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Plover, WI Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Plover is about the same as Wisconsin average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Plover is lower than Wisconsin average and is about the same as the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #365

Plover, WI
0.00
Wisconsin
0.00
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Plover, WI
0.0000
Wisconsin
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #475

Plover, WI
142.14
Wisconsin
153.98
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 1,950 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Plover, WI were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:3Cold:21Dense Fog:13Drought:17
Dust Storm:0Flood:64Hail:590Heat:23Heavy Snow:46
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:9Landslide:0Strong Wind:32
Thunderstorm Winds:919Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:4Winter Storm:58Winter Weather:4
Other:147 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Plover, WI.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Plover, WI.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Plover, WI.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 56 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Plover, WI.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
1.31976-06-13244°27'N / 89°31'W0.30 Mile50 Yards003K0Portage
5.41984-04-27244°22'N / 89°32'W44°25'N / 89°27'W5.50 Miles20 Yards00250K0Portage
7.01992-05-16244°22'N / 89°34'W44°23'N / 89°22'W11.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Portage
8.61956-04-03244°15'N / 89°31'W44°29'N / 89°20'W18.20 Miles100 Yards22250K0Portage
8.91964-08-22244°18'N / 89°36'W44°22'N / 89°30'W6.40 Miles333 Yards0025K0Portage
10.11970-07-07244°19'N / 89°31'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Portage
12.61976-06-12244°27'N / 89°17'W0.20 Mile50 Yards0025K0Portage
15.21964-05-07244°24'N / 89°50'W0.50 Mile100 Yards014250K0Wood
15.81951-09-26444°20'N / 89°18'W44°22'N / 89°13'W4.10 Miles100 Yards00250K0Portage
20.11964-05-08244°42'N / 89°35'W44°48'N / 89°22'W12.30 Miles500 Yards00250K0Marathon
23.11970-12-01244°31'N / 90°00'W2.00 Miles200 Yards003K0Wood
23.62007-06-07244°46'N / 89°28'W44°49'N / 89°21'W7.00 Miles225 Yards00343K0KMarathon
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The first tornado of the outbreak formed 9.4 miles east of Mosinee at 4:01 PM CDT. The storm moved across eastern Marathon County where it heavily damaged 2 homes (DI 2, DOD 6), 1 mobile home (DI 4, DOD 9) and 10 barns; caused major damage to 1 home; did minor damage to 6 homes and 1 business; and snapped or uprooted many trees (DI 27, DOD 4). The tornado dissipated near Pike Lake at 4:14 PM CDT. The average path width of the tornado was 150 yards. The tornado was rated EF2 with estimated winds of 115 to 125 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An unseasonably strong upper level storm system and deep surface low pressure (with central pressure as low as 979 mb) interacted with a cold front that moved from west to east across the area during the late afternoon and evening. A moist and unstable airmass ahead of the cold front provided the fuel to generate severe thunderstorms that included five tornadoes, near record-size hail and damaging winds. Thousands of homes sustained damage and about 15,000 customers lost power during the storms, some for almost 3 days as trees blocked roads and slowed repair work to power lines. Four people sustained minor injuries, and total damage from the storms exceeded $60 million. The first tornado of the outbreak moved across eastern Marathon County shortly after 4:00 PM CDT, producing damage to several homes. The tornado was rated EF2. A second thunderstorm produced a weak tornado in Wood County, which was rated EF0. The same storm responsible for this tornado produced softball size hail that damaged thousands of homes, several businesses and hundreds of vehicles. One hailstone that fell in Port Edwards measured 5.50 inches in diameter, making it the second largest hailstone on record in Wisconsin. The same supercell thunderstorm that produced the Marathon County tornado also produced a long-track tornado across northeast Shawano, northwest Menominee, southeast Langlade and northern Oconto counties. This tornado was on the ground for 47 minutes, covering 40.1 miles, and destroyed 14,400 acres of woodlands (timber loss was estimated at $12.5 million) and dozens of buildings along its path. The twister, which was over one-half mile at times, was rated EF3, with peak winds estimated of 150 to 160 mph. The storm responsible for the tornado also produced significant straight-line wind damage as it moved into western Marinette County. The fourth tornado of the outbreak, rated EF1, developed near Cedarville in Marinette Co., which was from the same thunderstorm that produced the long-track tornado. The final tornado of the afternoon and evening touched down near Harmony in Marinette Co. This tornado was rated EF1. Details of the tornadoes, hail, and wind damage can be found in the event narratives of the affected counties.
24.82004-06-23244°16'N / 89°11'W44°16'N / 89°03'W7.50 Miles125 Yards00915K0Waupaca
 Brief Description: Thunderstorms that developed ahead of a strong cold front that moved through Wisconsin produced severe weather in the central and east central parts of the state during the evening. A line of thunderstorms tore the roof from a barn, downed numerous trees and power lines and blew a pickup truck into a ditch as the storms moved through the Wood county communities of Vesper, Nekoosa, and Wisconsin Rapids. Glass fragments caused a minor injury to one of the occupants of the pickup truck. The storms also produced 7 minutes of dime size hail 1 mile east of Wisconsin Rapids. The storms also damaged several buildings 4 miles west of Stevens Point (Portage co.), downed trees in Saxeville (Waushara co.) and dropped quarter size hail in Plover (Portage co.). As the storms moved through Portage county three tornadoes touched down. One of the tornadoes caused minor tree damage in an industrial park in Whiting. Eyewitnesses observed water being sucked out of a pond at the same time as doors to an office were sucked open. Another tornado downed several trees, knocked down a fence, damaged the roof of a house and damaged some outbuildings as it passed north of Almond. The third tornado was the strongest and was on the ground intermittently for 10 miles from southeast Portage county into southwest Waupaca county. It downed trees and overturned an irrigation system in Portage county. It strengthened in Waupaca county where it scoured asphalt off a road, destroyed a barn, sheared off the top 50 feet of a silo, crushing three calves, damaged a sheet metal outbuilding and killed 3 sheep. It tore the roof from a house and destroyed the garage, overturned a semi trailer and moved it 50 feet, blew hay wagons against trees and snapped off or uprooted numerous trees. Some of the debris from this tornado landed several miles east in the Fremont area (Waupaca co.). A tornado touched down in at least four locations from Little Chute to Kaukauna as the storms moved across Outagamie county. It toppled or twisted large trees, ripped parts of the roofs from residential and commercial buildings, destroyed storage sheds and an old barn and overturned semi trailers and dropped some of them on other vehicles. A brief tornado touchdown also occurred on the west side of Green Bay (Brown co.) where it caused some tree damage.
26.31954-06-20244°53'N / 89°37'W44°48'N / 89°33'W6.10 Miles67 Yards0025K0Marathon
26.71951-09-26444°22'N / 89°13'W44°28'N / 88°47'W22.30 Miles100 Yards63250K0Waupaca
27.31957-04-19244°04'N / 89°24'W44°14'N / 89°00'W22.80 Miles50 Yards0125K0Waushara
28.51985-08-12244°34'N / 90°10'W44°38'N / 90°00'W10.00 Miles880 Yards01425.0M0Wood
28.61992-08-29344°04'N / 89°31'W44°08'N / 89°00'W28.00 Miles800 Yards13025.0M0Waushara
32.31970-12-01244°32'N / 89°13'W44°47'N / 88°40'W31.90 Miles200 Yards00250K0Waupaca
32.81988-05-08244°44'N / 89°57'W44°58'N / 89°54'W13.00 Miles250 Yards022.5M0Marathon
33.41984-04-27344°32'N / 88°55'W44°43'N / 88°53'W8.00 Miles43 Yards002.5M0Waupaca
33.41960-11-15244°38'N / 90°23'W44°54'N / 89°45'W36.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Clark
34.11984-09-24244°53'N / 89°56'W44°57'N / 89°41'W12.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Marathon
34.91964-05-07244°14'N / 90°13'W44°15'N / 90°08'W3.30 Miles30 Yards013K0Juneau
35.01955-07-31243°58'N / 89°30'W43°57'N / 89°26'W2.70 Miles50 Yards00250K0Marquette
35.01968-08-19244°52'N / 90°07'W44°52'N / 89°49'W14.30 Miles67 Yards052.5M0Marathon
35.01967-07-22244°41'N / 90°19'W44°40'N / 90°03'W12.80 Miles100 Yards02250K0Wood
36.11974-04-12244°50'N / 89°10'W44°53'N / 88°57'W10.70 Miles150 Yards01250K0Shawano
36.51961-09-03244°52'N / 90°01'W2.00 Miles33 Yards003K0Marathon
36.51964-05-08244°35'N / 88°51'W44°38'N / 88°48'W3.30 Miles200 Yards01250K0Waupaca
36.71954-04-15243°59'N / 89°11'W44°03'N / 89°05'W5.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Waushara
37.01959-05-06244°31'N / 88°52'W44°32'N / 88°43'W7.20 Miles1760 Yards000K0Waupaca
39.01984-07-10243°58'N / 89°58'W43°58'N / 89°52'W4.00 Miles500 Yards002.5M0Adams
39.31959-07-08243°53'N / 89°24'W43°56'N / 89°18'W5.20 Miles50 Yards0025K0Marquette
41.01980-07-19243°55'N / 89°52'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Adams
41.11984-04-27344°40'N / 88°53'W44°56'N / 88°49'W17.00 Miles43 Yards002.5M0Shawano
42.61957-04-19443°52'N / 90°11'W44°10'N / 90°05'W21.10 Miles300 Yards1025K0Juneau
42.71971-09-28345°03'N / 89°36'W45°06'N / 89°14'W18.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Marathon
43.01964-05-08243°45'N / 89°58'W43°59'N / 89°37'W23.50 Miles150 Yards00250K0Juneau
43.21983-07-03344°05'N / 90°14'W1.00 Mile50 Yards08250K0Juneau
43.51997-07-16245°07'N / 89°28'W45°04'N / 89°31'W1.40 Miles100 Yards00500K25KLincoln
 Brief Description: Severe thunderstorms affected much of northern, central and east-central Wisconsin during the afternoon and evening of July 16 with tornadoes, downburst winds and large hail. Millions of dollars in damage resulted from the biggest severe weather outbreak to affect the region in years. The storms began to develop early in the afternoon across north-central Wisconsin. Hail the size of baseballs fell in Minocqua (Oneida co.), damaging nearly 200 vehicles. As those storms moved southeast and weakened, a new supercell thunderstorm developed over Lincoln county. This new storm produced wind damage in Tomahawk and softball size hail northeast of Merrill. About 20 minutes later, a tornado developed in southeast Lincoln county and moved southeastward into Marathon county. This tornado, rated F2, was on the ground for more than three miles. It damaged several homes, vehicles and silos, and destroyed numerous barns, sheds and crops. Twenty head of dairy cattle were killed or had to be destroyed. As the tornadic supercell moved southeast, it produced two other weak tornadoes. Total damage to crops and property from five tornadoes, hail and straight-line winds in Marathon county alone topped $10 million. Another supercell thunderstorm produced a downburst swath of damage over three miles wide and 14 miles long from southeast Langlade county, through western Menominee county, into extreme north-central Shawano county. Menominee county was especially hard hit, as tens of thousands of trees were felled in the heavily forested county. Authorities estimated that nearly 25 million board feet of lumber was on the ground; it was hoped that much of it was going to be salvaged. At the height of the storm, winds were estimated to be near 100 mph. As the storm weakened and moved into north-central Shawano county, a 70 mph wind gust was measured near Morgan. Another storm in western Shawano county produced a downburst which downed trees across the city of Wittenberg. Part of a roof was blown off an apartment building in the downtown area, and several houses and businesses sustained damage from the fallen trees. A Wittenberg man was injured by flying glass. Lightning set a house on fire, destroying the second story, in the township of Germania. Another storm struck Waupaca county, producing high winds. A power pole fell and hit a car in New London, injuring the driver. Shortly after 530 pm, a supercell thunderstorm produced numerous wind gusts over 65 mph across the Fox Valley, blowing over many trees, damaging buildings and causing a fatality. A 36 year-old male was killed when a tree fell on his minivan in Oshkosh (Winnebago co.). His young daughter was uninjured in the accident. A wind gust to 82 mph was measured in Appleton (Outagamie co.), and a gust to 67 mph was recorded in Oshkosh. Thunderstorms over Waushara county produced flooding rains, a brief tornado, strong winds and hail. Over five inches of rain fell in only three hours near Hancock, producing some basement and street flooding. A brief tornado also touched down in an open field in Hancock. Numerous trees and powerlines were blown down in Wautoma. A thunderstorm knocked trees and power lines down in Kiel (Calumet/Manitowoc co.), and damaged seven tents at a fair in Cleveland (Manitowoc co.).
43.91997-07-16245°07'N / 89°26'W45°04'N / 89°24'W2.00 Miles100 Yards001.0M3.0MMarathon
 Brief Description: Severe thunderstorms affected much of northern, central and east-central Wisconsin during the afternoon and evening of July 16 with tornadoes, downburst winds and large hail. Millions of dollars in damage resulted from the biggest severe weather outbreak to affect the region in years. The storms began to develop early in the afternoon across north-central Wisconsin. Hail the size of baseballs fell in Minocqua (Oneida co.), damaging nearly 200 vehicles. As those storms moved southeast and weakened, a new supercell thunderstorm developed over Lincoln county. This new storm produced wind damage in Tomahawk and softball size hail northeast of Merrill. About 20 minutes later, a tornado developed in southeast Lincoln county and moved southeastward into Marathon county. This tornado, rated F2, was on the ground for more than three miles. It damaged several homes, vehicles and silos, and destroyed numerous barns, sheds and crops. Twenty head of dairy cattle were killed or had to be destroyed. As the tornadic supercell moved southeast, it produced two other weak tornadoes. Total damage to crops and property from five tornadoes, hail and straight-line winds in Marathon county alone topped $10 million. Another supercell thunderstorm produced a downburst swath of damage over three miles wide and 14 miles long from southeast Langlade county, through western Menominee county, into extreme north-central Shawano county. Menominee county was especially hard hit, as tens of thousands of trees were felled in the heavily forested county. Authorities estimated that nearly 25 million board feet of lumber was on the ground; it was hoped that much of it was going to be salvaged. At the height of the storm, winds were estimated to be near 100 mph. As the storm weakened and moved into north-central Shawano county, a 70 mph wind gust was measured near Morgan. Another storm in western Shawano county produced a downburst which downed trees across the city of Wittenberg. Part of a roof was blown off an apartment building in the downtown area, and several houses and businesses sustained damage from the fallen trees. A Wittenberg man was injured by flying glass. Lightning set a house on fire, destroying the second story, in the township of Germania. Another storm struck Waupaca county, producing high winds. A power pole fell and hit a car in New London, injuring the driver. Shortly after 530 pm, a supercell thunderstorm produced numerous wind gusts over 65 mph across the Fox Valley, blowing over many trees, damaging buildings and causing a fatality. A 36 year-old male was killed when a tree fell on his minivan in Oshkosh (Winnebago co.). His young daughter was uninjured in the accident. A wind gust to 82 mph was measured in Appleton (Outagamie co.), and a gust to 67 mph was recorded in Oshkosh. Thunderstorms over Waushara county produced flooding rains, a brief tornado, strong winds and hail. Over five inches of rain fell in only three hours near Hancock, producing some basement and street flooding. A brief tornado also touched down in an open field in Hancock. Numerous trees and powerlines were blown down in Wautoma. A thunderstorm knocked trees and power lines down in Kiel (Calumet/Manitowoc co.), and damaged seven tents at a fair in Cleveland (Manitowoc co.).
43.91996-08-07245°04'N / 90°04'W44°54'N / 90°02'W2.50 Miles200 Yards00200K250KMarathon
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down 6.5 miles north of Stratford, tore the top portion of a home off, flattened a garage and snapped off several large trees. The storm moved east-northeast for 2.5 miles, damaging a storage shed and 30 trees on a farm. Dozens of Ginseng shelters were thrown about. The tornado was not on the ground for the entire path.
45.31956-04-03443°56'N / 88°58'W43°59'N / 88°56'W1.90 Miles440 Yards7502.5M0Green Lake
45.61950-06-25343°57'N / 88°57'W43°58'N / 88°56'W00250K0Green Lake
45.61967-07-22244°42'N / 90°30'W44°41'N / 90°19'W8.60 Miles100 Yards00250K0Clark
46.21983-07-03244°53'N / 90°20'W44°54'N / 90°11'W6.00 Miles57 Yards00250K0Marathon
46.21956-04-03443°59'N / 88°56'W44°03'N / 88°45'W9.60 Miles440 Yards002.5M0Waushara
46.41992-09-07243°54'N / 89°02'W43°58'N / 88°53'W8.50 Miles400 Yards012.5M0Green Lake
46.61984-10-16243°46'N / 90°05'W44°02'N / 90°02'W17.00 Miles100 Yards03250K0Juneau
47.02004-06-23243°49'N / 89°29'W43°46'N / 89°16'W11.00 Miles200 Yards001.0M500KMarquette
 Brief Description: A strong tornado spun up about a half-mile east of Interstate 39/STH 51, near the intersection of Fawn Ct. and CTH M, or 3.5 NNW of Packwaukee. This tornado increased to F2 strength (estimated 140-150 mph) as it tore east/southeast through the southern part of Montello. Numerous trees were uprooted. Four homes were destroyed, 25 sustained major damage, and 142 had minor damage. In addition, 9 agricultural buildings were damaged or destroyed. The tornado ended in a swampy, Fox River bottom-land area about 4 miles southeast of Montello (1 mile short of the county line and south of CTH C and east STH 22). The responsible supercell also spun up a different tornado earlier in Adams County. Prop damage estimated at $1.0 M. Average path width was about 175 yards. Two rounds of severe weather affected parts of south-central and southeast Wisconsin on June 23rd, with the second round featuring 8 tornadoes, large hail (up to golf-ball size), and powerful straight-line downburst winds. A warm front moving north through the area resulted in favorable vertical wind shear to allow for supercell development. The 1st round of severe weather was due to a broken line of intense thunderstorms moving across Walworth, Milwaukee, Racine and Kenosha counties. Hail of up to 1 inch in diameter and torrential rainfall accompanied these storms before they moved over Lake Michigan and weakened. The 2nd round of severe weather was dominated by 2 cyclic supercells - one moved east/southeast through Marquette, Green Lake, Fond du Lac, and Washington Counties, spinning up 5 separate tornadoes, dumping hail stones up to 3 inches in diameter, and hurricane-force downburst winds. The large hail dented several vehicles. Two of these were rated F3. Refer to the individual tornado reports for more details. A more southerly supercell tracked across extreme southern Sauk County and then made a partial right turn and headed southeast through Dane County, spinning up 2 tornadoes in the process, as well as large hail and downburst winds. One powerful downburst wind in Madison (Dane Co.) blew equipment off the roof of a business at the Midvale Shopping Mall. A semi southwest of Ft. Atkinson was blown over by straight-line wind gusts. This southern supercell eventually spun up another tornado in south-central Jefferson County which moved into north-central Walworth County. Refer to the individual tornado reports for more details. Both supercells had downbursts that generated large hail and powerful, hurricane-force winds north and south of their tracks. Over all of Wisconsin, 16 tornadoes were documented on June 23rd, which is the 4th highest single-day total (record is 24 on May 8, 1988). For south-central and southeast Wisconsin, the 8 tornadoes on June 23rd was tied for the 4th highest single-day total (record is 11 on May 8, 1988).
48.31985-08-12243°50'N / 90°18'W44°00'N / 90°00'W17.00 Miles880 Yards2222.5M0Juneau
48.41950-06-25244°50'N / 90°21'W44°55'N / 90°19'W5.10 Miles17 Yards1025K0Clark
48.71984-04-27444°05'N / 88°45'W44°15'N / 88°32'W12.00 Miles60 Yards1102.5M0Winnebago
49.21971-09-28344°59'N / 90°18'W45°02'N / 90°04'W11.60 Miles300 Yards01250K0Marathon
50.01950-06-25244°55'N / 90°19'W44°58'N / 90°17'W2.70 Miles17 Yards0025K0Marathon


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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