the damage was minor.
33.01975-06-15341°21'N / 97°57'W40°45'N / 97°02'W63.20 Miles200 Yards00250K0Nance
33.01991-04-11240°13'N / 98°15'W40°21'N / 98°10'W10.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Nuckolls
33.11984-06-12340°16'N / 97°48'W40°18'N / 97°33'W13.00 Miles200 Yards052.5M0Thayer
33.31999-05-02241°05'N / 98°19'W41°10'N / 98°15'W5.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Howard
 Brief Description: As strong low pressure lifted across Nebraska and Kansas, a series of damaging tornadoes ripped across south-central Nebraska during the late afternoon and evening hours. No less than 10 tornadoes were confirmed across an area from west of Arapahoe to north of Grand Island near St. Libory. Tornado damage began around mid-afternoon near Holbrook. A brief tornado did some damage to a farmstead northwest of town. Another tornado set down in southern Gosper county and damaged or destroyed at least 3 irrigation center pivots. Tornadoes touched down near Ragan and west of Wilcox. Eventually, another twister near Macon hit two farms. With debris flying through the air, one man stood on his front porch as the tornado passed. Outbuildings, center pivots, and grain bins were heavily damaged by this tornado. Just after 6 pm, the first of three tornadoes in Adams county took aim on the region west of Kenesaw. Shortly thereafter, another tornado set down southeast of Kenesaw and moved northeast. One farm sustained damage southeast of Kenesaw as irrigation pipe littered the fields along the twister's path. Both tornadoes were on the ground at the same time. A third tornado set down west of Juniata but did no damage before lifting. Around 7 pm, a short lived tornado was observed just northwest of Wood River. This tornado destroyed grain bins, damaged a grain dryer and pulled shingles from a house nearby. Strong winds in the region also downed power lines and poles south of town. Finally, just after 8 pm, the final tornado of the evening set down in extreme western Merrick county and moved north just inside the Howard county line. This F2, multiple vortex tornado was on the ground for about 5 miles and damaged or destroyed numerous outbuildings and trees along its path.
33.81999-05-02240°35'N / 98°35'W40°39'N / 98°34'W10.00 Miles250 Yards00300K0Adams
 Brief Description: As strong low pressure lifted across Nebraska and Kansas, a series of damaging tornadoes ripped across south-central Nebraska during the late afternoon and evening hours. No less than 10 tornadoes were confirmed across an area from west of Arapahoe to north of Grand Island near St. Libory. Tornado damage began around mid-afternoon near Holbrook. A brief tornado did some damage to a farmstead northwest of town. Another tornado set down in southern Gosper county and damaged or destroyed at least 3 irrigation center pivots. Tornadoes touched down near Ragan and west of Wilcox. Eventually, another twister near Macon hit two farms. With debris flying through the air, one man stood on his front porch as the tornado passed. Outbuildings, center pivots, and grain bins were heavily damaged by this tornado. Just after 6 pm, the first of three tornadoes in Adams county took aim on the region west of Kenesaw. Shortly thereafter, another tornado set down southeast of Kenesaw and moved northeast. One farm sustained damage southeast of Kenesaw as irrigation pipe littered the fields along the twister's path. Both tornadoes were on the ground at the same time. A third tornado set down west of Juniata but did no damage before lifting. Around 7 pm, a short lived tornado was observed just northwest of Wood River. This tornado destroyed grain bins, damaged a grain dryer and pulled shingles from a house nearby. Strong winds in the region also downed power lines and poles south of town. Finally, just after 8 pm, the final tornado of the evening set down in extreme western Merrick county and moved north just inside the Howard county line. This F2, multiple vortex tornado was on the ground for about 5 miles and damaged or destroyed numerous outbuildings and trees along its path.
33.91985-05-10240°53'N / 97°20'W0.50 Mile400 Yards042.5M0Seward
34.21984-06-11341°02'N / 98°28'W41°05'N / 98°22'W7.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Howard
34.41990-06-18240°24'N / 98°27'W0.70 Mile440 Yards00250K0Adams
34.61968-07-30241°10'N / 97°39'W41°07'N / 97°32'W6.40 Miles200 Yards02250K0Polk
35.61974-04-20340°06'N / 97°56'W40°19'N / 97°44'W18.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Nuckolls
36.01953-05-09340°18'N / 97°27'W40°46'N / 97°09'W35.70 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Fillmore
36.31990-03-13240°43'N / 98°40'W40°49'N / 98°36'W7.00 Miles80 Yards00250K0Hall
36.31992-06-15241°10'N / 97°35'W2.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Polk
36.82004-05-22240°15'N / 97°30'W40°28'N / 97°21'W8.00 Miles800 Yards002.5M500KThayer
 Brief Description: A tornado traveled 8 miles and damaged 6 farmsteads. One house was hit by the tornado. Damage was so severe; the owners burnt the 120 year old house. A machine shed was destroyed toward the end of the tornadoes path. Three semi-trucks were stacked on top of each other at one site. Several center pivot systems were destroyed. One of the worst severe weather outbreaks in recent years struck south-central Nebraska the afternoon and evening of May 22. No less than 17 different tornadoes rolled across south-central Nebraska. Dozens of homes were damaged and a few completely destroyed. Over 250 center irrigation pivots were damaged or destroyed in south-central Nebraska alone. Large hail and strong straight-line winds of up to 80 mph also wreaked havoc on the region. Several million dollars in property damage was reported. Hundreds of power poles were snapped resulting in dozens of miles of downed electrical line.
36.81984-06-11341°00'N / 98°35'W41°02'N / 98°28'W7.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Hall
37.51990-03-13240°40'N / 98°39'W40°43'N / 98°40'W2.00 Miles80 Yards00250K0Adams
37.91980-06-02240°14'N / 97°36'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0025K0Thayer
37.91990-03-13441°02'N / 97°22'W41°02'N / 97°20'W4.00 Miles440 Yards0025.0M0Seward
38.11982-05-10241°13'N / 98°15'W0.30 Mile20 Yards00250K0Merrick
38.11953-05-09340°15'N / 97°34'W40°18'N / 97°27'W6.50 Miles880 Yards5802.5M0Thayer
38.12001-10-09241°15'N / 98°00'W41°17'N / 98°00'W3.00 Miles350 Yards00300K25KMerrick
 Brief Description: Tornado crossed from Merrick County into Nance County. A powerful upper level low pressure system plowing into an unstable airmass triggered widespread severe weather across south-central Nebraska during the late afternoon and evening hours. As many as nine tornadoes were confirmed and many reports of hail were received. The tornado damage was confined to an area located north and east of Grand Island, which included Merrick, Nance, Polk, Greeley, and Hamilton counties. The tornadoes got going west of Marquette. One twister set down in Hamilton county and crossed the Platte River southeast of Chapman. Damage to outbuildings was of most significance. Other tornadoes were reported in the Marquette area, with one tornado on the ground for 12 miles from south of Marquette to southeast of Hordville. This tornado was rated an F1 and produced minor structural damage to buildings and grain bins at several farms. Power lines were lost and several trees were blown over. Numerous center pivot irrigation systems were damaged. Just before 6 pm CDT, the most damaging tornado of the day developed near the Polk and Hamilton county line, and proceeded northeast across western Polk county, leaving a path of destruction in its wake. Storm chaser reports indicated this tornado frequently became multi-vortex in nature and produced a wide swath of damage. Three miles north of Polk, a home was completely ripped from its foundation and blown into some nearby trees. The tornado was rated an F3 at this point. Along its 18 mile path, the tornado damaged over 20 center pivots, and nearly every farmstead in the path of the tornado sustained damage to the home, outbuildings, machinery or grain bins. This tornado lifted southwest of Silver Creek. Just prior to the F3 tornado in Polk county, an F2 tornado was ripping up a farmstead in northern Merrick county. This tornado was responsible for tearing the roof from a home, destroying two large metal outbuildings and damage to a half-dozen vehicles. The tornado moved north and destroyed a barn on the Nance and Merrick county line, but narrowly missed the home. Window and siding damage was noted at the home. Later that evening, one final tornado was reported. This tornado moved from south of Silver Creek to northeast of Silver Creek just before sunset. The tornado clipped the southeast side of town, resulting in damage to the post office, several cars, trees, and 13 residences in town. Fortunately, most of the damage was minor.
38.41992-06-15340°29'N / 97°20'W40°44'N / 97°07'W19.00 Miles500 Yards002.5M0Saline
38.51990-03-13340°47'N / 98°42'W40°58'N / 98°36'W12.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Hall
40.11962-07-21341°06'N / 97°47'W41°24'N / 97°30'W25.20 Miles880 Yards01250K0Polk
40.52003-06-22240°09'N / 97°43'W40°09'N / 97°46'W3.00 Miles200 Yards1710.0M1.0MThayer
 Brief Description: A strong tornado set down on the southeast side of Deshler near the fairgrounds and moved west through the south side of Deshler. The slow moving tornado lifted a couple of miles west of town. M47PH Thunderstorms erupted during the evening in south-central Nebraska. One storm near Aurora produced very large hail. One stone measured by an NWS Storm Survey team was determined to be the largest sized stone to fall in the United States. It measured 7 inches in diameter and 18.75 inches in circumference. Many other large stones were noted on the northern side of Aurora. Given the lack of wind, damage was limited to roofs, a few windows and some crop land near town. The storm also produced a couple of brief small tornadoes as it slowly moved through northern Hamilton county. At nearly the same time, another very slow moving storm produced several tornadoes, hail and extremely heavy rains in Thayer county. One tornado moved through the town of Deshler going from the southeast side of town to the west. One man was killed in his garage before he was able to get to shelter. Over 400 homes in Deshler were damaged with four being completely demolished. Nearly 100 homes were moderately to severely damaged. Six businesses in town were considered a complete loss and 25 others reportedly suffered moderate to severe damage. Seven people were injured, most were minor and were from broken glass. Later in the evening, a tornado was reported north of Bradshaw in York county. Storm spotters about 1 mile west of the tornado saw debris being flung through the air. A farmstead was hit with most of the damage done to an old barn. Despite ongoing drought conditions, widespread flooding was reported in Thayer and southern Fillmore counties. The flash flood along the Rose Creek at Hubbell provided some of the worst damage. Water was flowing into houses and businesses on main street to the tune of up to 5 feet deep. Boats were the only mode of travel through the business district. Up to 15 residents had to be evacuated by the local Dive and Rescue team using jet skis. The flooding was caused by extremely heavy rainfall in nearby Republic County, Kansas. Flooding and flash flooding was also a problem throughout Thayer county. Rainfall of over 12 inches was reported about 5 miles north of Deshler. Residents reported nearly 5 hours of constant, wind-driven rain. Windows were blown out and the rain just poured into homes. Widespread agricultural damage was done due to the rain. The runoff in the Snake and Spring creeks ravaged Deshler, the town which had already been hammered by tornadoes that evening. Flooding was concentrated in the southern part of town and most widespread near the park and fairgrounds. Major river flooding was reported along the Little Blue River from just west of Hebron to the Jefferson county line. One man at his farmstead near Gilead had to be air lifted to safety by the National Guard as flooding waters rose on his property. Dozens of county roads and bridges were damaged or destroyed. U. S. Highway 81 was restricted to one lane travel at Hebron due to the high water on the road. Portions of Highways 81, 136 and 9 were closed for a time due to high water. The Big Sandy Creek flowed out of its banks at Alexandria and crested at 14.5 feet. Water was flowing over the highway near town and filling back into the town's sewer drains. In all, several million dollars in damage was done by the flooding alone. Some locals said this was the worst flooding in the area in 55 years.
40.61991-04-11240°10'N / 98°20'W40°13'N / 98°15'W5.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Webster
40.91986-04-26240°10'N / 97°34'W40°18'N / 97°25'W10.00 Miles40 Yards00250K0Thayer
41.41967-06-12240°40'N / 99°03'W40°48'N / 98°25'W34.30 Miles50 Yards0025K0Buffalo
41.91964-05-23240°50'N / 97°13'W40°46'N / 97°05'W7.90 Miles60 Yards00250K0Seward
42.11999-04-21241°08'N / 98°33'W41°08'N / 98°31'W2.00 Miles30 Yards00100K0Howard
 Brief Description: Thunderstorms developed west of Holdrege in the morning and spread quickly northeast to St. Paul and Greeley by noon. Early on, the thunderstorms dumped hail and torrential rainfall northeast of Holdrege. 2.75" diameter hail was reported north of Holdrege and some areas in northwest Phelps county noted three foot hail drifts. Rain and hail teamed to produce areas of erosion across freshly tilled fields. As the storms spread northeast, a brief tornado damaged a home under construction north of Dannebrog. The tornado nearly destroyed the entire main floor. Only one wall was left standing. The owner and construction crew at the house at the time escaped injury by going to the basement just before the tornado struck. Minor roof damage occurred on a nearby house. Another brief tornado touch down occurred just south of St. Paul, causing some minor damage to outbuildings.
42.31990-03-13241°15'N / 98°16'W41°17'N / 98°20'W2.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Merrick
42.41958-07-18340°47'N / 98°45'W3.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Buffalo
42.61957-06-15240°47'N / 97°14'W40°56'N / 97°04'W13.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Seward
42.81965-05-08440°52'N / 98°36'W41°33'N / 98°17'W49.90 Miles33 Yards0025.0M0Hall
42.82006-09-15241°06'N / 97°19'W41°07'N / 97°18'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0000Butler
 Brief Description: A tornado did extensive tree damage and some structual damage throughout the town of Surprise including destroying a mobile home and tearing the roof off of a bar. The tornado was embedded in a larger downburst area that did damage over a 28 square mile area surrounding Surprise according a NWS storm survey. The tornado was rated an F2 in Surprise, where it initially touched down, and then weakened and lifted a few minutes later 1 mile northeast of town.
42.81975-04-27240°10'N / 97°34'W0.30 Mile20 Yards003K0Thayer
43.01965-05-25240°02'N / 98°42'W40°33'N / 98°23'W39.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Webster
43.11990-03-13340°43'N / 98°50'W40°47'N / 98°42'W10.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Buffalo
43.21964-05-05541°03'N / 97°34'W41°21'N / 97°16'W25.80 Miles880 Yards0025K0Polk
43.31992-06-15340°44'N / 97°07'W40°46'N / 97°07'W2.00 Miles500 Yards002.5M0Seward
43.51982-05-10241°13'N / 98°27'W0.30 Mile20 Yards0025K0Howard
43.91964-05-05241°07'N / 98°33'W41°23'N / 98°15'W24.00 Miles33 Yards0725K0Howard
44.21984-04-25341°11'N / 98°30'W41°16'N / 98°25'W8.00 Miles40 Yards01825.0M0Howard
44.31953-05-09340°46'N / 97°09'W40°46'N / 97°03'W4.70 Miles880 Yards022.5M0Seward
44.41990-03-13440°03'N / 98°32'W40°18'N / 98°16'W20.00 Miles440 Yards0025.0M0Webster
44.71967-06-09240°18'N / 97°34'W40°25'N / 96°54'W35.90 Miles33 Yards00250K0Thayer
44.71991-05-16240°48'N / 97°13'W40°58'N / 97°01'W11.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Seward
45.21993-05-07240°16'N / 98°58'W40°49'N / 98°35'W40.00 Miles200 Yards005.0M0Hall
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down four miles southwest of Upland. Several farm buildings were destroyed and a house damaged. The tornado moved northeast in Kearney county with touchdowns eight miles south and four miles Minden. It crossed the Platte river east of Kearney. Funnel clouds were reported in eastern Buffalo county with 60 mph wind gusts at the Kearney Interstate 80 interchange. The tornado was last seen 1 1/2 miles east of Wood River in southwest Hall county.
45.41984-06-11240°53'N / 98°47'W0.50 Mile20 Yards0025K0Buffalo
45.81985-05-10440°11'N / 98°43'W40°21'N / 98°27'W17.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Webster
46.01957-04-25440°42'N / 97°14'W40°49'N / 96°54'W19.00 Miles333 Yards182.5M0Seward
46.41990-03-13241°17'N / 98°20'W41°25'N / 98°09'W11.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Nance
47.31957-05-20240°41'N / 97°15'W40°50'N / 96°50'W23.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Saline
47.61959-06-27241°05'N / 98°43'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Howard
47.71986-09-18340°01'N / 97°56'W40°02'N / 97°55'W1.00 Mile80 Yards072.5M0Nuckolls
47.91974-05-10240°02'N / 98°06'W1.00 Mile233 Yards002.5M0Nuckolls
48.01990-03-13340°01'N / 97°37'W40°10'N / 97°28'W13.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Thayer
48.21965-05-08341°03'N / 98°45'W41°11'N / 98°39'W10.20 Miles33 Yards000K0Howard
48.31978-04-07240°05'N / 98°20'W0.20 Mile10 Yards000K0Webster
48.72010-06-20240°01'N / 98°04'W40°01'N / 98°03'W1.00 Mile1300 Yards000K0KNuckolls
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The most significant damage was confined to the city limits of Superior. There was widespread tree damage, along with a warehouse building and several small buildings being destroyed and a number of snapped power poles. On the southeast edge of town, railroad cars were overturned. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Much like the previous day, most severe weather focused south of the Nebraska and Kansas border on this Sunday afternoon and evening. However, one severe storm crept just far enough north of the state line to produce a damaging EF2 tornado in the community of Superior in southern Nuckolls County. The storm complex that eventually produced this tornado initially developed across Northwest Kansas in the vicinity of a nearly stationary east-west surface front, as a subtle mid-level shortwave ejected from a large-scale western United States trough. As these storms snuck into far South Central Nebraska out of North Central Kansas, the synoptic environment was quite supportive of severe weather, featuring deep-layer wind shear of 40 knots, and MLCAPE values around 3500 J/kg. The low-level shear environment was also favorable for tornadoes, with 0-1 km shear values around 25 knots, and 0-1 km storm relative helicity of at least 300 m2/s2. The storm that produced the Superior tornado was essentially an embedded supercell on the north end of a squall line, associated with a bookend vortex that first developed within the line in North Central Kansas. Around the same time as the Superior tornado, a separate area of strong to severe storms flared up several counties to the north, resulting in a quarter-sized hail report from Valley County.
48.81964-04-26240°56'N / 98°54'W41°00'N / 98°44'W9.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Buffalo
49.22001-06-13440°51'N / 97°05'W40°57'N / 96°59'W8.00 Miles400 Yards021.0M0Seward
 Brief Description: A slow moving tornado tracked from south of Seward to just east of town with a total track length of 8 miles. The tornado was caught on film by several chasers. The tornado destroyed an entire farmstead and a propane and anhydrous ammonia tank farm and machine shed. Several vehicles were tumbled and tossed into a field across from the farm house. The tornado was at its maximum intensity at the farmstead it destroyed. Northeast of highway 34 the tornado struck several sheds and barns.
49.41975-12-13240°02'N / 97°35'W40°07'N / 97°28'W8.00 Miles60 Yards00250K0Thayer
49.51986-09-18339°59'N / 97°55'W40°01'N / 97°56'W1.00 Mile500 Yards002.5M0Republic
49.52004-05-22240°20'N / 97°17'W40°29'N / 96°54'W20.00 Miles1200 Yards0820.0M0Saline
 Brief Description: See description below This long tracked tornado is often referred to as the Hallam tornado. It initially touched down 3 miles west of Daykin in northern Jefferson county. The tornado was rated an f0 or f1 in Jefferson county damaging farm outbuildings, grain bins and trees. From there the tornado crossed into Saline county southwest of Western and remained an f0 or f1 until it struck the southern portion of Wilber where it strengthened to f2. Roofs were blown off of homes just southeast of Wilber. The tornado traveled from Wilber into Gage county, crossing the county line west of Clatonia where it grew to its most intense stage, f4. The tornado remained nearly at this strength as it crossed into Lancaster county near Hallam with a damage path of around 2 1/2 miles. Many well-built homes were demolished from Clatonia to Hallam, along with grain bins, farm sheds, and outbuildings. Many trees were destroyed or uprooted. Although Hallam itself escaped the strongest winds from the storm, which occurred just south of town, 95 percent of the buildings in town were either destroyed or severely damaged. The lone fatality from the tornado occurred in Hallam. The storm also toppled several hopper cars from a freight train on the west edge of town. In total 55 railroad cars were derailed. From Hallam the tornado traveled east for several miles prior to turning northeast again just north of Cortland. The storm then tracked 2 miles north of Firth, severely damaging the Firth-Norris high school and a nearby middle school. School busses were tossed in this area. Several homes northeast of the schools were flattened as the tornado regained its f4 strength. The damage path continued northeast to Holland and then to 2 miles north of Panama where the tornado weakened to around an f2 and the damage path began to narrow. The track then curved more toward the north, passing just south of Bennet where a few homes sustained f3 damage. After passing south of Bennet, the storm moved back to the northeast and began to weaken to f0 or f1 strength as it crossed into Otoe county southwest of Palmyra. The tornado finally dissipated 1 miles west southwest of Palmyra. In total the tornado was on the ground for around 54 miles with a maximum intensity of f4. Besides the fatality, 38 people sustained injuries, 158 homes were leveled and 57 others were seriously damaged. The dollar amount of damage was estimated at 160 million, with 60 million of that agricultural including 100 cattle and 50 hogs lost. Some 150,000 acres of crop land sustained significant damage. The 5 counties were declared national disaster areas by Fema.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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