Local Data Search

 
USA.com / Oklahoma / Coal County / Phillips, OK / Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

Phillips, OK Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
Hot Rankings
Fastest / Slowest Growing Cities Nearby
Best / Worst Cities by Crime Rate Nearby
Richest / Poorest Cities by Income Nearby
Expensive / Cheapest Homes Nearby
Most / Least Educated Cities Nearby
Fastest / Slowest Growing Cities in OK
High / Low OK Cities by Males Employed
High / Low OK Cities by Females Employed
Best / Worst Cities by Crime Rate in OK
Richest / Poorest Cities by Income in OK
Expensive / Cheapest Homes by City in OK
Most / Least Educated Cities in OK

The chance of earthquake damage in Phillips is lower than Oklahoma average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Phillips is much lower than Oklahoma average and is much higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #282

Phillips, OK
0.09
Oklahoma
0.31
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Phillips, OK
0.0000
Oklahoma
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #562

Phillips, OK
271.73
Oklahoma
363.83
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 3,449 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Phillips, OK were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:1Cold:4Dense Fog:10Drought:32
Dust Storm:0Flood:187Hail:1,894Heat:24Heavy Snow:25
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:18Landslide:0Strong Wind:30
Thunderstorm Winds:1,079Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:5Winter Storm:26Winter Weather:25
Other:89 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Phillips, OK.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 1 historical earthquake event that had a recorded magnitude of 3.5 or above found in or near Phillips, OK.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
48.21969-05-024.6N/A35.2-96.3

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 127 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Phillips, OK.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
3.41950-04-28234°33'N / 96°12'W0.80 Mile100 Yards0025K0Coal
3.61981-05-13234°29'N / 96°13'W34°26'N / 96°10'W4.50 Miles100 Yards003K0Coal
6.02001-04-11234°30'N / 96°10'W34°36'N / 96°06'W8.00 Miles200 Yards1175K0Coal
 Brief Description: This tornado formed 4 miles southeast of Coalgate and tracked northeastward for 8 miles before crossing into northwest Atoka County at 0434 CST (See following entry for information about the Atoka County segment). The tornado then continued for another 5 miles before dissipating at 0440 CST. In Coal County, 1 fatalilty and injuries to another person occurred when a mobile home was thrown approximately 200 yards and disintegrated 4 miles east of Coalgate. In addition, a well-constructed frame home suffered severe roof damage and exterior wall damage in extreme eastern Coal County. M41MH Six tornadoes across southern Oklahoma and one tornado across western north Texas developed during the overnight hours of the 11th. The most notable tornado formed across Coal County in Oklahoma and resulted in one fatality and one injury as it destroyed a mobile home. In addition to damage produced by severe thunderstorms, sustained winds of 40 to 50 mph with gusts as high as 73 mph developed just ahead of the most frequent period of severe weather and persisted for several hours. In Tillman County, at 2330 CST on the 10th, a barn roof was damaged 3 miles east of Frederick. A barn roof was blown off, and a fence was downed 4 miles east of Frederick, and a house roof sustained minor damage 4 miles north of Frederick. Trees and power lines were downed in Ponca City in Kay County, while in Garfield County, minor but widespread damage, was sustained to trees, power poles, and numerous other structures.
9.11954-07-23234°36'N / 96°20'W0.30 Mile440 Yards000K0Coal
9.61953-04-14234°22'N / 96°12'W0.30 Mile23 Yards003K0Atoka
11.01982-11-22234°20'N / 96°09'W34°24'N / 96°06'W5.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Atoka
13.71992-05-11234°40'N / 96°11'W34°43'N / 96°06'W4.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Coal
14.01992-05-11334°39'N / 96°26'W34°40'N / 96°20'W12.00 Miles150 Yards01250K0Coal
14.21963-03-18234°38'N / 96°25'W003K0Coal
14.41991-03-21234°18'N / 96°17'W34°19'N / 95°59'W19.00 Miles400 Yards06250K0Atoka
17.52001-04-11234°38'N / 96°30'W34°40'N / 96°27'W4.50 Miles400 Yards00400K0Coal
 Brief Description: This tornado formed in Pontotoc County and crossed into Coal County at approximately 0349 CST, then re-entered Pontotoc County at approximately 0356 CST. Nineteen power transmission towers, 3 for major trunk power lines, were downed across this area. Six tornadoes across southern Oklahoma and one tornado across western north Texas developed during the overnight hours of the 11th. The most notable tornado formed across Coal County in Oklahoma and resulted in one fatality and one injury as it destroyed a mobile home. In addition to damage produced by severe thunderstorms, sustained winds of 40 to 50 mph with gusts as high as 73 mph developed just ahead of the most frequent period of severe weather and persisted for several hours. In Tillman County, at 2330 CST on the 10th, a barn roof was damaged 3 miles east of Frederick. A barn roof was blown off, and a fence was downed 4 miles east of Frederick, and a house roof sustained minor damage 4 miles north of Frederick. Trees and power lines were downed in Ponca City in Kay County, while in Garfield County, minor but widespread damage, was sustained to trees, power poles, and numerous other structures.
17.91992-05-11234°43'N / 96°06'W34°43'N / 95°59'W6.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Pittsburg
18.31966-04-27434°17'N / 96°24'W34°16'N / 96°22'W2.30 Miles300 Yards00250K0Atoka
18.42001-04-11234°40'N / 96°28'W34°44'N / 96°25'W4.50 Miles400 Yards0070K0Pontotoc
 Brief Description: This is the 3rd and final segment to the tornado which formed in Pontotoc County at 0340 CST, moved through Coal County, then re-entered Pontotoc County at 0356 CST. Several additional power transmission towers were downed across this area, along with substantial damage to a power substation about 1 mile southwest of Lula. Six tornadoes across southern Oklahoma and one tornado across western north Texas developed during the overnight hours of the 11th. The most notable tornado formed across Coal County in Oklahoma and resulted in one fatality and one injury as it destroyed a mobile home. In addition to damage produced by severe thunderstorms, sustained winds of 40 to 50 mph with gusts as high as 73 mph developed just ahead of the most frequent period of severe weather and persisted for several hours. In Tillman County, at 2330 CST on the 10th, a barn roof was damaged 3 miles east of Frederick. A barn roof was blown off, and a fence was downed 4 miles east of Frederick, and a house roof sustained minor damage 4 miles north of Frederick. Trees and power lines were downed in Ponca City in Kay County, while in Garfield County, minor but widespread damage, was sustained to trees, power poles, and numerous other structures.
18.72001-04-11234°34'N / 96°34'W34°37'N / 96°30'W5.50 Miles400 Yards0045K0Pontotoc
 Brief Description: This tornado formed 2.5 miles southwest of Jesse in Pontotoc County and tracked northeastward for 15 miles, crossed through northwest Coal County, then re-entered eastern Pontotoc County before dissipating. A mobile home and barn were destroyed, and power poles were downed 1.5 miles west of Jesse. The mobile home was picked up, thrown northward over a fence and completely broken apart with contents spread over a half-mile area. About 1 mile northwest of Jesse, a barn was destroyed; oil storage tanks were overturned and smashed; an oil pumping unit was overturned and torn apart; power poles were downed, and fences were blown over. Six tornadoes across southern Oklahoma and one tornado across western north Texas developed during the overnight hours of the 11th. The most notable tornado formed across Coal County in Oklahoma and resulted in one fatality and one injury as it destroyed a mobile home. In addition to damage produced by severe thunderstorms, sustained winds of 40 to 50 mph with gusts as high as 73 mph developed just ahead of the most frequent period of severe weather and persisted for several hours. In Tillman County, at 2330 CST on the 10th, a barn roof was damaged 3 miles east of Frederick. A barn roof was blown off, and a fence was downed 4 miles east of Frederick, and a house roof sustained minor damage 4 miles north of Frederick. Trees and power lines were downed in Ponca City in Kay County, while in Garfield County, minor but widespread damage, was sustained to trees, power poles, and numerous other structures.
19.11974-06-06234°18'N / 96°00'W34°20'N / 95°57'W3.80 Miles100 Yards0025K0Atoka
19.81957-05-25234°16'N / 96°25'W1.00 Mile200 Yards0025K0Johnston
19.81966-04-27434°19'N / 96°32'W34°17'N / 96°24'W7.90 Miles300 Yards02250K0Johnston
20.01985-02-23234°13'N / 96°05'W34°20'N / 95°56'W10.00 Miles500 Yards03250K0Atoka
20.41985-11-30234°13'N / 96°05'W34°16'N / 96°02'W4.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Atoka
20.71970-06-11234°36'N / 96°34'W2.50 Miles440 Yards0025K0Pontotoc
21.02010-05-10234°15'N / 96°25'W34°14'N / 96°24'W2.00 Miles400 Yards002.6M0KJohnston
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado is labeled #N2. The tornado developed about a mile south-southeast of Coleman and moved southeast another mile, eventually traveling just into Atoka county. Several buildings, including a home, sustained major damage. Four other homes sustained at least partial damage. The U Cross Arena and Pavilion was heavily damaged, with part of the roof moved removed, steal beams on the outside of the building knocked down, and a section of the building completely destroyed. The tornado continued across the Atoka county border. This tornado moved into Atoka County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A significant outbreak of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes affected a large part of northern, central, and southern Oklahoma. Tornadoes were most numerous across central and southern Oklahoma, with significant damage occurring over many areas. Severe thunderstorms erupted by mid afternoon across northern and western Oklahoma. Given the potent combination of ingredients in place, storms began to produce tornadoes quickly after initiation. Storm motions of 50 to 60 mph were common. During the mid afternoon hours, severe weather was confined to northern Oklahoma. It was there a long track supercell storm produced tornadoes near the Kansas border - including one rated EF3 - from near Wakita to north of Braman. The capping inversion that had delayed thunderstorm development into central Oklahoma weakened, allowing for explosive supercell development along the dry line along and west of the Interstate 35 corridor. Rapid development and intensification was common with the late afternoon storms, with storms becoming tornadic within a very short time after initiation. This round of storms would directly impact a large part of the Oklahoma City metro area at rush hour, and posed a significant threat to the area. The first tornado in this area occurred in Canadian County. During the next several hours, tornadoes were clustered around the metro area, and at times there were multiple significant damaging tornadoes occurring simultaneously. Several of the tornadoes had long tracks. Damage from the tornadoes was substantial, with numerous structures, vehicles, trees and power poles/lines significantly damaged or destroyed. One of the more intense tornadoes moved across Lake Thunderbird east of Norman destroying numerous boats. More storms developed across southwest and south central Oklahoma, and also quickly became tornadic. By 9 pm, 35 tornadoes had been reported. While the loss of three lives was tragic, the casualties could have been much higher given the storm's fast motions, their intensity, the time of day and the areas impacted. While exact monetary damage figures were not available, it is estimated that losses were in excess of $595 million. At least 450 sustained injuries, most of them minor. Unfortunately three people lost their lives. Note: The large number of injuries and tornadoes made it difficult to associate injuries with specific tornadoes. Injury numbers were included when we had confidence in the numbers. Note: The complex nature of storm evolutions and interactions made the job of classifying tornadoes difficult. This represents our best scientific assessment based on ground and aerial surveys, data from multiple radars, photographic and video evidence and anecdotal information.
21.21959-05-09434°37'N / 96°35'W34°41'N / 96°31'W6.20 Miles900 Yards712250K0Pontotoc
21.31954-09-07234°37'N / 96°35'W34°40'N / 96°32'W4.50 Miles200 Yards00250K0Pontotoc
23.62001-04-11234°10'N / 96°36'W34°20'N / 96°24'W16.00 Miles500 Yards042.5M0Johnston
 Brief Description: This tornado formed over northern portions of Lake Texoma, then tracked northeastward for 16 miles before crossing into western Atoka County. About 5 miles east of Tishomingo in Johnston County, 2 injuries, both requiring hospital care, occurred when a mobile home was lofted and deposited upside-down about 40 yards from its original location. In addition, a frame home 1 mile east of Milburn was severely damaged when the roof was completely removed. Across the remainder of the damage path in Johnston County, 3 additional mobile homes were destroyed, and 21 other structures, including 1 business and 2 churches, sustained damage. Six tornadoes across southern Oklahoma and one tornado across western north Texas developed during the overnight hours of the 11th. The most notable tornado formed across Coal County in Oklahoma and resulted in one fatality and one injury as it destroyed a mobile home. In addition to damage produced by severe thunderstorms, sustained winds of 40 to 50 mph with gusts as high as 73 mph developed just ahead of the most frequent period of severe weather and persisted for several hours. In Tillman County, at 2330 CST on the 10th, a barn roof was damaged 3 miles east of Frederick. A barn roof was blown off, and a fence was downed 4 miles east of Frederick, and a house roof sustained minor damage 4 miles north of Frederick. Trees and power lines were downed in Ponca City in Kay County, while in Garfield County, minor but widespread damage, was sustained to trees, power poles, and numerous other structures.
23.71992-05-11234°37'N / 96°38'W34°41'N / 96°34'W5.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Pontotoc
24.31959-05-09234°51'N / 96°18'W003K0Hughes
25.61962-05-29234°15'N / 96°33'W0025K0Johnston
26.41971-04-22234°37'N / 96°40'W1.00 Mile400 Yards00250K0Pontotoc
27.11992-05-11434°45'N / 95°57'W34°47'N / 95°47'W10.00 Miles400 Yards03250K0Pittsburg
28.81962-07-20234°46'N / 96°37'W000K0Pontotoc
28.91951-05-09234°07'N / 96°31'W34°11'N / 96°28'W5.40 Miles100 Yards0125K0Johnston
30.11983-06-28234°21'N / 96°43'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0025K0Johnston
30.71954-05-24234°18'N / 96°42'W000K0Johnston
30.71992-05-11234°32'N / 95°44'W34°32'N / 95°38'W5.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Atoka
30.81966-04-27234°58'N / 96°15'W34°56'N / 96°12'W3.60 Miles150 Yards0125K0Hughes
30.92008-05-10234°34'N / 95°42'W34°33'N / 95°40'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0075K0KAtoka
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado continued into Pushmataha county before lifting 2.75 miles WSW of Adel. In Atoka County, three houses were damaged. The roof was removed and some of the exterior walls on one well-built home were collapsed. Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped above the ground. Monetary damage were estimated. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A powerful storm system strengthened over the central Plains during the day on Saturday, drawing rich gulf moisture north into eastern Oklahoma. A surface low pressure developed with a trailing cold front that moved quickly through western Oklahoma, and a dry line extending to the east of the cold front. Isolated severe thunderstorms developed near Hughes county early in the afternoon, with large hail reported in a few locations. Later in the afternoon, supercells over eastern Oklahoma expanded southwest. One supercell developed over far eastern Atoka county, producing a tornado near Daisy and large hail. Damage was reported with the tornado, but there were no injuries. Monetary damages were estimated.
30.91956-04-28234°08'N / 96°04'W34°15'N / 95°36'W27.90 Miles300 Yards003K0Bryan
31.81983-05-14234°56'N / 96°01'W0.10 Mile50 Yards00250K0Pittsburg
32.01953-06-05234°40'N / 96°45'W0025K0Pontotoc
32.42008-05-10234°54'N / 96°01'W34°55'N / 95°51'W8.00 Miles200 Yards00500K0KPittsburg
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A strong tornado severely damaged homes, snapped and uprooted numerous trees, and blew down power poles and power lines. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Elevated severe thunderstorms containing large hail developed north of a warm front that was moving slowly northward across eastern Oklahoma and west central Arkansas during the morning and early afternoon of the 10th. Another round of severe thunderstorms developed late in the afternoon as a dry line approached the area from the west. Extreme instability and strong vertical wind shear resulted in the development of long-lived supercell thunderstorms that moved across eastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas during the late afternoon and evening. Several of these supercells became tornadic and a few produced long-lived damaging tornadoes. One such supercell developed and moved along the Oklahoma-Kansas border and then into southwestern Missouri. This storm produced a tornado in northeastern Craig County OK that remained on the ground for 29 miles in Oklahoma, continued for about 31 miles in Newton County MO, and finally dissipated about 15 miles into Barry County MO. It produced EF-4 damage in several locations, including Picher, a small town in north-central Ottawa County OK. Twenty-one fatalities, over 350 injuries, and an estimated $60 million in property damage resulted from this tornado in Oklahoma and Missouri. Six of the fatalities and about 150 injuries occurred in Picher OK. Other strong tornadoes developed and moved across portions of Pittsburg and Latimer Counties. A EF-2 tornado was on the ground for about eight miles west of McAlester, damaging numerous homes in its path. Another EF-2 tornado developed southwest of Hartshorne in Pittsburg County and moved 19 miles before dissipating just east of Yanush in Latimer County. Four injuries resulted from that tornado and numerous homes were severely damaged or destroyed.
32.51982-03-15334°48'N / 96°42'W34°51'N / 96°35'W6.00 Miles60 Yards1362.5M0Pontotoc
32.71980-04-02234°03'N / 96°23'W4.00 Miles60 Yards0025K0Bryan
32.71992-05-11234°32'N / 95°38'W34°34'N / 95°40'W11.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Pushmataha
32.91975-11-19234°42'N / 96°45'W2.50 Miles50 Yards003K0Pontotoc
32.91966-04-27334°53'N / 96°00'W34°58'N / 95°54'W8.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Pittsburg
32.91982-04-02234°02'N / 96°08'W0.50 Mile10 Yards0025K0Bryan
33.01991-03-21234°01'N / 96°24'W34°04'N / 96°20'W5.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Bryan
33.21983-05-13234°59'N / 96°11'W0.10 Mile50 Yards0025K0Hughes
33.31973-04-20334°47'N / 96°41'W34°53'N / 96°37'W7.90 Miles100 Yards0212.5M0Pontotoc
33.41970-04-18234°44'N / 96°44'W34°48'N / 96°42'W5.20 Miles50 Yards0025K0Pontotoc
33.51954-05-01234°52'N / 96°35'W34°58'N / 96°29'W8.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Pontotoc
34.01954-09-20234°00'N / 96°23'W34°03'N / 96°20'W4.50 Miles33 Yards013K0Bryan
34.11968-04-19234°50'N / 96°40'W34°52'N / 96°38'W3.30 Miles27 Yards0225K0Pontotoc
34.61992-05-11234°34'N / 96°50'W34°35'N / 96°49'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0025K0Pontotoc
34.71991-03-21334°46'N / 96°47'W34°52'N / 96°37'W11.00 Miles350 Yards022.5M0Pontotoc
34.81981-05-23334°05'N / 96°30'W33°59'N / 96°23'W9.70 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Bryan
35.51960-01-14234°42'N / 96°48'W003K0Pontotoc
35.91950-03-27234°51'N / 95°45'W0.10 Mile77 Yards003K0Pittsburg
36.11972-04-20233°56'N / 96°23'W34°03'N / 96°19'W8.90 Miles50 Yards0025K0Bryan
36.31951-05-09234°00'N / 96°36'W34°07'N / 96°31'W9.40 Miles100 Yards0025K0Bryan
36.51950-09-15235°00'N / 96°15'W35°04'N / 96°10'W6.80 Miles100 Yards06250K0Hughes
36.81992-05-11234°33'N / 96°54'W34°34'N / 96°50'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Murray
37.01964-04-03333°59'N / 96°37'W34°05'N / 96°27'W11.80 Miles200 Yards01250K0Bryan
37.11964-04-03234°06'N / 96°39'W000K0Marshall
37.31953-03-13334°11'N / 96°57'W34°19'N / 96°39'W19.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Carter
37.41957-04-02433°56'N / 96°26'W34°02'N / 96°22'W7.90 Miles200 Yards33250K0Bryan
37.81982-04-02334°04'N / 95°57'W34°04'N / 95°42'W8.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Choctaw
38.91974-05-25233°54'N / 96°23'W34°00'N / 96°18'W8.50 Miles1500 Yards0025K0Bryan
38.92000-04-23234°20'N / 95°39'W34°19'N / 95°30'W9.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Pushmataha
 Brief Description: A F2 tornado touched down northeast of Moyers and traveled 9 miles east southeast before lifting 1 mile south of Finley. A mobile home and several outbuilding were destroyed. Some roof damage was reported to several buildings.
39.61982-05-28234°13'N / 95°38'W34°17'N / 95°34'W6.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Pushmataha
39.61960-05-04334°49'N / 96°50'W35°00'N / 96°36'W18.30 Miles33 Yards06250K0Pontotoc
39.61960-05-05234°55'N / 95°47'W34°57'N / 95°44'W4.10 Miles500 Yards0025K0Pittsburg
39.81984-05-02234°38'N / 96°56'W34°40'N / 96°52'W4.50 Miles200 Yards00250K0Garvin
39.91969-06-14233°54'N / 96°29'W33°59'N / 96°17'W12.80 Miles100 Yards0025K0Bryan
39.91955-04-12234°14'N / 95°37'W34°18'N / 95°33'W6.10 Miles33 Yards000K0Pushmataha
40.01957-04-02434°00'N / 96°39'W34°03'N / 96°35'W5.20 Miles200 Yards262.5M0Marshall
40.21955-02-28235°00'N / 95°51'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Pittsburg
40.31983-11-22234°05'N / 95°44'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Choctaw
40.41957-04-02234°33'N / 96°55'W34°38'N / 96°56'W5.70 Miles400 Yards0025K0Murray
40.51959-05-10234°54'N / 96°45'W2.00 Miles300 Yards003K0Seminole
41.01957-04-25235°05'N / 96°23'W2.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Hughes
41.11961-03-05234°00'N / 95°50'W34°02'N / 95°47'W3.80 Miles50 Yards003K0Choctaw
41.21961-03-29235°06'N / 96°15'W0025K0Hughes
41.21969-10-10235°04'N / 96°28'W0.80 Mile200 Yards00250K0Hughes
41.71964-07-28235°06'N / 96°06'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Hughes
41.71992-05-11233°54'N / 96°12'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00250K0Bryan
41.71982-03-15235°05'N / 96°26'W00250K0Hughes
42.02008-05-10234°46'N / 95°36'W34°45'N / 95°30'W8.00 Miles400 Yards00200K0KPittsburg
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado destroyed mobile homes, severely damaged permanent homes, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, destroyed barns and outbuildings, and blew down power poles and power lines. This tornado continued into Latimer County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Elevated severe thunderstorms containing large hail developed north of a warm front that was moving slowly northward across eastern Oklahoma and west central Arkansas during the morning and early afternoon of the 10th. Another round of severe thunderstorms developed late in the afternoon as a dry line approached the area from the west. Extreme instability and strong vertical wind shear resulted in the development of long-lived supercell thunderstorms that moved across eastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas during the late afternoon and evening. Several of these supercells became tornadic and a few produced long-lived damaging tornadoes. One such supercell developed and moved along the Oklahoma-Kansas border and then into southwestern Missouri. This storm produced a tornado in northeastern Craig County OK that remained on the ground for 29 miles in Oklahoma, continued for about 31 miles in Newton County MO, and finally dissipated about 15 miles into Barry County MO. It produced EF-4 damage in several locations, including Picher, a small town in north-central Ottawa County OK. Twenty-one fatalities, over 350 injuries, and an estimated $60 million in property damage resulted from this tornado in Oklahoma and Missouri. Six of the fatalities and about 150 injuries occurred in Picher OK. Other strong tornadoes developed and moved across portions of Pittsburg and Latimer Counties. A EF-2 tornado was on the ground for about eight miles west of McAlester, damaging numerous homes in its path. Another EF-2 tornado developed southwest of Hartshorne in Pittsburg County and moved 19 miles before dissipating just east of Yanush in Latimer County. Four injuries resulted from that tornado and numerous homes were severely damaged or destroyed.
42.21960-05-04434°04'N / 95°42'W34°09'N / 95°37'W7.60 Miles150 Yards00250K0Choctaw
42.61957-04-02234°38'N / 96°56'W34°43'N / 96°57'W5.90 Miles400 Yards0125K0Garvin
42.61950-04-28435°05'N / 96°24'W35°08'N / 96°21'W4.50 Miles200 Yards532250K0Hughes
43.01963-11-19234°24'N / 96°58'W1.00 Mile440 Yards000K0Murray
43.01979-10-21234°37'N / 96°58'W1.00 Mile60 Yards0025K0Murray
43.31954-05-01234°58'N / 96°29'W35°17'N / 96°11'W27.60 Miles33 Yards062.5M0Hughes
43.41960-05-04434°09'N / 95°37'W34°23'N / 95°25'W19.80 Miles150 Yards00250K0Pushmataha
43.51961-02-17334°49'N / 96°55'W34°56'N / 96°46'W12.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Pontotoc
43.61961-02-17334°56'N / 96°46'W35°10'N / 96°27'W25.00 Miles300 Yards072.5M0Seminole
43.71960-05-04434°01'N / 95°42'W34°04'N / 95°42'W3.40 Miles150 Yards03250K0Choctaw
44.31979-04-11234°02'N / 96°45'W0025K0Marshall
44.41964-04-03333°57'N / 96°41'W33°59'N / 96°37'W4.90 Miles200 Yards00250K0Marshall
44.61958-11-17234°48'N / 96°57'W34°53'N / 96°50'W8.80 Miles500 Yards000K0Garvin
44.61998-06-08235°08'N / 96°25'W35°09'N / 96°17'W8.00 Miles587 Yards0000Hughes
 Brief Description: Surveys revealed that this tornado formed about a mile east of the intersection of State Highway 48 and county road EW129. About one mile after touching down, the Wewoka tornado apparently merged with it. This tornado damaged a house and destroyed numerous pecan trees shortly after the merger. The tornado moved east passing one-half mile south of the town of Yeager, but overturning a mobile home and downing power lines along a railroad just south of town. The tornado then began moving east-northeast as it moved south of Yeager. It completely destroyed a mobile home and toppled an oil pumping jack and storage tank east of Yeager. The last damage was a barn damaged 4 miles east of Yeager and the tornado lifted at 815 pm. The Yeager tornado was on the ground for 8 miles with a maximum width of four-tenths of a mile. This tornado was rated F2 (winds estimated between 113 and 157 mph) based on the destruction of a mobile home east of Yeager. Summary of events of June 8, 1998: Severe thunderstorms developed and moved across much of Oklahoma during the afternoon and evening of the 8th, producing hail as large as softballs, wind gusts to 70 mph, and 3 tornadoes. The tornadoes were spawned by a single storm between 6 and 715 pm CST in Pottawatomie and Seminole Counties. The first tornado (an F1) touched down 3.5 miles west-southwest of Maud in Pottawatomie County, moved east into Seminole County, lifting about 11 miles west-southwest of Wewoka. The second tornado (rated F2) touched down 2.5 miles southwest of Wewoka in Seminole County, moved east through Wewoka, and crossed into Hughes County. Meanwhile, the third tornado (also an F2) developed about 4.5 miles west-southwest of Yeager in Hughes County. These two tornadoes then merged about 3.5 miles southwest of Yeager and continued east until they lifted 4 miles east of Yeager. This tornadic thunderstorm also produced hail as large as softballs southwest of Seminole in Seminole County. Baseball sized hail was reported with a different storm in Oklahoma City in Oklahoma County. Widespread hail and wind damage occurred in Ponca City in Kay County and in Norman in Cleveland County. Wind gusts were estimated as high as 70 mph near Wellston and Warwick in Lincoln County. Significant thunderstorm wind damage occurred throughout Lincoln County, in Purcell in McClain County, and near Calumet and El Reno in Canadian County. See preceding individual Storm Data entries for further details and additional reports.
44.81992-05-11234°00'N / 96°43'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0132.5M0Marshall
44.81998-06-08235°07'N / 96°26'W35°09'N / 96°24'W2.00 Miles440 Yards0000Hughes
 Brief Description: Surveys showed that at about 735 pm, a tornado touched down about 1/2 mile southwest of the intersection of US-270 and SH-59, or about 2.5 miles southwest of Wewoka. The storm moved east through the south side of Wewoka causing damage in a neighborhood in the southwest side of Wewoka and along state highway 56 in the south part of town. The tornado continued moving east destroying two mobile homes southeast of Wewoka before crossing into Hughes County. It caused minor damage to a couple of homes and unroofed a mobile home near State Highway 48. The tornado then turned northeast and apparently merged with the Yeager tornado (see separate Storm Data entry) just northeast of the intersection of State Highway 48 and county road EW129. This tornado was on the ground for 8 miles and had a maximum width of 1/3 of a mile. The tornado was rated F2 (winds estimated between 113 and 157 mph) based on damage in southwest Wewoka including a brick house unroofed and the south exterior wall blown in. Eyewitness reports indicate that this was likely a multiple vortex tornado. Summary of events of June 8, 1998: Severe thunderstorms developed and moved across much of Oklahoma during the afternoon and evening of the 8th, producing hail as large as softballs, wind gusts to 70 mph, and 3 tornadoes. The tornadoes were spawned by a single storm between 6 and 715 pm CST in Pottawatomie and Seminole Counties. The first tornado (an F1) touched down 3.5 miles west-southwest of Maud in Pottawatomie County, moved east into Seminole County, lifting about 11 miles west-southwest of Wewoka. The second tornado (rated F2) touched down 2.5 miles southwest of Wewoka in Seminole County, moved east through Wewoka, and crossed into Hughes County. Meanwhile, the third tornado (also an F2) developed about 4.5 miles west-southwest of Yeager in Hughes County. These two tornadoes then merged about 3.5 miles southwest of Yeager and continued east until they lifted 4 miles east of Yeager. This tornadic thunderstorm also produced hail as large as softballs southwest of Seminole in Seminole County. Baseball sized hail was reported with a different storm in Oklahoma City in Oklahoma County. Widespread hail and wind damage occurred in Ponca City in Kay County and in Norman in Cleveland County. Wind gusts were estimated as high as 70 mph near Wellston and Warwick in Lincoln County. Significant thunderstorm wind damage occurred throughout Lincoln County, in Purcell in McClain County, and near Calumet and El Reno in Canadian County. See preceding individual Storm Data entries for further details and additional reports.
45.21998-06-08235°07'N / 96°31'W35°08'N / 96°26'W6.00 Miles440 Yards0000Seminole
 Brief Description: Surveys showed that at about 735 pm, a tornado touched down about 1/2 mile southwest of the intersection of US-270 and SH-59, or about 2.5 miles southwest of Wewoka. The storm moved east through the south side of Wewoka causing damage in a neighborhood in the southwest side of Wewoka and along state highway 56 in the south part of town. The tornado continued moving east destroying two mobile homes southeast of Wewoka before crossing into Hughes County. It caused minor damage to a couple of homes and unroofed a mobile home near State Highway 48. The tornado then turned northeast and apparently merged with the Yeager tornado (see separate Storm Data entry) just northeast of the intersection of State Highway 48 and county road EW129. This tornado was on the ground for 8 miles and had a maximum width of 1/3 of a mile. The tornado was rated F2 (winds estimated between 113 and 157 mph) based on damage in southwest Wewoka including a brick house unroofed and the south exterior wall blown in. Eyewitness reports indicate that this was likely a multiple vortex tornado. Summary of events of June 8, 1998: Severe thunderstorms developed and moved across much of Oklahoma during the afternoon and evening of the 8th, producing hail as large as softballs, wind gusts to 70 mph, and 3 tornadoes. The tornadoes were spawned by a single storm between 6 and 715 pm CST in Pottawatomie and Seminole Counties. The first tornado (an F1) touched down 3.5 miles west-southwest of Maud in Pottawatomie County, moved east into Seminole County, lifting about 11 miles west-southwest of Wewoka. The second tornado (rated F2) touched down 2.5 miles southwest of Wewoka in Seminole County, moved east through Wewoka, and crossed into Hughes County. Meanwhile, the third tornado (also an F2) developed about 4.5 miles west-southwest of Yeager in Hughes County. These two tornadoes then merged about 3.5 miles southwest of Yeager and continued east until they lifted 4 miles east of Yeager. This tornadic thunderstorm also produced hail as large as softballs southwest of Seminole in Seminole County. Baseball sized hail was reported with a different storm in Oklahoma City in Oklahoma County. Widespread hail and wind damage occurred in Ponca City in Kay County and in Norman in Cleveland County. Wind gusts were estimated as high as 70 mph near Wellston and Warwick in Lincoln County. Significant thunderstorm wind damage occurred throughout Lincoln County, in Purcell in McClain County, and near Calumet and El Reno in Canadian County. See preceding individual Storm Data entries for further details and additional reports.
45.51964-04-03234°03'N / 96°48'W0.50 Mile123 Yards000K0Marshall
46.01968-05-13334°56'N / 96°51'W35°03'N / 96°42'W11.60 Miles100 Yards00250K0Pottawatomie
46.11960-05-04434°57'N / 96°48'W35°03'N / 96°44'W8.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Pottawatomie
46.11961-02-17334°48'N / 96°57'W2.00 Miles300 Yards012.5M0Garvin
46.11957-09-14435°00'N / 96°47'W35°17'N / 96°09'W40.70 Miles440 Yards00250K0Seminole
46.71983-05-13234°25'N / 97°06'W34°30'N / 96°59'W7.00 Miles200 Yards01250K0Murray
46.91959-10-04233°48'N / 96°12'W33°51'N / 96°14'W4.30 Miles200 Yards0225K0Bryan
47.11971-03-12333°54'N / 96°35'W33°51'N / 96°30'W6.20 Miles250 Yards03250K0Bryan
47.31965-05-26235°09'N / 96°30'W0025K0Seminole
47.51971-03-12333°51'N / 96°30'W33°48'N / 96°12'W17.60 Miles250 Yards00250K0Bryan
47.61959-03-31333°53'N / 96°48'W34°01'N / 96°38'W13.20 Miles600 Yards010250K0Marshall
47.71953-06-05334°38'N / 97°10'W34°28'N / 96°57'W16.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Garvin
47.72003-05-08234°04'N / 96°57'W34°08'N / 96°51'W7.00 Miles300 Yards00100K0Marshall
 Brief Description: This strong F2 tornado is the final of three Oklahoma tornadoes produced by a supercell that moved across south central Oklahoma. The tornado was seen by spotters touching down approximately a mile east of the Carter-Marshall county line. The tornado then moved northeast before dissipating north of Antioch. The most significant damage was sustained in an area about three miles west of Antioch along Highway 70. A wood frame home lost its roof and two walls. Two barns also lost roofs in this area. A forty foot by one hundred foot barn south of Highway 70 was heavily damaged. Three tractors were also damaged. One of the tractors was hooked up to a hay baler and was moved 100 yards. This was the first of three tornadic events in two days for Oklahoma. The other two events occurred on the afternoon of May 8 and on May 9, 2003 (see appropriate storm data). The five tornadoes that occurred in south central Oklahoma all happened after midnight with the strongest tornadoes producing F2 damage. One large supercell produced the three strongest tornadoes of the night.
48.71957-01-22235°09'N / 96°30'W35°15'N / 96°14'W16.60 Miles33 Yards0025K0Hughes
49.01971-03-12333°58'N / 96°53'W33°54'N / 96°35'W17.80 Miles250 Yards01250K0Marshall
49.12008-05-10234°45'N / 95°30'W34°42'N / 95°18'W11.00 Miles580 Yards041.0M0KLatimer
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado continued from Pittsburg County. As it moved into Latimer County, the tornado destroyed a double-wide mobile home, severely damaged another home and barn, and rolled an F350 pickup truck about 50 yards. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted as the tornado approached Yanush. In Yanush, about 50 homes were damaged, eight of those were destroyed along with one business. Numerous sheds, barns, and outbuildings were destroyed. Numerous trees and power lines were blown down. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Elevated severe thunderstorms containing large hail developed north of a warm front that was moving slowly northward across eastern Oklahoma and west central Arkansas during the morning and early afternoon of the 10th. Another round of severe thunderstorms developed late in the afternoon as a dry line approached the area from the west. Extreme instability and strong vertical wind shear resulted in the development of long-lived supercell thunderstorms that moved across eastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas during the late afternoon and evening. Several of these supercells became tornadic and a few produced long-lived damaging tornadoes. One such supercell developed and moved along the Oklahoma-Kansas border and then into southwestern Missouri. This storm produced a tornado in northeastern Craig County OK that remained on the ground for 29 miles in Oklahoma, continued for about 31 miles in Newton County MO, and finally dissipated about 15 miles into Barry County MO. It produced EF-4 damage in several locations, including Picher, a small town in north-central Ottawa County OK. Twenty-one fatalities, over 350 injuries, and an estimated $60 million in property damage resulted from this tornado in Oklahoma and Missouri. Six of the fatalities and about 150 injuries occurred in Picher OK. Other strong tornadoes developed and moved across portions of Pittsburg and Latimer Counties. A EF-2 tornado was on the ground for about eight miles west of McAlester, damaging numerous homes in its path. Another EF-2 tornado developed southwest of Hartshorne in Pittsburg County and moved 19 miles before dissipating just east of Yanush in Latimer County. Four injuries resulted from that tornado and numerous homes were severely damaged or destroyed.
49.21957-01-22235°04'N / 96°52'W35°09'N / 96°30'W21.50 Miles440 Yards0025K0Pottawatomie
49.41967-04-16235°09'N / 96°39'W35°11'N / 96°27'W11.50 Miles33 Yards03250K0Seminole
49.41954-05-01234°53'N / 95°52'W35°13'N / 95°27'W32.90 Miles33 Yards0625K0Pittsburg
49.81997-05-26335°10'N / 95°53'W35°09'N / 95°49'W5.00 Miles440 Yards01100K0Pittsburg
50.01957-04-02234°51'N / 95°34'W34°58'N / 95°25'W11.70 Miles440 Yards0025K0Pittsburg


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
The USA.com website and domain are privately owned and are not operated by or affiliated with any government or municipal authority.
© 2018 World Media Group, LLC.