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Rohrersville, MD Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Rohrersville is about the same as Maryland average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Rohrersville is higher than Maryland average and is about the same as the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #489

Rohrersville, MD
0.05
Maryland
0.17
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Rohrersville, MD
0.0000
Maryland
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #270

Rohrersville, MD
137.75
Maryland
121.90
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 5,056 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Rohrersville, MD were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:4Cold:35Dense Fog:24Drought:22
Dust Storm:0Flood:691Hail:868Heat:56Heavy Snow:35
High Surf:0Hurricane:3Ice Storm:14Landslide:0Strong Wind:96
Thunderstorm Winds:2,548Tropical Storm:7Wildfire:4Winter Storm:85Winter Weather:91
Other:473 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Rohrersville, MD.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Rohrersville, MD.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Rohrersville, MD.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 39 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Rohrersville, MD.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
4.22004-09-17239°24'N / 77°33'W39°24'N / 77°39'W3.00 Miles200 Yards005K0Frederick
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado touched down in far northwest Frederick County, on the northwest edge of Catoctin Mountain Park. A thickly forested stand of hardwood trees was snapped off above the bases.
5.11996-07-19239°23'N / 77°42'W39°21'N / 77°42'W2.00 Miles125 Yards00400K75KWashington
 Brief Description: A moderate tornado (F2) tracked between two mountain ridges in extreme southern Washington Co, knocking down hundreds of trees, including several onto homes which caused substantial damage. At least one barn was completely destroyed in Yarrowsburg. The storm attained maximum strength just south of town (where the trees, including numerous hardwoods, were flattened). The tornado weakened considerably before dissipating along the eastern ridge. Structural and vehicle damage, though not as prevalent as the tree damage, included the following: Portions of roofs from two barns were blown off; minor residential damage, including shattered windows, unhinged shingles, and torn off trim/gutters. Some gravestones were overturned by the winds, and several power lines were knocked down. Several vehicles and vehicle windows were damaged.
12.01989-11-16239°15'N / 77°47'W39°20'N / 77°48'W9.00 Miles50 Yards03250K0Jefferson
17.01978-07-31239°24'N / 77°21'W1.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Frederick
20.12004-09-17239°22'N / 78°02'W39°23'N / 78°02'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0625K0Berkeley
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down in Darkesville in southern Berkeley County. The F2 tornado produced extensive structural damage to homes and businesses in the area. The storm traveled north and toppled tractor trailers and vehicles on Interstate-81. At least 6 people were injured from the automobile accidents.
22.61979-09-05239°08'N / 77°30'W0.50 Mile30 Yards00250K0Loudoun
24.11975-08-04239°14'N / 78°02'W0.80 Mile100 Yards00250K0Clarke
24.21979-09-05239°06'N / 77°32'W0.50 Mile50 Yards02250K0Loudoun
29.01983-05-22339°42'N / 77°15'W39°42'N / 77°14'W1.00 Mile37 Yards0025K0Frederick
29.71961-07-13239°19'N / 78°12'W013K0Frederick
30.41983-05-22339°42'N / 77°14'W39°43'N / 77°12'W1.00 Mile37 Yards0025K0Carroll
30.61980-06-03239°00'N / 77°40'W38°59'N / 77°37'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Loudoun
31.12004-09-17238°57'N / 77°27'W39°05'N / 77°27'W8.00 Miles150 Yards003.0M0Loudoun
 Brief Description: A thunderstorm moved into eastern Loudoun County from Fairfax County near the Dulles International Airport. The storm produced a tornado which touched down at Dulles International Airport and passed within one half mile of the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Sterling. This prompted the staff on duty to seek shelter in the office constructed saferoom. As the storm traveled north from the Dulles International Airport, it produced minor tree damage. More extensive damage occurred north of Waxpool Road at the Beaumede Corporate Park. Seven buildings were damaged. A wall collapsed in one of the buildings. A tractor trailer was overturned. The tornado also pushed two cars into the side of a building. The tornado weakened as it traveled north. The last damage in Loudoun County was reported just north of Route 7.
31.52004-09-17239°10'N / 78°10'W39°12'N / 78°09'W5.00 Miles125 Yards00250K0Frederick
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado produced a nearly continuous path of damage for 5 miles in eastern Frederick County. It touched down west of Millwood Pike near the Winchester Airport. Three homes suffered roof damage, a detached two car garage was destroyed, a platform deck was blown away, an office trailer was overturned, and numerous trees along the track of the storm were uprooted or topped.
33.31978-07-31239°18'N / 77°04'W0.80 Mile40 Yards00250K0Howard
36.91979-05-23239°35'N / 77°00'W2.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Carroll
37.51996-07-19339°30'N / 76°59'W39°29'N / 76°57'W2.20 Miles350 Yards035.0M20KCarroll
 Brief Description: One of the most potent tornadoes in recorded history in the state of Maryland tracked for 2 and 1/4 miles through the Mystic Kane and Four Seasons subdivisions just off state route 32 northwest of Gamber. The tornado was a strong F3 (180 mph estimated winds) with multiple vortices. Homes and trees struck by individual vortices sustained the worst damage. There were several eyewitness accounts of the tornado/funnel cloud shortly before touchdown. In all, 66 structures sustained damage. Twelve single-family homes were destroyed, five which lost most of the second story and garages. Three persons were injured. Two children were injured when the tornado blew them out of the second level of one of the homes. Their father suffered cuts and bruises when a wall partially collapsed on him while he was trying the rescue the children. Another dozen homes were deemed temporarily uninhabitable with substantial roof and siding damage. An additional 37 homes, a couple of apartments, and another barn received some damage. Many material items were sucked out of the homes, from bicycles to jewelry. Several automobiles were damaged by fallen and/or flying debris. Debris littered the ground for miles. A barn along route 32 was completely destroyed, and pieces of it were found as far away as 3.5 miles to the southeast of the barn's original location. Dozens of trees were snapped, shredded, debarked, and uprooted. Corn stalks were sucked up leaving six inch stubs as the tornado crossed a field west of route 32. A corn stalk was embedded into the wall of a house 1/2 mile away from the stalk's original location. Numerous airborne missiles (large and small) were generated, puncturing holes into homes and becoming embedded into the ground. A refrigerator was found wrapped around a mailbox. A van was dragged 50 feet, then flipped over two times. Other vehicles were also damaged.
39.01981-07-28238°54'N / 77°26'W0.10 Mile27 Yards0025K0Fairfax
39.71954-04-25239°50'N / 77°14'W39°48'N / 76°59'W13.30 Miles500 Yards0025K0Adams
40.91976-03-21239°56'N / 77°15'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Adams
41.41978-08-28239°45'N / 77°00'W39°43'N / 76°59'W1.90 Miles33 Yards003K0York
41.71978-08-28239°48'N / 77°02'W39°45'N / 77°00'W3.30 Miles20 Yards003K0Adams
42.12004-09-17238°48'N / 77°26'W38°54'N / 77°27'W7.00 Miles150 Yards012.5M0Fairfax
 Brief Description: A tornadic thunderstorm entered western Fairfax County from Prince William County. The storm had a path of about 7 miles. Beginning on Old Centerville Road, the storm produced scattered tree damage along its path and minor roofing damage to structures in the London Town Area. A line of damage was carved from Lee Highway northward into the Centerville and Chantilly areas.The tornado destroyed one estate and damaged about 50 other dwellings. The storm was also responsible for downed trees and power lines. The tornado lifted as it crossed Route 50.
43.21961-04-16340°03'N / 77°31'W00250K0Cumberland
43.81993-09-27238°47'N / 77°42'W38°49'N / 77°40'W3.00 Miles100 Yards02500K0Fauquier And Prince William
 Brief Description: Thunderstorms moved through norther Virginia downing trees near Tanners and Madison in Madison County and across northern Culpeper County. A tornado touched down near New Baltimore, or about 2.5 miles east of Warrenton in Faquier County, and moved east into Prince William County to about 2 miles southwest of Manassas. The tornado ripped a barn roof off and blew a large business sign down as well as downing trees and power lines. There was significant structural damage to one home in the Nokesville area. Two people sustained minor injuries from flying debris.
44.01978-08-28239°43'N / 76°59'W39°34'N / 76°47'W14.80 Miles33 Yards000K0Frederick
44.02001-09-24239°44'N / 76°59'W39°48'N / 76°56'W5.00 Miles200 Yards00900K0York
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near Grand Valley Road at 17:33 EST about 5 miles South of Hanover PA. The tornado proceded northward, through Parkville then lifting to the north of Blooming Grove at 17:40 EST. The path of the tornado was about 5 miles in length but not always on the ground while the width varied from 50 to 200 yards. The top wind speeds were estimated at 110 to 120 mph. There were no injuries or deaths. Significant damage included 8 homes with roofs torn off, brick and structural damage to several additional homes, 50 to 75 trees knocked down, 38 cars damaged at a car dealership, significant roof and water damage to a middle school and administration building, and significant structural damage to a store complex northwest of Blooming Grove.
44.51996-06-24238°50'N / 77°31'W38°50'N / 77°13'W19.00 Miles200 Yards014.0M0Fairfax
 Brief Description: A tornado, associated with the mesocyclone of a heavy-precipitation supercell, touched down in extreme southeastern Loudoun Co near the Bull Run, then proceeded east-southeast for 20 miles, knocking down over 1000 trees and causing substantial property damage, especially in western Fairfax County, before lifting along the Capital Beltway at the Braddock Road interchange less than 2 miles west of Annandale. While moving over rural terrain in extreme southeastern Loudoun and extreme western Fairfax Cos, the tornado uprooted or snapped tens of trees. The storm rapidly intensified over western Fairfax Co, where it produced F2 damage. The storm uprooted or snapped hundreds of trees along Pleasant Valley Road (local route 621) before moving into the Sully Station area of Centreville, where it produced estimated winds of over 130 mph. The most impressive damage occurred along Tree Line Drive, where 11 of 17 homes incurred moderate to major damage. Eight homes were condemned due to major damage or total destruction, including one which lost it's entire roof and back wall. Dozens more homes sustained moderate damage, including shingle, siding, chimney, roof, and window damage. After passing through Sully Station, the twister weakened somewhat, producing F1-rated damage until just south of Fairfax City (near Burke), then weakened to F0 intensity before it was overwhelmed by straight-line winds near the Capital Beltway. The storm accelerated on an east-southeast track roughly paralleling Braddock Road. Additional damage was incurred to residences and trees from subdivisions west of Fairfax City to just north of Burke (south of Fairfax City), continuing to the Annandale area. The combined efforts of several agencies produced property damage estimates along the track (not including flora) to be $2.99 million. Included in that total are 323 homes which sustained minor damage. An estimated 80 thousand homes lost power along the track of the tornado in Fairfax Co, with some homes not receiving juice until several days after the event.
45.22004-09-17238°42'N / 77°45'W38°52'N / 77°44'W13.00 Miles200 Yards00750K0Fauquier
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado produced widespread structural damage to two subdivisions in northern Fauquier County. Some small items were turned into projectiles by this tornado and landed in trees and the sides of homes and some vehicles. There was substantial tree damage. Numerous large, healthy trees were uprooted and snapped. This is the third tornado of this event in Fauquier.
45.31990-10-18239°28'N / 76°49'W0.10 Mile100 Yards05925.0M0Baltimore
45.51983-10-13238°53'N / 77°12'W1.00 Mile40 Yards002.5M0Falls Church (c)
45.51969-08-09238°52'N / 77°14'W00250K0Fairfax
45.81979-09-05338°47'N / 77°05'W39°00'N / 77°16'W17.90 Miles300 Yards162.5M0Fairfax
46.52001-09-24239°08'N / 76°53'W39°14'N / 76°50'W6.00 Miles100 Yards001.0M0Howard
 Brief Description: A tornado crossed into Howard County from Laurel and remained on the ground until it dissipated about 1 mile east of Columbia. Several townhomes in North Laurel were damaged and trees were downed along the remainder of its path. Severe thunderstorms moved through Central Maryland during the early evening of the 24th. One thunderstorm produced a devastating F3 tornado which was on the ground for 17.5 miles from College Park in Prince George's County to just east of Columbia in Howard County. Multiple vortices were reported with the tornado at times. The tornado first touched down in Northwest Branch Stream Valley Park just west of Hyattsville. It rapidly strengthened to an F3 tornado with winds up to 200 MPH. The damage path ranged in width from 100 to 200 yards. The tornado crossed the intersection of Adelphi Road and University Boulevard into the western campus of the University of Maryland. Ten trailers being used as a temporary office for the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute were completely destroyed by the twister. Debris from the trailers such as video tapes and pieces of paper were found up to 60 miles away in Northern Baltimore and Harford Counties in addition to extreme southeast Pennsylvania. Four of the six people inside the trailers were injured, one seriously. One staff member was thrown free of the destruction and was found in a dumpster nearby. Another person dug their hands into the carpet and held on as their feet were being pulled up in the air by the tornado. The other four occupants, including one child, took shelter under desks and survived. Two University of Maryland students who were visiting their father who worked in the trailers left by car shortly before the tornado hit. The two sisters, ages 20 and 23, were killed when the tornado picked up their car outside of Denton Hall and threw it either around or over an eight-story dorm. They died instantly when their car crashed into a wooded area 300 yards from the road. Most of the other buildings on the campus in the path of the storm were made of brick and suffered only minor to moderate damage, such as Denton Hall Dormitory, Easton Hall Dormitory and Dining Hall, and the President's Mansion. A parking lot outside of Denton Hall full of cars was also hit by the tornado. At least 200 vehicles in the parking lot were damaged, including at least 100 that were blown into and onto other vehicles. At least twenty cars were totaled and one car was partially ripped apart. The woods behind the parking lot were nearly flattened. The bubble roof of the football practice facility near Byrd Stadium was removed. Forty-eight people on campus, including 25 students, were injured by flying debris as the twister downed trees and ripped pieces of siding and roofing off buildings. In addition, residential areas near the campus, including the University Courtyard Apartments sustained damage. A total of 3000 students were left temporarily homeless after two dorms and an off-campus housing unit were evacuated due to storm damage. During the recovery effort, a 78-year-old firefighter who responded to the tragedy at the University died of a heart attack shortly after returning from the scene. The tornado moved north-northeast off the campus and crossed University Boulevard at the intersection of Metzerott Road. The steeple of a church was removed and cars were flipped near the intersection. Power lines and trees were also downed. The twister continued through Paint Branch Stream Valley Park where it downed numerous trees. The tornado weakened to F2 strength before it crossed Interstate 95/495 just west of the Route 1 interchange. It was remarkable that even though the highway was filled with bumper to bumper rush hour traffic, the only damage reported was a flipped tractor trailer. The next area hit by the tornado was the community of Cherry Hill. Several trees and power lines were downed onto roads and houses just west of Baltimore Avenue, including the Chestnut Hills subdivision. Several businesses along Route 1 sustained minor damage, and three additional buildings lost portions of their roofs. Three employees of a business in the Chestnut Hills Shopping Center were injured by flying glass after the windows on the front of the store were shattered. The tornado moved across the National Agricultural Research Center and caused over $40 million dollars in damage. Thirty greenhouses were damaged and several long term studies inside were destroyed. Fifteen other buildings west of Route 1 suffered minor to moderate damage. Numerous trees, including a row of historic willow oaks, were downed. Over 65 vehicles in the employee parking lot were damaged by flying debris. Eleven of these vehicles were totaled. Just north of the research center, "stunning" tree and power line damage was reported at the intersection of Sellman and Montgomery Roads. The tornado tracked across Powder Mill Road and ripped the roof off an office building at the intersection of Cedar Lane. It continued across the Beltsville Heights development and caused damage to the roof at Martin Luther King Elementary School. The tornado continued moving north-northeast toward Laurel. The continuation of the damage path was located at the Virginia Manor Industrial Park on Van Dusen Road where several trees were downed. The tornado was spotted as it moved past Laurel Hospital and it caused minor damage in the Village at Wellington subdivision nearby. The next concentrated area of damage was found at Laurel High School. An annex with 6 classrooms was heavily damaged. The roof was ripped off three of the classrooms and three people inside the structure were injured by flying debris. Significant damage was also reported to the athletic fields behind the school. The tornado moved northeast across the Fairlawn development where it damaged several homes. One home on 10th Street was destroyed after the twister removed the roof and an outside wall. On Montrose Avenue, a woman and her dog were briefly picked up by the tornado. The woman sustained injuries to her hip and leg after being tossed 3 feet in the air and the dog landed uninjured. The historic Harrison Building at the corner of 9th and Montgomery Streets lost its roof and a church and school nearby were damaged. The tornado remained on the ground as it crossed the Patuxent River into Howard County. Across Prince George's County, the tornado was responsible for $100 million in damage. A total of 861 homes, 561 vehicles, and 23 businesses were damaged countywide. In North Laurel, the twister heavily damaged a townhouse complex on Riverbrink Court in the Settlers Landing development. A total of 43 townhomes were damaged, four of which were uninhabitable. The tornado weakened to an F1 before it downed trees onto All Saints Road. The tornado weakened to an F0 as it exited North Laurel and moved across Savage Park. Isolated reports of downed trees were received in the community, including on Red Jacket Way, Vollmerhausen Road, and at the intersection of Interstate 95 and Route 32. In its final stages, the tornado crossed the General Electric Appliance Park and downed its final tree at the intersection of Snowden River Parkway and Route 175 southeast of Columbia. In addition to the devastating tornado, the storms also produced very heavy rainfall and gusty winds. In Anne Arundel County, strong winds from the tornadic thunderstorm downed 13 trees between Laurel and Maryland City. In northern Carroll County, a bow echo produced damaging winds which downed trees along Bankard Road northwest of Union Mills. Rainfall totals included 3.93 inches in Millers, 3.30 inches in Manchester, and 3.26 inches in Westminster. In Montgomery County, 2 to 4 inches of rainfall across the western portion of the county caused low lying areas to quickly fill with water. Several roads were flooded including River Road and Falls Road. A motorist had to be rescued after their car stalled in high water in Poolsville. A total of 3.61 inches of rainfall was recorded in Damascus. In Howard County, between 2 and 3.75 inches of rain fell. A total of 2.86 inches was recorded in Columbia and 3.46 inches fell just southeast of the city. In Frederick County, several roads were flooded by heavy downpours including Ball Road off Route 355 and New Design Road south of Adamstown Road. Heavy rain downed trees at the intersection of Greenfield and Page Roads, Lingamore road and Gashouse Pike, Lawson Road and Route 75, and Bittle Road and Route 17. Street flooding was also reported in Point of Rocks on Route 28. Rainfall totals included 2.54 inches in Wolfsville and 2.30 inches in Frederick.
47.01973-04-01338°48'N / 77°20'W38°51'N / 77°13'W7.10 Miles100 Yards03725.0M0Fairfax
47.21973-04-01338°51'N / 77°13'W38°52'N / 77°10'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Fauquier
48.51990-06-08239°49'N / 76°54'W1.00 Mile60 Yards01250K0York
48.71980-06-07339°56'N / 77°01'W1.50 Miles400 Yards00250K0Adams
49.42001-09-24338°56'N / 76°59'W39°06'N / 76°51'W11.50 Miles200 Yards255100.0M0Prince George's
 Brief Description: A large multi-vortex tornado touched down near Hyattsville, tracked along the Route 1 cooridor from College Park to Laurel, then crossed into Howard County. The tornado killed 2 students at the University of Maryland, injured 54 others countywide, and caused 100 million dollars in damage. F20VE, F23VE Severe thunderstorms moved through Central Maryland during the early evening of the 24th. One thunderstorm produced a devastating F3 tornado which was on the ground for 17.5 miles from College Park in Prince George's County to just east of Columbia in Howard County. Multiple vortices were reported with the tornado at times. The tornado first touched down in Northwest Branch Stream Valley Park just west of Hyattsville. It rapidly strengthened to an F3 tornado with winds up to 200 MPH. The damage path ranged in width from 100 to 200 yards. The tornado crossed the intersection of Adelphi Road and University Boulevard into the western campus of the University of Maryland. Ten trailers being used as a temporary office for the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute were completely destroyed by the twister. Debris from the trailers such as video tapes and pieces of paper were found up to 60 miles away in Northern Baltimore and Harford Counties in addition to extreme southeast Pennsylvania. Four of the six people inside the trailers were injured, one seriously. One staff member was thrown free of the destruction and was found in a dumpster nearby. Another person dug their hands into the carpet and held on as their feet were being pulled up in the air by the tornado. The other four occupants, including one child, took shelter under desks and survived. Two University of Maryland students who were visiting their father who worked in the trailers left by car shortly before the tornado hit. The two sisters, ages 20 and 23, were killed when the tornado picked up their car outside of Denton Hall and threw it either around or over an eight-story dorm. They died instantly when their car crashed into a wooded area 300 yards from the road. Most of the other buildings on the campus in the path of the storm were made of brick and suffered only minor to moderate damage, such as Denton Hall Dormitory, Easton Hall Dormitory and Dining Hall, and the President's Mansion. A parking lot outside of Denton Hall full of cars was also hit by the tornado. At least 200 vehicles in the parking lot were damaged, including at least 100 that were blown into and onto other vehicles. At least twenty cars were totaled and one car was partially ripped apart. The woods behind the parking lot were nearly flattened. The bubble roof of the football practice facility near Byrd Stadium was removed. Forty-eight people on campus, including 25 students, were injured by flying debris as the twister downed trees and ripped pieces of siding and roofing off buildings. In addition, residential areas near the campus, including the University Courtyard Apartments sustained damage. A total of 3000 students were left temporarily homeless after two dorms and an off-campus housing unit were evacuated due to storm damage. During the recovery effort, a 78-year-old firefighter who responded to the tragedy at the University died of a heart attack shortly after returning from the scene. The tornado moved north-northeast off the campus and crossed University Boulevard at the intersection of Metzerott Road. The steeple of a church was removed and cars were flipped near the intersection. Power lines and trees were also downed. The twister continued through Paint Branch Stream Valley Park where it downed numerous trees. The tornado weakened to F2 strength before it crossed Interstate 95/495 just west of the Route 1 interchange. It was remarkable that even though the highway was filled with bumper to bumper rush hour traffic, the only damage reported was a flipped tractor trailer. The next area hit by the tornado was the community of Cherry Hill. Several trees and power lines were downed onto roads and houses just west of Baltimore Avenue, including the Chestnut Hills subdivision. Several businesses along Route 1 sustained minor damage, and three additional buildings lost portions of their roofs. Three employees of a business in the Chestnut Hills Shopping Center were injured by flying glass after the windows on the front of the store were shattered. The tornado moved across the National Agricultural Research Center and caused over $40 million dollars in damage. Thirty greenhouses were damaged and several long term studies inside were destroyed. Fifteen other buildings west of Route 1 suffered minor to moderate damage. Numerous trees, including a row of historic willow oaks, were downed. Over 65 vehicles in the employee parking lot were damaged by flying debris. Eleven of these vehicles were totaled. Just north of the research center, "stunning" tree and power line damage was reported at the intersection of Sellman and Montgomery Roads. The tornado tracked across Powder Mill Road and ripped the roof off an office building at the intersection of Cedar Lane. It continued across the Beltsville Heights development and caused damage to the roof at Martin Luther King Elementary School. The tornado continued moving north-northeast toward Laurel. The continuation of the damage path was located at the Virginia Manor Industrial Park on Van Dusen Road where several trees were downed. The tornado was spotted as it moved past Laurel Hospital and it caused minor damage in the Village at Wellington subdivision nearby. The next concentrated area of damage was found at Laurel High School. An annex with 6 classrooms was heavily damaged. The roof was ripped off three of the classrooms and three people inside the structure were injured by flying debris. Significant damage was also reported to the athletic fields behind the school. The tornado moved northeast across the Fairlawn development where it damaged several homes. One home on 10th Street was destroyed after the twister removed the roof and an outside wall. On Montrose Avenue, a woman and her dog were briefly picked up by the tornado. The woman sustained injuries to her hip and leg after being tossed 3 feet in the air and the dog landed uninjured. The historic Harrison Building at the corner of 9th and Montgomery Streets lost its roof and a church and school nearby were damaged. The tornado remained on the ground as it crossed the Patuxent River into Howard County. Across Prince George's County, the tornado was responsible for $100 million in damage. A total of 861 homes, 561 vehicles, and 23 businesses were damaged countywide. In North Laurel, the twister heavily damaged a townhouse complex on Riverbrink Court in the Settlers Landing development. A total of 43 townhomes were damaged, four of which were uninhabitable. The tornado weakened to an F1 before it downed trees onto All Saints Road. The tornado weakened to an F0 as it exited North Laurel and moved across Savage Park. Isolated reports of downed trees were received in the community, including on Red Jacket Way, Vollmerhausen Road, and at the intersection of Interstate 95 and Route 32. In its final stages, the tornado crossed the General Electric Appliance Park and downed its final tree at the intersection of Snowden River Parkway and Route 175 southeast of Columbia. In addition to the devastating tornado, the storms also produced very heavy rainfall and gusty winds. In Anne Arundel County, strong winds from the tornadic thunderstorm downed 13 trees between Laurel and Maryland City. In northern Carroll County, a bow echo produced damaging winds which downed trees along Bankard Road northwest of Union Mills. Rainfall totals included 3.93 inches in Millers, 3.30 inches in Manchester, and 3.26 inches in Westminster. In Montgomery County, 2 to 4 inches of rainfall across the western portion of the county caused low lying areas to quickly fill with water. Several roads were flooded including River Road and Falls Road. A motorist had to be rescued after their car stalled in high water in Poolsville. A total of 3.61 inches of rainfall was recorded in Damascus. In Howard County, between 2 and 3.75 inches of rain fell. A total of 2.86 inches was recorded in Columbia and 3.46 inches fell just southeast of the city. In Frederick County, several roads were flooded by heavy downpours including Ball Road off Route 355 and New Design Road south of Adamstown Road. Heavy rain downed trees at the intersection of Greenfield and Page Roads, Lingamore road and Gashouse Pike, Lawson Road and Route 75, and Bittle Road and Route 17. Street flooding was also reported in Point of Rocks on Route 28. Rainfall totals included 2.54 inches in Wolfsville and 2.30 inches in Frederick.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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