Local Data Search

 
USA.com / Ohio / Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

Ohio Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
Hot Ohio Rankings
Fastest / Slowest Growing Cities in OH
High / Low OH Cities by Males Employed
High / Low OH Cities by Females Employed
Best / Worst Cities by Crime Rate in OH
Richest / Poorest Cities by Income in OH
Expensive / Cheapest Homes by City in OH
Most / Least Educated Cities in OH

The chance of earthquake damage in Ohio is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Ohio is higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #33

Ohio
0.16
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #14

Ohio
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #17

Ohio
156.02
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 21,667 other weather extremes events from 1950 to 2010 were recorded in Ohio. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:6Cold:45Dense Fog:5Drought:25
Dust Storm:0Flood:3,080Hail:5,234Heat:30Heavy Snow:239
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:56Landslide:0Strong Wind:444
Thunderstorm Winds:11,790Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:0Winter Storm:209Winter Weather:23
Other:481 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Ohio.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 2 historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in Ohio.

DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
1937-03-095.5N/A40.4-84.2
1967-04-084.2N/A39.6-82.5

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 303 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in Ohio.

DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
1968-04-23538°42'N / 82°48'W38°47'N / 82°39'W9.80 Miles400 Yards7752.5M0Scioto
1968-04-23538°47'N / 82°39'W38°48'N / 82°35'W3.60 Miles400 Yards010K0Lawrence
1968-04-23538°48'N / 82°35'W38°49'N / 82°12'W20.60 Miles400 Yards017250K0Gallia
1974-04-03539°38'N / 84°03'W39°47'N / 83°43'W20.40 Miles533 Yards361150250.0M0Greene
1974-04-03539°47'N / 83°43'W39°55'N / 83°36'W10.90 Miles533 Yards002.5M0Clark
1974-04-03539°07'N / 84°40'W39°13'N / 84°38'W6.80 Miles533 Yards31900K0Hamilton
1985-05-31541°12'N / 81°09'W41°12'N / 81°02'W6.50 Miles440 Yards00250.0M0Portage
1985-05-31541°12'N / 81°02'W41°10'N / 80°34'W23.50 Miles440 Yards10250250.0M0Trumbull
1985-05-31541°10'N / 80°34'W41°10'N / 80°31'W3.00 Miles440 Yards00250.0M0Trumbull
1953-06-08441°13'N / 83°54'W41°15'N / 83°50'W3.30 Miles33 Yards510K0Henry
1953-06-08441°15'N / 83°50'W41°16'N / 83°26'W20.50 Miles33 Yards380K0Wood
1953-06-08441°16'N / 83°26'W41°25'N / 82°50'W32.60 Miles100 Yards000K0Sandusky
1953-06-08441°25'N / 82°50'W41°28'N / 82°20'W26.00 Miles33 Yards2230K0Erie
1953-06-08441°28'N / 82°20'W41°22'N / 81°58'W20.00 Miles33 Yards1470K0Lorain
1953-06-08441°22'N / 81°58'W41°30'N / 81°43'W15.60 Miles33 Yards63000K0Cuyahoga
1961-04-25439°45'N / 84°48'W39°45'N / 84°37'W9.50 Miles77 Yards002.5M0Preble
1965-04-11440°42'N / 84°48'W40°44'N / 84°42'W5.10 Miles33 Yards2242.5M0Mercer
1965-04-11440°44'N / 84°42'W40°46'N / 84°23'W16.50 Miles33 Yards04250K0Van Wert
1965-04-11440°48'N / 84°12'W40°52'N / 83°52'W17.80 Miles400 Yards111002.5M0Allen
1965-04-11441°40'N / 83°36'W41°43'N / 83°30'W5.60 Miles200 Yards1620725.0M0Lucas
1965-04-11440°52'N / 83°52'W40°57'N / 83°36'W14.70 Miles400 Yards24250K0Hancock
1965-04-11440°21'N / 84°23'W40°23'N / 84°02'W18.40 Miles300 Yards3502.5M0Shelby
1965-04-11441°14'N / 82°15'W41°18'N / 82°00'W13.40 Miles400 Yards1710025.0M0Lorain
1965-04-11441°18'N / 82°00'W41°20'N / 81°50'W8.60 Miles400 Yards110025.0M0Cuyahoga
1968-04-23439°06'N / 84°16'W39°12'N / 84°00'W15.80 Miles100 Yards1292.5M0Clermont
1968-04-23439°12'N / 84°00'W39°22'N / 83°55'W12.20 Miles300 Yards012.5M0Brown
1968-04-23438°46'N / 83°52'W38°48'N / 83°42'W9.10 Miles550 Yards142.5M0Brown
1968-04-23438°48'N / 83°42'W38°53'N / 82°55'W42.50 Miles550 Yards000K0Adams
1968-04-23439°22'N / 83°55'W39°17'N / 83°52'W6.10 Miles33 Yards032.5M0Clinton
1974-04-03439°11'N / 84°29'W39°18'N / 84°23'W9.40 Miles350 Yards239250K0Hamilton
1974-04-03439°18'N / 84°23'W39°26'N / 84°17'W10.40 Miles350 Yards00250K0Warren
1985-05-31441°50'N / 80°33'W41°51'N / 80°31'W2.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Ashtabula
1985-05-31441°29'N / 80°31'W41°29'N / 80°31'W0.20 Mile300 Yards0025K0Trumbull
1990-06-02439°15'N / 84°48'W39°17'N / 84°35'W10.00 Miles1350 Yards01425.0M0Hamilton
1990-06-02439°17'N / 84°35'W39°20'N / 84°35'W3.00 Miles1350 Yards0225.0M0Butler
1990-06-02439°20'N / 84°35'W39°20'N / 84°19'W12.00 Miles1350 Yards0025.0M0Butler
1990-06-02439°20'N / 84°19'W39°21'N / 84°20'W2.00 Miles1350 Yards0025.0M0Warren
1992-02-18440°44'N / 84°34'W2.80 Miles40 Yards062.5M0Van Wert
1999-04-09439°14'N / 84°22'W39°18'N / 84°17'W8.00 Miles440 Yards46582.0M0Hamilton
 Brief Description: A tornado began with F2 intensity in Blue Ash in the northeast corner of the county. This tornado moved through Montgomery, Symmes Township, and Loveland before entering Warren county. The intensity of the tornado was F2 and F3 at many points along the track, intensifying to a low end F4 while in Montgomery. The width of the tornado ranged from 100 yards to 1/4 mile wide. Four fatalities occurred; two in a home and the other two in vehicles. About 91 homes and apartments were destroyed along with 37 businesses. Additionally, 197 homes and apartments suffered major damage with 477 others also incurring damage. Twenty six businesses had major damage with 18 others also incurring damage. M40VE, M38VE, M58PH, F52PH
2000-09-20439°39'N / 83°59'W39°44'N / 83°53'W9.00 Miles500 Yards110015.0M0Greene
 Brief Description: A violent tornado that moved at 65 mph hit the town of Xenia for the second time in 26 years damaging some of the same areas that were hit in 1974. Along the path of the tornado, around 250 homes were either damaged or destroyed, over 40 businesses were damaged or destroyed including the local Wal Mart, Kroger, and Tire Discounters, and 6 churches were damaged. A strip mall was nearly destroyed, cars were thrown from the Highway 35 bypass into ditches, 4 semi-trailers were thrown up to 400 yards, and most of the buildings were damaged or destroyed at the Greene county fairgrounds. In Sugarcreek Township, which is to the southwest of Xenia, an additional 14 houses and 3 barns were damaged and some crops were destroyed on a narrow path. Over 10,000 residents were without power for at least 1 day. M63VE
2002-11-10440°47'N / 84°46'W40°59'N / 84°26'W21.60 Miles880 Yards21730.0M0Van Wert
 Brief Description: This tornado touched down in the southwest corner of Van Wert County about 4 miles northeast of Willshire and moved northeast across the western portion of the city of Van Wert, and then crossed U.S. 30 and continued northeast before exiting the county about 7 miles east of Scott. NWS ground and aerial surveys showed the tornado quickly intensified to F4 about 5 miles southwest of the city of Van Wert near Zook road, where a 75 year old male was killed in his home. The tornado continued moving northeast as an F4 into the city of Van Wert, were it hit the Twin Cinemas and the Vision Industrial Park. At this point the tornado was about one half mile wide. 60 persons watching a movie in the cinemas, mostly children, took shelter before the tornado hit, with only minor injuries. Vehicles from the parking lot were thrown into the seats where the children had been sitting. An 18 year old male driving past the cinemas was thrown from his vehicle and killed. The tornado then destroyed five industries in the Vision Industrial Park, before moving north of U.S. 30, producing F4 damage to additional businesses and homes. The tornado weakened to F3 as it moved northeast and crossed into Paulding county. 164 homes were damaged in Van Wert county, and 43 were totally destroyed. 27 businesses sustained damage, with 5 totally destroyed in Vision Park. Three county engineer buildings were destroyed, with one house used by a township. Total damage in Van Wert county was near 30 million dollars. M18VE, M75PH On Sunday, November 10th, 2002 a cold front trailed from a deep surface low over northern Lake Michigan into central Missouri. Ahead of the cold front the KILN (Wilmington, OH) 1200 UTC sounding showed an unstable airmass with CAPE (Convectively Available Potential Energy) of 1148 J/kg and a Storm Relative Helicity (SRH) of 408 m/s2. Another sounding at 1800 UTC showed CAPE had increased on a modified sounding to 1313 J/kg, with SRH increasing to 587 m/s2. A broken squall line developed from Indianapolis to Fort Wayne Indiana and Defiance Ohio with the cold front. A small low topped supercell developed ahead of the line over Blackford county Indiana and was moving northeast at 50 MPH. This parent supercell produced 3 seperate tornadoes in Indiana (see StormData, Indiana, Northeast for more information) before crossing into Ohio. There the supercell intensified and a tornado touched down in Van Wert County Ohio, reaching F4 in strength as it reached the city of Van Wert. The tornado then moved northeast with a total path length of 53 miles, producing F3 damage in Paulding and Putnam counties, and F0 damage in Defiance and Henry counties.
2010-06-05441°33'N / 83°32'W41°34'N / 83°25'W7.00 Miles400 Yards728100.0M0KWood
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A devastating tornado moved across portions of northern Wood County during the late evening hours of June 5th. The tornado reached a peak intensity of EF4 and was responsible for the deaths of seven people. Five of the victims died immediately with the other two passing away from their injuries at later dates. The initial touchdown occurred east of Perrysburg along Oregon Road just to the north of the Ohio Turnpike. The tornado then moved east northeast toward Toledo Metcalf Field as an EF0 to EF1. The tornado intensified to an EF2 as it crossed East Broadway Street. Over two dozen homes in a neighborhood bordered by East Broadway to the west and State Route 795 to the north and east were heavily damaged or destroyed. The worst of the damage was along Shawnee and Neill Avenues in this neighborhood. The tornado then crossed State Route 795 and followed the highway toward Metcalf Field. The tornado intensified to EF3 at that time. Several homes along Moline-Martin Road were destroyed between State Route 795 and Metcalf Field. An occupant of one of the homes, an 87 year old man, was injured by the tornado and later died. As the tornado approached Metcalf Field it crossed a railroad yard and overturned a couple dozen railroad cars. The tornado then moved across the southern end of the airport grounds and destroyed the Lake Township Administrative and Police Department building located just northwest of the intersection of Cummings Road and State Route 795. A 20 year old female was killed by the tornado just outside of the police department. She had left her vehicle along with her boyfriend and child to seek refuge in the police station. She was caught outside and was reportedly killed by flying debris. At the police station, the tornado destroyed at least six police vehicles and one emergency response vehicle. The emergency response vehicle was found over 1000 feet away from its original position. One police vehicle was found wrapped around a large tree. After doing extensive damage to an agricultural business, the tornado struck the Lake Local School District complex along State Route 795 and Lemoyne Road. Lake High School took a direct hit from the tornado and was damaged enough to be considered destroyed. The nearby middle and elementary schools sustained considerable roof damage. The high school gymnasium was scheduled to hold a commencement ceremony for the graduating senior class on June 6th. Large sections of the gymnasium collapsed. A field house, cafeteria and auditorium adjacent to the high school were destroyed. At least eight school buses were overturned and destroyed by the tornado. The tornado continued to move parallel to and just north of State Route 795 at EF3 intensity. A 56 year old female was killed by flying debris while driving her car on State Route 795 near the school complex. The woman's daughters were following in another car which was also destroyed. The daughters both sustained minor injuries. The tornado continued east northeast and crossed Interstate 280 just north of the State Route 795 interchange before moving across open fields for about a mile. The tornado may have briefly weakened to EF2 intensity, but then strengthened back to EF3 intensity as it crossed Bradner Road to the west of Millbury. The tornado destroyed several homes in a neighborhood bordered by Bradner Road to the west and Cherry Street to the south. A 47 year old man was killed in house on Case Road in this neighborhood. The man's daughter was the valedictorian of the graduating senior class at Lake High School which was destroyed by the tornado. The tornado then intensified to EF4 as it approached Main Street on the north side of Millbury. Over a dozen homes were destroyed or heavily damaged along Main Street. A 36 year old woman and her four year old son were killed in one of the destroyed homes on Main Street. The woman's 37 year old husband died on June 12th from injuries sustained from the tornado. Several more homes were destroyed or heavily damaged on Hille Drive and Woodville Road before the tornado crossed North Fostoria Road and moved into Ottawa County as a weak EF3 or strong EF2 tornado. This tornado was on the ground for around six and a half miles in Wood County and destroyed or heavily damaged over 60 homes. Dozens of additional homes sustained minor damage with another couple hundred homes affected by the storm. Dozens of vehicles were also destroyed. Hundreds of trees were toppled or snapped by the tornado along the damage path which was up to 400 yards in width. The tornado debarked some of the larger trees along the damage path. At least one high tension utility pole was toppled by the tornado and widespread power outages occurred in Millbury and Walbridge. Damage to the Lake Township infrastructure was estimated at five million dollars with tens of millions of losses to the Lake Local School District. The exact number of injuries caused by this tornado is unknown, but at least 17 people had to be hospitalized in nearby Toledo. Debris from this tornado has been found dozens of miles away, including on some of the islands in western Lake Erie. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary frontal system stretched across the lower Great Lakes on the morning of Saturday, June 5th. This resulted in a very warm and humid airmass over northern Ohio. Outflow boundaries from earlier storms interacted with the stationary front to initiate thunderstorm development during the afternoon hours across inland northern Ohio. One of the stronger thunderstorms produced tornadoes in Richland and Holmes Counties. There were also a few reports of straight line thunderstorm wind damage. A rapidly deepening area of low pressure moved quickly east across southern lower Michigan during the evening hours. This low eventually moved across Lake Erie during the early morning hours of the 6th. Showers and thunderstorms developed across northern Indiana during the evening hours. These storms intensified and moved east along the stationary front and into Northwest Ohio. A devastating EF4 tornado developed over Wood County a little before midnight. This tornado moved into Ottawa County before dissipating. Seven people were killed and dozens of homes destroyed by the tornado. A weaker tornado also moved across portions of Lucas County. A third round of storms developed during the early morning hours of the 6th ahead of a cold front trailing the low. These storms moved across northern Ohio and produced pockets of damage. An EF1 tornado occurred in Ashtabula County around daybreak. A total of five tornadoes occurred in northern Ohio on June 5th and 6th. These tornadoes killed seven people, injured dozens and destroyed or damaged over a 100 homes. A school and a public administration building were also leveled. Damage estimates easily topped $100 million.
1950-07-19340°43'N / 84°05'W40°50'N / 83°58'W9.70 Miles300 Yards0302.5M0Allen
1955-03-01341°16'N / 80°40'W2.50 Miles40 Yards16250K0Mahoning
1955-11-15340°06'N / 84°46'W40°06'N / 84°38'W6.60 Miles300 Yards012.5M0Darke
1956-08-05341°09'N / 80°42'W41°08'N / 80°41'W00250K0Trumbull
1956-08-05341°08'N / 80°41'W41°07'N / 80°40'W20250K0Mahoning
1959-02-10339°05'N / 83°42'W39°05'N / 83°30'W10.50 Miles400 Yards06250K0Highland
1961-05-06341°33'N / 84°48'W41°34'N / 84°45'W1.90 Miles813 Yards0025K0Williams
1961-07-28340°12'N / 84°48'W40°14'N / 84°25'W20.20 Miles200 Yards02250K0Darke
1961-07-28340°16'N / 84°11'W0.50 Mile200 Yards022250K0Shelby
1965-04-08338°52'N / 82°59'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Scioto
1965-04-11341°04'N / 83°08'W41°07'N / 82°51'W15.00 Miles300 Yards430250K0Seneca
1965-11-16339°30'N / 83°29'W39°30'N / 83°24'W3.80 Miles100 Yards04250K0Fayette
1966-09-29341°27'N / 81°33'W41°27'N / 81°27'W4.50 Miles60 Yards0202.5M0Cuyahoga
1969-05-08339°40'N / 84°08'W39°42'N / 84°06'W1.90 Miles150 Yards0252.5M0Montgomery
1969-05-08340°18'N / 81°12'W2.00 Miles300 Yards114250K0Harrison
1969-05-10339°20'N / 84°46'W39°25'N / 84°20'W23.80 Miles400 Yards092.5M0Butler
1969-05-10339°25'N / 84°20'W39°32'N / 84°00'W19.40 Miles400 Yards010250K0Warren
1969-05-10339°32'N / 84°00'W39°33'N / 83°55'W4.10 Miles400 Yards000K0Clinton
1969-05-10339°33'N / 83°55'W39°35'N / 83°47'W7.20 Miles400 Yards060K0Greene
1969-08-09339°13'N / 84°31'W39°10'N / 84°18'W11.90 Miles400 Yards42402.5M0Hamilton
1969-08-09339°10'N / 84°18'W39°07'N / 84°07'W10.30 Miles400 Yards07250K0Clermont
1970-09-03339°39'N / 82°58'W39°40'N / 82°55'W2.30 Miles100 Yards0125K0Pickaway
1971-02-22339°58'N / 82°56'W40°02'N / 82°50'W6.80 Miles100 Yards072.5M0Franklin
1971-05-24340°29'N / 83°56'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0025K0Logan
1971-06-02340°55'N / 84°00'W40°56'N / 83°24'W31.50 Miles200 Yards0025K0Allen
1971-06-02341°05'N / 84°00'W40°59'N / 83°15'W39.60 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Putnam
1973-05-10341°14'N / 83°26'W41°06'N / 82°42'W39.10 Miles27 Yards102.5M0Seneca
1973-05-10341°06'N / 82°42'W41°02'N / 82°30'W11.00 Miles50 Yards51002.5M0Huron
1973-05-10340°14'N / 83°50'W40°01'N / 83°36'W19.20 Miles300 Yards003K0Champaign
1973-05-10340°01'N / 83°36'W39°55'N / 83°31'W8.00 Miles300 Yards043K0Clark
1973-05-10339°55'N / 83°31'W39°55'N / 83°15'W14.10 Miles300 Yards003K0Madison
1973-05-10339°55'N / 83°15'W39°55'N / 82°48'W23.80 Miles300 Yards033K0Franklin
1973-05-10339°55'N / 82°48'W39°55'N / 82°30'W15.80 Miles300 Yards003K0Fairfield
1973-05-10339°55'N / 82°30'W39°55'N / 82°20'W8.70 Miles300 Yards013K0Perry
1973-06-03341°12'N / 81°26'W41°11'N / 81°20'W4.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Summit
1973-06-03341°11'N / 81°20'W41°11'N / 81°10'W8.40 Miles100 Yards0125K0Portage
1974-04-03338°49'N / 83°36'W38°57'N / 83°22'W15.50 Miles500 Yards103K0Adams
1974-04-03341°03'N / 84°27'W41°10'N / 84°22'W8.70 Miles177 Yards01250K0Paulding
1977-10-01339°15'N / 84°40'W0.70 Mile150 Yards0172.5M0Hamilton
1978-10-12340°48'N / 80°55'W40°53'N / 80°49'W7.30 Miles250 Yards042.5M0Columbiana
1981-06-13340°30'N / 82°54'W40°33'N / 82°51'W3.80 Miles350 Yards45625.0M0Morrow
1983-05-02341°20'N / 83°50'W41°22'N / 83°45'W5.00 Miles100 Yards12225.0M0Wood
1983-05-02341°20'N / 81°39'W41°22'N / 81°26'W12.00 Miles100 Yards12525.0M0Cuyahoga
1985-05-31341°26'N / 81°00'W41°31'N / 80°51'W9.00 Miles440 Yards0202.5M0Trumbull
1985-05-31341°31'N / 80°51'W41°33'N / 80°44'W6.00 Miles440 Yards0102.5M0Ashtabula
1985-05-31340°10'N / 82°43'W40°14'N / 82°11'W27.00 Miles150 Yards12025.0M0Licking
1985-05-31340°14'N / 82°11'W40°14'N / 82°08'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0025.0M0Coshocton
1991-03-27341°39'N / 84°50'W41°42'N / 84°43'W6.40 Miles200 Yards01825.0M0Williams
1992-07-12341°14'N / 82°00'W41°13'N / 81°52'W7.00 Miles300 Yards042.5M0Medina
1992-07-12341°08'N / 81°29'W41°10'N / 81°26'W8.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Summit
1992-11-22339°47'N / 84°45'W39°56'N / 84°38'W12.00 Miles500 Yards0025.0M0Preble
1992-11-22339°56'N / 84°38'W39°59'N / 84°33'W8.00 Miles500 Yards02125.0M0Darke
1997-07-02338°51'N / 84°11'W38°49'N / 84°04'W12.00 Miles500 Yards002.0M0Clermont
 Brief Description: A multiple vortex tornado tracked across the southern part of the county. The tornado damaged or destroyed 56 mobile homes and 27 single family homes. Several barns and sheds were destroyed and numerous trees were downed. No serious injuries or deaths occurred with this tornado. A low pressure system with an unusually strong mid and upper level jet streak was moving across the Great Lakes with an associated cold front moving across the upper Ohio valley. Thunderstorms developed across Indiana and moved into West-Central Ohio around mid-afternoon with a distinct bow echo causing wind damage from near to Lima to southeast of Columbus. On the southern edge of the first line of storms, a supercell developed over Central Indiana. This storm evolved into a bow echo and swept across the Dayton metro area causing extensive wind damage and a brief tornado in Greene county. Another supercell developed near Cincinnati and moved southeastward along the Ohio River. This storm produced the F3 tornado in Clermont county.
1999-10-13339°36'N / 82°59'W39°37'N / 82°57'W3.50 Miles440 Yards064.0M0Pickaway
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down west of Circleville, pulling a small shed off of its foundation and destroying a section of a construction building. after this, the tornado lifted and then touched down in a more developed area in town. It destroyed a building housing two businesses and ripped the roof off of a section of a strip mall, ejecting furniture from inside the structure. A large sign weighing several hundred pounds was ripped from its foundation and blown twenty feet away. A tractor trailer with a load of 18 to 19 tons was blown over and dragged ten feet away from where it landed. The tornado then proceeded to a housing development where several homes were destroyed, several roofs ripped off, and garages either destroyed or moved from their foundations. Trees were twisted and broken off at their bases and carports were also torn from nearby houses. A cold front pushed east from Illinois and Indiana during the afternoon hours and combined with a vigorous upper level disturbance that dropped into the Ohio Valley from the lower Great Lakes region. These factors prompted a squall line to develop ahead of the cold front that moved southeast through the Wilmington Ohio (ILN) county warning area before entering northeast Kentucky and southeast Ohio.
2001-10-24340°53'N / 84°19'W41°09'N / 83°54'W29.00 Miles440 Yards001.0M0Putnam
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down in extreme southeast Van Wert county northwest of Delphos as an F0 and moved northeast into Putnam county southwest of Fort Jennings. F3 damage occurred 2 miles southwest of Ottawa in Putnam county with significant damage to well built homes and structures. The tornado was skipping across northeast Putnam county with F1-F2 damage before lifting just south of the Henry county line east of Belmore.
2002-11-10340°59'N / 84°27'W41°05'N / 84°20'W9.00 Miles440 Yards0000Paulding
 Brief Description: This tornado originated in Van Wert county and crossed into Paulding county 3 miles southwest of Roselms and exited Paulding county about 2.5 miles southeast of Oakwood. NWS ground and aerial survey found F3 damage along the entire path in Paulding county, with only one structure remaining standing in the town of Roselms, in which the town residents had taken cover in the basement. On Sunday, November 10th, 2002 a cold front trailed from a deep surface low over northern Lake Michigan into central Missouri. Ahead of the cold front the KILN (Wilmington, OH) 1200 UTC sounding showed an unstable airmass with CAPE (Convectively Available Potential Energy) of 1148 J/kg and a Storm Relative Helicity (SRH) of 408 m/s2. Another sounding at 1800 UTC showed CAPE had increased on a modified sounding to 1313 J/kg, with SRH increasing to 587 m/s2. A broken squall line developed from Indianapolis to Fort Wayne Indiana and Defiance Ohio with the cold front. A small low topped supercell developed ahead of the line over Blackford county Indiana and was moving northeast at 50 MPH. This parent supercell produced 3 seperate tornadoes in Indiana (see StormData, Indiana, Northeast for more information) before crossing into Ohio. There the supercell intensified and a tornado touched down in Van Wert County Ohio, reaching F4 in strength as it reached the city of Van Wert. The tornado then moved northeast with a total path length of 53 miles, producing F3 damage in Paulding and Putnam counties, and F0 damage in Defiance and Henry counties.
2002-11-10341°05'N / 84°20'W41°10'N / 84°16'W7.20 Miles440 Yards2000Putnam
 Brief Description: This tornado originated in Van Wert county and moved across Paulding county into Putnam county about 4 miles west southwest of Continental. NWS ground and aerial survey found F3 damage as the tornado entered Putnam county, striking a mobile home and killing a husband and wife. The tornado moved northeast across the northwest corner of Putnam county, quickly weakening to an F0 as it exited the county 4.5 miles north of Continental. M72MH, F67MH On Sunday, November 10th, 2002 a cold front trailed from a deep surface low over northern Lake Michigan into central Missouri. Ahead of the cold front the KILN (Wilmington, OH) 1200 UTC sounding showed an unstable airmass with CAPE (Convectively Available Potential Energy) of 1148 J/kg and a Storm Relative Helicity (SRH) of 408 m/s2. Another sounding at 1800 UTC showed CAPE had increased on a modified sounding to 1313 J/kg, with SRH increasing to 587 m/s2. A broken squall line developed from Indianapolis to Fort Wayne Indiana and Defiance Ohio with the cold front. A small low topped supercell developed ahead of the line over Blackford county Indiana and was moving northeast at 50 MPH. This parent supercell produced 3 seperate tornadoes in Indiana (see StormData, Indiana, Northeast for more information) before crossing into Ohio. There the supercell intensified and a tornado touched down in Van Wert County Ohio, reaching F4 in strength as it reached the city of Van Wert. The tornado then moved northeast with a total path length of 53 miles, producing F3 damage in Paulding and Putnam counties, and F0 damage in Defiance and Henry counties.
2002-11-10340°21'N / 83°33'W40°21'N / 83°33'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0030K0Logan
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down across the extreme eastern part of the county and moved northeast, continuing into Union County. Two semi trailers and a shed roof were damaged.
2002-11-10340°23'N / 83°32'W40°26'N / 83°27'W7.00 Miles300 Yards02500K0Union
 Brief Description: The tornado moved into the northwest part of the county from Logan County, tracking northeast across rural areas. Nine homes were damaged, four of which were completely destroyed. Half a dozen barn and sheds were destroyed. A 400-foot metal hi-tension cellular tower was toppled and destroyed and numerous cars were totalled. The worst damage occurred to a modular home along Newton-Perkins Road. Two individuals in the home were severely injured.
2002-11-10341°06'N / 83°10'W41°14'N / 82°54'W21.00 Miles100 Yards1212.8M0Seneca
 Brief Description: An F1 tornado touched down southwest of Tiffin near the Seneca County Airport. The tornado moved east northeast and strengthened to F3 intesity as it crossed U.S. Highway 224 and moved into Tiffin. The Honey Creek subdivision along County Road 19 near US 224 was hard hit. Six homes on Nantucket Drive in the subdivision were destroyed and many other homes damaged. As the tornado continued across the southern part of Tiffin it leveled a business along State Route 231 and destroyed several homes on Siesta Drive just east of State Route 231. A retirement community along St. Francis Avenue and just north of Siesta Drive was also hard hit by the tornado. Eight homes in the community were destroyed with five more damaged enough to be declared uninhabitable. Another 25 homes sustained lesser amounts of damage and several cars were found lying upside down. The tornado weakened to F2 intensity as it crossed State Route 100 and moved over Greenlawn Cemetary. From the cemetary, the tornado began to move in more of a northeasterly direction and briefly weakened to F1 intensity as it passed to the east of Heidelburg College. The tornado reintensified to F2 as it crossed State Route 18 and continued northeast across open country where it damaged many more homes and buildings. The tornado reached strong F3 intensity for several miles to the northwest and north of Republic. A 24 year old male was killed and two other people seriously injured when a home in Scipio Township on County Road 38 near County Road 43 was swept off of it's foundation. Two other homes nearby were also leveled. The tornado remained on the ground for another ten miles and gradually weakened to F2 intensity. It finally lifted south of State Route 18 near Fireside. Later, the same parent thunderstorm spawned another tornado a few miles away in Huron County. Overall, this tornado destroyed 32 homes and businesses, heavily damaged another eight and slightly damaged around 70 homes in Seneca County. Dozens of cars were also damaged and destroyed with downed trees and power poles numbering in the hundreds. The damage path from this tornado was roughly 21 miles in length and over 200 yards in width at times. M24PH
2010-06-05341°34'N / 83°25'W41°34'N / 83°22'W2.00 Miles200 Yards002.4M0KOttawa
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A strong tornado moved into western Ottawa County from Wood County during the late evening hours of June 5th. The tornado entered the county at 11:30 pm EDT as a weak EF3 or strong EF2 tornado. A couple homes on Trowbridge Road just east of the county line were heavily damaged. The tornado then continued east northeast to just north of the intersection of Billman and Trowbridge Roads where a few more homes were significantly damaged. After crossing Billman Road, the tornado took a turn to the right and intensified back to EF3. The tornado crossed Reiman Road just south of Trowbridge Road and finally lifted just before reaching Bolander Road. Around a dozen homes near the intersection of Trowbridge Road and Reiman Road were damaged. In Ottawa County, a total of 11 homes were destroyed with another 14 homes sustaining major damage from the tornado. Around 20 additional homes sustained lesser damages. This tornado was on the ground in Ottawa County for just over two and a quarter miles and had a maximum width of around 200 yards. Two injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary frontal system stretched across the lower Great Lakes on the morning of Saturday, June 5th. This resulted in a very warm and humid airmass over northern Ohio. Outflow boundaries from earlier storms interacted with the stationary front to initiate thunderstorm development during the afternoon hours across inland northern Ohio. One of the stronger thunderstorms produced tornadoes in Richland and Holmes Counties. There were also a few reports of straight line thunderstorm wind damage. A rapidly deepening area of low pressure moved quickly east across southern lower Michigan during the evening hours. This low eventually moved across Lake Erie during the early morning hours of the 6th. Showers and thunderstorms developed across northern Indiana during the evening hours. These storms intensified and moved east along the stationary front and into Northwest Ohio. A devastating EF4 tornado developed over Wood County a little before midnight. This tornado moved into Ottawa County before dissipating. Seven people were killed and dozens of homes destroyed by the tornado. A weaker tornado also moved across portions of Lucas County. A third round of storms developed during the early morning hours of the 6th ahead of a cold front trailing the low. These storms moved across northern Ohio and produced pockets of damage. An EF1 tornado occurred in Ashtabula County around daybreak. A total of five tornadoes occurred in northern Ohio on June 5th and 6th. These tornadoes killed seven people, injured dozens and destroyed or damaged over a 100 homes. A school and a public administration building were also leveled. Damage estimates easily topped $100 million.
2010-09-16339°09'N / 81°47'W39°08'N / 81°45'W3.00 Miles250 Yards061.5M0KMeigs
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A new rotating supercell formed south of thunderstorm complex that caused the tornado and strong downburst in western Athens County. A new tornado formed. Significant structural damage to farm buildings and a few homes occurred along Eden Ridge Road. This road is also County Route 50. The tornado path then went across State Route 124 between community of Reedsville and Eden along the Ohio River. A majority of the mobile homes affected were in this vicinity. In addition, a well built single family home and its detached commercial grade garage were completely destroyed. The foundations of both structures were wiped clean. The EF3 damage included this area along State Route 124. Maximum wind gusts of 150 mph were estimated. The county reported 22 structures destroyed or having major damage, including mostly mobile and single family homes. However, one car repair shop was also included. Another 20 homes were affected or had minor damage. Around a dozen outbuildings were damaged or destroyed. One male received rib and leg fractures when his truck was flipped over while he was in it. A woman was injured when she was pinned in rubble from her mobile home. In the dark, her barking dog helped first responders find her faster. A total of 6 people were injured, 2 seriously. This tornado crossed the Ohio River and killed a man immediately on the other side of the river in southern Wood County of West Virginia. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front, in tandem with strong mid and upper level forcing, produced a severe weather outbreak in southeast Ohio into extreme western West Virginia during the late afternoon and evening of Thursday the 16th. The setup featured a 45 knot mid level flow and a 95 knot upper level jet. Matter of fact, a larger area of showers, associated with a warm front, had moved across southeast Ohio and West Virginia during the morning and midday hours. This kept the surface based instability at a minimum. However, new cells formed further west during the mid afternoon over western Ohio. It was this new cluster of convection that would intensify due to the strong mid and upper level dynamics. Several of the new cells formed and intensified on the southern or southwestern flank of the overall larger area of showers and thunderstorms. This area of convection stretched further to the northeast into eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. This allowed an unimpeded low level moisture inflow into the new development. Surface dew points ahead of the cold front reached into the mid 60s. Most of the severe thunderstorms exhibited strong rotation, resulting in the spawning of 5 tornadoes. Four of these 5 tornadoes were in Ohio. One of the 4 Ohio tornadoes crossed from Fairfield County into western Perry County. Another 1 of the 4 crossed from Perry into northwestern Morgan County. One tornado patch was solely in western Athens County. The damage continued another 10 miles in Athens County from a strong rear flank downdraft. Finally, the last of the 4 tornadoes in Ohio crossed the Ohio River from northeastern Meigs County into southern Wood County in West Virginia. From storm surveys, this was the strongest tornado. The last tornado path in this outbreak was solely in western West Virginia. Luckily, there were no fatalities in southeastern Ohio. However, there was one death on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River.
1950-07-19240°48'N / 84°37'W40°49'N / 84°35'W000K0Van Wert
1951-04-28241°00'N / 83°40'W41°06'N / 83°24'W15.20 Miles33 Yards052.5M0Hancock
1951-06-22241°25'N / 81°51'W1.00 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Cuyahoga
1953-06-13239°44'N / 84°38'W0025K0Preble
1954-04-27240°13'N / 80°53'W1.00 Mile33 Yards01250K0Jefferson
1954-09-30240°45'N / 81°09'W1325K0Carroll
1955-03-11240°53'N / 80°50'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00250K0Columbiana
1955-03-11240°17'N / 81°37'W40°17'N / 81°32'W3.30 Miles200 Yards01250K0Tuscarawas
1956-02-25239°16'N / 84°49'W0.50 Mile100 Yards00250K0Hamilton
1956-02-25239°20'N / 84°34'W1.00 Mile500 Yards05250K0Butler
1956-02-25239°44'N / 83°48'W0.30 Mile30 Yards00250K0Greene
1956-03-07238°57'N / 83°04'W38°57'N / 83°01'W1.90 Miles440 Yards0025K0Pike
1956-07-08241°36'N / 80°57'W41°48'N / 80°34'W23.90 Miles880 Yards00250K0Ashtabula
1957-05-14240°48'N / 81°54'W03250K0Wayne
1957-06-11240°18'N / 82°42'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Knox
1957-07-04241°28'N / 84°34'W41°27'N / 84°30'W2.70 Miles33 Yards00250K0Williams
1958-05-22239°35'N / 82°58'W39°37'N / 82°48'W9.00 Miles30 Yards03250K0Pickaway
1958-06-13240°06'N / 83°50'W40°09'N / 83°45'W5.10 Miles33 Yards00250K0Champaign
1958-07-11239°06'N / 84°33'W39°05'N / 84°32'W000K0Hamilton
1958-07-22240°05'N / 82°25'W40°04'N / 82°15'W8.60 Miles200 Yards0025K0Licking
1958-07-22240°04'N / 82°15'W40°07'N / 82°01'W12.60 Miles33 Yards030K0Muskingum
1958-07-22240°14'N / 81°34'W40°20'N / 81°26'W9.50 Miles200 Yards0325K0Tuscarawas
1959-05-22239°54'N / 84°12'W003K0Miami
1959-10-06241°21'N / 81°13'W41°24'N / 81°01'W10.50 Miles100 Yards00250K0Geauga
1960-06-22239°06'N / 83°48'W0025K0Highland
1960-08-21240°30'N / 83°11'W40°30'N / 83°05'W4.50 Miles880 Yards0025K0Marion
1961-02-18241°06'N / 83°12'W1.50 Miles440 Yards00250K0Seneca
1961-04-25239°18'N / 84°00'W39°19'N / 83°50'W8.80 Miles50 Yards24250K0Clinton
1961-04-25239°19'N / 83°50'W39°22'N / 83°32'W16.20 Miles50 Yards00250K0Highland
1961-06-08240°11'N / 84°15'W00250K0Miami
1962-05-26239°18'N / 82°54'W0025K0Ross
1962-08-20241°24'N / 81°48'W0.50 Mile500 Yards4202.5M0Cuyahoga
1963-04-19239°49'N / 83°51'W00250K0Greene
1963-04-19241°05'N / 81°30'W002.5M0Summit
1963-04-19241°02'N / 80°52'W41°02'N / 80°34'W15.30 Miles33 Yards00250K0Mahoning
1963-04-19241°48'N / 81°00'W0025K0Ashtabula
1963-05-27240°07'N / 84°40'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Darke
1963-06-05239°46'N / 83°04'W0025K0Pickaway
1964-06-15240°59'N / 84°10'W41°02'N / 84°00'W8.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Putnam
1964-06-15240°52'N / 83°28'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Wyandot
1964-06-15240°56'N / 83°22'W07250K0Wyandot
1964-08-22241°42'N / 84°36'W0025K0Williams
1965-04-08239°08'N / 83°00'W1.00 Mile30 Yards09250K0Pike
1965-04-08239°11'N / 83°46'W39°11'N / 83°34'W10.50 Miles300 Yards00250K0Highland
1965-04-11240°22'N / 83°16'W40°23'N / 83°15'W0525K0Union
1965-04-11240°23'N / 83°15'W40°25'N / 83°01'W12.30 Miles400 Yards4352.5M0Delaware
1965-04-11240°25'N / 83°01'W40°28'N / 82°50'W9.90 Miles400 Yards0222.5M0Morrow
1965-08-25241°30'N / 84°24'W41°32'N / 84°13'W9.40 Miles880 Yards012.5M0Williams
1965-08-25240°42'N / 82°24'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Richland
1965-11-16241°00'N / 82°58'W41°04'N / 82°53'W5.90 Miles500 Yards00250K0Seneca
1965-11-16240°12'N / 83°36'W0.20 Mile33 Yards0425K0Champaign
1965-11-16240°48'N / 81°15'W40°50'N / 81°08'W5.90 Miles300 Yards292.5M0Stark
1965-11-16240°00'N / 81°46'W40°02'N / 81°42'W4.10 Miles50 Yards05250K0Muskingum
1965-11-27240°02'N / 82°27'W40°06'N / 82°22'W5.90 Miles300 Yards01250K0Licking
1966-10-09239°42'N / 84°02'W39°41'N / 83°56'W4.90 Miles100 Yards03250K0Greene
1967-03-13238°57'N / 81°54'W0025K0Meigs
1967-07-24241°36'N / 80°57'W41°45'N / 80°42'W16.40 Miles600 Yards02250K0Ashtabula
1967-07-24240°49'N / 80°41'W40°49'N / 80°33'W6.50 Miles277 Yards02250K0Columbiana
1968-04-23238°49'N / 82°52'W38°51'N / 82°47'W4.90 Miles100 Yards01250K0Scioto
1968-05-15240°48'N / 81°42'W1.00 Mile440 Yards0025K0Wayne
1968-06-25239°58'N / 81°45'W40°00'N / 81°43'W2.30 Miles177 Yards05250K0Muskingum
1968-06-25240°00'N / 81°43'W40°04'N / 81°38'W6.20 Miles177 Yards00250K0Guernsey
1969-07-04241°48'N / 81°15'W41°45'N / 81°07'W7.20 Miles100 Yards040250K0Lake
1970-04-02239°21'N / 83°30'W1.00 Mile200 Yards0025K0Highland
1970-04-02240°07'N / 82°55'W2.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0Franklin
1970-04-02240°24'N / 82°29'W2.00 Miles150 Yards01250K0Knox
1970-05-12241°26'N / 84°12'W41°14'N / 84°06'W14.40 Miles50 Yards0025K0Henry
1970-05-13240°33'N / 82°56'W053K0Morrow
1970-05-14240°17'N / 83°47'W3.00 Miles350 Yards00250K0Logan
1970-05-14240°30'N / 82°45'W40°32'N / 82°43'W3.00 Miles700 Yards07250K0Morrow
1970-07-15241°24'N / 81°51'W01250K0Cuyahoga
1970-09-26240°17'N / 81°41'W003K0Coshocton
1971-02-22239°37'N / 83°15'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Fayette
1971-05-06240°31'N / 83°12'W40°34'N / 83°04'W7.40 Miles150 Yards03250K0Marion
1971-05-16241°33'N / 83°38'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0025K0Wood
1971-05-16239°50'N / 82°48'W003K0Fairfield
1971-07-13240°08'N / 81°22'W2.00 Miles100 Yards05250K0Guernsey
1971-07-24239°33'N / 81°39'W1.00 Mile33 Yards00250K0Washington
1971-08-10241°18'N / 84°48'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Defiance
1972-08-17240°54'N / 82°30'W0.10 Mile30 Yards0025K0Richland
1972-08-17241°02'N / 82°37'W2.80 Miles183 Yards00250K0Huron
1973-05-08240°06'N / 83°07'W40°15'N / 82°51'W17.30 Miles67 Yards00250K0Franklin
1973-05-10240°46'N / 83°30'W40°42'N / 83°07'W20.40 Miles267 Yards0025K0Wyandot
1973-05-10241°02'N / 82°30'W40°57'N / 82°08'W19.70 Miles667 Yards06250K0Ashland
1973-05-10240°42'N / 83°07'W40°40'N / 82°51'W13.90 Miles267 Yards003K0Marion
1973-05-10240°57'N / 82°08'W40°57'N / 81°44'W20.70 Miles667 Yards02250K0Wayne
1973-05-10240°40'N / 82°51'W40°38'N / 82°31'W17.30 Miles267 Yards003K0Morrow
1973-05-10240°38'N / 82°31'W40°37'N / 82°23'W6.60 Miles267 Yards01425K0Richland
1973-05-10240°34'N / 82°01'W40°32'N / 81°54'W6.20 Miles17 Yards01250K0Holmes
1973-05-25240°03'N / 83°11'W00250K0Franklin
1973-05-30240°03'N / 83°07'W2.00 Miles17 Yards012.5M0Franklin
1973-08-14240°00'N / 82°00'W40°02'N / 81°46'W12.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Muskingum
1974-04-03239°50'N / 83°34'W39°56'N / 83°18'W15.70 Miles180 Yards00250K0Clark
1974-04-03239°23'N / 84°14'W39°31'N / 84°10'W9.80 Miles177 Yards092.5M0Warren
1974-04-03240°05'N / 82°51'W40°08'N / 82°46'W5.10 Miles90 Yards00250K0Franklin
1974-04-03241°02'N / 84°24'W41°07'N / 84°15'W9.20 Miles350 Yards00250K0Paulding
1975-04-02239°29'N / 84°07'W1.00 Mile50 Yards032.5M0Warren
1975-07-13241°10'N / 82°01'W41°12'N / 81°56'W4.10 Miles50 Yards00250K0Lorain
1975-08-13240°44'N / 82°47'W0.50 Mile20 Yards00250K0Crawford
1975-11-10240°54'N / 83°33'W0.30 Mile30 Yards00250K0Hancock
1976-02-16241°04'N / 80°50'W1.50 Miles600 Yards00250K0Mahoning
1976-07-31240°44'N / 81°50'W0025K0Wayne
1977-06-30241°18'N / 82°50'W0.70 Mile50 Yards00250K0Huron
1977-06-30240°53'N / 82°41'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00250K0Richland
1977-06-30240°55'N / 81°28'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0025K0Stark
1978-06-07241°09'N / 80°46'W41°10'N / 80°43'W002.5M0Trumbull
1978-06-07240°04'N / 81°38'W0.80 Mile100 Yards062.5M0Guernsey
1979-08-08240°31'N / 83°08'W1.20 Miles50 Yards00250K0Marion
1980-04-08239°32'N / 84°23'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0102.5M0Butler
1980-04-08239°59'N / 84°33'W1.00 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Darke
1980-04-08241°17'N / 83°29'W1.50 Miles100 Yards07250K0Wood
1980-04-08241°39'N / 83°28'W0.80 Mile127 Yards022.5M0Lucas
1980-07-05240°40'N / 82°51'W0.20 Mile33 Yards0125K0Morrow
1980-07-09241°01'N / 83°41'W0.20 Mile50 Yards003K0Hancock
1981-06-08240°17'N / 84°09'W40°18'N / 84°06'W1.30 Miles200 Yards02250K0Shelby
1981-06-08240°32'N / 82°25'W40°32'N / 82°20'W3.80 Miles50 Yards02250K0Knox
1981-06-08240°27'N / 81°55'W40°27'N / 81°52'W2.30 Miles500 Yards05250K0Holmes
1981-06-13240°04'N / 81°53'W40°05'N / 81°50'W2.30 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Muskingum
1981-06-13239°53'N / 82°19'W2.00 Miles250 Yards02250K0Perry
1981-07-28239°25'N / 81°18'W39°24'N / 81°18'W1.10 Miles50 Yards05250K0Washington
1982-03-31240°24'N / 82°29'W1.00 Mile200 Yards04250K0Knox
1982-04-03240°30'N / 82°33'W0.80 Mile50 Yards09250K0Knox
1982-06-16238°39'N / 83°14'W38°41'N / 83°12'W2.00 Miles30 Yards0025K0Scioto
1983-05-02241°14'N / 84°01'W41°17'N / 83°55'W5.00 Miles83 Yards002.5M0Henry
1983-05-02241°01'N / 82°36'W2.00 Miles50 Yards02250K0Huron
1985-03-28240°40'N / 82°35'W2.00 Miles77 Yards002.5M0Richland
1985-05-31241°41'N / 80°43'W41°44'N / 80°31'W9.00 Miles220 Yards0152.5M0Ashtabula
1985-05-31240°53'N / 80°51'W40°50'N / 80°35'W15.00 Miles220 Yards02025.0M0Columbiana
1985-06-22241°41'N / 81°03'W41°43'N / 81°01'W2.40 Miles40 Yards00250K0Geauga
1985-06-22241°43'N / 81°01'W41°48'N / 80°31'W27.00 Miles40 Yards02250K0Ashtabula
1986-03-10239°21'N / 84°23'W1.00 Mile200 Yards002.5M0Butler
1986-03-10239°27'N / 83°50'W39°31'N / 83°45'W6.00 Miles73 Yards0102.5M0Clinton
1986-03-10239°29'N / 83°34'W39°42'N / 83°17'W22.00 Miles100 Yards102.5M0Fayette
1986-03-10238°44'N / 83°50'W38°48'N / 83°45'W6.00 Miles143 Yards002.5M0Brown
1986-03-10241°03'N / 82°41'W41°10'N / 82°35'W8.00 Miles200 Yards1102.5M0Huron
1986-03-10239°43'N / 83°16'W39°43'N / 83°13'W3.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Madison
1986-03-10239°43'N / 83°12'W39°45'N / 83°13'W3.00 Miles100 Yards0102.5M0Pickaway
1986-03-10239°58'N / 81°50'W40°00'N / 81°44'W5.00 Miles100 Yards13250K0Muskingum
1986-07-12238°35'N / 84°33'W0.10 Mile73 Yards0025K0Preble
1986-07-12241°14'N / 84°21'W41°13'N / 84°19'W3.30 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Defiance
1986-08-26241°24'N / 82°11'W41°27'N / 82°10'W3.00 Miles440 Yards022.5M0Lorain
1987-06-27241°04'N / 80°39'W1.50 Miles40 Yards00250K0Mahoning
1989-04-25239°41'N / 83°56'W39°45'N / 83°51'W5.00 Miles123 Yards0162.5M0Greene
1989-11-15240°26'N / 82°56'W40°36'N / 82°37'W21.00 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Morrow
1989-11-15240°36'N / 82°37'W40°38'N / 82°36'W2.00 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Richland
1989-11-27241°05'N / 82°48'W41°16'N / 82°34'W15.00 Miles73 Yards012.5M0Huron
1990-05-04239°30'N / 84°23'W0.20 Mile150 Yards15250K0Butler
1990-06-02238°52'N / 84°11'W38°55'N / 84°09'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Clermont
1990-06-22240°36'N / 82°40'W40°35'N / 82°37'W3.00 Miles200 Yards012.5M0Morrow
1990-06-22240°35'N / 82°37'W40°41'N / 82°23'W19.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Richland
1990-09-14239°33'N / 84°03'W39°30'N / 83°59'W5.50 Miles200 Yards042.5M0Warren
1990-09-14239°30'N / 83°59'W39°29'N / 83°34'W22.50 Miles200 Yards022.5M0Clinton
1990-09-14239°29'N / 83°34'W39°32'N / 83°26'W7.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Fayette
1992-07-12241°32'N / 84°14'W2.00 Miles150 Yards082.5M0Fulton
1992-07-12241°31'N / 83°49'W41°31'N / 83°42'W5.00 Miles200 Yards012.5M0Lucas
1992-07-12241°31'N / 83°42'W41°31'N / 83°38'W2.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Wood
1992-07-12241°33'N / 83°38'W0.10 Mile150 Yards05250K0Wood
1992-07-12241°22'N / 83°40'W0.10 Mile100 Yards0525K0Wood
1992-07-12241°31'N / 83°22'W41°34'N / 83°10'W10.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Ottawa
1992-07-12240°41'N / 84°45'W40°44'N / 84°48'W3.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Mercer
1992-07-12241°27'N / 82°43'W2.00 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Erie
1992-07-12241°14'N / 82°07'W2.00 Miles200 Yards032.5M0Lorain
1992-07-12241°11'N / 82°21'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Huron
1992-07-12241°03'N / 81°13'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00250K0Portage
1992-07-13241°03'N / 83°19'W41°03'N / 82°59'W16.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Seneca
1997-07-02239°41'N / 83°49'W39°41'N / 83°49'W0.20 Mile300 Yards0050K0Greene
 Brief Description: A brief tornado developed in the apex of a bow echo that moved across the county. A house was blown off its foundation and moved 35 feet away. A low pressure system with an unusually strong mid and upper level jet streak was moving across the Great Lakes with an associated cold front moving across the upper Ohio valley. Thunderstorms developed across Indiana and moved into West-Central Ohio around mid-afternoon with a distinct bow echo causing wind damage from near to Lima to southeast of Columbus. On the southern edge of the first line of storms, a supercell developed over Central Indiana. This storm evolved into a bow echo and swept across the Dayton metro area causing extensive wind damage and a brief tornado in Greene county. Another supercell developed near Cincinnati and moved southeastward along the Ohio River. This storm produced the F3 tornado in Clermont county.
1998-06-24241°31'N / 82°57'W41°31'N / 82°57'W3.50 Miles100 Yards01320.0M5.0MOttawa
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down approximately 10 miles west of Port Clinton and just west of the Davis Bessie power plant. Winds were between 113 and 157 miles per hour. Considerable damage occurred, with some barns completely destroyed and an apartment complex heavily damaged. Sixty three homes were destroyed, 63 sustained major damage, 238 had minor damage, semi trucks and mobile homes were overturned and trees and utility poles were downed. Loss of power lines outside Davis Bessie triggered a shutdown and a second stage alert; power was out for several days in places. A state of emergency was declared and all roads were closed in the county. Many buildings were destroyed and trees were downed at Camp Perry. A tree containing an eagle's nest with 2 eaglets was blown down. One of the eaglets survived.
1998-06-27239°48'N / 81°23'W39°48'N / 81°23'W0.30 Mile200 Yards1175K0Noble
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado with estimated 150 MPH winds demolished a mobile home, killing a 45-year-old woman. Numerous trees along the relatively short path were sheared/downed. F45MH
1998-08-25240°14'N / 82°29'W40°10'N / 82°16'W10.00 Miles250 Yards00300K0Licking
 Brief Description: A tornado knocked down numerous trees, destroyed 2 barns, and caused significant damage to 4 homes.
1999-04-09239°21'N / 84°11'W39°23'N / 84°16'W1.50 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Warren
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down in eastern Hamilton Township causing heavy damage to a farmstead. The roof of the house and an extension to a barn were destroyed. Further down the path, a house was skewed from its foundation.
2000-05-23240°21'N / 81°05'W40°20'N / 81°04'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00100K0Harrison
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado with maximum winds estimated at 120 MPH passed through a 3-mile section of rural Harrison County. The tornado passed over only one residence as it moved to the east but destroyed several items on the property, including a cinder-block garage, a wooden barn, and several outbuildings. A parked truck was lifted and turned about 90 degrees but was otherwise undamaged. There were several large sections of heavily wooded area along the tornado's path which were completely cleared of trees. No injuries or fatalities were reported.
2000-05-23240°40'N / 82°54'W40°40'N / 82°54'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00200K0Marion
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down near Lyons Road approximately four miles west of the Town of Martel. The observed damage path was approximately three miles in length and was oriented west to east. The width of the path varied between 100 and 200 yards. Five homes were damaged and two mobile homes destroyed. One of the mobile homes was found wrapped around a large tree.
2000-06-15238°45'N / 82°24'W38°46'N / 82°21'W2.50 Miles150 Yards00100K0Gallia
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down near Burnette Road, then moved east across Hannan Trace Road, before dissipating east of Rocky Fork Road. In the vicinity of Hannan Trace Road, the tornado width was 150 yards and destroyed 3 barns. Wooden pieces of the barn, from 1 to 5 feet in length, became projectiles. The wood was scattered about the area, with some pieces wedged into the ground. The storm was rated as an F2 in this area. Elsewhere along its path, the tornado was weaker. Two homes received minor damage. Farm equipment and one truck were also damaged.
2000-09-20241°15'N / 82°42'W41°15'N / 82°42'W1.50 Miles100 Yards01250K15KHuron
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down north of Monroeville along State Route 99 near Mead Road. The tornado traveled east for 2.5 miles along State Route 113 and dissipated in Erie County near the corner of Higbee and Livengood Roads. The tornado was not on the ground the entire length and had a damage path approximately 100 yards in width. A mobile home, small outbuilding, barn, garage and a camper were destroyed in Huron County. An adult male inside the mobile home was slightly injured. The damage path of the tornado was clearly visible through corn fields and debris from the destroyed buildings was strewn along the path and in some case thrown well outside the path. Ears of corn were found shucked, apparently by the tornado. Several hundred trees were downed along the damage path.
2000-09-20241°18'N / 82°37'W41°18'N / 82°37'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00175K10KErie
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down north of Monroeville in Huron County and traveled east along State Route 113 into southern Erie County. The tornado dissipated near the corner of Higbee and Livengood Roads after destroying a farm house. The destroyed house was ripped from its foundation, moved 40 feet and knocked over. A second house and a small barn were also slightly damaged. The tornado traveled approximately one mile in Erie County and had a damage path about 100 yards wide. Debris from the homes was thrown well outside the damage path which was clearly visible through corn fields. Ears of corn were shucked, apparently by the tornado and some ears had many kernels removed. Several dozen trees were downed along the damage path.
2000-09-20240°08'N / 82°50'W40°11'N / 82°47'W5.00 Miles100 Yards021.0M0Delaware
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down in the southeastern part of the county, along Harlem road and then raced rapidly eastward to the Licking county line. Two high tension power line towers were bent over and 14 houses were either damaged or destroyed.
2000-09-20240°11'N / 82°44'W40°16'N / 82°29'W16.00 Miles100 Yards001.0M100KLicking
 Brief Description: A tornado tracked out of Delaware county across the northwestern part of the county and then continued into Knox county. The storm lifted briefly in spots but maintained a 25 mile track across the three counties, mainly in rural areas. Eleven homes received major damage and 4 received minor damage. Several barns and outbuildings were also destroyed. Twelve buildings at the Buckeye Egg Company were destroyed, trapping one million chickens inside.
2001-04-09241°02'N / 80°32'W41°02'N / 80°32'W4.00 Miles75 Yards00200K0Mahoning
 Brief Description: A weak F2 tornado touched down near Lowellville in eastern Mahoning County. The tornado had a intermittent damage path approximately four miles in length and 75 yards in width. Two homes, one business and two garages suffered significant damage with around a dozen other homes sustaining minor damage.
2001-05-21241°06'N / 82°01'W41°06'N / 82°01'W7.50 Miles80 Yards001.0M0Medina
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down along New London Eastern Road near Pawnee in southwestern Chatham Township. The tornado then traveled northeast for approximately 7.5 miles before dissipating along State Route 83 about three miles north of Chatham. The damage path was intermittent and approximately 250 feet in width. A new home was completely destroyed near the location of the initial touchdown. A truck nearby was thrown 500 feet by the tornado. A church and parsonage were damaged along Old Mill Road. The tornado then struck an alpaca farm along State Route 83 north of Chatham and destroyed three barns and damaged several other outbuildings. Several garages and a home were damaged elsewhere along the damage path. Over three hundred trees were knocked down and two cars destroyed.
2002-04-28240°51'N / 81°31'W40°52'N / 81°24'W7.20 Miles440 Yards0245.5M0Stark
 Brief Description: A strong F2 tornado touched down at 158 pm edt and caused major damage and two minor injuries along a path of just over seven miles. Major damage occurred along the path which was nearly a quarter mile in width at times. The initial touchdown occurred west of the intersection of Arlington Avenue and Windy Lane Street NW near Crystal Springs. From this location, the tornado moved east northeast through residential neighborhoods in Jackson Township. The tornado passed to the north of Lake Cable, crossed Interstate 77 near Portage Street and finally dissipated near a shopping district along State Route 297 in North Canton. The damage path was intermittent along part of its length. Over 300 homes were damaged along the damage path with 25 structures destroyed. An additional 38 buildings including three businesses were partially destroyed with 50 more structures sustaining significant roof damage. Another 197 homes and businesses suffered minor damage. A middle school building suffered extensive damage and was closed for nearly a week for repairs. A nearby high school was also damaged. Approximately 1000 trees were downed by the tornado and over 300 vehicles damaged.
2002-05-08238°52'N / 82°21'W38°53'N / 82°17'W3.00 Miles80 Yards033.5M0Gallia
 Brief Description: A warm frontal boundary interacted with a complex of showers and thunderstorms to form a tornado on the southern flank of the precipitation. Touchdown was along Adamsville Road near Route 35. The roof was ripped off a home, 2 mobile homes were destroyed, along with a pole barn. The tornado then struck both rest areas on Route 35. The rest building on the north side of the highway was severely damaged. At least 2 tractor trailers were flipped over, while others parked in the lot, were damaged. Another mobile home near the rest stop was destroyed. Proceeding just east to Dewey Road, the tornado wiped a modular home off its foundation. A trailer was destroyed at the corner of Kerr and Viney Roads. Down Kerr Road, a home had its roof removed and a mobile home was moved off its foundation. On Fairview Road, another mobile home was damaged. What was amazing and fortunate, in just about all the cases, no one was home when the tornado struck. Three people were injured at the rest stop.
2002-11-10241°07'N / 83°30'W41°07'N / 83°30'W3.50 Miles50 Yards0011.0M0Hancock
 Brief Description: An F1 tornado touched down to the northeast of Arcadia in northeastern Hancock County. The initial touchdown occurred just south of State Route 12 and to the east of County Road 330. From this location the tornado moved northeast and strengthened to F2 intensity as it entered the southwest end of Fostoria. Two businesses were heavily damaged on the outskirts of Fostoria along State Route 12. One of the two, a fertilizer business, had two of it's four buildings completely leveled and the remaining two heavily damaged. A nearby gas storage facility had two large storage tanks damaged. Nearby, the tornado derailed two railroad cars near the West Tiffin Street crossing and toppled 19 high voltage transmission poles interrupting power for a large area. Extensive damage was done to neighborhoods on the southwest side of Tiffin with Jeannette Drive, Vickie Lane and West Tiffin Streets hardest hit. As the tornado neared downtown Fostoria it tore the roof off of a high school which allowed rain water to enter the building and damage all three floors. Total damage to the school was estimated to be well over $500,000. Just east of the school, the community hospital was hit and sustained over $1 million in damage. The tornado lifted just east of the hospital and touched down a second time on the northeast side of Fostoria (Seneca County). In Fostoria, eight homes were destroyed with nine more homes damaged enough to be declared uninhabitable. An additional 60 to 70 homes sustained minor damage with dozens of cars damaged in varying amounts. Hundreds of trees and power poles were downed along the damage path which was around 50 yards in width.
2002-11-10241°31'N / 82°57'W41°35'N / 82°51'W10.00 Miles50 Yards0413.5M0Ottawa
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down south of Port Clinton and then moved northeast entering the city just west of the intersection of Wilcox Road and Fulton Road. The tornado moved through the heart of the city reaching Lake Erie at Lakeview Park. From there, the tornado moved northeast over Lake Erie to Catawba Island where it finally dissipated after a ten mile long damage path. Four people suffered minor injuries as a result of the tornado. Hardest hit was the Lakeview Park area where two condominiums were blown off their stilts into Lake Erie and many other structures where destroyed. The initial storm damage in Port Clinton occurred along 11th Street where several homes were heavily damaged or destroyed. Significant damage also occurred near 8th and Fulton Streets. As the tornado moved through the city, it damaged the local high school and a hospital. Significant damage also occurred on Catawba Island with several homes damaged and destroyed before the tornado finally dissipated. A total of 24 homes and 16 apartments were destroyed along the damage path with approximately 60 additional homes damaged enough to be deemed uninhabitable. Another 80 structures sustained minor to moderate amounts of damage. The damage path was typically no more than 50 yards in width. Dozens of vehicles were damaged or destroyed by the tornado and hundreds of trees and power poles were toppled.
2002-11-10240°57'N / 82°13'W40°57'N / 82°13'W5.50 Miles50 Yards001.6M0Ashland
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down two miles southwest of Polk near the intersection of County Road 601 and Township Road 902. A new home at this location was destroyed. The tornado then traveled northeast across the western and northern portions of Polk. Two homes on the west side of Polk were heavily damaged and a small barn was leveled just north of town. Another 10 to 12 buildings, including two public buildings sustained minor damage in Polk. From Polk, the tornado traveled northeast across rural areas and passed just to the west of Albion. Two homes along County Road 620 just west of Township Road 521 lost entire roofs and had exterior walls partially or entirely knocked down. A nearby barn was leveled with debris thrown as much as one half mile. A small boat tethered in a pond near the barn was found a quarter mile away and the pond itself was filled with debris. A church in the area had it's steeple toppled. The tornado continued northeast and damaged several more homes and buildings. The tornado moved into Medina County just east of County Road 175. In the county, a total of five homes were either completely destroyed or declared unlivable with another 11 homes sustaining enough damage to require significant repairs. Approximately 30 additional homes and buildings suffered minor damage. A few dozen cars sustained varying amounts of damage. The tornado was on the ground in Ashland County for approximately five and a half miles with the damage path no more than 50 yards in width.
2002-11-10241°02'N / 82°08'W41°02'N / 82°08'W4.00 Miles50 Yards00750K0Medina
 Brief Description: A tornado moved into the county from Ashland County just to the east of Firestone Road. The tornado then traveled northeast through Homerville and finally dissipated about a mile and a half northeast of the town. The first significant damage in the county occurred along Williams Road where a newer two story home lost it's roof and most of the second floor. Several other homes and buildings in this area sustained minor damage. In Homerville, an auto repair shop was destroyed and several homes sustained moderate to minor damage. A barn was destroyed just southwest of town. Many cars were damaged and dozens of trees downed. The tornado was on the ground in Medina County for approximately four miles and had a damage path no more than 50 yards in width.
2002-11-10240°58'N / 82°06'W40°59'N / 82°00'W5.00 Miles100 Yards001K0Wayne
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down about four miles south of West Salem just east of State Route 301 along Pleasant Home Road. The tornado then traveled northeast for approximately five miles before dissipating two and one half miles southwest of Burbank near the intersection of Britton and Franchester Roads. Extensive damage was done along the damage path which was mostly around 50 yards in width but up to several hundred feet wide along Palmer Road. A home on Pleasant Home Road was heavily damaged as were three other homes on Easton Road to the west of Wohlganuth Road. Two more homes were severely damaged on Wohlganuth Road. A home and six outbuildings were destroyed as the tornado crossed Palmer Road about a mile east of State Route 539 (Wohlganuth Road). A second home was leveled on Ruff Road just to the west of Stratton Road. Finally, a home was heavily damaged near where the tornado dissipated. Several other homes and buildings sustained minor damage. Many vehicles were also damaged. At least 20 power poles were snapped and several hundred trees downed along the damage path.
2002-11-10241°19'N / 81°30'W41°19'N / 81°26'W3.30 Miles100 Yards0010.2M0Summit
 Brief Description: A small F0/F1 tornado touched down in Macedonia near the intersection of Valley View Drive (SR 631) and Aurora Road and moved northeast. The tornado gradually strengthened and reached F2 intensity as it crossed State Route 14 and moved into Twinsburg. After a track of just over three miles the tornado weakened to F1 intensity and crossed into Cuyahoga County south of Glenwillow. Extensive damage was done in Macedonia and Twinsburg. In Macedonia, 60 homes were damaged including two that were destroyed and 15 others were damaged enough to be declared uninhabitable. The most severe damage in the county occurred in the Glenwood Preserve neighborhood on the north side of Twinsburg. Extensive damage was done on Andover Drive and Deeplake Circle where several homes were leveled and a total of 45 homes damaged. Damage estimates in Twinsburg alone were well over $5 million. The damage path was continuous and about 100 yards in width. Dozens of cars were damaged or destroyed and hundreds of trees and power poles downed in Summit County.
2003-11-12240°48'N / 81°56'W40°48'N / 81°56'W12.00 Miles125 Yards0321.0M0Wayne
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down southwest of Wooster near the intersection of U.S. Route 250 and Old Lincoln Highway (County Road 30A). Several businesses were heavily damaged near the site of the initial touchdown. The tornado then crossed State Route 302 and moved over open farmland and into a business park on the southwest side of Wooster. Several more business were damaged in this area. The tornado continued east through residential neighborhoods just north of downtown Wooster. The tornado exited the city near the intersection of State Routes 3/83 and 585. A factory near this location was heavily damaged. The tornado continued east into Green Township and strengthened to F2 intensity at it crossed Geyers Road. Two more businesses were heavily damaged in this area. The tornado weakened to F1 intensity just after severely damaging a home on Canal Road near Eby Road. The tornado continued across open farmland for another four miles before finally lifting just southwest of Orrville near the intersection of Back Orrville Road and North Crown Hill Road. The damage path was around 12 miles in length and up to 125 yards in width. Around 15 businesses and over 100 homes were damaged by this tornado. Ten semi trailers were overturned at one factory and over 30 cars heavily damaged at an automobile dealership. Many other automobiles were damaged along the damage path. In addition, hundreds of trees and dozens of power poles were downed.
2003-11-12240°27'N / 81°31'W40°30'N / 81°27'W3.50 Miles175 Yards01160K0Tuscarawas
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado touched down near May Rd just off Route 52 southwest of New Philadelphia. It moved east northeast at 45 mph, damaging several homes along Crooked Run Rd. Several homes had significant damage with roofs taken completely off; some walls were toppled. Several garages and barns suffered significant damage. Few garages completely destroyed. A least one mobile home was knocked off its foundation.Many trees and power lines were downed. Tornado went across Interstate 77 and into New Philadelphia, where 12 homes had scattered damage. Crooked Run Rd had the most significant damage. Path length 3.5 miles; path width 175 yards; maximum winds estimated 120 mph.
2006-03-31240°45'N / 84°37'W40°46'N / 84°35'W2.00 Miles300 Yards001.0M0Van Wert
 Brief Description: The tornado was likely produced as the result of a line of thunderstorms overtaking an isolated supercell thunderstorm ahead of the line. The circulation which produced the tornado intensified shortly after the merger of the line and isolated supercell. The tornado developed near the intersection of Burris Road and Walnut Grove Church Road about 1 mile south of Ohio City. The tornado tracked to the east-northeast for roughly 2 miles before dissipating near Greenville Rd about 2 miles east of Ohio City. Damage along the first half of the tornado track was consistent with F2 intensity, with winds estimated at 140-150 mph and an initial path width of about 300 yards. In this area, 3 barns were completely destroyed, with another 5 sustaining damage. A garage was destroyed, and several houses received damage including roof, siding, and windows. Several grain bins were also damaged, along with other miscellaneous vehicle and property damage, including several tractors, a combine and other farm implements. Damage along the second half of the tornado track was consistent with F1 intensity, with the path width narrowing to about 25 yards. Several buildings sustained roof, siding, and window damage, with several instances of trailer and vehicle damage.
2006-06-22240°37'N / 81°47'W40°37'N / 81°42'W6.00 Miles100 Yards00750K0Holmes
 Brief Description: During the late afternoon hours of June 22nd, a severe thunderstorm moved across eastern Holmes County and produced a tornado. This tornado touched down at 5:30 pm just west of Mt Hope and tracked east through Winesburg and then exited the county. The tornado had a damage path in Holmes County roughly six miles in length and 50 to 100 yards in width. The majority of the damage was classified as F1, but there were several areas of F2 damage evident. Along the path, numerous structures were damaged and hundreds of trees toppled or snapped. A barn was heavily damaged near where the tornado first touched down. Two houses nearby sustained siding and roof damage. A home on State Route 241 just outside of Mt. Hope was destroyed and several buildings at a factory in Mt. Hope sustained major damage. Metal roofs were torn off of these factory buildings with debris found as far as a mile away. Wooden beams from the buildings were thrown and pierced metal garage doors. Empty box trailers were overturned and one box trailer was even torn from its frame. The tornado continued east from Mt Hope and damaged several more homes on it's way to Winesburg. One house had it's second floor torn off. A second factory near Winesburg lost large sections of roof. In Winesburg, a few homes sustained roof damage. The tornado continued into Tuscarawas County and caused damage there. Later, the same parent thunderstorm produced another tornado west of Waynesburg in southeastern Stark County.
2006-10-11239°48'N / 83°06'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0060K0KPickaway
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado briefly touched down in extreme northwest Pickaway County. The damage path extended along a short length of Carson Road, just west of Interstate 71. A barn made of wood and cinder blocks was completely destroyed, with the cinder blocks being carried 200 to 300 yards away. Several pieces of wood were strewn onto neighboring properties, with some pieces impaled into the ground or asphalt. A few homes had significant roof damage and windows blown out. Large trees were snapped or uprooted along the damage path. The damage was mainly F1, with some isolated pockets of low end F2 damage up to 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A squall line moved through central Ohio during the evening. Two tornadoes occurred in the Columbus metro area as the squall line moved through.
2006-10-11240°05'N / 82°47'W40°05'N / 82°47'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0050.0M0KFranklin
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down and moved through the Upper Albany West subdivision. Sixty-seven homes were damaged, sixteen of those severely and an additional eight completely destroyed. Many of the homes sustained significant roof, siding and window damage. Much of the damage was F1, with some low end F2 damage to around 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A squall line moved through central Ohio during the evening. Two tornadoes occurred in the Columbus metro area as the squall line moved through.
2008-05-31241°05'N / 83°31'W41°08'N / 83°25'W6.00 Miles100 Yards061.0M0KHancock
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down in northeastern Hancock County about two miles southwest of Arcadia near the intersection of Township Roads 214 and 254. The tornado continued northeast for about six miles before moving into Seneca County on the south end of Fostoria. The total tornado path length was over eight miles. The track was parallel to State Route 12 and about a mile to the south of the road. The tornado was initially an EF1 but strengthened to EF2 intensity after crossing County Road 330. The tornado returned to EF1 intensity just before reaching County Road 23 on the southwest edge of Fostoria. The damage path had a maximum width of around 100 yards. Around a dozen properties sustained damage from this tornado. At least two homes were destroyed with several others heavily damaged. Many outbuildings were also damaged. Hundreds of trees were toppled along the damage path. At least six people were treated at a Fostoria hospital for cuts and bruises. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front trailing an area of low pressure over the central Great Lakes moved into western Ohio during the late evening hours of May 30th. Showers and thunderstorms developed in advance of this front and moved across northern Ohio during the early morning hours of May 31st. A few of these thunderstorms became severe with one producing a tornado.
2010-06-05241°29'N / 84°00'W41°31'N / 83°52'W7.00 Miles700 Yards00500K0KFulton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down along Highway 109 just north of County Road A and moved northeast, impacting several homes, trees and power lines. Several homes were severely damaged or destroyed (DI:FR12 DOD: 8). However, improper anchoring of some of the homes resulted in a failure on all walls, resulting in their destruction. Several trees were uprooted or damaged, including through the Maumee State Forest. The tornado ended near the Fulton/Lucas county line. The maximum width of the tornado was around 700 yards with maximum wind speeds estimated around 130 mph. Damage is estimated at $500,000. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front worked north towards lower Michigan during the evening hours of the 5th. Storms were initially slow to organize, but quickly intensified and became supercellular. One of these storms tracked into Fulton county and quickly spawned a tornado north of Liberty Center. The tornado remained on the ground for roughly 7 miles producing damage along its track before dissipating near the Fulton/Lucas county line.
2010-09-16240°46'N / 81°57'W40°48'N / 81°45'W11.00 Miles150 Yards0035.0M0KWayne
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down in Wayne County two miles southwest of downtown Wooster around 5:26 pm. This tornado strengthened to EF2 intensity and continued on the ground for over 11 miles before finally lifting two miles west of Dalton. Extensive damage occurred along the damage path with dozens of homes and buildings damaged. After the initial touchdown, the tornado quickly intensified to an EF2 as it continued on the ground to the east northeast. The tornado crossed Prairie Lane and Timken Road and then moved across St. Mary's Cemetery. Damage at the cemetery was extensive with 80 of 81 large trees knocked down and over two hundred gravestones broken or toppled. From the cemetery, the tornado crossed Madison Avenue and moved across the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). Significant damage occurred on the OADRC campus with several buildings severely damaged. A laboratory in one the buildings was destroyed. Two historic homes on the property sustained significant roof damage and several greenhouses were destroyed. Two barns and a machine shop were also leveled. The 102 year old Secrest Arboretum on the campus lost over 800 trees and many research projects were damaged or destroyed. The tornado tossed and destroyed several vehicles and a lot of farm machinery was also damaged or destroyed. From the OARDC campus, the tornado continued east along Secrest Road damaging or destroying several homes and buildings. The tornado weakened to EF1 intensity as it crossed Sylvan Road and to an EF0 as it crossed Barnard Road. The tornado then remained either an EF0 or EF1 until it lifted near the intersection of Kidron Road and Old Lincoln Way just west of Dalton. A total of nine homes were either destroyed or sustained major damage. Another 90 homes sustained lesser amounts of damage. In addition, at least 50 barns, garages and other outbuildings were damaged of destroyed. Thousands of trees were also toppled along the damage path which was up to 150 yards in width. Twenty eight utility poles were knocked down in Wooster alone and high tension transmission lines were also torn down by the tornado. The downed transmission lines affected four substations and resulted in around a third of Wayne County loosing power right after the tornado. The OARDC campus was closed for over a week and two local school districts had to close on September 17th because of the power outages. Only one very minor injury was reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: During the late morning hours on September 16th, a warm front lifted northward through Ohio allowing for a significant destabilization of the atmosphere. By early afternoon, a severe thunderstorm watch was issued for most of northern Ohio. Severe thunderstorms swept across Ohio ahead of a cold front beginning in the mid afternoon and lasting well into the evening. Two devastating tornadoes occurred in northern Ohio. An EF2 tornado touched down in Wayne County near Wooster. This tornado left an eleven and a half mile long damage path and damaged over a hundred homes and buildings. A second tornado touched down in southern Holmes County. This tornado was rated an EF1 and was on the ground for about three miles.
2010-09-16239°24'N / 82°15'W39°24'N / 82°11'W3.00 Miles300 Yards07750K0KAthens
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touchdown was along Kimberly Road, about 4 miles from Nelsonville. The tornado reached maximum intensity along Matheny Road to State Route 691. Matheny Road is also called York Township Road 269. Damage was concentrated along Matheny Road and State Route 691. The low level circulation was evident in the damage along Matheny Road. Debris was strewn one way on the south side of the road, then in the opposite direction on the north side. One resident said, you could see stuff flying through the air. Then the noise got real loud and we ran into the house and into a closet. The house was just shaking. Several mobile homes were completely destroyed. Yet, some of these mobile homes were poorly anchored or not anchored at all. Many large softwood trees were uprooted or snapped at their trunks. Reports were received of several cows being lifted by the tornado. A hay bale weighing 1800 pounds was lofted into the air and set back down. The maximum wind gusts were estimated at 120 to 130 mph. A total of 7 people were injured. About 13 homes were destroyed, with dozens of other homes damaged. Since 1950, this is only the second confirmed tornado in Athens County. The previous tornado was a F1 during May of 1980. However, prior to 1950, 3 tornadoes have been reported in Athens County, back in July of 1896, April of 1922, and June of 1937. The June 1937 tornado killed 3. The storm in 1896 was reported in Glouster. However, historical accounts also describe a tornado in the late 1800s that destroyed a large grove of sycamore trees in the city of Athens. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front, in tandem with strong mid and upper level forcing, produced a severe weather outbreak in southeast Ohio into extreme western West Virginia during the late afternoon and evening of Thursday the 16th. The setup featured a 45 knot mid level flow and a 95 knot upper level jet. Matter of fact, a larger area of showers, associated with a warm front, had moved across southeast Ohio and West Virginia during the morning and midday hours. This kept the surface based instability at a minimum. However, new cells formed further west during the mid afternoon over western Ohio. It was this new cluster of convection that would intensify due to the strong mid and upper level dynamics. Several of the new cells formed and intensified on the southern or southwestern flank of the overall larger area of showers and thunderstorms. This area of convection stretched further to the northeast into eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. This allowed an unimpeded low level moisture inflow into the new development. Surface dew points ahead of the cold front reached into the mid 60s. Most of the severe thunderstorms exhibited strong rotation, resulting in the spawning of 5 tornadoes. Four of these 5 tornadoes were in Ohio. One of the 4 Ohio tornadoes crossed from Fairfield County into western Perry County. Another 1 of the 4 crossed from Perry into northwestern Morgan County. One tornado patch was solely in western Athens County. The damage continued another 10 miles in Athens County from a strong rear flank downdraft. Finally, the last of the 4 tornadoes in Ohio crossed the Ohio River from northeastern Meigs County into southern Wood County in West Virginia. From storm surveys, this was the strongest tornado. The last tornado path in this outbreak was solely in western West Virginia. Luckily, there were no fatalities in southeastern Ohio. However, there was one death on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River.
2010-09-16239°45'N / 82°24'W39°45'N / 82°16'W7.00 Miles800 Yards01500K0KPerry
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado originiated in Fairfield County, but got stronger in western Perry County. The damage path widened as it crossed several north to south oriented roads. A convergent damage pattern was evident. Large trees were snapped along Avalon Road. A greater swath of tree and structural damage was along Otterbein Road. The damage path widened to as much as 800 yards, though the southern portion of the path was dominant. The tornado unleashed it worst winds as it continued east to encounter Palomino Road and County Township Road 138. At this stage, there was aproximately a 1 mile long and 100 yard wide path of EF2 strength winds, estimated at 110 to 120 mph. A manufactured home on Palomino Road was missing 95 percent of it roof covering and 40 to 50 percent of the roof supports and interior ceilings were missing. The woman inside was injured when a hallway door struck her in the back. There were at least 2 eyewitnesses to the actual tornado. Almost a mile east on County Township Road 138 a cluster of houses was heavily damaged. The worst damage was a newer 2 story single family home, but seemed to be of the manufactured home quality. Its roof and garage were completely blown off and thrown away. The tornado began to weaken as it headed across County Road 25. The tornado further weakened during its final 1.5 miles, ending near the intersection of County Roads 122, 123, and 134. About 8 homes were destroyed in this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A cold front, in tandem with strong mid and upper level forcing, produced a severe weather outbreak in southeast Ohio into extreme western West Virginia during the late afternoon and evening of Thursday the 16th. The setup featured a 45 knot mid level flow and a 95 knot upper level jet. Matter of fact, a larger area of showers, associated with a warm front, had moved across southeast Ohio and West Virginia during the morning and midday hours. This kept the surface based instability at a minimum. However, new cells formed further west during the mid afternoon over western Ohio. It was this new cluster of convection that would intensify due to the strong mid and upper level dynamics. Several of the new cells formed and intensified on the southern or southwestern flank of the overall larger area of showers and thunderstorms. This area of convection stretched further to the northeast into eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. This allowed an unimpeded low level moisture inflow into the new development. Surface dew points ahead of the cold front reached into the mid 60s. Most of the severe thunderstorms exhibited strong rotation, resulting in the spawning of 5 tornadoes. Four of these 5 tornadoes were in Ohio. One of the 4 Ohio tornadoes crossed from Fairfield County into western Perry County. Another 1 of the 4 crossed from Perry into northwestern Morgan County. One tornado patch was solely in western Athens County. The damage continued another 10 miles in Athens County from a strong rear flank downdraft. Finally, the last of the 4 tornadoes in Ohio crossed the Ohio River from northeastern Meigs County into southern Wood County in West Virginia. From storm surveys, this was the strongest tornado. The last tornado path in this outbreak was solely in western West Virginia. Luckily, there were no fatalities in southeastern Ohio. However, there was one death on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River.
2010-10-26240°37'N / 84°10'W40°39'N / 84°07'W3.00 Miles110 Yards00230K0KAuglaize
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down in Auglaize County at 1059 EST and continued into Allen County at 1102 EST before lifting at 1103 EST. The path width was 110 yards in Auglaize County and 20 yards in Allen County. The tornado traveled for 2.53 miles in Auglaize County and then 1.39 miles in Allen County. The damage was consistent with winds around 110 miles per hour in Auglaize County and 75 miles per hour in Allen County. The tornado was rated an EF2 in Auglaize County and an EF0 in Allen County. The tornado initially touched down southwest of Cridersville where the tornado destroyed a barn. The tornado briefly lifted and then touched down in Cridersville. Damage in Cridersville included roofs blown off of houses, a house shifted off of the foundation, a house with major structural damage, and a half collapsed brick gymnasium. Objects were also impaled into the side of buildings. The tornado again briefly lifted and then touched down again in Allen County near McClain Road, north of Hume Road. At this location a quarter of a metal roof was pulled off of a metal barn. Damage estimates in Auglaize County are 230,000 dollars and in Allen County damage estimates are 8,000 dollars. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A historically deep low pressure system sent a very strong cold front into a marginally unstable, but very sheared environment. A line of storms formed west of the area overnight and moved into the region during the peak heating hours of the day. Severe wind gusts occurred along the entire line with multiple tornadoes occurring around the region as well.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
The USA.com website and domain are privately owned and are not operated by or affiliated with any government or municipal authority.
© 2017 World Media Group, LLC.