Local Data Search

 
USA.com / Pennsylvania / Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

Pennsylvania Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
Hot Pennsylvania Rankings
Fastest / Slowest Growing Cities in PA
High / Low PA Cities by Males Employed
High / Low PA Cities by Females Employed
Best / Worst Cities by Crime Rate in PA
Richest / Poorest Cities by Income in PA
Expensive / Cheapest Homes by City in PA
Most / Least Educated Cities in PA

The chance of earthquake damage in Pennsylvania is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Pennsylvania is lower than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #31

Pennsylvania
0.17
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #14

Pennsylvania
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #27

Pennsylvania
109.77
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 19,701 other weather extremes events from 1950 to 2010 were recorded in Pennsylvania. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:10Cold:76Dense Fog:42Drought:82
Dust Storm:0Flood:3,190Hail:3,056Heat:147Heavy Snow:518
High Surf:13Hurricane:0Ice Storm:81Landslide:1Strong Wind:488
Thunderstorm Winds:10,330Tropical Storm:2Wildfire:48Winter Storm:261Winter Weather:257
Other:1,099 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Pennsylvania.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 4 historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in Pennsylvania.

DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
1964-05-124.53340.2-76.5
1984-04-234.4539.92-76.36
1980-03-113.7540.16-75.1
1980-03-053.5540.19-75.16

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 216 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in Pennsylvania.

DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
1985-05-31541°10'N / 80°31'W41°12'N / 80°29'W2.00 Miles450 Yards00250K0Mercer
1985-05-31541°12'N / 80°29'W41°13'N / 80°16'W12.00 Miles450 Yards860250K0Mercer
1980-06-03440°39'N / 79°44'W40°37'N / 79°42'W1.90 Miles33 Yards020250.0M0Allegheny
1980-06-03440°37'N / 79°42'W40°36'N / 79°33'W7.60 Miles33 Yards00250.0M0Westmoreland
1980-06-03440°36'N / 79°33'W40°35'N / 79°30'W2.30 Miles33 Yards0120250.0M0Armstrong
1985-05-31441°51'N / 80°31'W41°55'N / 80°17'W12.00 Miles400 Yards128225.0M0Erie
1985-05-31441°29'N / 80°31'W41°29'N / 80°25'W7.00 Miles350 Yards0525.0M0Mercer
1985-05-31441°56'N / 79°57'W41°59'N / 79°38'W16.00 Miles300 Yards000K0Erie
1985-05-31441°29'N / 80°25'W41°31'N / 79°56'W22.50 Miles350 Yards87525.0M0Crawford
1985-05-31441°59'N / 79°38'W42°00'N / 79°36'W2.00 Miles300 Yards000K0Erie
1985-05-31442°00'N / 79°36'W42°01'N / 79°34'W2.00 Miles300 Yards000K0Warren
1985-05-31441°31'N / 79°56'W40°44'N / 78°50'W12.50 Miles350 Yards84025.0M0Venango
1985-05-31440°44'N / 78°50'W41°26'N / 79°31'W11.00 Miles350 Yards0525.0M0Venango
1985-05-31441°26'N / 79°31'W41°26'N / 79°28'W3.00 Miles350 Yards0025.0M0Forest
1985-05-31441°33'N / 79°37'W41°31'N / 79°32'W4.00 Miles800 Yards000K0Venango
1985-05-31441°31'N / 79°32'W41°27'N / 78°56'W25.00 Miles800 Yards7300K0Forest
1985-05-31441°11'N / 78°40'W41°12'N / 78°04'W30.00 Miles3330 Yards0025.0M0Clearfield
1985-05-31441°38'N / 79°02'W41°38'N / 78°56'W3.50 Miles1000 Yards000K0Warren
1985-05-31441°38'N / 78°56'W41°40'N / 78°50'W7.50 Miles1000 Yards000K0Mckean
1985-05-31441°12'N / 78°04'W41°12'N / 77°57'W5.50 Miles3330 Yards0025.0M0Clinton
1985-05-31441°40'N / 78°50'W41°38'N / 78°42'W6.50 Miles1000 Yards4400K0Mckean
1985-05-31441°12'N / 77°57'W41°10'N / 77°52'W4.50 Miles3330 Yards0025.0M0Centre
1985-05-31441°10'N / 77°52'W41°13'N / 77°19'W29.00 Miles3330 Yards0025.0M0Clinton
1985-05-31441°38'N / 78°42'W41°33'N / 78°30'W11.50 Miles1000 Yards000K0Elk
1950-11-04340°12'N / 76°07'W40°16'N / 76°04'W4.70 Miles100 Yards01250K0Lancaster
1950-11-04340°16'N / 76°04'W40°24'N / 75°56'W11.20 Miles100 Yards00250K0Berks
1952-04-05339°48'N / 76°59'W39°57'N / 76°43'W17.50 Miles33 Yards042.5M0York
1955-03-22339°58'N / 75°37'W40°03'N / 75°28'W9.60 Miles600 Yards10250K0Chester
1961-04-16340°03'N / 77°31'W00250K0Cumberland
1963-08-03340°19'N / 79°53'W27025.0M0Allegheny
1963-09-03341°25'N / 78°44'W41°27'N / 78°34'W8.40 Miles100 Yards0202.5M0Elk
1970-06-18340°24'N / 76°18'W40°24'N / 76°14'W1.90 Miles880 Yards152.5M0Lebanon
1971-06-02341°52'N / 80°08'W41°56'N / 79°34'W29.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Erie
1972-05-02341°28'N / 80°13'W41°29'N / 80°12'W0025K0Mercer
1972-05-02341°29'N / 80°12'W41°33'N / 80°04'W7.90 Miles33 Yards0325K0Crawford
1976-03-21340°59'N / 75°11'W0.50 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Monroe
1976-07-11340°21'N / 79°30'W40°16'N / 79°18'W11.80 Miles67 Yards1172.5M0Westmoreland
1976-07-29341°12'N / 77°16'W41°14'N / 76°47'W25.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Lycoming
1980-06-07339°56'N / 77°01'W1.50 Miles400 Yards00250K0Adams
1981-07-26340°46'N / 75°35'W40°48'N / 75°31'W3.30 Miles50 Yards02250K0Northampton
1985-05-31341°42'N / 80°09'W41°45'N / 79°44'W23.00 Miles277 Yards200K0Crawford
1985-05-31341°43'N / 79°48'W41°45'N / 79°40'W8.00 Miles427 Yards002.5M0Crawford
1985-05-31341°41'N / 79°29'W41°39'N / 79°09'W17.00 Miles800 Yards080K0Warren
1985-05-31340°49'N / 80°28'W40°47'N / 80°09'W17.00 Miles243 Yards34025.0M0Beaver
1985-05-31340°47'N / 80°09'W40°43'N / 79°44'W22.00 Miles243 Yards68025.0M0Butler
1985-05-31341°11'N / 77°09'W41°08'N / 76°58'W11.00 Miles910 Yards22025.0M0Lycoming
1985-05-31341°08'N / 76°58'W41°09'N / 76°55'W4.00 Miles910 Yards22025.0M0Union
1985-05-31341°09'N / 76°55'W41°07'N / 76°50'W4.00 Miles2640 Yards22025.0M0Northumberland
1998-05-31341°18'N / 75°06'W41°14'N / 74°52'W20.00 Miles200 Yards021.0M0Pike
 Brief Description: The cell that produced tornadic damage earlier both in southern Wayne county and just upstream in Promised Land State Park dropped a tornado once again across the southern and southeastern portions of Pike county. A nearly continuous 20 mile path was uncovered via aerial storm surveys from Pecks Pond east-southeastward to near route 739 in Delaware township. The average width of the damage path was about 200 yards. The twister descended once again in the Pecks Pond area around 8:20 pm EDT. At that point, the intensity was rated as F2 as the tornado cut down nearly every tree in its path on its way towards Blue Heron Lake. At approximately 8:30 pm, the tornado struck the small vacation community surrounding Blue Heron Lake. A summer home was leveled by the force of the twister. The only things left standing were an interior wall and a few sturdy metal cabinets on the floor in the kitchen. An adjacent mobile home was severely damaged as well. Two campers near this area had minor injuries from falling tree limbs. Otherwise, though, injuries were kept to a minimum as homes were mostly vacant. In addition, an estimated thousands of trees were sheared off or toppled bordering Blue Heron Lake both to the west and east. The twister's intensity increased at this point to F3. Further downstream, the tornado continued to cut a consistent path of twisted off and/or uprooted trees across the Little Mud Pond, Silver Lake, and Deer Leap Factory areas. The tornado appeared to skip across hilltop sections along this route with its intensity mainly in the F1 range. Finally, just before 8:45 pm EDT, the tornado ascended once again in Delaware township as little in the way of damage was evident between route 739 and the Delaware River. In all, emergency management and federal officials estimated that in excess of 1 million dollars damage was incurred along this approximately 20 mile path. Many roads were closed as they became impassable due to fallen trees and wires. Portions of routes 402 and 390 were closed for several days. In addition, sections of Promised Land State Park were closed off to the public for about two weeks until all debris was cleared away and power was restored. An intensifying storm system moved across upstate New York and into southern Quebec early in the morning on the 31st. This system dragged a warm front across northeastern Pennsylvania. Behind this front, a southerly flow of warm, moist, and unstable air quickly developed. This set the stage for the development of severe weather later that afternoon as a cold front and strong upper air disturbance approached. From late in the afternoon until late that evening, northeastern Pennsylvania was under siege from severe thunderstorms, including several tornadic supercells. In all, nine separate tornadoes touched down on this day. Overall damage estimates run into the millions with many homes and structures heavily damaged or destroyed. The most devastating storms occurred in Pike county. Within about a 3 hour stretch from 7 to 10 pm EDT, four different twisters affected the county. One tornadic cell was responsible for knocking down thousands of healthy large trees in and around Promised Land State Park with several vacation homes damaged or leveled. Fortunately, injuries were kept at a minimum. Widespread straight line wind damage also occurred with hailstones the size of ping pong balls falling in some places. The north side of Scranton had extensive wind damage as a storm passed through shortly before 10 pm EDT and sections of Wayne and Luzerne counties had roads closed and/or blocked from falling trees for more than 2 days after the storm. Pennsylvania Power and Light Company estimated that hundreds of thousands of customers were without power at the height of the storms on the evening of the 31st. Some of the more remote locations did not have power restored for the better part of a week.
1998-05-31339°45'N / 79°05'W39°44'N / 78°58'W13.00 Miles880 Yards1154.0M0Somerset
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down just east of Mt. Davis and traveled east-southeast into downtown Salisbury. The storm then continued eastward for 8 miles ending east of the town of Pocahontas. The tornado was rated as an F2 (113 to 157 mph) through the town of Salisbury, but probably reached F3 (158 to 206 mph) intensity briefly near Pocohontas. Along the 15 mile path, damages were estimated to reach between $3 million to $4 million. The path length of the tornado was probably close to 15 miles. F0 damage (40-72 mph) was in a swath about 1/2 mile wide, with F2 damage confined to an area about 2 blocks wide in Salisbury. Near Pocohontas, a farmhouse was completely destroyed indicating winds of F3 intensity (158 to 206 mph) in an area about 50 yards wide. Fifteen people were injured from the tornado. One person, a 13 year old female in a van, lost her life when a tree fell onto the vehicle. 150 people were sheltered overnight Sunday. A 51-year old male and 15-year old female died from carbon monoxide poisoning when a portable generator malfunctioned 3 days after the event. The tornado struck downtown Salisbury around 8:50pm. Ten to fifteen businesses were significantly damaged. Siding and parts of roofs were removed from a number of homes, and part of a roof was removed from a church. The roof was completely ripped off of a furniture factory. Several tractor trailers at the factory were overturned. F13VE
1998-05-31340°29'N / 75°54'W40°29'N / 75°44'W8.30 Miles120 Yards071.4M0Berks
 Brief Description: A violent thunderstorm produced a swath of wind damage across the northern half of Berks County and included an eight mile long strong F3 (Fujita Scale) Tornado that devastated the borough of Lyons. Seven persons were injured (five within Lyons). About 40 homes were either destroyed or damaged in Lyons, Maiden Creek, Maxatawny and Richmond Townships. Preliminary damage estimates for the entire event were placed at $1.5 million dollars. About 10,250 homes and businesses lost power. The last homes to come back on line were in Lyons on June 3rd. This was the first tornado of that strength to occur in Southeast Pennsylvania and the Southern Poconos since the Limerick Tornado on July 27, 1994 and the first F3 tornado to occur within Berks County since November 4, 1950. Even before the tornado formed, the parent thunderstorm was producing wind damage in western Berks County. Wind damage started in Centre Township as several trailers were overturned in Donny Acres. In Leesport, the severe thunderstorm ripped the entire roof off one home. The couple in the house was temporarily trapped after the porch roof they use to access the stairs collapsed. The thunderstorm also ripped the roof and some bricks off a detached garage. Other houses and buildings on East Main Street also had some minor wind damage. Debris from a knitting company's air conditioning unit pelted a neighborhood. Wind damage also occurred in Ontelaunee Tonship along Pennsylvania State Route 61. The tornado made its initial touchdown just to the east of Lake Ontelaunee in Maiden Creek Township around 9 p.m. EDT and moved almost due east across Richmond Township into the borough of Lyons (about 910 p.m. EDT), across southern Maxatawny Township and lifted in northern Rockland Township and 915 p.m. EDT. The tornado was on the ground for about 8.3 miles. Its path width was around 120 yards. The tornado destruction started near U.S. Route 222 in Maiden Creek Township as the roof was blown off one farmhouse. A vehicle was also crushed by a tree. In Maxatawny Township six homes were severely damaged. One house collapsed on Smoketown Road in the Bowers area. A second house lost its roof in the Arrowhead Development. The damage increased across Richmond Township as 10 homes or farms were destroyed or damaged. Pennsylvania State Route 662 was closed between U.S Route 222 and the Fleetwood Borough line because of downed poles and trees. Parts of U.S. Route 222 were also closed because of debris on the road. One house completely collapsed. At one farm the tornado toppled a huge silo and ripped off the roofs of another silo and the barn. At another home, the remains of a large metal storage bin rested on top of the house. Golf ball size hail also damaged two vehicles and a metal awning. The same parent thunderstorm also produced straight line wind damage farther south in Ruscombmanor Township. The worst damage occurred in the borough of Lyons. The north side of the borough was destroyed. About one quarter of the borough's 550 residents were affected by the tornado. The tornado damage within this borough led to a presidential declaration of a disaster area for Berks County. About 100 residents were sheltered. The tornado cut a two block wide path along Hunter Street just north of the Conrail Tracks. About 25 homes were heavily damaged, several collapsed. Miraculously, only five persons were injured. The last two tornado related injuries occurred in northern Rockland Township as it lifted and threw a modular home from its foundation. The two men inside were injured. The tornado then lifted. Although the tornado lifted, the parent thunderstorm still produced wind damage across eastern Berks County. Noble Street was closed in Kutztown because of downed trees and lines. Trees were also uprooted in Longswamp Township. Downed limbs and wires caused power outages in District, Greenwich, Longswamp and Rockland Townships.
1998-06-02340°03'N / 79°13'W39°45'N / 79°05'W26.00 Miles1760 Yards0000Somerset
 Brief Description: The second tornado of the evening, and the third to strike Somerset County in 3 days, this F3 was by far the longest and strongest of the trio. The storm created a path of damage 33 or more miles long, from Fayette County southeast across southern Somerset County into Maryland. The tornado crossed into Somerset County just southwest of the Seven Springs resort, tracked 26 miles across the county to the Maryland state line, 5 miles southeast of Salisbury. From there, the tornado continued southeast for more than 5 miles to Frostburg, Maryland. It, too, would cross the path of the May 31st storm, just 3 miles east of Salisbury. In some locations, the tornado was up to one mile wide. Damage from this tornado was rated at F3 on the fujita scale, with winds of 158 to 206 mph. Many farms were completely destroyed as this tornado moved through generally rural areas in southern Somerset County. A family in Laurel Falls near Summit Mills and St. Paul took shelter in a basement corner behind a television set. As the twister passed, they looked up to find all three stories of their house were gone, along with eight rows of foundation blocks. A battery operated clock found the next morning had stopped at 9:38 p.m. A neighbor told of losing electricity, then getting a phone call from his brother to warn him. He and his family took shelter in a hall closet because they had no basement. They told of hearing a buzzing noise like a giant bee's nest. Another neighbor found her mobile home flipped on its roof after taking shelter at her son's house. When the first tornado of the evening missed a Laurel Falls family mobile home, they proceeded to a neighbor's home. The second storm blew the trailer off its foundation. Residents of Boynton were cleaning up trees with chainsaws and front end loaders from the first tornado around 7:30pm when firefighters came by and told them to get back inside because another tornado was on its way. The second tornado broke all the windows from one house, ripped the roof off another and a barn. One person told of seeking shelter from rain in a shed when the first tornado passed, then going to the home basement when the second came through, mentioning that she was unable to pull the basement door shut behind her. The shed disappeared during the second storm. Estimated damage from the Tuesday evening tornadoes included 30 to 40 properties, including permanent and seasonal residences and farms. There were no deaths or injuries from this severe tornado. However, over 100 head of cattle were killed in one barn alone, which was completely destroyed. Many other farms lost tens of cattle and other livestock.
1998-06-02341°37'N / 76°03'W41°34'N / 75°48'W26.00 Miles500 Yards2152.2M0Wyoming
 Brief Description: The same tornadic supercell that affected southeastern Bradford county moved eastward into northern Wyoming county around 10 pm EDT. Aerial damage surveys indicate that intervals of tree damage occurred from Meshoppen eastward to near Valentine Hill on the border of Lemon township. This damage was primarily in the form of twisted off tree sections at canopy level and also some uprooted trees on hilltop areas. Between 1010 and 1015 pm, the tornado lowered again down the east side of Valentine Hill, skipped across the far north end of Stevens Lake, and carved a path over a small hill just west of Lake Carey. Several residences along this path had heavy tree damage and minor siding and roof damage to their homes. The twister then seemed to temporarily turn towards the south and cross a portion of the long axis of Lake Carey. It was here within this small vacation community that the most severe damage occurred along with loss of life. Eyewitness accounts indicate that the tornado crossed State Route 1003 (a small causeway across the short axis of the lake in an west-east orientation) at about 1020 pm. Every structure located along this narrow strip of land crossing Lake Carey either sustained substantial damage or was completely leveled. It was here where two fatalities occurred as an elderly woman and her grandson were literally sucked out of the second floor of a house and thrown into an adjacent building. Every nearby tree was snapped off, uprooted, or otherwise toppled in chaotic patterns. At that point, the tornado made a jog to the left and resumed its eastward course. It crossed over State Route 1005, which parallels the eastern end of Lake Carey, then skipped up over a small hill. Again, heavy damage was inflicted upon homes in the path of the tornado both along the east end of the lake and also going up the hill. A dozen or more small boats which were anchored along the eastern end of the lake were thrown up out of the water and onto the shoreline. One home going up the hill towards the east was reduced to only its foundation and a portion of the back wall. Massive tree damage continued to be evident with a swath of trees cut down in a narrow path going over the hill and down its eastern side towards East Lemon township. A total of 42 homes in and around Lake Carey suffered considerable damage or were totally destroyed. The character of damage in this area indicates that the tornado strengthened and reached F3 intensity. The damage path was over a third of a mile wide at times. As the tornado pushed further to the east through East Lemon township, it encountered more rugged terrain and less populated areas. Still, however, it did encounter three additional homes and heavily damaged all of them. One had its roof completely torn away and its garage flattened. Another had its back deck destroyed and all of the back windows blown out. Swaths of tree damage were interspersed amongst these houses. Fortunately, two of the homes were unoccupied at the time with only one other minor injury associated with the storm in East Lemon township. The tornado was rated as F2 intensity at this point with damage widths varying from 250 to 400 yards. As the cell approached Factoryville and the Lackawanna county line after 1035 pm EDT, it weakened a bit with the tornado skipping over hilltop sections for the most part. Mostly tree damage was evident from aerial surveys between Route 92 and Lake Sheridan. The tornado's intensity had decreased to F1 along this segment of its path with the width of damage narrowing to under 100 yards in spots. In total, county emergency management officials estimated that in excess of 2 million dollars worth of damage was incurred with over 50 homes destroyed or heavily damaged. Fifteen injuries were directly tied to the tornado along with the two deaths mentioned earlier. M35PH, F72PH For the second time in three days, significant severe weather including tornadoes affected northeastern Pennsylvania. The primary focusing mechanisms were a strong mid level shortwave and surface cold front that approached the region during the evening of the 2nd. Strongly veering wind profiles that increased with height contributed significantly to the development of tornadic supercells. Two long tracked supercells produced tornadic damage across northeastern Pennsylvania during this event. The first tornado touched down in southwestern Susquehanna county in Auburn towship just after 9 pm EDT. This tornado tracked along a 12 mile path through Springville and Lathrop townships. Several mobile homes were damaged or destroyed and the roof of a small storage building was torn away. The twister also cut down scores of trees along the way. Its intensity was rated as F1. Fortunately, no injuries resulted. The other twister tracked along approximately a 35 mile path from extreme southeastern Bradford county across the length of northern Wyoming county and into northwestern Lackawanna county before weakening. The most devastation occurred in the small vacation community of Lake Carey in Wyoming county. The tornado strengthened to F3 intensity at Lake Carey and killed two people and injured a total of fifteen. More than 40 homes immediately surrounding the lake were either heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional residences were damaged or leveled further to the east through East Lemon township in northern Wyoming county. Isolated structural damage and considerable tree damage was the rule from Terry township in Bradford county eastward to just west of Lake Carey and also from East Lemon township eastward to near Lackawanna State Park where the tornado finally dissipated. In all, over 50 homes were damaged or destroyed and total damage estimates in the three county area exceeded three million dollars. Other smaller scale bow echo complexes produced widespread wind damage in the form of downed trees and power lines primarily across the northern tier counties and sections of the Poconos. Portions of Bradford, Susquehanna, and Wayne counties were without power for most of the night as electrical crews could not keep up with reports of downed wires. The most severely damaged areas including the Lake Carey vicinity needed assistance from the National Gaurd to clean up excess debris and help with repairs. Much of northeastern Pennsylvania qualified for federal disaster assistance.
2003-07-21341°55'N / 77°56'W41°55'N / 77°56'W2.50 Miles200 Yards00200K0Potter
 Brief Description: A team from the National Weather Service office in State College surveyed damage and interviewed residents and emergency management officials in Potter county. The team determined that an F3 tornado touched down in Potter county around 4:00 pm Monday July 21 2003. The tornado first touched down about 2 miles southwest of the town of Ellisburg...where it downed hundreds of trees. The tornado continued to the northeast...where it hit the Smoker Farm. The barn and house were completely destroyed...and one of three silos was tipped over. A second home on Smoker Road was also extensively damaged and is uninhabitable. In addition...a car was picked up and thrown 600 yards. A farm tractor was lifted into the trees. The tornado path was 2 1/2 miles long...while the width was about 200 yards. Based on the damage...the tornado was mainly an F2...but rated as a weak F3 at its peak with winds of 160 mph. There were two injuries, but no deaths.
2004-07-14340°17'N / 76°35'W40°17'N / 76°35'W7.50 Miles500 Yards0018.0M0Lebanon
 Brief Description: Thunderstorms spawned a strong F3 tornado in southern Lebanon County during the afternoon of July 14. The tornado first touched down in far western Lebanon County at 3:05 pm EDT, about 1 mile west of the town of Campbelltown. The tornado traveled east, and struck a housing development about one quarter mile south of Route 322. A total of 32 homes were destroyed, with another 37 homes sustaining significant damage. An additional 50 homes and 9 farm buildings in the area were damaged by downburst winds associated with the thunderstorm which spawned the tornado. The tornado continued along a path to the east for seven and one half miles. The tornado crossed Route 322 west of Mount Pleasant, and continued east, mainly across fields, until it lifted up about 2 miles northwest of the town of Cornwall at 3:15 pm EDT. The width of the tornado was one quarter mile. Although the tornadic damage was confined to the path described, additional damage occurred outside this path, again associated with downburst winds from the parent thunderstorm. Winds were estimated between 175 and 200 MPH, making this a strong F3 tornado on the Fujita scale. The tornado injured 24 persons, one critically. There were no deaths. The American Red Cross opened a mass care center, where over 50 people required assistance with sheltering. Between 25,000 and 30,000 customers lost power in Lebanon and Berks Counties as a result of the storms.
1950-07-05240°35'N / 75°42'W40°39'N / 75°28'W12.90 Miles33 Yards0225K0Lehigh
1950-07-05240°36'N / 76°45'W003K0Dauphin
1951-05-11240°07'N / 79°07'W40°03'N / 78°59'W8.00 Miles33 Yards0125K0Somerset
1951-06-27240°35'N / 79°15'W40°52'N / 79°11'W19.70 Miles33 Yards003K0Armstrong
1952-01-17241°36'N / 80°18'W0.50 Mile400 Yards00250K0Crawford
1952-07-19241°56'N / 79°45'W41°55'N / 79°38'W5.60 Miles27 Yards003K0Erie
1952-07-23240°37'N / 77°34'W0425K0Mifflin
1953-05-30240°24'N / 79°12'W40°24'N / 79°08'W1.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Indiana
1953-09-12240°40'N / 76°41'W40°39'N / 76°35'W4.70 Miles50 Yards003K0Northumberland
1953-11-22241°55'N / 79°38'W2.00 Miles67 Yards0225K0Erie
1953-11-23240°06'N / 76°24'W0.10 Mile20 Yards003K0Lancaster
1954-04-17241°40'N / 75°39'W2.00 Miles3 Yards003K0Susquehanna
1954-04-25239°50'N / 77°14'W39°48'N / 76°59'W13.30 Miles500 Yards0025K0Adams
1954-06-01241°18'N / 80°05'W033K0Mercer
1954-06-01240°55'N / 79°48'W40°57'N / 79°44'W3.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Butler
1954-06-01241°14'N / 79°33'W41°15'N / 79°30'W003K0Clarion
1954-06-10240°45'N / 80°15'W40°51'N / 80°11'W7.30 Miles33 Yards0125K0Beaver
1954-06-10240°51'N / 80°11'W40°53'N / 80°10'W0225K0Lawrence
1954-06-12241°41'N / 78°11'W0.20 Mile67 Yards0025K0Potter
1954-06-26240°15'N / 79°41'W0425K0Westmoreland
1954-09-19241°31'N / 76°40'W41°29'N / 76°25'W12.80 Miles50 Yards0025K0Sullivan
1954-09-19241°50'N / 76°11'W1.00 Mile50 Yards003K0Bradford
1954-09-30241°15'N / 80°28'W0025K0Mercer
1955-07-01241°45'N / 80°22'W41°46'N / 80°20'W0025K0Crawford
1955-08-19240°24'N / 77°23'W0025K0Chester
1956-05-12240°37'N / 80°17'W00250K0Beaver
1956-05-13240°22'N / 79°52'W0.70 Mile200 Yards05250K0Allegheny
1956-05-13240°15'N / 78°50'W01250K0Somerset
1956-06-13239°57'N / 76°43'W0225K0York
1956-08-13240°15'N / 75°18'W40°16'N / 75°15'W1.30 Miles333 Yards0025K0Montgomery
1957-11-19240°18'N / 76°35'W2.00 Miles13 Yards0025K0Lebanon
1958-07-14239°56'N / 75°08'W39°56'N / 75°07'W003K0Philadelphia
1958-07-14239°56'N / 75°07'W39°58'N / 74°56'W9.80 Miles27 Yards000K0Philadelphia
1960-06-24240°24'N / 75°37'W40°19'N / 75°28'W9.40 Miles200 Yards00250K0Berks
1960-06-24240°12'N / 75°15'W0.80 Mile27 Yards00250K0Montgomery
1960-07-04241°20'N / 75°44'W0025K0Luzerne
1961-06-08240°12'N / 75°27'W1.00 Mile200 Yards0125K0Montgomery
1961-07-29239°58'N / 76°40'W39°59'N / 76°30'W8.80 Miles500 Yards002.5M0York
1961-07-29239°59'N / 76°30'W40°02'N / 76°15'W13.40 Miles500 Yards022.5M0Lancaster
1962-05-24240°19'N / 74°57'W40°18'N / 74°54'W1.90 Miles67 Yards0025K0Bucks
1962-06-14241°46'N / 78°01'W0.20 Mile33 Yards003K0Potter
1963-03-27240°00'N / 76°51'W40°03'N / 76°32'W17.00 Miles20 Yards0025K0York
1964-06-15241°14'N / 80°14'W04250K0Mercer
1964-06-15240°18'N / 79°33'W2.00 Miles800 Yards04250K0Westmoreland
1965-11-16240°05'N / 79°37'W40°06'N / 79°36'W03250K0Westmoreland
1965-11-16240°06'N / 79°36'W40°07'N / 79°35'W03250K0Fayette
1966-04-23240°42'N / 79°24'W1.00 Mile17 Yards0025K0Armstrong
1966-08-16241°18'N / 77°00'W41°18'N / 76°54'W4.50 Miles100 Yards0125K0Lycoming
1967-09-21240°25'N / 77°11'W0.10 Mile30 Yards00250K0Perry
1967-10-18240°13'N / 76°45'W40°19'N / 76°36'W10.20 Miles30 Yards011250K0Dauphin
1968-06-25239°51'N / 80°19'W01250K0Greene
1968-09-10240°58'N / 75°58'W0025K0Luzerne
1969-07-27240°04'N / 76°42'W0.30 Mile100 Yards00250K0York
1970-03-26240°16'N / 76°46'W2.50 Miles50 Yards00250K0Dauphin
1970-07-02240°09'N / 76°37'W1.00 Mile1760 Yards0025K0Lancaster
1971-07-13239°46'N / 79°50'W39°42'N / 79°37'W12.20 Miles70 Yards04250K0Fayette
1971-07-13239°42'N / 79°37'W39°40'N / 79°33'W3.80 Miles100 Yards0025K0Fayette
1972-09-13241°09'N / 75°24'W0.10 Mile100 Yards003K0Monroe
1973-06-29240°14'N / 75°02'W40°15'N / 74°59'W1.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Bucks
1973-06-29239°56'N / 75°29'W39°54'N / 75°27'W1.90 Miles63 Yards0025K0Delaware
1974-04-14241°25'N / 76°33'W41°32'N / 76°21'W12.80 Miles100 Yards0025K0Sullivan
1974-08-17239°57'N / 76°06'W0.70 Mile33 Yards0025K0Lancaster
1975-04-03240°02'N / 75°40'W40°05'N / 75°39'W3.00 Miles20 Yards003K0Chester
1975-06-04240°35'N / 80°13'W40°11'N / 79°32'W45.30 Miles30 Yards000K0Beaver
1975-06-05240°45'N / 77°55'W00250K0Centre
1975-10-11240°17'N / 76°29'W40°10'N / 76°11'W17.50 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lebanon
1976-03-21239°56'N / 77°15'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Adams
1976-07-11241°19'N / 79°12'W40°58'N / 78°54'W28.70 Miles33 Yards17250K0Jefferson
1977-04-05240°15'N / 76°50'W2.00 Miles67 Yards012.5M0Dauphin
1977-09-18242°01'N / 80°21'W42°02'N / 80°15'W4.50 Miles33 Yards072.5M0Erie
1977-09-24241°00'N / 80°21'W002.5M0Lawrence
1978-08-28239°48'N / 77°02'W39°45'N / 77°00'W3.30 Miles20 Yards003K0Adams
1978-08-28239°45'N / 77°00'W39°43'N / 76°59'W1.90 Miles33 Yards003K0York
1978-08-28240°53'N / 76°52'W40°51'N / 76°48'W3.30 Miles50 Yards0125K0Snyder
1978-08-28240°51'N / 76°48'W40°52'N / 76°46'W0025K0Northumberland
1979-09-05239°46'N / 75°44'W39°48'N / 75°48'W4.10 Miles63 Yards142.5M0Chester
1979-09-05240°21'N / 75°48'W1.00 Mile30 Yards00250K0Berks
1979-10-05240°21'N / 75°55'W1.00 Mile40 Yards0125K0Berks
1979-10-05240°54'N / 75°19'W0.30 Mile100 Yards0025K0Monroe
1980-04-09240°44'N / 77°19'W40°43'N / 77°17'W00250K0Snyder
1980-05-12240°24'N / 79°23'W2.20 Miles20 Yards00250K0Westmoreland
1980-06-03240°32'N / 79°28'W40°32'N / 79°22'W4.90 Miles33 Yards00250K0Indiana
1980-06-07240°01'N / 77°04'W40°02'N / 77°01'W2.30 Miles800 Yards002.5M0Adams
1980-06-07240°02'N / 77°01'W40°02'N / 76°57'W3.30 Miles33 Yards002.5M0York
1980-06-09240°39'N / 78°39'W40°35'N / 78°32'W7.40 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Cambria
1981-04-28240°44'N / 79°44'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Butler
1981-04-29240°49'N / 75°35'W0025K0Carbon
1981-07-20240°51'N / 80°00'W00250K0Butler
1981-07-20240°51'N / 75°09'W40°55'N / 75°07'W4.10 Miles67 Yards0025K0Northampton
1981-07-26240°34'N / 79°14'W00250K0Indiana
1981-07-26240°52'N / 76°15'W0025K0Schuylkill
1981-07-28241°37'N / 79°46'W2.00 Miles33 Yards04250K0Crawford
1981-08-07241°24'N / 79°51'W00250K0Venango
1982-04-17241°12'N / 76°24'W41°15'N / 76°21'W4.00 Miles30 Yards0125K0Columbia
1983-05-02242°04'N / 80°02'W1.00 Mile33 Yards00250K0Erie
1983-05-02241°56'N / 77°27'W41°58'N / 77°15'W9.80 Miles30 Yards002.5M0Tioga
1983-05-22240°17'N / 79°53'W40°18'N / 79°47'W5.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Allegheny
1983-05-22240°18'N / 79°47'W40°20'N / 79°30'W14.00 Miles200 Yards062.5M0Westmoreland
1983-05-22240°20'N / 79°30'W40°27'N / 79°17'W13.00 Miles200 Yards042.5M0Westmoreland
1983-05-22240°27'N / 79°17'W40°30'N / 79°11'W6.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Indiana
1984-07-05240°26'N / 75°49'W40°29'N / 75°40'W7.00 Miles300 Yards022.5M0Berks
1984-07-05240°27'N / 75°46'W40°28'N / 75°42'W3.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Berks
1984-07-05240°29'N / 75°42'W40°29'N / 75°38'W3.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Berks
1984-07-05240°29'N / 75°38'W40°30'N / 75°35'W2.50 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Berks
1984-07-05240°30'N / 75°35'W40°31'N / 75°32'W2.50 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Lehigh
1984-07-05240°28'N / 75°38'W40°28'N / 75°35'W2.50 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Berks
1984-07-05240°28'N / 75°35'W40°29'N / 75°32'W2.50 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Lehigh
1984-07-06241°17'N / 76°09'W0.30 Mile300 Yards012250K0Luzerne
1985-05-31241°39'N / 80°25'W41°41'N / 80°21'W4.00 Miles200 Yards100K0Crawford
1985-05-31241°44'N / 80°31'W41°44'N / 80°30'W1.00 Mile127 Yards000K0Crawford
1985-05-31241°34'N / 78°57'W41°35'N / 78°56'W1.50 Miles300 Yards000K0Forest
1985-05-31241°35'N / 78°56'W41°37'N / 78°47'W10.50 Miles300 Yards000K0Elk
1985-05-31241°37'N / 78°47'W41°40'N / 78°39'W7.00 Miles300 Yards000K0Mckean
1985-05-31241°13'N / 79°48'W41°12'N / 79°41'W6.00 Miles150 Yards010K0Venango
1985-06-22241°48'N / 80°31'W41°50'N / 80°15'W14.00 Miles40 Yards00250K0Crawford
1985-07-31240°10'N / 76°54'W40°09'N / 76°51'W3.00 Miles20 Yards02250K0Lancaster
1986-09-23240°58'N / 79°26'W0.50 Mile40 Yards012.5M0Armstrong
1986-09-30241°48'N / 79°57'W0.50 Mile60 Yards012.5M0Crawford
1986-10-01239°55'N / 79°45'W39°54'N / 79°40'W4.50 Miles100 Yards022.5M0Fayette
1986-10-03241°08'N / 80°14'W41°08'N / 80°02'W9.00 Miles123 Yards002.5M0Mercer
1988-08-28241°34'N / 76°04'W1.50 Miles60 Yards00250K0Wyoming
1989-06-09239°57'N / 75°09'W39°57'N / 75°07'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0125K0Philadelphia
1989-06-15239°58'N / 76°40'W40°02'N / 76°30'W9.00 Miles100 Yards03250K0York
1989-06-15240°02'N / 76°30'W40°02'N / 76°26'W4.00 Miles100 Yards03250K0Lancaster
1989-06-15240°02'N / 76°26'W40°00'N / 76°24'W3.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lancaster
1989-06-20240°22'N / 77°30'W2.00 Miles23 Yards0125K0Perry
1989-11-20240°37'N / 77°49'W40°39'N / 77°47'W3.50 Miles1230 Yards0025K0Huntingdon
1990-06-08239°49'N / 76°54'W1.00 Mile60 Yards01250K0York
1990-06-30240°07'N / 80°09'W0.20 Mile250 Yards0025K0Washington
1991-05-06240°05'N / 76°40'W1.00 Mile100 Yards03250K0Lancaster
1991-09-18240°40'N / 77°49'W40°42'N / 77°47'W4.00 Miles330 Yards03250K0Huntingdon
1991-09-18241°47'N / 75°32'W41°47'N / 75°28'W3.00 Miles440 Yards0025K0Susquehanna
1991-09-18241°47'N / 75°28'W41°47'N / 75°27'W1.00 Mile440 Yards0025K0Wayne
1992-07-15240°53'N / 76°00'W1.50 Miles50 Yards022.5M0Schuylkill
1992-07-17240°24'N / 76°23'W1.00 Mile30 Yards00250K0Lebanon
1992-07-17239°54'N / 75°47'W39°55'N / 75°43'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Chester
1992-08-08241°06'N / 80°29'W1.50 Miles100 Yards011250K0Lawrence
1992-08-08241°04'N / 80°21'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Lawrence
1992-08-28239°57'N / 75°58'W2.00 Miles100 Yards03250K0Chester
1992-10-09240°07'N / 76°57'W2.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0York
1996-07-19241°05'N / 79°19'W41°04'N / 79°13'W7.50 Miles100 Yards0025K5KClarion
 Brief Description: A tornado began in Clarion County about 6 miles north of New Bethlehem. It tracked southeast into Jefferson County through Langville. The tornado lifted 1.5 miles west of Oliveburg. The tornado uprooted trees and rolled a mobile home, about a mile north of Truittsburg in Clarion County. The tornado also damaged some homes and farms, crops and downed extensive swaths of trees along its path. The tornado moved mainly in a straight line and averaged about 100 yards in width.
1996-07-19241°04'N / 79°13'W40°59'N / 79°04'W2.50 Miles100 Yards0025K5KJefferson
 Brief Description: A tornado began in Clarion County about 6 miles north of New Bethlehem. It tracked southeast into Jefferson County through Langville. The tornado lifted 1.5 miles west of Oliveburg. The tornado uprooted trees and rolled a mobile home, about a mile north of Truittsburg in Clarion County. The tornado also damaged some homes and farms, crops and downed extensive swaths of trees along its path. The tornado moved mainly in a straight line and averaged about 100 yards in width.
1996-07-19240°55'N / 78°55'W40°52'N / 78°48'W6.50 Miles200 Yards03200K10KIndiana
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down in Jefferson County and traveled southeast into northeast Indiana County, the tornado continued into the State Game Lands and exited Indiana County 4 miles north-north east of Glen Campbell and then entered Clearfield County. The tornado's path was 200 feet wide at its greatest width in Indiana County. Just some tree damage occurred in Jefferson County. The tornado strengthened and caused greater damage in Indiana County. Just east of Rossiter, the tornado tore the roof off of a barn. A child, playing outside, sought shelter in the barn. The roof lifted off and three of the four walls collapsed. The child was not injured. A horse that was inside the barn was sucked out and carried approximately 75 feet in the air into a field. The tornado traveled then traveled up a hill and significantly damaged one mobile home and destroyed a second. The second mobile home was carried at least 75 yards across a road and smashed against a row of trees. Three people were inside the mobile home and were injured, one critically. The tornado at this time was at it's strongest, at the upper end of F2. A nearby wood frame house was destroyed and dense areas of trees were felled or snapped. About a dozen homes sustained damage along the path, 5 were damaged extensively. Thirty pound cinder blocks from a garage were thrown approximately 300 yards up a nearby hill where a stronger suction vortex was noted. The tornado tracked into the State Game Lands and a 50 yard path of downed and twisted 100 to 150 foot trees was noted into the densely forested region.
1996-07-19240°43'N / 78°35'W40°39'N / 78°28'W8.40 Miles200 Yards0000Cambria
 Brief Description: An F1 to weak F2 tornado touched down in Clearfield County near New Washington around 10:15 a.m. EST. The tornado moved southeast approximately 19 miles along a curved path crossing Five Points into Cambria County across Glendale Lake before ending 2 miles east of Frugality. This storm damaged several mobile homes and farms in Five Points, picked a boat out of the water on Glendale Lake and felled many trees along its path. A herringbone tree pattern was apparent along with suction vortex damage to crops.
1996-07-19240°33'N / 78°45'W40°30'N / 78°39'W6.00 Miles100 Yards0000Cambria
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado touched down around 11:10 a.m. EST 2 miles east of Colver and tracked 6 miles southeast before ending 1 mile west of Loretto. The path width was 100 yards. Two homes and a barn were destroyed by this storm. Several roofs and a second barn were also damaged. A central suction vortex was visible in crop damage.
1996-11-08240°48'N / 75°32'W40°48'N / 75°32'W2.00 Miles67 Yards01250K0Northampton
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down in northwestern Northampton County near Danielsville at about 340 pm EST. It remained on the ground for about two miles and lifted prior to moving over the Blue Mountain Ridge which is the dividing line between Northampton and Monroe Counties. One person was injured and two families were made homeless after their homes were destroyed. About a dozen homes were damaged, two were destroyed, three vehicles were damaged or destroyed and significant roof damage occcurred to the Salem United Methodist Church. Damage estimates were around $250,000. The tornado was rated an F2 (or strong tornado with wind estimates between 113 and 157 mph) on the Fujita Scale. Lehigh Township was declared an emergency area. The tornado touched down near the Blue Mountain Road just south of Pennsylvania State Route 946. One of the first buildings in its path was the Salem United Methodist Church which lost part of its roof and a vehicle near the church was destroyed. It proceeded eastnortheast through Danielsville. An elderly woman was injured when the tornado struck the mobile home she was in and pushed it off its foundation. Another unoccupied 70 foot by 14 foot mobile home was tossed into a ditch 50 feet away. The roof of another house was found 100 feet downwind. A playhouse and a metal school bus shelter were deposited in the trees. Numerous trees were either snapped or damaged, but the majority of damage to other homes along the periphery of the tornado's path was limited to windows and chimneys. Prior to the tornado's touch down, the same parent thunderstorm did produce some damaging winds in Treichlers along Long Lane Road.
1997-08-15240°20'N / 79°19'W40°21'N / 79°16'W3.50 Miles200 Yards02800K10KWestmoreland
 Brief Description: A severe thunderstorm produced a tornado that produced substantial damage in a residential area east-northeast of Latrobe along the foothills of the Chestnut Ridge. The tornado first touched down 1 mile west of Derry. The tornado completely destroyed a large tier of metal stadium bleachers at a high school football field and wrapped them against a utility pole. A nearby roof of a business was damaged and a mobile home was completely destroyed and a few mobile homes sustained damage. The tornado then tracked through a rural area, damaging some farm buildings and downing field corn. The tornado continued its rapid (estimated forward speed 50-60 miles per hour) northeast track and caused significant damage in a mobile home park in Derry. The tornado crossed Route 217 and downed trees across railroad tracks and then entered a residential area in Millwood. One frame house in Millwood was severely damaged and part of a room addition collapsed and trapped a resident, who was treated at the scene. A resident of a mobile home sustained minor injuries as well. Numerous trees were uprooted and large branches and power lines were downed along the track of the storm. One home along Route 217 had a branch embedded into the house siding. The tornado was estimated to have wind speeds of between 90 and 120 miles per hour, briefly attaining an F-2 rating on the Fujita Tornado Scale. All tolled, 7-8 mobile homes were destroyed (3 totally decimated), 10-12 sustained major damage, 15-18 sustained minor damage. One frame house was heavily damaged and about 10 sustained minor damage. One car was destroyed when a tree fell on it. Parked next to the auto was another car with two occupants that were not injured. About 10 other cars were damaged. An open-air church in Millwood was also heavily damaged. The tornado appeared to have dissipated as it entered the heavily wooded slopes of the Chestnut Ridge.
1997-08-16241°54'N / 79°51'W41°54'N / 79°51'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00500K3KErie
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down and skipped along its path for several minutes. Twenty mobile homes were damaged and one was destroyed at the Maple Heights Trailer Court. A sixty by eighty foot block building was destroyed. Three houses and one business were damaged. A cornfield was flattened and several trees were downed.
1998-05-31241°20'N / 75°12'W41°21'N / 75°11'W2.00 Miles550 Yards00200K0Pike
 Brief Description: The tornadic supercell that affected southern Wayne county a bit earlier in the evening continued eastward into Pike county. A tornado touched down briefly in Promised Land and then plowed through portions of Promised Land State Park before temporarily lifting into the cloud base. The twister cut approximately a 2 mile by 500 yard path through heavily forested areas of the park. Camp sites were littered with trees as the tornado cut down hundreds of them. Some of the trees were very sizeable and they were still chopped down or twisted off quite easily as evidenced by ground and aerial post storm surveys. A few homes near the path of the twister sustained minor to moderate damage from falling trees. Fortunately, camp grounds and vacation homes were largely unoccupied when the tornado struck. The tornado appeared to be near ground level for only a few minutes as the damage path became discontinuous again just east of the park. An intensifying storm system moved across upstate New York and into southern Quebec early in the morning on the 31st. This system dragged a warm front across northeastern Pennsylvania. Behind this front, a southerly flow of warm, moist, and unstable air quickly developed. This set the stage for the development of severe weather later that afternoon as a cold front and strong upper air disturbance approached. From late in the afternoon until late that evening, northeastern Pennsylvania was under siege from severe thunderstorms, including several tornadic supercells. In all, nine separate tornadoes touched down on this day. Overall damage estimates run into the millions with many homes and structures heavily damaged or destroyed. The most devastating storms occurred in Pike county. Within about a 3 hour stretch from 7 to 10 pm EDT, four different twisters affected the county. One tornadic cell was responsible for knocking down thousands of healthy large trees in and around Promised Land State Park with several vacation homes damaged or leveled. Fortunately, injuries were kept at a minimum. Widespread straight line wind damage also occurred with hailstones the size of ping pong balls falling in some places. The north side of Scranton had extensive wind damage as a storm passed through shortly before 10 pm EDT and sections of Wayne and Luzerne counties had roads closed and/or blocked from falling trees for more than 2 days after the storm. Pennsylvania Power and Light Company estimated that hundreds of thousands of customers were without power at the height of the storms on the evening of the 31st. Some of the more remote locations did not have power restored for the better part of a week.
1998-05-31241°22'N / 75°10'W41°22'N / 75°08'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00400K0Pike
 Brief Description: A severe thunderstorm became tornadic just south of Interstate 84 and east of Tarey Hill in Blooming Grove township around 8:20 pm EDT. The tornado cut approximately a 3 mile by 200 yard path paralleling Interstate 84. The twister moved through heavily forested areas and mowed down hundreds of trees in its path. Again, many of the trees were quite sizeable and appeared to be toppled easily. The damage pattern was circular in spots as viewed by aerial surveys. Fortunately, little in the way of houses or populated regions were in the path of this particular tornado. The tornado's intensity seemed to fluctuate between F1 and F2. The tornado lifted back up just east of route 739 near Cranberry Ridge as little in the way of damage was seen downstream of this point. Several local roads were closed for up to 24 hours from fallen trees. An intensifying storm system moved across upstate New York and into southern Quebec early in the morning on the 31st. This system dragged a warm front across northeastern Pennsylvania. Behind this front, a southerly flow of warm, moist, and unstable air quickly developed. This set the stage for the development of severe weather later that afternoon as a cold front and strong upper air disturbance approached. From late in the afternoon until late that evening, northeastern Pennsylvania was under siege from severe thunderstorms, including several tornadic supercells. In all, nine separate tornadoes touched down on this day. Overall damage estimates run into the millions with many homes and structures heavily damaged or destroyed. The most devastating storms occurred in Pike county. Within about a 3 hour stretch from 7 to 10 pm EDT, four different twisters affected the county. One tornadic cell was responsible for knocking down thousands of healthy large trees in and around Promised Land State Park with several vacation homes damaged or leveled. Fortunately, injuries were kept at a minimum. Widespread straight line wind damage also occurred with hailstones the size of ping pong balls falling in some places. The north side of Scranton had extensive wind damage as a storm passed through shortly before 10 pm EDT and sections of Wayne and Luzerne counties had roads closed and/or blocked from falling trees for more than 2 days after the storm. Pennsylvania Power and Light Company estimated that hundreds of thousands of customers were without power at the height of the storms on the evening of the 31st. Some of the more remote locations did not have power restored for the better part of a week.
1998-05-31239°54'N / 76°10'W39°55'N / 76°03'W7.00 Miles880 Yards0000Lancaster
 Brief Description: The tornado struck about 12:30am EDT in the early morning hours of Monday, June 1st. Initial touchdown was just south of Quarryville. The tornado traveled east along a 7 mile path to Ninepoints. Damage was most extensive in the Ninepoints area and was rated an F2 intensity (112 to 157 mph). The width of the F2 damage was probably 100 to 200 yards wide with lesser damage extending out to 1/2 mile. At least 6 homes had significant damage. One home had the roof and second floor removed. Several barns were damaged and at least one destroyed. Trees were blown down on a number of homes. One person reported sighting the tornado. Only one minor injury was reported.
1998-06-01240°07'N / 75°02'W40°05'N / 74°57'W5.60 Miles200 Yards001.8M0Philadelphia
 Brief Description: A tornado ripped through Upper and Lower Moreland Townships as well as extreme northeast Philadelphia during the early morning of June 1st. The tornado was rated as an F1 (A weak tornado on the Fujita Scale) in Montgomery County and intensified into an F2 (or strong tornado on the Fujita Scale) within Philadelphia. The worst damage occurred within the unoccupied Byberry Industrial Park as the tornado reached its strongest intensity. Thirty-five commercial buildings were damaged, nine severely. Damage outside of the industrial park was mainly confined to downed trees. About ten homes were damaged by fallen trees. The damage within Philadelphia was discontinuous suggesting the tornado was not on the ground for its entire lifetime across the city. Damage was estimated at $1.8 million dollars. Because the buildings were unoccupied, no injuries occurred. The tornado moved into the city from Lower Moreland Township in the Bustleton/Lumar Park area around 120 a.m. EDT. Trees were split and knocked down. The tornado intensified into a strong one (F2 on the Fujita Scale) as it crossed into the Byberry Industrial Park. The worst damage was done in the area around Byberry Road, McNulty Road, Roosevelt Boulevard and Southampton Road. Five ton air conditioning units were tossed. Of the 35 commercial buildings damaged, nine were severely damaged and declared "imminently dangerous". Slabs of the roof were tossed 200 yards. Some buildings lost entire sides, had buckled steel beams, shattered windows and crushed equipment. The tornado plucked utility poles from the ground. About 20 poles were knocked over. Five teams of tree service personnel were overwhelmed. Damage south of the industrial park became sporadic as the tornado turned toward the southeast. It lifted just before the Bucks County border near Woodhaven Road just to the southeast of the Franklin Mills Mall. Its path length was about 5.6 miles and path width about 200 yards. PECO Energy reported 34,000 customers in Philadelphia lost power. Five thousand still did not have power the evening of the 1st. It was the worst non-winter storm in PECO Energy's 50 year history and the fourth worst overall. According to their lightning detection system, there were 7,000 cloud to ground lightning strikes in their service area as this line of thunderstorms moved through.
1998-06-02239°51'N / 79°14'W39°46'N / 79°04'W15.00 Miles880 Yards0000Somerset
 Brief Description: This F2 tornado was the first of two tornadoes to cross southern Somerset County on the evening of June 2. It would cross the path of the May 31st tornado that struck Salisbury. The tornado initially touched down about 4 miles southeast of Markleton, then tracked southeast for 12 miles across the Boynton area and ended in Pocahontas crossing the May 31st track about 6 miles east of Salisbury. The town of Boynton was hard hit, but most of the remaining damage in Pennsylvania was to trees. A carpentry shop near Pocahontas that had been destroyed by the May 31st tornado on Sunday was already being rebuilt by Amish farmers when the framing was blown over by this tornado. There were no deaths or injuries. See additional details in the Seven Springs to Frostburg tornado that paralleled the track of this storm just two hours later.
1998-06-02239°45'N / 79°39'W39°43'N / 79°34'W5.00 Miles300 Yards003.0M2.0MFayette
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado passed southeast through southern Fayette County PA, the northeast tip of Preston County WV, and into northwest Garrett County MD. The total length of the tornado as it passed across these three counties was 12 miles. Damage included a completely destroyed dairy barn, two completely destroyed house trailers, and at least 21 other structures heavily damaged, many with roofs partially or completely peeled off. Several cows were killed, with one cow thrown through the air over 100 yards. A clearly visible 300-yard wide, 1-mile long swath of trees which were completely sheared/uprooted was present near the Pennsylvania/West Virginia state border. One Fayette County official estimated at least two million dollars damage in lost timber alone in that county. Despite the damage, interviews with law enforcement officials, paramedics and local residents revealed no injuries occurred.
2001-09-24239°44'N / 76°59'W39°48'N / 76°56'W5.00 Miles200 Yards00900K0York
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near Grand Valley Road at 17:33 EST about 5 miles South of Hanover PA. The tornado proceded northward, through Parkville then lifting to the north of Blooming Grove at 17:40 EST. The path of the tornado was about 5 miles in length but not always on the ground while the width varied from 50 to 200 yards. The top wind speeds were estimated at 110 to 120 mph. There were no injuries or deaths. Significant damage included 8 homes with roofs torn off, brick and structural damage to several additional homes, 50 to 75 trees knocked down, 38 cars damaged at a car dealership, significant roof and water damage to a middle school and administration building, and significant structural damage to a store complex northwest of Blooming Grove.
2002-04-28240°34'N / 79°14'W40°37'N / 79°09'W5.00 Miles250 Yards01750K0Indiana
 Brief Description: A storm spawning two separate tornadoes passed over southern Armstrong County, continuing eastward into Indiana County. The first tornado, an F0, touched down at approximately 2:45 PM EST just south of the town of Spring Church in Armstrong County. It traveled east about 3 miles before crossing into Indiana County approximately 1 mile east of Maysville at 2:52 PM EST. This tornado continued traveling to the east for another mile, finally dissipating near the community of Iselin at around 2:55 PM EST. The maximum estimated winds with this tornado were about 70 MPH. Damage from this first tornado included numerous trees which were toppled or snapped. A small steeple was toppled, and a swimming pool was destroyed. There were several trees toppled onto houses, and some houses suffered minor wind damage. A garage was damaged, and a house under construction was lifted off the foundation. The same storm produced another stronger tornado, an F2, which touched down in Indiana County approximately 6 miles southwest of the city of Indiana at 3:00 PM EST. This F2 traveled to the east across Center Township for approximately 5 miles, dissipating just south of Indiana at 3:06 PM EST. The estimated maximum winds were around 135 MPH. This F2 tornado produced a swath of damage as it traveled eastward across Indiana County. One house was totally destroyed, and debris from this house was blown downwind. In this same area, a car was turned over and trees were stripped of leaves. An adjacent house exhibited damage from hail or flying projectiles on several sides. The house immediately to the north of the destroyed house lost part of its east-facing roof. There were at least an additional 18 houses damaged (roofs, shingles, siding, etc.). Several garages and barns were either toppled or snapped. A large sign from a hotel was blown down onto a car sales lot. Two cars were crushed and 18 other vehicles were damaged. One moderate injury was reported with this tornado.
2002-11-10241°15'N / 80°28'W41°20'N / 80°21'W7.00 Miles500 Yards1191.0M0Mercer
 Brief Description: Starting about 7:54 PM, an F2 tornado touched down near Trout Island Road, east of Sharpsville. The tornado traveled northeast at 50 mph, crossed Route 18, then ripped into Clark. It crossed Shenango River Lake and tracked to New Hamburg, where it dissipated 8:02 PM. The tornado path was 7 miles long, about 500 yards wide at its maximum, in the town of Clark. Maximum winds estimated 155 mph. Majority of damage and all injuries occurred in Clark. Fifteen homes completely destroyed, 13 major damage, 29 had minor damage. One business destroyed; 1 suffered major damage. A large number of trees were snapped or toppled. Large truck was overturned. One van was thrown across Route 258. Several other vehicles were moved by the tornado or suffered considerable damage. Strongest tornado in Mercer county since May 31,1985. M81PH
2004-05-25241°32'N / 80°10'W41°31'N / 80°03'W7.00 Miles50 Yards003.5M0Crawford
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado touched down three miles west of Custards and then tracked east for seven miles. The tornado finally lifted just west of Cochranton near U.S Highway 322. The damage path was continuous, up to 50 yards in width and roughly parallel to State Route 285. Significant damage occurred along the damage path. At least ten homes were damaged with two large farm buildings destroyed. Two factories west of Custards along Delano Road were also heavily damaged. One factory lost over 16,000 square feet of roofing and had much of it's inventory destroyed. The second factory was also heavily damaged on one side. Twelve semi trailers parked outside this factory were overturned and destroyed. Several dozen workers inside the factories had sought shelter prior to the arrival of the tornado and were uninjured. Hundreds of trees and dozens of power poles were downed along the damage path.
2006-12-01241°04'N / 76°04'W41°10'N / 75°46'W20.00 Miles150 Yards051.0M0KLuzerne
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: At 4:52 pm EST, Friday, December 1st, a tornado touched down near Hobbie in Luzerne County. The tornado tracked about 20 miles east northeast through Dorrance, Mountaintop, and Fairview Heights to Bear Creek where it lifted. Most of the damage was F1 intensity with F2 intensity reached in Fairview Heights near route 309. A grocery store in Fairview heights had its windows blown out which injured 5 people. There was significant roof damage as well. An 8000 pound air conditioning unit was toppled on the roof of this grocery store. A roof was lifted off of a well built home approximately a quarter mile to the east northeast of the grocery store. Thousands of trees were blown down and uprooted along the path of this tornado. Shingle and roof damage was common along the entire path of this tornado too. Over 100 homes sustained at least minor damage. Two trailer homes and a construction trailer were completely destroyed. There was also minor damage to a high school in Fairview Heights. A roof was blown off the fire department in Dorrance. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A persistent ridge of high pressure brought unseasonably mild temperatures to the northeast U.S. A sharp cold front formed a line of strong to severe thunderstorms which blew through Pennsylvania Friday afternoon. Winds from these thunderstorms knocked down numerous trees and power lines. Along with the severe thunderstorms, three tornadoes touched down in northeast Pennsylvania, the first occurrence of tornado touch downs in Pennsylvania during the month of December on record.
2009-07-29240°55'N / 75°15'W40°58'N / 75°11'W5.00 Miles100 Yards021.0M0KMonroe
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF-2 tornado with estimated maximum wind speeds of 120 mph touched down and affected Hamilton and Stroud Townships. The highest wind speeds and worst reported damage occurred on Middle Road in Hamilton Township and Stroudsmoor Road in Stroud Township. Two men were injured and about 10,000 homes and businesses lost power. Hundreds of trees were destroyed and at least 25 telephone poles had to be replaced. Power was not fully restored until the 31st. In Hamilton Township, two homes suffered roof damage and four large farm buildings and one garage were destroyed. In Stroud Township, one home lost its roof, two others had trees on their roofs and a section of a resort building lost its roof. This was the first reported tornado in Monroe County since July 1, 2001 and the first reported EF2 or F2 tornado in the county since October 5, 1979. The tornado touched down southwest of Kemmertown Road in Hamilton Township before causing substantial damage to the Blakeslee Farm near the intersection of Middle and Blakeslee Roads. On Kemmertown Road, a downed tree damaged a porch at an assisted living facility. At the Blakeslee Farm, the tornado destroyed three barns and a garage shed and took the roof and attic off of the home. A 46-year-old man suffered facial and rib injuries and a 66-year-old man suffered a head injury as the garage shed collapsed. In addition to the property damage, the tornado damaged the corn, hay, wheat and oat crops on the farm. Thirty percent of the trees on the property were destroyed . The tornado then lifted, causing only relatively minor damage as it followed Middle Road into Stroud Township. However, more substantial damage again occurred from Larsens Lane northeast to Fox Run Road and Essig Lane. More damage occurred as the tornado crossed Stroudsmoor Road, where numerous trees were felled, and roof damage occurred to the Stroudsmoor Country Inn. A downed tree also damaged a home on Stroudsmoor Road. Another downed tree damaged a home on Pennsylvania State Route 191. The tornado lifted just before it moved over the intersections of Routes 191 and 611 (Foxtwon Hill Road) just south of Stroudsburg. The tornado was on the ground for about 4.6 miles and its maximum width was about 100 yards. Damage was estimated at 1 million dollars. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front retreating to the north and a cold front approaching from the west produced strong to severe thunderstorms across eastern Pennsylvania during the afternoon of the 29th. One EF-2 tornado also occurred.
2010-07-23241°36'N / 75°13'W41°26'N / 74°58'W17.00 Miles400 Yards00100K0KWayne
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This was the third and most significant tornado touch down from the storm. The damage path begins three miles northeast of Honesdale. Significant tree damage occurred. Trees fell on an attached garage on Torrey Road. Barn roofs were peeled. The tornado intensifies as it moved along Dunn Road. Trees are snapped, uprooted and thrown in what appears to be two separate paths through dense woods indicating mulit-vortex. Several structures had damage from fallen trees. A fence was pulled out of the ground and strewn in different directions. The greatest damage occurred about 4 miles east of Honesdale and 1.5 miles west of Beach Lake where Dunn Road meets Route 652. Several structures were severely damaged or destroyed including a triple-wide trailer, two barns, and a commercial auto transmission business on Route 652. Here, winds were estimated to peek in the 110 to 120 MPH range putting it at the lower end of an EF2. The tornado continued to the southeast destroying trees on the west side of Williams Pond and Mud and Open Woods Ponds and then crossing into Pike County. It moved past Wolf Lake, Teedyuskung Lake, and Fawn Lake still doing EF1 damage to trees. The path begins to narrow and oscillate between EF0 with little damage to EF1 with trees snapped and uprooted. It crosses Route 590 (twice) and the Lackawaxen River east of Rowland and appears to dissipate over State Game Lands about 2 miles northeast of Greeley. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front lifted north into northeast Pennsylvania during the afternoon, putting the area into the warm and moist air mass of the warm sector, with temperatures in the mid 80s and dew points in the 70s. Showers and thunderstorms developed in the vicinity of the front in this unstable air mass. Stronger storms developed across southeast Susquehanna county, with one storm in particular developing strong rotation as it moved southeast into Wayne county. This storm went on to produce four tornadoes and other significant microburst damage as it continued southeast through Wayne and into Pike county.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
The USA.com website and domain are privately owned and are not operated by or affiliated with any government or municipal authority.
© 2017 World Media Group, LLC.