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Pocahontas, MO Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Pocahontas is higher than Missouri average and is lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Pocahontas is higher than Missouri average and is much higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #149

Pocahontas, MO
1.07
Missouri
0.70
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Pocahontas, MO
0.0000
Missouri
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #272

Pocahontas, MO
260.00
Missouri
214.01
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 3,519 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Pocahontas, MO were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:2Cold:32Dense Fog:29Drought:32
Dust Storm:0Flood:596Hail:952Heat:103Heavy Snow:49
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:31Landslide:0Strong Wind:54
Thunderstorm Winds:1,286Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:0Winter Storm:84Winter Weather:30
Other:239 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Pocahontas, MO.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 6 historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Pocahontas, MO.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
13.01965-08-155.1N/A37.37-89.47
36.81965-08-145N/A37.1-89.2
46.31972-06-194.51337-89.08
41.61967-07-213.9N/A37.5-90.4
40.51984-02-143.8237.21-89
38.71976-12-133.5537.8-90.24

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 115 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Pocahontas, MO.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
2.31957-12-18237°27'N / 89°44'W37°31'N / 89°37'W7.80 Miles700 Yards01250K0Cape Girardeau
7.62003-05-06337°23'N / 89°40'W37°24'N / 89°38'W2.00 Miles50 Yards0212.0M0Cape Girardeau
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down at the intersection of Highway 34 and Business Loop I-55 in Jackson, then moved northeast across downtown Jackson and the Bent Creek Golf Course. The damage path ended about 300 yards short of Interstate 55. Several trees blocked Interstate 55 near Jackson. Peak tornado winds were estimated near 180 MPH. The police and fire headquarters building was near the beginning of the damage path. The roof was blown off the building and windows were blown out, allowing rain to flood the building and cause extensive damage. The hazardous materials trailer and communications van were overturned. City police and fire operations were moved to alternate quarters. Streets were blocked by flipped cars and downed trees and power lines. Numerous large trees were snapped or uprooted. The roofs and some walls were torn off many buildings and homes, as well as a school in downtown Jackson. About 200 structures in Jackson received at least some degree of damage. Approximately 22 homes were destroyed, 43 received major damage, and 140 received minor damage. Of those, six were mobile homes and four were apartment buildings. Three businesses were destroyed, including a bakery. Four other businesses had major damage, including a storage company and a woodworking business. Two injured persons were treated and released from a local hospital. One family safely took shelter in their basement while baseball size hail battered the kitchen floor of their unroofed home, and a small sports car landed in their living room. Twenty gas leaks caused by the tornado were repaired within 6 hours. Power was restored to all but 30 homes within 48 hours. A supercellular severe thunderstorm tracked northeast across Bollinger and Cape Girardeau Counties, producing several tornadoes and hail up to golf ball size. Other severe thunderstorms north of the supercell's path produced damaging wind gusts and large hail.
9.11974-05-14237°38'N / 89°38'W1.00 Mile177 Yards0025K0Perry
9.11952-03-18237°22'N / 89°47'W37°27'N / 89°44'W6.20 Miles500 Yards0025K0Cape Girardeau
10.21957-12-18237°24'N / 89°52'W37°27'N / 89°44'W8.00 Miles700 Yards00250K0Cape Girardeau
10.91957-05-21237°23'N / 89°50'W37°25'N / 89°45'W5.10 Miles500 Yards0025K0Cape Girardeau
11.51971-03-14237°19'N / 89°34'W37°24'N / 89°30'W6.60 Miles23 Yards00250K0Cape Girardeau
12.91957-12-18237°41'N / 89°35'W1.00 Mile10 Yards0025K0Perry
16.52004-04-24237°17'N / 89°51'W37°20'N / 89°47'W5.40 Miles200 Yards0010K0Cape Girardeau
 Brief Description: Several barns were damaged, and one was destroyed. Two houses had roof damage. The most intense damage was in a forest, where hundreds of trees were snapped or uprooted. Peak winds were estimated at 130 MPH. The damage began on Highway RA, just south of Lake Girardeau, and continued northeast to about 2 miles west of Tilsit. A warm front extending across southeast Missouri was the focus for tornadic thunderstorms. The storms developed during the warmth of the afternoon and produced a few tornadoes, isolated dime size hail, and several reports of flash flooding.
16.62006-09-22437°41'N / 89°50'W37°46'N / 89°40'W8.00 Miles220 Yards057.0M0Perry
 Brief Description: This violent F-4 tornado reached its maximum intensity near the village of Crosstown, where peak winds were estimated near 210 MPH. Along the Perry County portion of the tornado track, 62 homes were destroyed, 17 had major damage, and 23 received minor damage. Ten of the destroyed homes were mobile homes, and seven that sustained major damage were mobile homes. Three churches were destroyed or heavily damaged. Numerous vehicles were tossed. Over 100 utility poles were broken off. Hundreds of trees were broken off or uprooted. The tornado first touched down at County Road 302 near Friedenburg, where F-1 winds destroyed a barn and partially unroofed a two-story house. There were also downed trees, including a few that fell on a house. As the tornado continued northeast across County Road 316 between Crosstown and Friedenburg, it widened to about 100 yards. Scores of trees were broken off or uprooted, and the roof was blown off a house. The tornado strengthened to F-3 intensity as it reached the junction of Highways P and C in Crosstown. The roof was torn off a church, windows were broken, and other structural damage occurred. Nearby, the roof was blown off a two-story brick store that was over 100 years old. An overturned vehicle was in the front yard, and trees were mangled. The width increased to 220 yards. In the center of Crosstown on Highway C, the tornado reached F-4 intensity. This is where a site-built house was levelled. The F-4 damage continued east along County Road 350 in Crosstown, where two more site-built houses were levelled. Only the bolted-down floor of one residence remained. An eyewitness along County Road 350 stated he took shelter in the basement after seeing fog coming directly toward him. His house remained mostly intact, except for the roof and garage. The tornado weakened to F-3 intensity about one to two miles east of Crosstown, where a modular home was destroyed except for the bathroom. A vehicle was tossed in the yard. The weakening trend continued east along County Road 350 to the Mississippi River, where many trees were uprooted and broken off. Some outbuildings were thrown around. The path width decreased to 75 yards as the intensity lowered to F-1. The average path width was 150 yards. There were five injuries requiring medical attention, including one broken arm. Two people were moderately injured when the vehicle they were driving was tossed into a house. Dozens of other residents received minor injuries but did not seek medical attention. Where the tornado crossed the Mississippi River, a barge loaded with coal was pushed to the shoreline. The windows were blown out of the tug boat, and enough coal was blown into the tug boat that it was shovelled out. The tornado crossed the Mississippi River into Jackson County, Illinois.
18.71999-01-21237°20'N / 89°22'W37°22'N / 89°21'W1.00 Mile200 Yards0020K0Union
 Brief Description: Top winds were estimated near 130 MPH. Damage was relatively light due to the track of the tornado over rural portions of those counties. A few sheds and barns were destroyed, and a house sustained moderate damage. A fairly large metal barn, about 100 feet by 50 feet, was blown into a stand of trees, but remained fully intact in the upper reaches of the trees. Tree damage was complete along some wooded portions of the track. The tornado formed less than a half mile east of Thebes, and then tracked seven miles through the Shawnee National Forest. The damaged structures were near Thebes and Gale.
19.01969-06-22337°41'N / 90°04'W37°41'N / 89°44'W18.10 Miles100 Yards06250K0Perry
19.31996-04-19337°44'N / 89°52'W37°46'N / 89°44'W11.50 Miles175 Yards005.0M0Perry
 Brief Description: The tornado destroyed 13 homes and caused major structural damage to 5 others. 63 other homes received minor or moderate structural damage. A total of 69 outbuildings and 6 businesses were damaged or destroyed. The Salvation Army and Red Cross were called in to provide food and shelter. State highways and county roads were cleared of tornado debris and open for travel within 24 hours. Extensive damage to utility lines resulted in prolonged power outages lasting a day or two. The F3 damage occurred just west of Menfro, shortly before the tornado dissipated.
19.41972-04-14237°34'N / 89°19'W37°32'N / 89°16'W3.30 Miles30 Yards0425K0Union
19.91999-01-21237°13'N / 89°27'W37°20'N / 89°23'W7.00 Miles400 Yards00150K0Alexander
 Brief Description: Top winds were estimated near 130 MPH. Damage was relatively light due to the track of the tornado over rural portions of those counties. A few sheds and barns were destroyed, and a house sustained moderate damage. A fairly large metal barn, about 100 feet by 50 feet, was blown into a stand of trees, but remained fully intact in the upper reaches of the trees. Tree damage was complete along some wooded portions of the track. The tornado formed less than a half mile east of Thebes, and then tracked seven miles through the Shawnee National Forest. The damaged structures were near Thebes and Gale.
20.91981-05-24237°12'N / 89°40'W37°12'N / 89°33'W6.40 Miles33 Yards012.5M0Scott
21.01981-05-24237°12'N / 89°43'W37°12'N / 89°40'W2.70 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Cape Girardeau
21.12006-09-22237°46'N / 89°39'W37°48'N / 89°20'W19.50 Miles225 Yards01800K0Jackson
 Brief Description: This tornado crossed the Mississippi River from Perry County, Missouri. The tornado weakened from its maximum F-4 intensity to F-2 intensity by the time it entered Jackson County in the Mississippi River bottomlands near Wilkinson Island. At this location, the wall of an old two-story farmhouse was blown out, and the roof was blown off. Hundreds of trees were broken off. Tree damage was visible across the river in Perry County, Missouri. The path width was estimated to be 200 yards wide on the Jackson County side of the river. Before reaching Illinois Route 3, the F-2 tornado widened to 250 yards and destroyed a mobile home. A resident of the mobile home was sent to the hospital. Nearby, a house was unroofed, and trees were snapped or uprooted. Another house lost a room that was added on. A swing set was blown 200 yards and wrapped around a mailbox. An empty tractor trailer rig was overturned. An empty grain bin was blown 100 yards into a field. Full grain bins were severely damaged but remained in place. The roof was blown off a brick house. As the tornado crossed Route 3, high tension utility poles were snapped off, hundreds of acres of corn were flattened, and trees were uprooted. Route 3 was closed for nine hours. From Route 3, the tornado proceeded east-northeast through mostly rural areas of the county, including the Kinkaid Lake State Wildlife Area. The tornado weakened to F-0 intensity before reaching Kinkaid Lake. At the Kinkaid Lake marina, about 50 RV's and boats were damaged, and trees were broken off. The tornado finally lifted shortly after crossing Highway 127 north of Murphysboro. The damage along Highway 127 was about 75 yards wide and consisted of broken tree limbs. A state trooper videotaped the tornado before it lifted. Storm chasers also videotaped the tornado. Peak winds where F-2 damage occurred in western Jackson County were estimated near 150 MPH. The average path width was about 150 yards. A total of about six homes were destroyed or severely damaged, and a dozen others were damaged to a lesser degree. Dozens of other non-residential buildings, such as garages, sheds, barns, and carports, were destroyed. Along the path, striations were evident in fields, and scores of utility poles were snapped off. There were numerous reports of debris falling from the sky in neighboring Perry County, Illinois. Debris as large as pieces of siding and roofing was reported in Du Quoin.
21.51971-12-15237°10'N / 89°32'W37°15'N / 89°29'W6.40 Miles100 Yards0025K0Scott
22.01957-12-18237°11'N / 89°40'W0.50 Mile33 Yards312.5M0Scott
22.41957-05-21337°34'N / 89°19'W37°38'N / 89°11'W8.50 Miles200 Yards00250K0Union
22.61955-04-22237°13'N / 89°50'W37°11'N / 89°46'W4.10 Miles50 Yards01250K0Cape Girardeau
23.11955-11-16237°26'N / 89°16'W37°27'N / 89°11'W4.50 Miles150 Yards00250K0Union
24.31957-12-18337°50'N / 89°45'W37°52'N / 89°39'W5.70 Miles33 Yards0025K0Randolph
25.01968-04-03237°25'N / 90°05'W2.50 Miles50 Yards0025K0Bollinger
25.11957-12-18437°42'N / 89°29'W37°50'N / 89°10'W19.50 Miles300 Yards111802.5M0Jackson
25.11976-02-16237°28'N / 89°11'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0125K0Union
25.21957-12-18237°50'N / 89°50'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00250K0Perry
26.01971-12-15237°05'N / 89°47'W37°10'N / 89°32'W14.90 Miles100 Yards12425K0Scott
26.41972-04-14237°32'N / 89°16'W37°31'N / 89°03'W11.80 Miles30 Yards0025K0Union
26.72002-04-28337°22'N / 89°20'W37°22'N / 89°02'W16.00 Miles400 Yards185.0M0Union
 Brief Description: The tornado first touched down in very hilly terrain in the Shawnee National Forest and then tracked east, crossing Route 127 just north of Mill Creek. The tornado then directly struck the community of Dongola, where most of the damage and casualties occurred. A 69-year-old woman was killed as she was attempting to flee her mobile home. The woman had just gotten into her car, started the engine, and turned the lights on when the tornado struck. She was blown away from the car and found dead under a structure across the road from where the vehicle was parked and still running. Elsewhere in the Dongola area, a train was blown off the tracks. Several wood houses were demolished, and seven double-wide trailers were destroyed. Approximately 75 homes were damaged. A recreational vehicle was tossed across Lake Dongola and impaled into the ground. F69VE
26.91957-12-18237°42'N / 89°13'W1.50 Miles33 Yards0525K0Jackson
27.01963-04-29237°07'N / 89°47'W37°08'N / 89°46'W1.30 Miles50 Yards1325K0Cape Girardeau
27.21967-12-21337°50'N / 89°54'W37°53'N / 89°48'W6.20 Miles200 Yards01325.0M0Perry
27.22006-09-22237°38'N / 90°09'W37°40'N / 90°03'W6.00 Miles400 Yards00150K0Perry
 Brief Description: The tornado entered Perry County from the extreme southeast corner of St. Francois County. The tornado was at its strongest along and north of County Road 738, shortly after entering Perry County. In this area, the damage path was about 400 yards wide, and peak winds were estimated near 120 MPH. A farm building was levelled, roofs were torn off houses, and dozens of acres of trees were flattened. The tornado weakened to F-1 intensity as it crossed Highway BB, where nearly 100 trees were uprooted and roofs were partially damaged. The path width was estimated around 200 yards at Highway BB. As the tornado continued east across County Road 730, a barn was destroyed, and dozens of trees were down. The path width was about 100 yards when the tornado reached Lake Perry, close to where it lifted along Highway T. At a campground on Lake Perry, recreational vehicles were overturned and damaged by falling trees. The path ended southwest of Silver Lake at Highway T. The average path width was 200 yards. In total, hundreds of acres of timber were flattened, several barns were destroyed, and others were severely damaged. Shingles and decking were ripped off several homes. The parent supercell that produced this tornado later produced a separate F-4 tornado in eastern parts of Perry County.
27.71970-06-01237°42'N / 89°12'W0525K0Jackson
28.01972-04-21237°13'N / 89°17'W37°14'N / 89°15'W1.30 Miles33 Yards0125K0Alexander
28.31971-04-27337°54'N / 89°48'W37°54'N / 89°43'W4.50 Miles200 Yards1202.5M0Franklin
28.42002-04-27337°13'N / 90°04'W37°16'N / 90°01'W4.00 Miles200 Yards1164.0M0Bollinger
 Brief Description: This strong tornado with peak winds near 180 MPH touched down in a rural area southwest of Marble Hill. A total of 19 residences were severely damaged, and 6 were destroyed. Approximately 10 of the residences were mobile homes and 15 were single-family homes. Another 50 outbuildings, such as barns and sheds, were destroyed or damaged. Seven people were inside a house that was demolished. One of the victims, a 12-year-old boy, was thrown about 50 yards from the house and fatally injured. Several others in the immediate area, possibly the other occupants of the house, were thrown into a nearby lake and swam to safety. Of the 16 people injured in the tornado, four were air lifted to hospitals with serious injuries. Cars were stacked atop cars. Several residents were trapped inside the debris of their homes for up to 3 hours. The large number of trees down across roads delayed the arrival of rescue teams. M12PH
28.91961-03-06237°52'N / 89°52'W37°54'N / 89°51'W1.90 Miles50 Yards0025K0Perry
29.01972-04-21237°14'N / 89°15'W37°17'N / 89°10'W5.60 Miles33 Yards0225K0Pulaski
29.11970-03-25237°43'N / 89°11'W01250K0Jackson
29.42006-03-11337°49'N / 90°00'W37°53'N / 89°54'W7.00 Miles400 Yards2101.0M0Perry
 Brief Description: The tornado entered Perry County from Ste. Genevieve County near Highway NN and just west of the community of Giboney. The tornado moved northeast, crossing Interstate 55 only about one-half mile from the Ste. Genevieve County line. Two fatalities and F3 damage occurred in the vicinity of where the tornado crossed U.S. Route 61. The two fatalities occurred on U.S. 61, where a vehicle was picked up and thrown into a propane tank. The truck in which they were riding was likely picked up, flipped over, and slammed into the ground several times. The coroner stated that the victims died instantly. One of the victims was ejected from the truck, which then struck the top of a large propane tank. Because of the ensuing propane leak, the victim still in the truck could not be removed until the following day, when the propane was off-loaded from the tank. Both of the victims in the vehicle were residents of a mobile home who were trying to flee the tornado. The home from which they fled sustained only minor damage. At least four other people were significantly injured as they were picked up by tornadic winds and hurled 100 yards. Their injuries were compounded by wind-blown debris. Eight victims were admitted to a local hospital to remove debris which penetrated their bodies, and two others were sent to regional hospitals for serious injuries. Three mobile homes were flattened, a brick house had its roof and several walls blown off, and numerous vehicles were tossed around. A total of about a dozen residences were destroyed or severely damaged in Perry County. Perry County was designated a federal disaster area, enabling individual residents to apply for relief. The dashboard camera in a sheriff deputy's patrol car captured the tornado on film as it crossed U.S. 61 at F3 intensity. Peak winds were estimated near 170 MPH. The tornado crossed into Randolph County, Illinois at Old River, near some railroad tracks about 1.5 miles southeast of St. Marys. M40VE, F49VE
29.81977-06-30237°10'N / 89°59'W2.00 Miles50 Yards04250K0Bollinger
29.91957-12-18237°54'N / 89°30'W37°55'N / 89°24'W5.40 Miles33 Yards0025K0Jackson
30.41973-05-26237°25'N / 90°11'W3.00 Miles200 Yards000K0Madison
30.42006-03-11237°45'N / 90°07'W37°47'N / 90°03'W4.00 Miles400 Yards0200Ste. Genevieve
 Brief Description: The fourth tornado from the Southeast Missouri supercell formed in extreme southwest Ste. Genevieve County and went on to be the longest and strongest of the four tornadoes. The tornado formed about 9:20 pm CST just east of Route WW and one mile north of Holmes Road. On Kramer Road, just off Route N, the tornado produced F2 damage that was at least 400 yards wide. A double wide mobile home was rolled about 150 yards and completely destroyed. Two occupants suffered serious injuries. Two other mobile homes in the area were also destroyed, along with two barns, a machine shed and a detached garage. The tornado continued northeast and tracked into northern Perry County.
30.42003-05-06237°16'N / 90°07'W37°16'N / 90°06'W0.80 Mile100 Yards0040K0Bollinger
 Brief Description: A mobile home, a house, and a barn was destroyed. Most of the damage was on County Road 702. Peak winds were estimated around 130 MPH. A supercellular severe thunderstorm tracked northeast across Bollinger and Cape Girardeau Counties, producing several tornadoes and hail up to golf ball size. Other severe thunderstorms north of the supercell's path produced damaging wind gusts and large hail.
30.41963-04-29237°05'N / 89°57'W37°07'N / 89°47'W9.40 Miles50 Yards0025K0Stoddard
31.01957-12-18337°54'N / 89°48'W38°00'N / 89°30'W17.70 Miles33 Yards00250K0Randolph
31.01951-11-13237°54'N / 89°32'W37°58'N / 89°26'W7.10 Miles250 Yards07250K0Jackson
31.21967-12-21337°53'N / 89°50'W38°01'N / 89°36'W15.70 Miles400 Yards02250K0Randolph
31.52006-03-11237°50'N / 89°54'W38°04'N / 89°35'W22.50 Miles300 Yards0000Randolph
 Brief Description: The fourth tornado from the Southeast Missouri supercell crossed into Randolph County Illinois about 9:47 pm CST moving across the southern portion of Kaskaskia Island. Debris originating from near St. Marys, Missouri was found in some fields on the island. Numerous snapped or uprooted trees were found on the island. The tornado crossed the Mississippi River on the north side of Chester with a damage path about 300 yards wide. F2 level damage was found just north of the Chester Correctional Center where a number of trees were leveled or snapped off. The tornado produced F1 damage at the Gorden Bud Cohen Recreational Complex where three wooden light posts were snapped off near the base, and several ball fields backstops and fences were blown over. Just to the east, three large pole barns and several outbuildings were destroyed, and a house had roof and exterior damage. The damage at this point was 300 yards wide and rated F2. The tornado continued to produced F1 to F2 damage along the remainder of its path through Randolph County with a nearly continuous 300 yard width. A Notable area of F2 damage were found just north and northeast of Bremen along Highway 150. This damage consisted of metal high power electric towers blown down, a destroyed mobile home, a number of destroyed barns and metal outbuildings, roof and exterior damage to several homes, and numerous trees uprooted. F2 damage was also found near Highway 150 about 1.5 miles west of Steeleville. The rear portion of a house had considerable roof and structural damage, several detached garages were destroyed, at least 5 metal outbuildings were destroyed, several barns destroyed, signs broken, and trees and power poles snapped. The tornado finally exited Randolph County about 1.5 miles south of Highway 154 on County Line Road about 10:15 pm CST.
31.61973-05-07237°06'N / 89°55'W0.30 Mile27 Yards000K0Stoddard
32.71971-12-15237°01'N / 89°51'W37°05'N / 89°47'W5.70 Miles100 Yards0225K0Stoddard
33.02002-04-24237°25'N / 90°18'W37°26'N / 90°10'W9.00 Miles800 Yards0300Madison
 Brief Description: A tornado hit Madison County, first causing damage about 9 miles south of Fredericktown along Highway 67. A mobile home was destroyed and a frame house lost its roof. The tornado moved east through a heavily wooded area uprooting and damaging trees. The tornado reached Marquand, a small town of about 400 people, about 4 pm and caused considerable damage. Large trees were uprooted or snapped off and nearly every structure in a 3 to 4 block area was damaged. The Fire Station was completely destroyed as was a restaurant that was next to it. Several other frame buildings lost all or parts of their roofs. A State Emergency Management Agency damage assessment reported that 6 homes were destroyed, 12 homes suffered major damage, and 22 homes had minor damage. There were 3 minor injuries reported.
33.12003-05-04237°03'N / 89°37'W37°01'N / 89°24'W11.50 Miles130 Yards0075K0Scott
 Brief Description: One mobile home was destroyed. Several small buildings were damaged. Numerous trees were blown down or damaged. Several irrigation systems were moved and/or turned over. Peak winds in the tornado were estimated near 130 MPH. Severe thunderstorms produced dime to nickel size hail in isolated locations from around Poplar Bluff west. The storms then organized into a single tornadic supercell just northeast of Poplar Bluff. This long-lived supercell moved east, passing between Cape Girardeau and Sikeston, then continued east-northeast through the Lower Ohio River Valley. The supercell produced a tornado in Scott County. Trees were blown down at Wappapello in southeast Wayne County.
34.71972-04-14237°31'N / 89°03'W37°33'N / 88°58'W4.90 Miles30 Yards0525K0Johnson
35.21974-06-22237°33'N / 89°00'W000K0Johnson
35.31986-05-15236°58'N / 89°42'W37°01'N / 89°39'W4.00 Miles400 Yards1152.5M0Scott
35.42002-04-28237°22'N / 89°03'W37°22'N / 88°59'W3.00 Miles400 Yards023.0M0Johnson
 Brief Description: The tornado entered Johnson County near Cypress and was on the ground for only a few miles in Johnson County. Cypress was impacted directly, where about 50 structures were damaged, including a school. The school lost portions of upper story walls and the roof. Two trailers were destroyed.
35.61957-12-18337°58'N / 89°49'W38°04'N / 89°28'W20.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Randolph
36.61957-12-18437°50'N / 89°10'W37°51'N / 89°05'W4.50 Miles300 Yards0102.5M0Williamson
36.71982-05-29338°02'N / 89°40'W38°02'N / 89°37'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Montgomery
37.51982-05-29338°02'N / 89°37'W38°03'N / 89°32'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Perry
37.71967-12-21338°01'N / 89°36'W38°04'N / 89°28'W7.90 Miles400 Yards00250K0Perry
38.21957-04-03237°04'N / 89°11'W37°06'N / 89°11'W2.30 Miles33 Yards00250K0Pulaski
38.52006-09-22237°36'N / 90°28'W37°39'N / 90°11'W18.00 Miles880 Yards0100Madison
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down just west of Route K approximately one mile north of Highway 72. As it traveled east, numerous trees and tree limbs were blown down. The tornado moved across U.S. Highway 67 about 4 miles northwest of Fredericktown, knocking down additional trees and tree limbs. The damage path was about 50 yards wide with a damage intensity of F0. As it approached the Fredericktown Municipal Airport, along Copper Mines Road, it began to produce multiple vortices. Two tornadic damage tracks were uncovered across a lake west of Highway OO along County Roads 271 and 272. Over 20 homes, mobile homes and machine sheds sustained varying degrees of damage. Several witnesses observed twin tornadoes merging into one large tornado over this area. The width of the damage path of the northern track was approximately 150 yards wide while the southern damage path was about 100 yards wide. The damage intensity ranged from F1 to F2 in this location. As the large tornado crossed Highway OO, five homes, four mobile homes and several machine sheds sustained varying degrees of damage. The damage path was 300 yards wide and high end F1 intensity. The tornado continued east along County Road 217. Four homes sustained F1 to F2 damage with debris from two of the homes thrown between 50 to 100 yards to the east. Also, numerous trees were either snapped or uprooted in this area. The width of the damage path in this area was about 250 yards. Further east, two tornadic damage tracks were uncovered about half a mile to a mile north of the intersection of County Roads 215 and 217. Four homes sustained varying degrees of damage while one mobile home was completely destroyed. One person was critically injured near the destroyed mobile home. Debris from the mobile home was tossed over 150 yards to the east. The width of the northern damage path was about 150 yards, while the width of the southern track was about 50 yards. The damage was rated high end F1 in this location. Witnesses observed the twin tornadoes merge again into one large funnel as it crossed a second small lake north of County Road 217. Four homes and several machine sheds sustained damage. Also, over a thousand trees around the lake were snapped or uprooted. The damage path was a quarter of a mile wide in this location and was rated F1 to low end F2. The tornado continued eastward into northeast Madison County crossing County Road 219 just south of the Madison/St. Francois County line. Three homes were damaged and three machine sheds were destroyed, as well as thousands of trees snapped or uprooted. The width of the damage path in this area was half a mile and was rated F2. The tornado then crossed into extreme southeastern St. Francois County near Martin Road.
38.61969-06-22437°43'N / 90°19'W37°43'N / 90°16'W2.30 Miles440 Yards002.5M0St. Francois
38.71963-05-16237°40'N / 90°21'W37°42'N / 90°16'W4.90 Miles50 Yards00250K0St. Francois
38.82003-05-06237°03'N / 89°21'W37°00'N / 89°11'W3.00 Miles400 Yards01300K0Alexander
 Brief Description: The tornado formed northwest of Cairo near the Mississippi River. Three tractor-trailer rigs were overturned on the Interstate 57 bridge over the Mississippi River. The tornado tracked through Cairo, damaging dozens of homes and several businesses. One single-family home was destroyed, injuring a child who was cut by flying debris. Of the damaged homes, about four sustained major damage, and the rest had mainly minor damage.
38.81958-04-05337°54'N / 89°20'W38°02'N / 89°09'W13.50 Miles100 Yards05250K0Jackson
39.12004-10-18237°36'N / 88°58'W37°34'N / 88°54'W4.30 Miles250 Yards02500K0Johnson
 Brief Description: The tornado turned east-southeast from Williamson County back into Johnson County. The bulk of the damage and injuries occurred in a neighborhood on the southern half of the Lake of Egypt. The two injured persons were mobile home residents whose homes were demolished. One of the mobile homes was swept clean off its foundation. The demolished home was deposited 50 to 100 yards away. The 32-year-old male occupant of the mobile home, who was ejected from the home, received numerous bruises and cuts. A female resident of another mobile home was injured. In total, three mobile homes were destroyed, and dozens of mobile homes, barns, and sheds were damaged. Rescue efforts were hampered by a large amount of tree debris on roads. Peak winds in the Lake of Egypt neighborhood were estimated near 120 MPH. The tornado lifted as it reached the southeast side of the Lake of Egypt. The parent thunderstorm produced another tornado in northern Johnson County only a few miles beyond where this tornado lifted. A supercell thunderstorm organized over southern Jackson County, then spawned a tornado as it moved east along the Union/Williamson County line. This supercell continued east-southeast across northern Johnson and northern Pope Counties, producing two significant tornadoes and large hail. Although the storm exhibited strong rotation as it continued east through Hardin County and across the Ohio River into Kentucky, no additional tornadoes were reported there.
39.21982-05-29338°03'N / 89°32'W38°04'N / 89°28'W3.00 Miles200 Yards07250K0Perry
39.52003-05-06437°16'N / 89°02'W37°16'N / 88°56'W6.00 Miles1000 Yards1133.5M0Pulaski
 Brief Description: This violent tornado began near Grand Chain and reached its maximum intensity of 210 MPH as it neared the Massac County line. A 53-year-old man was killed when the chimney of his house collapsed on him. The man, who was in his basement, was protecting his son by lying on top of him when the collapse occurred. The son received broken bones. Their house was impaled by some nearby large trees that prevented it from being swept farther away. Along the Pulaski County portion of the tornado path, six single family homes and ten mobile homes were destroyed. Another ten single family homes and a mobile home had major damage. A few dozen other residences received some type of minor damage. A few dozen outbuildings, two businesses, and a campground were destroyed or had major damage. Approximately 13 persons were injured, but only a few of those required hospitalization. All roads in the damage area were impassable due to large numbers of trees and building debris on them. Many of the tornado victims in this county had no insurance on their residences. The area of most intense destruction was along Tick Ridge Road, a state road that follows a ridge above the Ohio River. M53PH The deadliest and most destructive storm of the night tracked within 10 miles of the Ohio River across extreme southern Illinois. The storm produced a 33-mile long tornado that killed two and injured about 33. A small but very damaging downburst occurred several miles south of the tornado track. A swath of large hail occurred north of the tornado track. Hailstones up to 2 inches in diameter were reported at and near the intersection of Highways 145 and 147, near the community of Glendale in Pope County.
39.71957-12-18237°41'N / 90°21'W37°42'N / 90°18'W2.70 Miles33 Yards1125K0St. Francois
39.71986-05-15236°53'N / 89°35'W36°59'N / 89°28'W6.00 Miles500 Yards01925.0M0Scott
40.02003-05-06237°05'N / 89°18'W36°58'N / 89°09'W7.00 Miles100 Yards0000Mississippi
 Brief Description: This tornado formed on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River, crossed the river into Missouri at the Interstate 57 bridge, then crossed the river into Kentucky. On the Interstate 57 bridge over the Mississippi River, three 18-wheelers were flipped over, closing the bridge for several hours. The Missouri portion of the track was mainly across undeveloped river bottomland, used mainly for planting crops.
40.01982-05-29437°48'N / 89°08'W37°43'N / 88°50'W17.00 Miles400 Yards10181250.0M0Williamson
40.51957-12-18338°05'N / 89°33'W2.50 Miles33 Yards01250K0Perry
40.61967-06-21237°06'N / 89°06'W0025K0Pulaski
40.61957-04-03237°00'N / 89°12'W37°04'N / 89°11'W4.50 Miles33 Yards05250K0Alexander
40.71973-05-07237°24'N / 90°28'W37°34'N / 90°18'W14.60 Miles100 Yards00250K0Madison
40.81968-04-03237°21'N / 90°28'W37°28'N / 90°17'W12.80 Miles500 Yards00250K0Madison
40.91957-12-18437°51'N / 89°05'W37°53'N / 89°01'W4.30 Miles300 Yards0102.5M0Franklin
40.91973-05-07238°00'N / 89°14'W000K0Perry
41.71967-10-24236°54'N / 89°42'W36°54'N / 89°42'W0025K0Scott
41.81991-11-19337°44'N / 88°56'W1.50 Miles70 Yards01625.0M0Williamson
42.01952-03-18237°47'N / 90°21'W37°53'N / 90°13'W9.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Ste. Genevieve
42.01957-12-18237°18'N / 88°55'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Johnson
42.01959-03-14238°03'N / 90°00'W38°03'N / 89°57'W2.30 Miles120 Yards0125K0Randolph
42.51972-04-14237°33'N / 88°58'W37°34'N / 88°46'W10.90 Miles30 Yards0025K0Johnson
42.61969-06-22437°44'N / 90°25'W37°43'N / 90°19'W5.60 Miles440 Yards002.5M0St. Francois
42.71973-06-02237°46'N / 88°56'W00250K0Williamson
43.11972-04-21237°25'N / 90°33'W37°31'N / 90°18'W15.20 Miles50 Yards0025K0Madison
43.31986-05-15236°52'N / 89°37'W36°53'N / 89°35'W3.00 Miles500 Yards0025.0M0New Madrid
44.01955-04-22236°52'N / 89°34'W0.20 Mile10 Yards0025K0Scott
44.31981-04-22436°53'N / 89°27'W36°54'N / 89°20'W6.50 Miles33 Yards1625.0M0Mississippi
44.52006-03-11238°04'N / 89°36'W38°11'N / 89°16'W20.00 Miles300 Yards021.2M0Perry
 Brief Description: The tornado entered Perry County, IL from Randolph County about 1.5 miles south of Highway 154. The Perry County segment of the tornado was rated at its maximum intensity and width shortly after crossing the county line. Shortly after crossing into Perry County, some coal trucks were blown over, and a modular home was totally destroyed on Route 154 near Route 150. Two persons in the home were trapped inside for a time, but they sustained only minor injuries that were treated at a local hospital. Route 150 was closed for 12 hours due to downed trees and power lines. Within a few miles of the destroyed modular home, some hogs were killed at a hog farm, and an empty grain bin was picked up and blown 100 yards into a field. Several eyewitnesses at this location reported two funnels. As the tornado continued its northeast movement, passing northwest of Pinckneyville, it weakened to F1 intensity. Near where it crossed Illinois Route 13, trees were uprooted, roofs were blown off, and power poles were snapped. Siding was blown off a house. Near the end of the tornado track, just northwest of Tamaroa, a metal building was destroyed. Debris from the building was blown about 400 yards. A nearby house lost all of its shingles. Along the 20-mile path through Perry County, dozens of barns and outbuildings were severely damaged or destroyed. Dozens of homes sustained varying degrees of damage, ranging from minor to major. Hundreds of trees were uprooted or snapped. Peak winds on this county segment were estimated at 140 MPH, mainly near the Randolph County line. The average path width was close to 200 yards. A deputy sheriff reported a tornado crossing U.S. Highway 51 north of Tamaroa. This was the last evidence of the tornado, which likely dissipated as it crossed Route 51.
44.71964-03-25337°10'N / 90°31'W37°15'N / 90°13'W17.40 Miles300 Yards02625K0Wayne
44.72002-04-28237°22'N / 88°54'W37°22'N / 88°47'W7.00 Miles400 Yards02100K0Johnson
 Brief Description: This tornado was produced by the same supercell thunderstorm that spawned a long-track tornado over southern Union and southwest Johnson Counties. This tornado touched down along U.S. Highway 45, about 3 miles south of Vienna. The tornado moved east across Interstate 24, and then dissipated about 1.5 miles east of the interstate near Ganntown. Two persons were injured when their mobile home was demolished. Two other mobile homes were extensively damaged. Numerous trees were down.
45.31952-03-18238°06'N / 89°56'W38°09'N / 89°52'W4.90 Miles100 Yards00250K0Randolph
45.51958-06-12337°05'N / 89°00'W0325K0Ballard
46.21982-12-02237°27'N / 90°32'W37°34'N / 90°26'W8.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Madison
46.71952-03-18237°45'N / 90°30'W37°47'N / 90°21'W8.50 Miles100 Yards0125K0St. Francois
47.31957-12-18538°05'N / 89°15'W38°06'N / 89°09'W5.40 Miles200 Yards16250K0Perry
47.71971-07-15236°51'N / 89°21'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0625K0Mississippi
47.82003-05-06437°14'N / 88°56'W37°19'N / 88°42'W14.00 Miles1000 Yards12010.0M0Massac
 Brief Description: The tornado was near its maximum F-4 intensity as it crossed the Pulaski County line into western Massac County near the community of Hillerman. Estimated winds of 210 MPH disintegrated mobile homes and levelled several modern frame homes. One frame house was swept clean off its foundation, with only the roof left intact in a creek about 200 yards away. Many vehicles were lifted, rolled, or thrown up to 100 yards or more. Numerous cases of missiling were observed, including glass embedded in trees. Tree destruction in forested areas was nearly complete, and a few trees were debarked. The only fatality in Massac County was a 65-year-old female who was killed when her mobile home disintegrated. The official cause of death was blunt trauma to the head. She was found in a water-filled ravine about 100 yards from the former site of her mobile home. The frame of the mobile home was wrapped around the trunks of two trees that were stripped of all their limbs. Most of the levelled frame homes were concentrated on Boaz Road and Rolling Hills Road, in or near Hillerman. After passing through Hillerman, the tornado overturned dozens of railroad cars of a train just west of the Mermet Lake Conservation Area, which is off U.S. Route 45. The Mermet Lake Conservation Area was extensively damaged. An estimated 300 acres of forest were destroyed, boat docks were destroyed, and bathing facilities were destroyed. Dozens of waterfowl were found dead. After destroying additional residences and high tension power lines, the tornado crossed Interstate 24 near mile marker 28, about a mile south of the New Columbia exit. Tractor-trailer rigs and a tour bus were overturned on the interstate, injuring the drivers. The interstate was closed due to grain bins, tree limbs, and some building debris on the highway. Additional residences were destroyed between the interstate and the Pope County line. The tornado crossed into Pope County near where Illinois Route 145 crosses the county line. In Massac County, a total of 15 single-family houses and 13 mobile homes were destroyed. About 20 other single-family houses and 15 mobile homes received major damage. Several dozen other residences had some type of minor damage. Numerous vehicles and farming implements were destroyed, including combines. About 20 persons were injured in Massac County, but only one or two were hospitalized in serious or critical condition. Most of the injuries involved lacerations, bruises, broken bones, and internal injuries. Near Hillerman, a deputy sheriff escaped unhurt after his patrol car was thrown about 50 yards and struck by a flying tree and telephone pole. F65MH The deadliest and most destructive storm of the night tracked within 10 miles of the Ohio River across extreme southern Illinois. The storm produced a 33-mile long tornado that killed two and injured about 33. A small but very damaging downburst occurred several miles south of the tornado track. A swath of large hail occurred north of the tornado track. Hailstones up to 2 inches in diameter were reported at and near the intersection of Highways 145 and 147, near the community of Glendale in Pope County.
48.41960-02-09237°42'N / 90°33'W37°46'N / 90°24'W9.30 Miles100 Yards0025K0St. Francois
48.81969-06-22437°44'N / 90°33'W37°44'N / 90°25'W7.20 Miles440 Yards4142.5M0St. Francois
48.91958-04-05338°02'N / 89°09'W38°06'N / 89°03'W7.10 Miles100 Yards06250K0Jackson
49.12003-05-06237°01'N / 89°09'W36°58'N / 88°53'W15.00 Miles300 Yards0000Ballard
 Brief Description: The tornado crossed into Ballard County between Wickliffe and the U.S. Route 60/62 bridge over the Ohio River. The tornado was rated F-2 in a forested area along the Mississippi River just north of Wickliffe, where intense tree damage was observed. Along the rest of its path through Ballard County, it was rated F-1 or F-0 (winds below 113 MPH). Where the tornado passed through the northeast outskirts of Wickliffe, there were a few homes with mainly minor damage. Roads were blocked by large fallen trees, including a 300-year-old white oak tree. The tornado moved east-southeast across rural Ballard County, where there was considerable roof damage to a home, and a garage door was blown out. Large trees were uprooted. At least one house was struck by falling trees. There was slight structural damage to the roof and attic portion of a home. The most prolific tornado-producing storm of the night entered western Kentucky near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and moved east, passing between Paducah and Mayfield. The storm continued to spawn tornadoes, mostly of weak to moderate intensity, until it reached Kentucky Lake. Elsewhere, severe thunderstorms moved northeast across northwest Kentucky, producing sporadic wind damage and a tornado. Sporadic wind damage occurred in Livingston, Crittenden, Webster, and Daviess Counties, with a tornado in Union and Henderson Counties.
49.21973-11-24236°50'N / 89°20'W36°54'N / 89°08'W11.90 Miles33 Yards00250K0Mississippi
49.51985-04-05238°13'N / 89°42'W1.80 Miles50 Yards13250K0Randolph
49.91973-11-24236°47'N / 89°26'W36°50'N / 89°20'W6.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Mississippi


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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