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Georgia Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Georgia is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Georgia is higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #37

Georgia
0.08
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #14

Georgia
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #14

Georgia
179.92
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 21,652 other weather extremes events from 1950 to 2010 were recorded in Georgia. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:3Cold:28Dense Fog:6Drought:86
Dust Storm:0Flood:1,065Hail:6,512Heat:63Heavy Snow:106
High Surf:6Hurricane:6Ice Storm:33Landslide:2Strong Wind:239
Thunderstorm Winds:11,614Tropical Storm:48Wildfire:53Winter Storm:31Winter Weather:137
Other:1,614 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Georgia.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 5 historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in Georgia.

DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
1964-02-184.41534.8-85.5
1964-03-134.44033.2-83.4
1984-10-094.21234.75-85.2
1976-12-273.7532.22-82.46
1983-01-263.5532.73-83.38

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 444 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in Georgia.

DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
1953-04-30432°36'N / 83°36'W1.00 Mile333 Yards1830025.0M0Houston
1974-04-03434°30'N / 85°03'W34°34'N / 84°58'W6.60 Miles150 Yards6252.5M0Gordon
1974-04-03434°34'N / 84°58'W34°36'N / 84°56'W3.30 Miles150 Yards2252.5M0Whitfield
1974-04-03434°36'N / 84°56'W34°46'N / 84°46'W14.90 Miles150 Yards0152.5M0Murray
1974-04-03434°46'N / 84°46'W34°48'N / 84°42'W4.70 Miles200 Yards12250K0Murray
1974-04-03434°22'N / 84°20'W34°27'N / 84°15'W7.60 Miles200 Yards1172.5M0Pickens
1974-04-03434°27'N / 84°15'W34°30'N / 84°09'W6.80 Miles200 Yards5132.5M0Dawson
1974-04-03434°30'N / 84°09'W34°32'N / 84°07'W3.30 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Lumpkin
1974-04-03434°57'N / 84°18'W34°58'N / 84°13'W5.10 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Fannin
1992-11-22433°55'N / 84°40'W34°05'N / 84°31'W13.00 Miles867 Yards03425.0M0Cobb
1992-11-22434°05'N / 84°31'W34°10'N / 84°26'W7.00 Miles867 Yards0122.5M0Cherokee
1992-11-22433°11'N / 83°27'W33°25'N / 83°12'W20.00 Miles867 Yards45525.0M0Putnam
1992-11-22433°25'N / 83°12'W33°28'N / 83°02'W12.00 Miles867 Yards1312.5M0Greene
2008-05-11431°24'N / 81°27'W31°24'N / 81°18'W11.00 Miles700 Yards0912.5M0KMcintosh
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey team from the National Weather Service Office in Charleston, South Carolina along with other damage survey experts from across the country determined that the Tornado that struck McIntosh county Georgia on Sunday morning May 11, was a violent EF-4. The Tornado beginning and end times are based on radar data combined with credible ground truth reports. The Tornado formed at 952 am, approximately 3 miles northwest of Darien, Georgia and tracked east about 11 miles before dissipating at 1007 am as a water spout in Doboy Sound. The Tornado formed in a wooded area about a half mile west of Route 251 where numerous trees were snapped off. The Tornado strengthened rapidly as it approached and moved across Route 251. The Tornado struck a Marine Sales and Services Business located on the east side of Route 251. The bolts for all but one of the anchored metal support beams for the metal building were snapped off just above the concrete slab. With the exception of the one metal support beam that was bent to the ground, the slab was wiped clean. Approximately 50 boats were tossed around and destroyed, with one 18 foot 4000 pound boast carried about 650 yards into some trees. A 32 foot 8000 pound boat was carried about 130 yards onto the top of the Gateway Behavioral Services Building. A vehicle that was parked in the parking lot was carried in the air 150 yards. One 125 horsepower boat motor weighing 300 to 350 pounds was carried 250 yards and deposited into the roof of a building. In addition, one of the boats had yet to be accounted for at the time the survey was conducted. Several other vehicles near the business were rolled or tossed and severely damaged or destroyed. No one was in the building at the time the Tornado struck and damage to the building and all the boats were estimated to be 5 million dollars. Approximately 100 yards to the south-southeast of the Marine Sales and Services Building, the McIntosh Emergency Medical Services Building was destroyed by the Tornado with damage to three ambulances and one fire truck. Many of the metal support beams from this facility were torn from the concrete slab or snapped off. This building was rated for 120 mph winds. No one was in this building at the time of the Tornado because they were out on a non weather related call. The Gateway Behavioral Health and Services Building was totally destroyed. This metal framed building with brick exterior was located about 100 yards east-northeast of the McIntosh Emergency Medical Services Building and 130 yards east-southeast of the Marine Sales and Services Building. The roof of the Gateway Building collapsed along with many of the outer brick walls. Many of the large load bearing metal beams were bent or knocked down. Portions of the metal roof were carried a mile away onto Interstate 95. Some of the roofing material was found 11 miles away on Sapelo Island. Of the 12 people that were in the building when the Tornado hit, 9 were injured sustaining broken bones and or lacerations. Six vehicles around this building were damaged or destroyed and a metal light pole and several trees were snapped off in this area. Two other businesses in this area suffered damage including damage to satellite dishes and two overturned tractor trailers. Damage to the Marine Sales and Services Business and the Gateway Behavioral Health and Services Building indicated that EF-4 damage had occurred with winds estimated to be between 170 and 180 mph. After leaving this area the Tornado traveled east and weakened. The Tornado reached its maximum width of 700 yards as it crossed Interstate 95, and then decreased in size and was mainly from 200 to 500 yards wide during the remainder of the path. The Tornado damaged or destroyed four billboards along Interstate 95, produced mainly minor roof damage to several dozen homes mainly in the Ridgeville area, snapped off or uprooted thousands of trees, some of them falling on homes or vehicles, and damaged or destroyed numerous outbuildings. A resident of Ridgeville, Georgia whose home suffered minor damage in the Tornado, took shelter in a closet after seeing a National Weather Service Severe Weather Statement on the television mentioning that Ridgeville was in the path of the Tornado. The Tornado also damaged the Blue-N-Hall Marina and Fishing Dock. In this area, a large boat hoist along with 18 boats and several boat trailers were damaged or destroyed. Several power poles were also snapped off and several vehicles were damaged. Numerous trees were also snapped off on Hird Island. The Tornado likely dissipated over Doboy Sound as a waterspout. Besides portions of the Gateway roof, lots of other debris including signs were deposited on Sapelo Island. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front lifted northward through southern South Carolina and southeast Georgia during the morning, with a strong cold front then sweeping through the area during the evening. This resulted in several rounds of severe weather across the region.
1952-03-03332°48'N / 83°41'W32°47'N / 83°37'W4.30 Miles400 Yards04250K0Bibb
1952-05-11331°22'N / 83°15'W31°24'N / 83°12'W4.30 Miles200 Yards0102.5M0Berrien
1953-04-18332°30'N / 85°00'W32°29'N / 84°55'W5.10 Miles400 Yards230025.0M0Muscogee
1953-04-30332°42'N / 83°21'W2.00 Miles10 Yards12250K0Twiggs
1954-03-13332°21'N / 85°01'W32°22'N / 84°56'W5.10 Miles600 Yards22025.0M0Chattahoochee
1954-03-13332°32'N / 84°22'W32°40'N / 84°06'W18.10 Miles300 Yards0102.5M0Taylor
1954-03-13332°40'N / 84°06'W32°47'N / 83°52'W15.90 Miles300 Yards0152.5M0Crawford
1954-03-13332°47'N / 83°52'W32°52'N / 83°37'W15.50 Miles300 Yards5502.5M0Bibb
1954-12-05332°40'N / 85°05'W32°52'N / 84°43'W24.80 Miles200 Yards01250K0Harris
1954-12-05332°52'N / 84°43'W32°52'N / 84°36'W6.80 Miles100 Yards02250K0Meriwether
1957-04-08331°51'N / 83°05'W31°51'N / 82°50'W14.70 Miles400 Yards1325K0Telfair
1961-03-31332°15'N / 83°44'W1.00 Mile100 Yards1142.5M0Dooly
1961-03-31332°27'N / 84°59'W32°31'N / 84°56'W5.20 Miles33 Yards0025K0Muscogee
1962-03-21334°10'N / 84°25'W10.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Cherokee
1964-04-28333°44'N / 85°20'W33°44'N / 85°09'W10.60 Miles33 Yards0225K0Haralson
1964-12-24333°30'N / 84°55'W33°15'N / 84°25'W33.60 Miles400 Yards00250K0Troup
1964-12-24333°15'N / 84°25'W33°21'N / 84°20'W8.40 Miles400 Yards00250K0Troup
1964-12-24333°21'N / 84°20'W33°25'N / 84°16'W6.20 Miles400 Yards00250K0Henry
1964-12-24333°25'N / 84°16'W33°30'N / 84°07'W10.40 Miles400 Yards01250K0Henry
1964-12-24333°30'N / 84°07'W33°31'N / 84°03'W4.10 Miles400 Yards00250K0Henry
1964-12-24333°31'N / 84°03'W33°29'N / 83°50'W12.70 Miles400 Yards00250K0Newton
1964-12-25333°02'N / 83°23'W33°08'N / 83°06'W17.80 Miles600 Yards002.5M0Baldwin
1964-12-25332°43'N / 84°00'W32°54'N / 83°40'W23.10 Miles600 Yards002.5M0Crawford
1964-12-26332°54'N / 83°40'W33°02'N / 83°23'W18.90 Miles600 Yards2162.5M0Jones
1968-11-11331°21'N / 83°56'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Worth
1968-11-18331°10'N / 82°18'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Ware
1968-12-28330°45'N / 84°38'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0025K0Decatur
1970-04-02333°20'N / 84°48'W0.30 Mile100 Yards0025K0Coweta
1970-04-02334°14'N / 84°11'W34°19'N / 84°08'W6.50 Miles50 Yards0025K0Forsyth
1971-04-23331°48'N / 84°36'W31°55'N / 84°29'W10.60 Miles500 Yards01250K0Paulding
1971-04-23331°46'N / 84°38'W31°48'N / 84°36'W3.30 Miles500 Yards00250K0Randolph
1971-04-23332°01'N / 83°58'W32°02'N / 83°48'W9.90 Miles150 Yards00250K0Dooly
1971-04-23332°01'N / 84°00'W32°01'N / 83°57'W3.60 Miles150 Yards08250K0Sumter
1972-01-10333°40'N / 84°24'W33°41'N / 84°21'W3.00 Miles200 Yards19250K0Fulton
1972-01-10333°41'N / 84°21'W33°42'N / 84°18'W3.30 Miles200 Yards00250K0De Kalb
1972-01-13332°52'N / 82°23'W32°55'N / 82°15'W8.60 Miles400 Yards022.5M0Jefferson
1972-01-13332°55'N / 82°15'W33°05'N / 81°52'W25.00 Miles400 Yards0192.5M0Burke
1973-05-27333°43'N / 84°30'W0.50 Mile100 Yards00250K0Fulton
1973-05-28333°52'N / 83°38'W33°56'N / 83°30'W8.90 Miles200 Yards0025.0M0Walton
1973-05-28333°56'N / 83°30'W33°58'N / 83°20'W9.80 Miles100 Yards16525.0M0Clarke
1973-12-13334°18'N / 83°52'W34°18'N / 83°42'W9.50 Miles200 Yards0212.5M0Hall
1975-02-18332°33'N / 83°56'W32°33'N / 83°46'W9.70 Miles300 Yards25025.0M0Peach
1975-03-24333°46'N / 84°32'W33°54'N / 84°20'W14.80 Miles500 Yards3152250.0M0Fulton
1977-04-04334°10'N / 85°12'W34°15'N / 85°05'W8.80 Miles400 Yards1152.5M0Floyd
1989-03-05333°17'N / 84°50'W33°25'N / 84°41'W14.00 Miles120 Yards02325.0M0Coweta
1989-11-15334°37'N / 83°36'W34°42'N / 83°30'W8.00 Miles1760 Yards032.5M0Habersham
1991-03-29333°50'N / 84°39'W33°54'N / 84°35'W5.00 Miles1320 Yards02525.0M0Cobb
1992-11-22334°34'N / 83°56'W34°41'N / 83°48'W10.00 Miles867 Yards172.5M0Lumpkin
1992-11-22333°41'N / 82°29'W33°49'N / 82°17'W5.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Lincoln
1993-02-21333°56'N / 84°42'W33°54'N / 84°30'W8.00 Miles880 Yards0350.0M0Cobb
 Brief Description: The tornado touched down near Lost Mountain in Western Cobb County and proceded on an east southeat path across rural portions of the county, initially uprooting mainly trees and downing power lines. As the tornado moved over Marietta it touched down and caused severe damage to two condominium complexes, a large strip shopping center, and several apartment complexes. Over 400 condominiums, apartments, businesses, and mobile homes sustained damage from the tornado. Of the 400 structures damaged, 113 were mobile homes. In Marietta, several mobile home parks were severely damaged near Dobbins Air Force Base. Several businesses and industrial parks in Marietta sustained major damage. Box cars were pushed off railroad tracks. Numerous trees, poles, and power lines were downed which caused extensive power outages. Many of the trees were twisted or snapped in half. Over 9,100 Marietta Georgia Power customers lost their power as a result of the tornado.
1998-04-09332°10'N / 81°35'W32°13'N / 81°25'W8.00 Miles440 Yards2162.2M0Bryan
 Brief Description: Tornado first touched down just northeast of Pembroke and then crossed I-16 at the Olive Branch Road overpass (about 2 miles west of exit 29) then continued northeast. Significant damage occurred in the Olive Branch Rd. area and also just north of Blitchton, where a 38 year-old female and a 41 year old male were killed along with 15 injured. There were seventy-four (74) homes and other buildiings damaged, with fourteen of those destroyed (6 mobile homes, two frame houses, two brick homes, and four other buildings. Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped off 10 to 15 feet above the ground. F38MH, M41MH
1999-04-15332°03'N / 83°58'W32°07'N / 83°43'W14.50 Miles700 Yards02810.0M0Dooly
 Brief Description: An NWS Storm survey showed the tornado touched down along highway 27 at the Flint River near Drayton. The tornado hopped eastward along highway 27, demolishing pecan orchards and barns, before devastating the town of Vienna. It exited the town between 2 schools, with only minor damage to either. It later crossed I-75 between Georgia highways 27 and 215, blocking the Interstate with debris. The storm lifted a short distance east of there between Noble Gin Road and Smyrna Church Road. The EMA director said 25 percent of homes and businesses were destroyed or severely damaged. Of the 28 injuries the most serious was a broken leg. Newspaper accounts reported 69 houses, 15 mobile homes, and 9 businesses were destroyed. Another 256 homes, 12 churches, 10 mobile homes, and 6 businesses suffered damage. Three apartment complexes were ruined and 70 power poles were ripped from the ground. Around 400 people were left homeless in a town with a population of over 2700.
2000-02-13331°10'N / 84°16'W31°14'N / 84°07'W9.20 Miles300 Yards1117520.0M2.0MMitchell
 Brief Description: A strong tornado tore through two major subdivisions and four mobile home parks just south of Camilla after touching down just east of Branchville. Damage assessments from the American Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency reported 200 homes destroyed and 250 homes were damaged. Two miles south of Camilla on GA Highway 112, a large trailer manufacturing plant was destroyed. Eleven fatalities were confirmed by the Georgia Emergency Management Agency, all of which resided in mobile homes. Approximately 175 persons were injured. The American Red Cross and Salvation Army opened several shelters for the homeless. Hundreds of acres of pecan trees were uprooted, pine trees snapped, and power lines toppled. Numerous irrigation systems were damaged. Property damage estimates totalled $20 million with crop losses estimated at $2 million. Mitchell County was declared a federal disaster area. Reported by the Mitchell County EMA. F55MH, F18MH, F50MH, M17MH, M47MH, F40MH, F33MH, F17MH, F25MH, F51MH, F51MH
2000-02-14331°01'N / 84°12'W31°00'N / 84°03'W8.50 Miles300 Yards6153.5M3.0MGrady
 Brief Description: A strong tornado tore through northern Grady County, then crossed into extreme northwest Thomas County. Fifteen homes were destroyed and numerous damaged. Fifteen persons were injured, mostly from flying debris. Six fatalities were confirmed by the Georgia Emergency Management Agency: four deaths in mobile homes and two in a woodframe home. Scores of pecan trees were uprooted, pine trees snapped and power lines toppled. Farmers suffered major losses to irrigation equipment, trailers and shelters. Eight chicken houses were flattened, killing a half million chickens. Grady County was declared a federal disaster area. Reported by the Grady County EMA. M64PH, F63PH, F54MH, M85MH, F1MH, F28MH
2000-02-14331°04'N / 84°09'W31°06'N / 84°06'W2.00 Miles300 Yards00500K0Thomas
 Brief Description: A strong tornado moved from the northeast corner of Grady County into extreme northwest Thomas County near Meigs. A few homes were damaged with numerous downed trees and power lines. Reported by the Thomas County EMA.
2000-02-14331°05'N / 84°01'W31°04'N / 84°01'W4.50 Miles300 Yards111.0M0Mitchell
 Brief Description: A strong tornado tracked northeast from extreme northwest Thomas County into extreme southeast Mitchell County. Numerous homes were damaged as well as downed trees and power lines. One man died from injuries sustained when the tornado destroyed his mobile home and neighboring woodframe home two miles north of Meigs. Reported by the Mitchell County EMA. M73MH
2003-03-20331°11'N / 84°16'W31°21'N / 84°01'W19.00 Miles600 Yards42006.0M0Mitchell
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado touched down near Branchville, and traveled northeast. Its path was similar to the February 14, 2000 tornado. The tornado intensified to F3 as it passed just south of Camilla, then weakened as it neared the Mitchell-Worth County line. The tornado destroyed 66 homes, and damaged 200 homes and businesses. Numerous trees and power lines were down. At least three dozen roads were closed by debris. The tornado claimed four lives and injured 200. The hardest hit area was in the Goodson Road area of Camilla. A state of emergency was declared for Mitchell County. Reported by the Mitchell County EMA and CAP/NWS aerial survey team. M1MH, M8MH, F40MH, M42MH
2005-03-22331°04'N / 84°53'W31°08'N / 84°41'W15.20 Miles1250 Yards0105.5M0Miller
 Brief Description: The tornado, which crossed from Seminole County into Miller County, quickly intensified as it paralleled Highway 91. It damaged nearly 100 homes and destroyed 25 others along its path. It struck a 120+ acre farm on Nobles Road, destroying several storage buildings, welding shop, farrowing house and implement shed, and heavily damaging the family residence. Several irrigation pivots were damaged or destroyed. Many trees and power lines were down. Ten people were injured, two of those critically. The tornado weakened as it approached County Road 45. It continued its northeastward trek across County Road 310 and U.S. Highway 27, then dissipated about three miles southeast of Colquitt. The storm survey was conducted by the NWS Tallahassee WCM and SOO.
2006-01-02333°09'N / 84°27'W33°09'N / 84°24'W3.00 Miles440 Yards03750K0Pike
 Brief Description: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service and confirmed by Emergency Managers from both Pike and Meriwether counties concluded that an F3 tornado touched down one mile southeast of Hollonville in northwest Pike county and traveled east for approximately 3 miles, terminating at a point about 4 miles east-southeast of Hollonville in north central Pike county. Five homes along the path were extensively damaged or destroyed. One home was moved 60 feet from its foundation. Two vehicles were thrown 250 yards. Several farm structures were also damaged in the area. A number of trees and power lines were also down in the area. Three injuries were reported during the event. Two men that were working in a barn were injured when the tornado blew the barn away. A third man was injured while clinging to a fence post that the tornado ripped from the ground. The tornado had an overall path length of 3 miles with a path width of 1/4 mile. One interesting note is that family photographs from one of the homes destroyed near Hollonville were found as far away as Williamson, near the Spalding county line.
2007-03-01332°43'N / 83°55'W32°46'N / 83°50'W7.00 Miles448 Yards09500K0KCrawford
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that an EF3 tornado touched down approximately four miles east of Knoxville and continued east-northeast into Bibb county ending just southeast of Lizella. The tornado exited Crawford county about 5.5 miles east of Sandy Point or about 9 miles east-northeast of Knoxville. The tornado traveled over six miles in Crawford county, but the path length of the entire track was approximately 8.5 miles long with a maximum path width of one-quarter mile. Significant damage was noted along the path of the tornado, especially along Sandy Point Road in northeast Crawford county. Here, several homes and outbuildings were heavily damaged or destroyed. Numerous trees were either snapped or uprooted. Nine injuries were reported in the area of the damaged homes. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01332°45'N / 83°50'W32°47'N / 83°48'W3.00 Miles448 Yards0025K0KBibb
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that an EF3 tornado which originally touched down approximately four miles east of Knoxville in Crawford county, continued east-northeast into Bibb county lifting just southeast of Lizella. The tornado entered Bibb county three miles south-southeast of Lizella and lifted about one mile east-southeast of Lizella. The path length within Bibb county was about three miles long with a maximum path width of one-quarter mile wide. Damage within Bibb county was primarily confined to trees and power lines. However, one home did sustain damage on Lower Thomaston Road. Several trees were down east of Lizella near U.S. Highway 80. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01331°55'N / 84°33'W31°58'N / 84°26'W8.00 Miles1790 Yards031.0M0KWebster
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that a strong, violent, and long-lived EF3 tornado tracked across southeast Webster, much of Sumter, and far southern Macon counties. The tornado touched down near Chambliss on the Webster/Terrell county line and tracked east-northeast exiting the county into Sumter county near Bottsford. While the overall path length of the tornado was around 40 miles, the path length within Webster county was between seven and eight miles. While the tornado reached its maximum path width of 1.0 mile in Sumter county near Americus, it was determined to be less than this within Webster county. A path of significant damage was noted across southeast Webster county. A concrete block house and two machine shops on East Centerpoint Road just northeast of Chambliss were completely destroyed. Three injuries resulted from the damage here. Twenty-five feet of asphalt in front of the home was also ripped up by the tornado. On a nearby farm, five cows were killed when they were tossed about by the tornado. A tractor-trailer traveling on Georgia Highway 520 near Chambliss was overturned causing it to catch on fire and burn. Very nearby, at the intersection of Georgia Highway 520 and TV Tower Road, a 1096 foot Georgia Public Television transmission tower was destroyed when two-thirds of the tower was twisted off by the tornado and destroyed. Only 150 feet of the 1096 foot tower was left standing after the tornado passed. Numerous trees and power lines were also down in the area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01331°58'N / 84°27'W32°13'N / 84°04'W32.00 Miles1790 Yards28110.0M0KSumter
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia concluded that the EF3 tornado that first touched down in southeast Webster county continued to track northeast from the southwest to the northeast corner of Sumter county and then continued into extreme southern Macon county before finally lifting. The tornado tracked a total distance on the ground of approximately 40 miles. The tornado entered Sumter county about 4.75 miles southwest of Plains in southwest Sumter county and exited the northeast part of the county about 9 miles north of Methvins in northeast Sumter county. This was by far the most violent and devastating tornado of the March 1st outbreak. The tornado tracked roughly 32 miles across Sumter county with a maximum path width of 1.0 mile wide, which occurred in the Americus area. Damage within the city of Americus was extensive, although structures, trees, and power lines were down along the entire path of the tornado. The most significant damage in Americus was to the Sumter Regional Hospital, of which a significant portion was destroyed. Hundreds of homes and businesses in the Americus area were either totally destroyed or sustained significant damage. Hunderds of vehicles were also damaged or destroyed by debris and/or tossed about like matchsticks. The majority of the damage was within the vicinity of the Sumter Regional Hospital. Two deaths were reported at a home in Americus when a wall collapsed on a 43 year-old male and a 53-year old female. At least eight injuries were documented, but there may have been more. Within the city of Americus, proper, there were 1235 total structures damaged or destroyed, including 217 businesses, 993 residences, 3 cemeteries, 10 churches, 1 fire station, 1 hospital, 8 recreational facilities/parks, and 2 schools. There were 75 structures (42 businesses, 31 residences, 1 hospital, 1 church) were destroyed. There were 148 structures (27 businesses, 116 residences, 3 recreational facilities/parks, 2 churches) with major damage. There were 331 structures (60 businesses, 260 residences, 3 recreational facilities/parks, 5 churches, 1 school, 2 cemeteries) with major damage and 681 structures (88 businesses, 586 residences, 2 recreational facilities/parks, 2 churches, 1 school, 1 cemetery, 1 fire station) with minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01332°13'N / 84°09'W32°13'N / 84°06'W3.00 Miles1790 Yards002K0KMacon
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City confirmed that the EF3 tornado, that originated in Webster county near Chambliss and tracked across Sumter county from south of Plains, through Americus, to north of Methvins, continued briefly into extreme southern Macon county before lifting south of Oglethorpe just west of the Flint River in a very rural, swamp like area of the county. The tornado path length within Macon county was approximately three miles. Damage within Macon county was confined to trees and a few power lines. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2008-02-26333°33'N / 85°17'W33°34'N / 85°10'W7.00 Miles100 Yards018.0M0KCarroll
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A ground and aerial damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia and the Carroll County Emergency Management Director concluded that an EF3 tornado touched down in extreme western Carroll county, just across the Alabama state line, about 13 miles west of Carrollton and continued to a point approximately five miles west of Carrollton. The tornado traveled a path length of seven to eight miles and had a maximum path width of 100 yards. Maximum wind speeds were estimated at 140 mph. Twelve structures, mostly single family homes, suffered extensive damage along the path of the tornado. Only four of the affected structures were manufactured or mobile homes. Two of the affected homes were destroyed, on Indian Creek Road. A woman was injured on Smithfield Road when she was blown from her home. Numerous trees and power lines were down throughout the area as well. Damages were estimated to be nearly $10 million. This plus the following tornado resulted in damage to 128 structures. Six single-family and one mobile home were destroyed, two mobile homes suffered major damage, 34 single-family homes sustained minor damage, and 84 single-family homes, along with one mobile home, suffered minor damage. Five businesses were damaged, two of which were destroyed, along with one suffering major and two others minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A deep upper trough was moving from the mid-south toward the southeast U.S. early on the 26th. A strong cold front accompanied the upper system. A squall line of thunderstorms developed after midnight on the 25th across Mississippi and Alabama and reached the Georgia/Alabama border around 5 am EST. The line of thunderstorms intensified and bowed out just as it was moving in Georgia during the early morning hours. Wind gusts in excess 60 mph affected many counties as these thunderstorms rolled through the area during the early morning hours, causing extensive wind damage to trees, power lines, and some structures from the west and northwest side of Atlanta toward the Alabama border. In addition, two tornadoes, one an EF3, developed along the stronger part of the line as it moved through Carroll county before daybreak causing extensive damage along their paths.
2008-03-15334°05'N / 85°06'W34°06'N / 85°03'W3.00 Miles880 Yards113.5M0KPolk
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A ground and aerial survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, GA in cooperation with the Georgia State Patrol and local emergency managers confirmed that an EF3 tornado had touched down in extreme north central Polk county, just east of the town of Seney near the intersection of Georgia Highway 101 and the Floyd county line. The tornado then tracked approximately 16 miles across extreme northeast Polk, extreme southeast Floyd, and into southern Bartow county before lifting southwest of Cartersville. The tornado had a maximum path width of 1/2 mile with maximum wind speeds estimated at 150 mph. EF3 damage was noted at three locations along the path of the tornado as it tracked across the three counties. The tornado made an approximate 3-mile track across far northern Polk county. Within Polk county, four homes were destroyed, two sustained major damage, five had minor damage, and 5 others were minimally impacted. All of these were in the far north central and northeast part of the county between Georgia Highway 101 and the Floyd county line where Bon Loop Road intersects the Floyd county line. One fatality and one injury occurred on Bon Loop Road where a home was destroyed. In addition, several county outbuildings, barns, shops, vehicles, one motor home, one travel trailer, one dog kennel business, several fences were heavily damaged. Several livestock were either injured or killed. Hundreds of trees and power lines were down in the area, including several high tension power lines support structures, which were heavily damaged. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The pattern that began to evolve on March 14th continued and intensified on March 15th. A stationary front remained draped across north Georgia from near Atlanta to Athens. South of this front, the air mass was becoming increasingly warm, moist and unstable. Meanwhile, aloft, a low amplitude, yet vigorous short wave embedded within a fast zonal flow, was tracking rapidly eastward from the mid south into the southeast. Strong shear and high helicity combined with the unstable air mass and the frontal boundary to allow repeated severe thunderstorms to develop and track eastward along the boundary across north Georgia. The activity began early in the day as a complex of thunderstorms moved into the area from Alabama and continued until nearly midnight. As the day progressed, especially during the afternoon, the development of the activity gradually progressed further south and by midnight had reached the south and southeast parts of the state. Numerous severe thunderstorms and tornadic supercells were observed throughout the day. Historical records indicate that this was one of the most significant severe weather days for the Peachtree City Weather Forecast Office with more events and warnings than had been observed since May 2003.
2008-03-15334°06'N / 85°05'W34°06'N / 85°02'W3.00 Miles880 Yards111.0M0KFloyd
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A ground and aerial storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City Georgia in cooperation with the Georgia State Patrol confirmed that the EF3 tornado, that first touched down in extreme north central Polk county just east of Seney, continued on an east-northeastward track across extreme southeast Floyd county. Approximately three miles of the 16-mile long path of this tornado was within Floyd county. The maximum path was once again estimated to be approximately 1/2 mile. Despite the relatively short time frame and small area of the county affected, considerable damage was inflicted to the far southeast part of the county. A home was destroyed on Old Wax Road, resulting in additional fatality and injury. Dozens of trees and several power lines were also down in this part of the county. Overall damage consisted of 20 homes, 10 of which were destroyed, and 10 with minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The pattern that began to evolve on March 14th continued and intensified on March 15th. A stationary front remained draped across north Georgia from near Atlanta to Athens. South of this front, the air mass was becoming increasingly warm, moist and unstable. Meanwhile, aloft, a low amplitude, yet vigorous short wave embedded within a fast zonal flow, was tracking rapidly eastward from the mid south into the southeast. Strong shear and high helicity combined with the unstable air mass and the frontal boundary to allow repeated severe thunderstorms to develop and track eastward along the boundary across north Georgia. The activity began early in the day as a complex of thunderstorms moved into the area from Alabama and continued until nearly midnight. As the day progressed, especially during the afternoon, the development of the activity gradually progressed further south and by midnight had reached the south and southeast parts of the state. Numerous severe thunderstorms and tornadic supercells were observed throughout the day. Historical records indicate that this was one of the most significant severe weather days for the Peachtree City Weather Forecast Office with more events and warnings than had been observed since May 2003.
2008-03-15334°06'N / 85°02'W34°07'N / 84°51'W11.00 Miles880 Yards003.0M0KBartow
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia in cooperation with the Georgia State Patrol confirmed that the EF3 tornado, that originated in Polk county just east of Seney, and continued across extreme southeast Floyd county, continued into southern Bartow county. The tornado entered the county about 3 1/4 miles west-northwest of Taylorsville and finally lifted about four miles southwest of Cartersville. The tornado tracked approximately 11 miles across southern Bartow county. While no deaths or injuries were reported from the tornado in Bartow county, several mobile homes were heavily damaged and hundreds of trees and several high voltage power transmission lines were knocked down and there was damage to the Georgia Power Plant on Georgia Highway 113. In addition, the Taylorsville Elementary School sustained significant damage. Several homes sustained roof damage along Popum Road just north of Taylorsville, a number of trees were down along Euharlee Road, and several bulidings, a number of trees, and several street signs were down in the area of Woodland High School about three miles southwest of Cartersville. All together, there were approximately 55 homes damaged, six of which were destroyed, and 30 homes with minor damage. Two schools, as noted above Taylorsville Elementary and Woodland High School suffered heavy damage. Some Georgia Power high transmission towers were also down. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The pattern that began to evolve on March 14th continued and intensified on March 15th. A stationary front remained draped across north Georgia from near Atlanta to Athens. South of this front, the air mass was becoming increasingly warm, moist and unstable. Meanwhile, aloft, a low amplitude, yet vigorous short wave embedded within a fast zonal flow, was tracking rapidly eastward from the mid south into the southeast. Strong shear and high helicity combined with the unstable air mass and the frontal boundary to allow repeated severe thunderstorms to develop and track eastward along the boundary across north Georgia. The activity began early in the day as a complex of thunderstorms moved into the area from Alabama and continued until nearly midnight. As the day progressed, especially during the afternoon, the development of the activity gradually progressed further south and by midnight had reached the south and southeast parts of the state. Numerous severe thunderstorms and tornadic supercells were observed throughout the day. Historical records indicate that this was one of the most significant severe weather days for the Peachtree City Weather Forecast Office with more events and warnings than had been observed since May 2003.
2008-05-11332°20'N / 82°34'W32°19'N / 82°29'W5.00 Miles150 Yards00200K0KTreutlen
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF3 tornado, the strongest tornado of the 15 separate tornadoes to affect north and central Georgia this Mother's Day, touched down approximately three miles south-southeast of Soperton, then tracked east-southeast across southern Treutlen county and into extreme northeastern Montgomery county. The second floor of a two-story home was completely removed by the tornado. Numerous sheds and outbuildings were destroyed along the path of the tornado. Trees and power lines were also down along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11332°19'N / 82°29'W32°19'N / 82°27'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0KMontgomery
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the EF3 tornado, that initially touched down approximately three miles south-southeast of Soperton, continued on an east-southeastward track approximately seven miles into extreme northeast Montgomery county. The tornado likely weakened to less than EF3 intensity as it entered Montgomery county. A number of outbuildings and sheds were destroyed along the path of the tornado in northeast Montgomery county. A number of trees and power lines were also downed. However, no damage to any homes was observed or reported in Montgomery county. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11332°18'N / 82°13'W32°17'N / 82°07'W5.00 Miles200 Yards021.0M0KTattnall
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A confirmed EF-3 Tornado crossed into extreme northwestern Tattnall county from Toombs county, then continued east-southeastward into the community of Cobbtown, Georgia before turning east and dissipating. The first indications of significant damage, consistent with an EF-1 Tornado, occurred along Representative Kennedy Road where a mobile home was partially destroyed. A well defined path of debris was noted trailing southeast of this area across open farm fields. Several homes were also severely damaged with roofs blown off along Henry Moxley Road about 1 mile southeast of Representative Kennedy Road. The Tornado continued to strengthen as it turned east toward Cobbtown, Georgia and peaked in intensity as it tracked near the intersection of Georgia State Highways 121 and 57. Here the Tornado completely leveled a brick convenience store and caused considerable damage to trees and nearby structures. Two people working in the store at the time of the Tornado were injured but not killed. The damage pattern in this area was consistent with an EF-3 Tornado with winds estimated between 140 and 150 mph. Also in this same general area, but south of the Tornado track there was evidence of a strong downburst. The winds were estimated to be around 100 mph with the downburst, likely associated with the rear flank downdraft of the Supercell Thunderstorm. The Tornado continued to move east across open farm fields where extensive tree damage and minor structural damage consistent with an EF-1 and EF-0 Tornado was noted. The Tornado dissipated about 1.5 miles east of Cobbtown, however occasional bouts of non-tornadic straight line winds were observed across portions of northeast Tattnall County and northern Evans County near Undine, Georgia. Maximum sustained winds were estimated between 140 and 150 mph with a maximum width of approximately 200 yards. Considerable damage was reported along the path of the Tornado, and although no one was killed, 2 people were injured. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front lifted northward through southern South Carolina and southeast Georgia during the morning, with a strong cold front then sweeping through the area during the evening. This resulted in several rounds of severe weather across the region.
2009-02-18333°15'N / 82°53'W33°15'N / 82°45'W8.00 Miles500 Yards13500K0KHancock
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF3 tornado touched down approximately five miles east-southeast of Sparta, or about three miles east of the intersection of Georgia Highway 15 and 16. The tornado then moved along a nearly eight-mile long path across far southeast Hancock county and continued into extreme southern Warren county and then into extreme northwest Glascock county. The total tornado path length was nearly 11 miles long. The maximum path width was estimated to be 500 yards with maximum winds of 140 mph. A church, two site-built homes, and four mobile homes were completely destroyed in the Hickory Grove Community. One fatality and three injuries occurred where the mobile homes were destroyed. Hundreds of trees were either uprooted or snapped along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front accompanied and deep negatively tilted upper trough through the eastern U.S. from the 18th into the 19th. An unseasonably warm and unstable air mass developed in advance of the cold front during the late afternoon and early evening across north and central Georgia as warm, moist air rode northward into Georgia on a strong low-level jet. Afternoon temperatures in the 70s and dewpoints in the 60s, combined with strong shear and moderate instability, resulted in the development of numerous supercell thunderstorms from mid-afternoon until a few hours after midnight on the 19th. Ten tornadoes, ranging in scale from EF0 to EF3 tracked across several north and central Georgia counties. The worst tornadoes affected the east central Georgia counties of Jasper, Putnam, Hancock, and Jasper. A death was observed in Hancock county with an EF3 tornado and several injuries were reported from Putnam and Hancock counties. In addition to the tornadoes, very large hail occurred with several of the thunderstorms, including four-inch diameter hail in Coweta and Fayette counties just south of Atlanta. Numerous reports of golf ball and larger-sized hail were received. The event resulted in millions of dollars of damage and the destruction of several homes in north and central Georgia counties.
2009-02-18333°40'N / 82°52'W33°38'N / 82°34'W17.00 Miles880 Yards00300K0KWilkes
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast office in Columbia, South Carolina, confirmed that an EF3 tornado had tracked across far southern Wilkes county causing considerable damage along its path. The tornado continued its east-southeastward track into extreme northeastern McDuffie county. The total tornado path length was 18.6 miles. The tornado initially touched down in the Tyrone community in southwest Washington county. Here a cinder block home was completely destroyed with the cinder block debris blown downstream nearly 1/2 mile. Fifteen other homes along the path of the tornado sustained moderate to major damage from the tornado. Nineteen outbuildings and a commercial chicken house was destroyed. In addition, a steeple was blown off a church and a 2-ton truck was moved 60 feet. The maximum path width was approximately 1/2 mile with maximum winds estimated to be 160 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front accompanied and deep negatively tilted upper trough through the eastern U.S. from the 18th into the 19th. An unseasonably warm and unstable air mass developed in advance of the cold front during the late afternoon and early evening across north and central Georgia as warm, moist air rode northward into Georgia on a strong low-level jet. Afternoon temperatures in the 70s and dewpoints in the 60s, combined with strong shear and moderate instability, resulted in the development of numerous supercell thunderstorms from mid-afternoon until a few hours after midnight on the 19th. Ten tornadoes, ranging in scale from EF0 to EF3 tracked across several north and central Georgia counties. The worst tornadoes affected the east central Georgia counties of Jasper, Putnam, Hancock, and Jasper. A death was observed in Hancock county with an EF3 tornado and several injuries were reported from Putnam and Hancock counties. In addition to the tornadoes, very large hail occurred with several of the thunderstorms, including four-inch diameter hail in Coweta and Fayette counties just south of Atlanta. Numerous reports of golf ball and larger-sized hail were received. The event resulted in millions of dollars of damage and the destruction of several homes in north and central Georgia counties.
2009-02-19330°49'N / 83°48'W30°49'N / 83°46'W1.00 Mile500 Yards00100K0KThomas
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The same supercell which spawned the EF-2 tornado near Thomasville produced another tornado, which touched down along Five Forks Road about two miles north of U.S. Highway 84. Numerous trees were snapped or twisted. Many power lines were down and several county roads were impassible due to fallen debris. The tornado was rated an EF-3 based on the debarked trees on the east side of Salem Road. The tornado lifted before crossing State Road 33. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Just after midnight on the 19th, a long track supercell thunderstorm spawned an EF-2 tornado south of Cairo in Grady County. The tornado raced to the east into Thomas County, causing EF-2 damage just south of Thomasville. A second tornado developed and produced EF-3 damage near Boston.
2009-04-10333°07'N / 82°11'W33°07'N / 81°44'W26.00 Miles880 Yards043.0M0KBurke
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An supercell tornado tracked across Burke county and severely damaged several homes and buildings. Numerous trees and powerlines were damaged. There was one critical injury and several other minor injuries. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Supercell thunderstorms moved across the CSRA and produced large tornadoes. One tornado tracked across Columbia and Richmond counties then went into Aiken county South Carolina along highway 278. The second tornado tracked across Burke county then into lower Barnwell and Allendale counties in South Carolina. Several homes were destroyed and many had moderate to severe damage. Widespread trees and powerlines were also down. Total damage estimate was 3 million dollars.
2009-04-10333°27'N / 82°09'W33°25'N / 81°57'W12.00 Miles880 Yards0125.0M0KRichmond
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A supercell tornado continued out of Columbia county and tracked across the Augusta area severely damaging many homes and business and taking down numerous trees and powerlines. One hundred and fifty people had to be evacuated from a nursing home that was damaged and there were around a dozen minor injuries. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Supercell thunderstorms moved across the CSRA and produced large tornadoes. One tornado tracked across Columbia and Richmond counties then went into Aiken county South Carolina along highway 278. The second tornado tracked across Burke county then into lower Barnwell and Allendale counties in South Carolina. Several homes were destroyed and many had moderate to severe damage. Widespread trees and powerlines were also down. Total damage estimate was 3 million dollars.
2009-04-10333°17'N / 82°56'W33°18'N / 82°49'W7.00 Miles880 Yards01500K250KHancock
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet a third tornado touched down in Hancock county within a 15 minute period of time. However, this tornado was determined to be an EF3 tornado. This tornado touched down about halfway between Sparta and Culverton in east central Hancock county. The tornado was determined to have a maximum path width of 1/2 mile with maximum winds of 160 mph. Much of the damage occurred along Dunn and Hickory Grove Roads. Along the path of the tornado, one 4000 square foot site-built home was completely destroyed. The debris from the home was scattered across an area up to 400 feet downstream. A resident of this home suffered serious injuries. Another nearby double-wide mobile home was also completely destroyed. Two other nearby homes on Dunn suffered minor damage and two additional homes on Youngblood Road toward Jewell suffered extensive roof damage. A swath of 116 mature pecan trees at a pecan orchard on Hickory Grove road were flattened. These were owned by a resident adjacent to one of the damaged homes on Hickory Grove Road. One of the homeowners also lost a Shetland pony during the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A vigorous upper closed low was moving from the mid-south and Mississippi valley region into the mid-Atlantic and southeast U.S. A strong cold front accompanied the upper system. A strong low-level jet in advance of these weather systems transported warm, moist Gulf air northward into the region. With strong dynamics, hence shear, combined with an unusually moist, unstable atmosphere, the atmosphere was primed for a major weather outbreak. One round of thunderstorms passed through north Georgia during the early morning hours. A few minor severe weather events accompanied this system in northwest Georgia. Partial clearing followed the morning convection, allowing temperatures to soar into the mid 70s across much of north and central Georgia in advance of the main weather system. Scattered to numerous discrete supercell thunderstorms developed during mid-afternoon in northwest Georgia and progressed east and southeast across the remaining portions of the county warning area during the evening hours. Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes lingered into the early morning hours of the 11th across the southern counties of central Georgia. During the eight hour period from 5 pm EDT on April 10th to 1 am EDT on April 11th, a total of 14 tornadoes were confirmed to have touched down in north and central Georgia causing millions in damages. While some injuries were observed, no deaths were observed.
1951-05-23231°18'N / 83°50'W31°16'N / 83°41'W9.20 Miles50 Yards0025K0Colquitt
1952-01-22231°16'N / 84°01'W31°17'N / 84°00'W1.90 Miles350 Yards00250K0Mitchell
1952-01-22231°17'N / 84°00'W31°20'N / 83°54'W6.80 Miles350 Yards08250K0Colquitt
1952-01-28231°31'N / 83°47'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Worth
1952-02-29234°24'N / 83°20'W34°25'N / 83°12'W7.80 Miles77 Yards0025K0Franklin
1952-02-29234°22'N / 83°35'W34°22'N / 83°25'W9.40 Miles300 Yards03250K0Banks
1952-02-29234°07'N / 83°40'W0.20 Mile17 Yards0525K0Jackson
1953-04-18232°18'N / 84°01'W1.00 Mile200 Yards01250K0Macon
1953-04-18232°19'N / 84°31'W0.20 Mile700 Yards02250K0Marion
1953-04-30232°20'N / 84°30'W0.30 Mile20 Yards0325K0Marion
1953-04-30232°47'N / 83°30'W0.50 Mile10 Yards1325K0Twiggs
1953-04-30232°38'N / 83°42'W32°40'N / 83°37'W5.60 Miles200 Yards00250K0Bibb
1953-12-04233°58'N / 84°25'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Cobb
1954-03-31234°07'N / 83°14'W34°09'N / 83°04'W9.80 Miles200 Yards05250K0Madison
1954-03-31234°09'N / 83°04'W34°10'N / 82°56'W7.70 Miles200 Yards020250K0Elbert
1954-12-05231°23'N / 84°56'W31°25'N / 84°50'W6.40 Miles250 Yards0225K0Early
1954-12-05231°56'N / 85°05'W31°58'N / 84°57'W8.20 Miles100 Yards00250K0Quitman
1954-12-05232°09'N / 84°39'W32°10'N / 84°33'W6.20 Miles100 Yards08250K0Webster
1954-12-05232°11'N / 84°25'W32°11'N / 84°20'W4.90 Miles100 Yards04250K0Schley
1954-12-05231°58'N / 84°57'W32°09'N / 84°39'W21.60 Miles100 Yards120250K0Stewart
1954-12-05232°18'N / 84°35'W32°20'N / 84°28'W7.40 Miles150 Yards0725K0Marion
1954-12-05234°05'N / 85°00'W34°07'N / 84°53'W7.10 Miles500 Yards0025K0Bartow
1954-12-05232°10'N / 84°33'W32°11'N / 84°25'W7.90 Miles100 Yards00250K0Stewart
1954-12-05232°11'N / 84°20'W32°15'N / 84°18'W5.20 Miles100 Yards00250K0Stewart
1954-12-05231°50'N / 84°24'W31°51'N / 84°22'W2.70 Miles200 Yards0025K0Terrell
1954-12-05231°14'N / 84°56'W31°15'N / 84°54'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Early
1954-12-05233°42'N / 84°26'W0.50 Mile50 Yards14025K0Fulton
1955-04-02231°32'N / 83°31'W31°33'N / 83°28'W3.80 Miles880 Yards0025K0Tift
1956-02-18234°42'N / 85°17'W34°52'N / 84°56'W22.90 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Walker
1956-04-15233°54'N / 84°52'W34°12'N / 84°08'W46.80 Miles67 Yards00250K0Paulding
1956-05-03233°02'N / 84°12'W33°07'N / 84°06'W8.20 Miles33 Yards01250K0Lamar
1957-04-05232°12'N / 84°21'W32°18'N / 84°16'W8.60 Miles400 Yards23250K0Schley
1957-04-05232°18'N / 84°16'W32°31'N / 84°02'W20.20 Miles400 Yards02250K0Macon
1957-04-05232°31'N / 84°02'W32°50'N / 83°20'W46.20 Miles400 Yards00250K0Peach
1957-04-05233°28'N / 82°30'W33°28'N / 82°24'W5.90 Miles400 Yards0025K0Warren
1957-04-05233°28'N / 82°24'W33°28'N / 82°09'W14.40 Miles400 Yards0025K0Columbia
1957-04-05233°28'N / 82°24'W33°30'N / 82°22'W3.00 Miles400 Yards0025K0Columbia
1957-04-08234°26'N / 85°00'W34°32'N / 84°52'W10.30 Miles200 Yards05250K0Gordon
1957-04-08231°52'N / 84°42'W31°55'N / 84°38'W5.20 Miles200 Yards0125K0Randolph
1957-11-18234°28'N / 85°16'W34°33'N / 85°02'W14.50 Miles500 Yards00250K0Chattooga
1957-11-29231°28'N / 82°21'W1.00 Mile300 Yards0625K0Bacon
1958-01-24232°23'N / 83°22'W1.50 Miles200 Yards016250K0Bleckley
1958-01-31232°49'N / 83°39'W0.30 Mile33 Yards00250K0Bibb
1958-11-28231°58'N / 83°39'W0.60 Mile33 Yards0025K0Crisp
1958-11-28232°06'N / 83°04'W0.20 Mile33 Yards01250K0Dodge
1959-04-19232°48'N / 83°30'W32°52'N / 83°25'W6.60 Miles120 Yards02250K0Twiggs
1960-05-07232°06'N / 83°48'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Dooly
1960-05-07231°22'N / 84°10'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Mitchell
1961-02-24232°12'N / 83°50'W32°14'N / 83°46'W4.90 Miles200 Yards0025K0Dooly
1961-02-24232°48'N / 83°49'W32°50'N / 83°46'W3.80 Miles30 Yards0025K0Bibb
1961-02-24232°36'N / 83°15'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Twiggs
1961-02-24232°05'N / 83°08'W0.50 Mile600 Yards0025K0Baldwin
1961-02-24232°33'N / 84°15'W2.00 Miles30 Yards0025K0Taylor
1961-03-08234°54'N / 85°18'W34°56'N / 85°02'W15.20 Miles600 Yards00250K0Catoosa
1961-03-31232°14'N / 84°18'W0.50 Mile400 Yards0025K0Schley
1961-03-31232°00'N / 81°54'W0.20 Mile33 Yards003K0Tattnall
1961-04-03231°48'N / 82°18'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Appling
1961-04-03231°35'N / 83°59'W31°35'N / 83°35'W23.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Worth
1961-04-03231°35'N / 84°10'W31°35'N / 83°59'W10.90 Miles33 Yards0125K0Dougherty
1961-04-09232°03'N / 84°48'W32°05'N / 84°44'W4.90 Miles300 Yards000K0Stewart
1961-04-12231°30'N / 82°35'W31°30'N / 82°19'W15.70 Miles33 Yards0225K0Bacon
1961-04-12231°30'N / 82°40'W31°30'N / 82°35'W4.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Coffee
1961-04-15232°00'N / 84°12'W32°03'N / 84°09'W5.10 Miles300 Yards0025K0Sumter
1961-05-09232°56'N / 85°09'W0.80 Mile50 Yards0025K0Troup
1961-06-26232°24'N / 83°22'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Bleckley
1961-09-13232°04'N / 81°07'W0.20 Mile20 Yards0025K0Chatham
1961-11-23231°24'N / 84°56'W0.90 Mile33 Yards003K0Early
1961-12-18230°48'N / 83°18'W0.50 Mile37 Yards0025K0Lowndes
1962-01-06231°36'N / 82°24'W31°39'N / 82°20'W5.40 Miles300 Yards0025K0Bacon
1962-02-22232°36'N / 84°07'W0.80 Mile33 Yards0025K0Taylor
1962-04-11234°14'N / 84°30'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Cherokee
1963-01-11232°54'N / 84°20'W32°55'N / 84°15'W5.20 Miles40 Yards0025K0Upson
1963-01-13231°20'N / 81°48'W1.00 Mile300 Yards0025K0Brantley
1963-01-20232°15'N / 84°18'W32°16'N / 84°14'W4.30 Miles400 Yards01250K0Schley
1963-01-20232°16'N / 84°14'W32°18'N / 84°02'W12.10 Miles400 Yards00250K0Macon
1963-01-20232°38'N / 83°18'W0.50 Mile30 Yards0225K0Twiggs
1963-01-20232°30'N / 83°44'W32°30'N / 83°36'W7.90 Miles33 Yards0125K0Houston
1963-01-20232°02'N / 82°30'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Montgomery
1963-02-24231°12'N / 81°24'W1.00 Mile33 Yards003K0Glynn
1963-03-26230°48'N / 83°38'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Brooks
1963-04-06231°08'N / 84°11'W0.80 Mile37 Yards0025K0Mitchell
1963-04-06231°00'N / 83°34'W31°00'N / 83°26'W8.00 Miles300 Yards0025K0Brooks
1963-06-14231°43'N / 83°15'W0.50 Mile33 Yards02250K0Ben Hill
1963-09-28232°36'N / 82°22'W32°55'N / 82°04'W27.90 Miles100 Yards00250K0Emanuel
1963-09-28232°55'N / 82°04'W33°03'N / 81°40'W24.90 Miles100 Yards05250K0Burke
1964-04-08231°22'N / 82°55'W5.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Atkinson
1964-12-25231°31'N / 83°44'W31°32'N / 83°39'W5.40 Miles300 Yards03250K0Worth
1964-12-25231°32'N / 83°39'W31°37'N / 83°24'W15.80 Miles300 Yards00250K0Tift
1964-12-25231°38'N / 83°48'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0025K0Crisp
1965-03-23233°28'N / 83°02'W33°30'N / 82°57'W5.20 Miles150 Yards0025K0Greene
1965-04-15234°23'N / 84°07'W34°22'N / 83°55'W11.50 Miles33 Yards00250K0Pickens
1965-04-26234°15'N / 84°20'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Cherokee
1965-07-06232°04'N / 84°14'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Sumter
1965-07-11233°30'N / 83°35'W33°33'N / 83°42'W7.40 Miles33 Yards0025K0Newton
1965-08-09231°35'N / 84°10'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Dougherty
1966-02-13233°53'N / 83°10'W33°59'N / 83°10'W6.90 Miles400 Yards01250K0Oglethorpe
1966-02-28232°02'N / 82°30'W0.90 Mile33 Yards0025K0Montgomery
1966-05-01234°12'N / 83°34'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Jackson
1966-05-16231°26'N / 83°56'W1.00 Mile400 Yards0025K0Worth
1966-05-16231°32'N / 83°50'W0.90 Mile400 Yards00250K0Worth
1966-07-08230°47'N / 83°18'W30°48'N / 83°15'W3.30 Miles300 Yards01250K0Lowndes
1966-08-04231°48'N / 84°06'W0.20 Mile100 Yards0025K0Lee
1966-12-10234°35'N / 83°20'W0.50 Mile500 Yards003K0Stephens
1967-03-06233°27'N / 83°36'W0.80 Mile150 Yards0025K0Jasper
1967-05-22231°33'N / 83°25'W0.50 Mile30 Yards0025K0Tift
1967-05-22230°49'N / 83°17'W0.50 Mile500 Yards0025K0Lowndes
1967-06-19231°42'N / 83°15'W0.90 Mile33 Yards0025K0Ben Hill
1967-07-07232°40'N / 84°15'W2.00 Miles30 Yards0025K0Taylor
1967-07-07232°45'N / 81°38'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Screven
1967-08-19233°27'N / 84°18'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Clayton
1967-11-22233°43'N / 85°09'W33°44'N / 85°03'W6.10 Miles33 Yards0025K0Haralson
1967-11-22233°44'N / 85°03'W33°44'N / 84°55'W7.80 Miles33 Yards0225K0Carroll
1967-12-18234°13'N / 85°12'W34°14'N / 85°09'W3.30 Miles27 Yards0225K0Floyd
1968-03-12233°45'N / 85°16'W33°47'N / 85°10'W6.20 Miles100 Yards0025K0Haralson
1968-05-29234°18'N / 85°06'W0.80 Mile33 Yards0025K0Floyd
1968-06-02232°13'N / 82°25'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Toombs
1968-08-06232°54'N / 81°44'W0.30 Mile10 Yards003K0Screven
1968-08-24231°40'N / 83°38'W0.30 Mile33 Yards012250K0Turner
1968-12-03230°54'N / 83°18'W0.10 Mile27 Yards003K0Lowndes
1969-04-18230°48'N / 84°48'W30°49'N / 84°47'W1.90 Miles233 Yards0025K0Seminole
1969-04-18230°49'N / 84°47'W31°03'N / 84°35'W20.00 Miles233 Yards0125K0Decatur
1969-04-18231°03'N / 84°35'W31°26'N / 83°08'W89.60 Miles233 Yards0025K0Grady
1969-04-18231°26'N / 83°08'W31°34'N / 82°38'W30.80 Miles233 Yards0282.5M0Coffee
1969-04-18231°34'N / 82°38'W31°48'N / 81°40'W59.10 Miles233 Yards003K0Bacon
1969-04-18231°48'N / 81°40'W31°52'N / 81°24'W16.40 Miles233 Yards0125K0Liberty
1969-05-15231°28'N / 83°28'W2.00 Miles33 Yards003K0Tift
1969-05-18233°20'N / 83°55'W33°32'N / 83°47'W15.90 Miles50 Yards003K0Butts
1969-07-19233°24'N / 84°12'W1.00 Mile37 Yards0025K0Henry
1969-12-25231°42'N / 84°15'W31°45'N / 84°12'W4.70 Miles200 Yards0725K0Lee
1970-01-29234°00'N / 83°54'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Gwinnett
1970-02-25231°12'N / 82°29'W31°12'N / 82°18'W10.90 Miles100 Yards02250K0Ware
1970-03-20232°40'N / 84°54'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0125K0Harris
1970-04-02234°18'N / 82°56'W34°21'N / 82°52'W5.20 Miles100 Yards0225K0Hart
1970-04-09234°18'N / 83°08'W34°19'N / 83°06'W2.30 Miles400 Yards00250K0Franklin
1970-04-19232°39'N / 84°54'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0125K0Harris
1970-05-15230°53'N / 84°36'W0.40 Mile40 Yards00250K0Decatur
1970-05-25232°01'N / 80°51'W2.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Chatham
1970-06-22231°10'N / 83°27'W0.30 Mile33 Yards0025K0Cook
1970-07-19234°12'N / 84°54'W0.50 Mile20 Yards0225K0Bartow
1970-07-22232°48'N / 82°24'W2.00 Miles300 Yards1125K0Emanuel
1970-12-16231°57'N / 84°15'W0.50 Mile40 Yards0125K0Sumter
1970-12-29230°48'N / 84°22'W30°48'N / 84°17'W5.10 Miles400 Yards043K0Grady
1971-01-05231°31'N / 82°50'W31°30'N / 82°53'W3.30 Miles77 Yards0125K0Coffee
1971-01-15232°03'N / 84°02'W2.00 Miles100 Yards1125K0Sumter
1971-01-15232°23'N / 83°22'W0.50 Mile33 Yards0025K0Bleckley
1971-01-15232°14'N / 82°07'W0025K0Tattnall
1971-01-15231°56'N / 81°56'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Tattnall
1971-01-15231°38'N / 82°35'W0025K0Bacon
1971-01-15231°48'N / 81°36'W0.50 Mile100 Yards0425K0Liberty
1971-02-07230°56'N / 84°58'W31°02'N / 84°45'W14.50 Miles300 Yards02250K0Seminole
1971-02-07231°02'N / 84°45'W31°03'N / 84°39'W6.10 Miles300 Yards00250K0Decatur
1971-04-23232°22'N / 84°13'W32°24'N / 84°10'W3.80 Miles100 Yards11025K0Macon
1971-04-23232°01'N / 83°20'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0125K0Wilcox
1971-04-23232°00'N / 81°58'W32°02'N / 81°53'W5.60 Miles100 Yards0325K0Tattnall
1971-04-28233°52'N / 84°40'W0.30 Mile77 Yards00250K0Cobb
1971-04-29230°47'N / 83°40'W30°51'N / 83°30'W11.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Brooks
1971-04-29230°54'N / 84°20'W30°53'N / 84°10'W10.00 Miles300 Yards022.5M0Grady
1971-04-30231°34'N / 84°49'W31°29'N / 84°30'W19.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Calhoun
1971-04-30231°35'N / 84°50'W31°34'N / 84°49'W2.30 Miles100 Yards0225K0Carroll
1971-05-12231°36'N / 82°54'W31°38'N / 82°51'W4.30 Miles100 Yards0025K0Coffee
1971-07-19232°38'N / 83°56'W0.10 Mile20 Yards0025K0Houston
1972-01-05232°11'N / 83°36'W32°11'N / 83°33'W3.30 Miles300 Yards00250K0Montgomery
1972-01-13231°05'N / 84°12'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0225K0Mitchell
1972-01-13230°44'N / 84°39'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0325K0Decatur
1972-01-13232°30'N / 83°02'W32°37'N / 82°54'W11.30 Miles200 Yards00250K0Laurens
1972-03-16232°23'N / 83°21'W0.50 Mile100 Yards012250K0Bleckley
1972-06-19231°29'N / 82°52'W1.50 Miles50 Yards00250K0Coffee
1972-10-27230°45'N / 84°29'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00250K0Decatur
1972-10-27232°22'N / 81°19'W1.00 Mile400 Yards00250K0Effingham
1973-02-08231°35'N / 83°56'W2.00 Miles500 Yards05250K0Worth
1973-03-16234°30'N / 85°15'W34°35'N / 85°10'W7.60 Miles100 Yards012.5M0Chattooga
1973-03-16234°34'N / 84°57'W2.00 Miles300 Yards05250K0Gordon
1973-03-31233°32'N / 84°20'W33°45'N / 83°56'W27.40 Miles500 Yards00250.0M0Clayton
1973-03-31233°45'N / 83°56'W33°53'N / 83°35'W22.10 Miles500 Yards150250.0M0Walton
1973-03-31233°53'N / 83°35'W33°55'N / 83°28'W7.20 Miles500 Yards00250.0M0Oconee
1973-03-31233°55'N / 83°28'W33°59'N / 83°16'W12.40 Miles500 Yards150250.0M0Clarke
1973-03-31233°59'N / 83°16'W34°01'N / 83°14'W3.30 Miles500 Yards00250.0M0Oglethorpe
1973-04-26230°49'N / 84°39'W00250K0Decatur
1973-05-27233°15'N / 85°05'W0.80 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Heard
1973-11-09232°00'N / 81°05'W1.00 Mile200 Yards00250K0Chatham
1973-11-21234°34'N / 83°17'W0025K0Stephens
1974-04-03234°41'N / 84°30'W34°49'N / 84°21'W12.60 Miles200 Yards032.5M0Gilmer
1974-04-03234°49'N / 84°21'W34°51'N / 84°19'W3.00 Miles200 Yards022.5M0Fannin
1974-04-03233°40'N / 85°21'W33°54'N / 84°55'W29.60 Miles150 Yards152.5M0Haralson
1974-04-03233°54'N / 84°55'W34°05'N / 84°44'W16.50 Miles150 Yards080K0Paulding
1974-04-03234°05'N / 84°44'W34°06'N / 84°43'W2.30 Miles150 Yards070K0Cobb
1974-04-03234°06'N / 84°43'W34°08'N / 84°40'W3.80 Miles150 Yards000K0Bartow
1974-04-03234°08'N / 84°40'W34°10'N / 84°38'W3.30 Miles150 Yards000K0Cherokee
1974-04-03234°58'N / 83°23'W0.30 Mile20 Yards00250K0Rabun
1974-05-12231°56'N / 81°56'W31°59'N / 81°47'W9.40 Miles100 Yards272.5M0Tattnall
1974-05-12231°50'N / 81°42'W0.60 Mile40 Yards0225K0Long
1975-01-12230°47'N / 84°55'W31°05'N / 84°23'W37.80 Miles100 Yards0025K0Seminole
1975-01-12231°05'N / 84°23'W31°27'N / 84°00'W34.00 Miles100 Yards0152.5M0Mitchell
1975-01-12231°27'N / 84°00'W31°41'N / 83°30'W33.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Worth
1975-01-12232°12'N / 82°19'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0125K0Toombs
1975-03-13232°12'N / 83°54'W32°15'N / 83°46'W8.60 Miles200 Yards05250K0Dooly
1975-03-14232°46'N / 82°48'W6.00 Miles100 Yards07250K0Washington
1975-05-03232°29'N / 81°16'W32°32'N / 81°12'W5.40 Miles50 Yards02250K0Effingham
1976-03-16232°42'N / 82°03'W0.80 Mile400 Yards00250K0Jenkins
1976-03-16232°48'N / 81°58'W0.30 Mile100 Yards00250K0Jenkins
1976-03-16231°28'N / 82°15'W0.30 Mile100 Yards00250K0Pierce
1976-05-14234°15'N / 83°34'W34°15'N / 83°33'W1.90 Miles160 Yards000K0Jackson
1976-05-14234°15'N / 83°33'W34°20'N / 83°30'W6.50 Miles160 Yards02250K0Banks
1976-05-14234°28'N / 83°32'W1.00 Mile50 Yards00250K0Habersham
1976-05-28233°53'N / 83°57'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Gwinnett
1976-05-28233°57'N / 83°23'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Clarke
1977-03-30234°33'N / 84°51'W34°36'N / 84°40'W11.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Gordon
1977-03-30234°37'N / 84°30'W2.00 Miles100 Yards04250K0Gilmer
1978-04-18233°56'N / 85°17'W33°56'N / 85°13'W4.10 Miles200 Yards00250K0Polk
1978-05-01232°29'N / 84°59'W32°30'N / 84°50'W8.90 Miles150 Yards032.5M0Muscogee
1978-05-08233°37'N / 84°23'W33°39'N / 84°19'W4.50 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Clayton
1978-05-08233°39'N / 84°19'W33°41'N / 84°18'W2.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0De Kalb
1979-11-11230°47'N / 83°47'W0.10 Mile50 Yards002.5M0Thomas
1980-05-23232°03'N / 81°05'W1.00 Mile100 Yards02250K0Chatham
1982-04-05231°08'N / 84°57'W31°08'N / 84°56'W1.00 Mile100 Yards002.5M0Early
1982-04-05231°08'N / 84°56'W31°08'N / 84°48'W7.00 Miles100 Yards012.5M0Miller
1982-04-25230°57'N / 82°59'W1.00 Mile400 Yards052.5M0Lanier
1982-04-26234°08'N / 84°51'W34°09'N / 84°48'W5.00 Miles300 Yards05250K0Bartow
1982-12-29231°56'N / 83°04'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Telfair
1983-12-03233°47'N / 84°31'W0.50 Mile80 Yards002.5M0Fulton
1984-02-27230°51'N / 81°36'W30°54'N / 81°32'W3.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Camden
1984-05-03232°22'N / 81°53'W32°31'N / 81°38'W20.00 Miles200 Yards0302.5M0Bulloch
1984-11-10234°01'N / 84°09'W1.50 Miles127 Yards082.5M0Gwinnett
1985-04-05234°30'N / 84°36'W34°33'N / 84°31'W5.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Pickens
1985-04-05234°14'N / 84°21'W34°14'N / 84°17'W3.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Cherokee
1986-03-19233°58'N / 84°32'W34°01'N / 84°29'W5.70 Miles300 Yards01525.0M0Cobb
1988-04-18230°54'N / 84°39'W2.70 Miles80 Yards032.5M0Decatur
1989-03-05233°10'N / 85°14'W33°22'N / 84°58'W20.00 Miles167 Yards102.5M0Heard
1989-03-05233°22'N / 84°58'W33°28'N / 84°50'W10.00 Miles167 Yards062.5M0Coweta
1989-04-04234°13'N / 85°11'W34°16'N / 85°08'W4.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Floyd
1989-04-04234°06'N / 84°42'W34°05'N / 84°40'W2.00 Miles150 Yards00250K0Bartow
1989-04-04234°05'N / 84°40'W34°05'N / 84°40'W1.00 Mile150 Yards00250K0Cobb
1989-04-04234°06'N / 84°37'W34°04'N / 84°34'W3.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Cherokee
1989-04-04234°04'N / 84°34'W34°02'N / 84°31'W3.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Cobb
1989-04-04234°25'N / 83°46'W34°22'N / 83°40'W7.50 Miles50 Yards0025K0Hall
1989-04-04234°25'N / 83°59'W34°30'N / 83°52'W9.00 Miles100 Yards0025K0Hall
1989-04-04234°10'N / 84°00'W34°09'N / 83°57'W3.30 Miles50 Yards00250K0Hall
1989-04-04234°26'N / 83°27'W34°21'N / 83°27'W5.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Banks
1989-04-04234°30'N / 83°34'W34°36'N / 83°27'W8.00 Miles50 Yards032.5M0Habersham
1989-05-05234°33'N / 83°19'W34°38'N / 83°14'W6.00 Miles300 Yards0152.5M0Stephens
1989-10-01231°04'N / 83°56'W31°15'N / 83°52'W10.00 Miles100 Yards2122.5M0Colquitt
1989-10-01232°01'N / 83°41'W32°04'N / 83°44'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Dooly
1989-10-01232°50'N / 82°37'W32°53'N / 82°40'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Washington
1989-10-01233°36'N / 84°11'W33°36'N / 84°05'W3.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Henry
1989-10-01233°36'N / 84°05'W33°37'N / 84°04'W1.00 Mile300 Yards000K0Rockdale
1989-10-01233°42'N / 83°57'W2.00 Miles300 Yards00250K0Rockdale
1989-11-08232°07'N / 83°30'W0.80 Mile100 Yards18250K0Wilcox
1989-11-15234°15'N / 85°27'W34°22'N / 85°20'W8.00 Miles500 Yards012.5M0Floyd
1989-11-15233°27'N / 84°40'W33°31'N / 84°36'W3.00 Miles300 Yards002.5M0Coweta
1989-11-15233°31'N / 84°36'W33°32'N / 84°37'W1.00 Mile300 Yards002.5M0Fulton
1989-11-15233°29'N / 84°39'W33°31'N / 84°36'W3.00 Miles300 Yards072.5M0Coweta
1989-11-15233°31'N / 84°36'W33°33'N / 84°35'W4.00 Miles300 Yards072.5M0Fulton
1990-01-29233°20'N / 82°11'W0.90 Mile100 Yards06250K0Richmond
1990-02-10233°52'N / 84°36'W1.30 Miles200 Yards022.5M0Cobb
1990-02-16233°35'N / 85°03'W33°41'N / 84°57'W7.00 Miles100 Yards011250K0Carroll
1991-03-29233°45'N / 84°46'W33°46'N / 84°43'W3.00 Miles200 Yards0225.0M0Douglas
1992-11-22234°45'N / 85°31'W34°47'N / 85°28'W3.50 Miles500 Yards00250K0Dade
1992-11-22233°17'N / 84°25'W33°21'N / 84°19'W7.00 Miles100 Yards032.5M0Spalding
1992-11-22233°21'N / 84°19'W33°23'N / 84°17'W3.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Henry
1992-11-22233°02'N / 83°48'W33°04'N / 83°44'W2.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Monroe
1992-11-22233°04'N / 83°44'W33°07'N / 83°37'W8.00 Miles100 Yards012.5M0Jones
1993-10-30231°40'N / 84°10'W31°42'N / 84°02'W5.00 Miles750 Yards32750.0M0Lee
 Brief Description: A tornado struck a subdivision five miles north of Albany and killed three people and injured another 27. At least 42 homes were destroyed or severely damaged. Also, fifteen mobile homes were completely destroyed by the F2 tornado. The three fatalities occurred in a mobile home and all three victims bodies were blown 75 to 150 feet away from the dwelling. Most of the damaged or destroyed homes were two story with brick or stucco exterior. Several residents noted that the tornado sounded like a freight train as it passed overhead. One elderly lady stated that her dog became restless and started barking 20 minutes before the tornado struck her home. Continuous lightning was observed by several residents prior to and after the tornado touchdown. Several cars were destroyed by fallen trees or wind blown debris. Most of the trees downed by the tornado winds were 60 to 70 feet tall Southern Pine. Most trees were snapped in half and laid to rest in a general northeast direction. Property damage estimates topped $12 million dollars. The tornado stayed on the ground most of its lifetime and varied in width from one-quarter to one-half mile. The damage path was approximately five miles long and ran in a SW to NE direction. The forward speed of the tornado was 60 miles an hour. (F32M)(M14M)(M8M)
1996-03-06231°35'N / 83°56'W31°35'N / 83°47'W10.00 Miles200 Yards006.0M2.0MWorth
 Brief Description: A tornado began near Oak Glenn and moved east across Worth County to Shingler. Several mobile homes were destroyed along with several tractor trailers. At least four large grain bins were demolished along with other farm buildings and equipment. Damage to timber was also significant.
1996-11-08232°23'N / 83°10'W32°25'N / 83°08'W4.00 Miles50 Yards16200K0Dodge
 Brief Description: A mixture of severe thunderstorm winds and tornado damage occurred in a track from near Chester in northern Dodge county into Laurens county. In Dodge county near the intersection of highways 257 and 126 down-burst/straight-line winds pushed over several very large oak and sycamore trees, blew the tin roof off of an older home, and blew the steeple off of a church. The roof was lifted from a stronger, well-built home about three-quarters of a mile from the Dodge/Laruens county line. A tornado touched down just inside Dodge county near the Dodge/Laurens county line destroying a double-wide mobile home. A seven year old girl was killed and six other family members were injured. Victims were found in a wooded area as far as 200 yards away from where the mobile home had stood. The home had not been tied down. F7MH
1997-10-26231°32'N / 82°26'W31°36'N / 82°28'W6.00 Miles30 Yards01200K0Bacon
 Brief Description: Ten homes destroyed, four with major damage, and 17 sustained minor damage. A four mile line of standing pine timber was completely destroyed.
1998-04-08233°53'N / 84°31'W33°53'N / 84°28'W3.00 Miles200 Yards0015.0M0Cobb
 Brief Description: The same supercell that had tracked from Alabama across Haralson and Paulding counties spawned another tornado in Smyrna. The touchdown was along Windy Hill Road just west of Cobb Parkway where a commercial building sustained heavy damage. A filling station and car dealership less than a block east also sustained heavy damage. There was $500,000 to $750,000 in damage to new cars. Trees over a foot in diameter were snapped or uprooted. In total, 59 buildings were damaged, but no injuries were reported. Aerial and ground surveys by NWS employees showed the path varied from 100 to 200 yards wide with a length of about 3 miles. The tornado crossed just into Fulton county near I-285 and the Chattahoochee River. Dime to quarter size hail and other wind damage were also reported in north and central Cobb county.
1998-04-08233°57'N / 84°20'W33°57'N / 84°16'W4.00 Miles800 Yards1025.0M0De Kalb
 Brief Description: The damage path began just northeast of Perimeter Mall in Dunwoody and extended well into Gwinnett county. There was significant widespread damage to trees and homes. One person was killed when a tree fell on his home. DeKalb College's north campus was closed after several buildings sustained major damage. M72PH
1998-04-08233°56'N / 84°14'W34°01'N / 83°59'W15.00 Miles800 Yards01050.0M0Gwinnett
 Brief Description: Significant widespread damage continued into Gwinnett county in a path from Norcross through Duluth and Suwanee to north of Lawrenceville. Large trees were knocked down or snapped. Many of them fell on homes and apartments causing damage. Roofs were torn off of houses. At least 5000 homes were affected. Ten people at an apartment complex were treated for minor injuries.
1998-04-09232°11'N / 81°25'W32°14'N / 81°18'W8.00 Miles400 Yards01500K0Effingham
 Brief Description: The Bryan County tornado crossed the county line and weakened as it moved into a less populated area. Once the tornado moved east of GA State Road 17, it lifted. There were no further reports of damage or touchdowns from the parent supercell until the F1 touchdown reported just west of Hardeeville, S.C., which is approximately 12 miles from the last report of damage in Effingham County, Georgia. There were 40 homes damaged along GA 17, about 5 miles south of Guyton. Six of these were mobile homes that were destroyed. Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped off 10 to 15 feet above the ground.
1998-04-09231°50'N / 81°47'W31°51'N / 81°45'W2.50 Miles400 Yards324200K0Long
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down in the Rye Patch Community where 3 people died (all were in mobile homes).Ten mobile homes were destroyed and two others were damaged along with a roof blown off a block house. Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped off above the ground. F13MH, F30MH, M49MH
1998-04-09231°51'N / 81°44'W31°56'N / 81°28'W17.00 Miles400 Yards1738.0M0Liberty
 Brief Description: F2 tornado moved from Long County into Liberty County, which encompasses much of Fort Stewart Army Base. One soldier was killed while in an administrative building and seven others were injured. Seven buildings were destroyed while another fifty-five(55) suffered different degrees of damage. M51BU
1998-05-07233°46'N / 82°28'W33°46'N / 82°28'W1.00 Mile200 Yards08300K0Lincoln
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado hit the Pine Woods subdivision destryoing 12 homes and causing major damage to 15 homes and minor damage to 8 homes.
1998-05-07233°43'N / 82°18'W33°43'N / 82°18'W0.50 Mile200 Yards00350K0Lincoln
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado destroyed 7 homes and did major and minor damage to about a dozen others at Indian Cove.
1998-09-03232°45'N / 81°39'W32°49'N / 81°36'W8.00 Miles350 Yards07435K0Screven
 Brief Description: Numerous trees snapped off or uprooted. The most extensive damage was approximately 3 miles north of Sylvania. In this area, there were 5 mobile homes destroyed, 1 business destroyed, 15 mobile homes with major damage and 5 mobile homes with minor damage.
1999-05-07233°39'N / 85°13'W33°42'N / 85°10'W4.50 Miles150 Yards00200K0Carroll
 Brief Description: Sight survey by NWS personnel and newspaper accounts determined that the tornado touched down in Carroll county near Five Points Road and Mt Zion Road. The storm path was to the northeast across Interstate 20 and then into Haralson county. All along the path there was structural damage to several homes, businesses, barns and outbuildings. Many hundreds of trees were snapped or uprooted, which caused much of the damage. Several of the trees were very large hardwoods and pines. There was also extensive damage to power and telephone lines.
1999-05-07233°42'N / 85°10'W33°45'N / 85°06'W5.50 Miles150 Yards03400K0Haralson
 Brief Description: The tornado continued northeast from Carroll county and crossed into Haralson county southwest of Bremen. There was heavy damage to a mobile home dealership in Bremen, where around 35 mobile homes were damaged or destroyed. Debris was tossed across the highway. The tornado continued northeast and did damage at the Maple Creek golf course before lifting. Newspaper accouints said three people in Haralson county were taken to the hospital with fractures.
2000-02-14231°19'N / 83°38'W31°20'N / 83°37'W1.00 Mile200 Yards10500K0Colquitt
 Brief Description: A strong tornado tore through extreme northeast Colquitt County near Crosland toppling trees and power lines before it moved into extreme southwest Tift County. Several mobile homes were damaged. One woman was killed in a mobile home just northeast of Crosland when a large tree and another mobile home were blown against her home. Colquitt County was declared a federal disaster area. Reported by a amateur radio operator and the Colquitt County EMA. F43MH
2000-02-14231°18'N / 83°38'W31°21'N / 83°35'W5.00 Miles200 Yards0102.0M0Tift
 Brief Description: A strong tornado crossed U.S. Highway 319 from extreme northeast Colquitt County into extreme southwest Tift County, just south of Omega. Twelve mobile homes and eight pre-fabricated homes were destroyed. Numerous frame homes were damaged, including some moved off their block foundations. Ten persons were injured. Numerous trees and power lines were down. Just northeast of Omega, a school bus was blown into a nearby home. Tift County was declared a federal disaster area. Reported by the Tift County EMA.
2000-04-03233°58'N / 85°23'W34°00'N / 85°16'W6.00 Miles75 Yards061.0M0Polk
 Brief Description: Survey of damage by NWS personnel indicated that an F1 - F2 tornado, 50 - 100 yards wide, touched down in the Potash community at approximately 2:00 am EDT near Harmony Road. The tornado traveled approximately 6 miles with the terminating point just southwest of Cedartown. The tornado snapped off and uprooted several trees at its touchdown point on Harmony Road and caused a poultry house to lean as well as blowing off some of its tin roof. Next, a house on Blair Road was severely damaged and numerous trees were felled. Further downstream, several mobile homes and numerous trees were hit on Branch Road, Cornelius Road, and Highway 278 between Cornelius Road and Berry Road. The most severe damage was on Berry Road where two mobile homes were totally destroyed and 3 people seriously injured. The Polk county EMA director reported that a total a 6 people were injured, 2 seriously, and a total of 20 homes were destroyed or damaged. In addition, a roof was blown off a fruit/vegetable stand on Highway 27 south of Cedartown, but this did not appear to be related to the tornado. In excess of 1 million dollars damage was caused by the tornado.
2000-12-16231°35'N / 84°20'W31°37'N / 84°12'W6.00 Miles75 Yards00750K0Dougherty
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado damaged the main house and several surrounding structures at Abigail Plantation off Old Tallahassee Road, as well as several other homes on Old Dawson and Springhill Roads. Hundreds of plantation trees were uprooted. Downed power poles affected 300 customers in northwest Albany. A few storage buildings were damaged at the Cookville Trailer Park just west of Albany. Reported by the Dougherty County Police and WALB-TV Albany.
2000-12-16232°00'N / 84°10'W32°04'N / 83°59'W10.00 Miles100 Yards00310K0Sumter
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service disaster survey team reported that an F2 tornado first touched down at 9:30 pm EST 6 miles southeast of Americus, Georgia, on Henry Hart Road, midway between Georgia Highway 377 and U. S. Highway 280. The tornado then moved northeast at approximately 45 mph lifting 1 mile east of the Flint river at Georgia Highway 27 and Joe Stewart Road around 9:42 pm EST. The tornado cut a path up to 100 yards wide and traveled on the ground about 10 miles or 12 minutes. Although the tornado traveled through mainly rural areas, significant damage was reported. A wooden frame house was completely destroyed near the tornado's touchdown point on Henry Hart Road, while another home was damaged nearby. As the tornado continued along its northeastward path, five outbuildings were destroyed, three barns were destroyed, two cattle were killed, one large camper was overturned, one high tension power line tower was severely damaged, and a few temporary construction trailers were damaged. Finally, just before the tornado lifted, several chicken houses were destroyed on Joe Stewart Road. As a result, nearly 400 chickens were killed. In addition, numerous trees and power lines were blown down all across the county. There were no injuries or deaths reported with the tornado.
2000-12-17233°19'N / 81°58'W33°20'N / 81°58'W2.00 Miles60 Yards0800Richmond
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado intermittently touched down along a 2 mile path. Extensive damage was done to the Timberidge subdivision and to other homes and mobile homes along its path. Eight people were injurred, one seriously. There were no deaths.
2001-03-15230°50'N / 84°25'W30°50'N / 84°24'W1.00 Mile200 Yards04500K0Decatur
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado touched down on Fewell Road in the Bell Dixon Community and tracked northeast into western Grady County. Debris was scattered over a wide area. Four persons were injured, one critically. Five homes sustained roof and window damage. Numerous trees and power lines down. One house was destroyed and eight others were severely damaged. A double-wide mobile home on Bell Dixon Road was lifted from its foundation and reduced to bits of debris in a neighboring field. Reported by the Decatur County EMA and Bainbridge Post Searchlight.
2001-03-15230°51'N / 84°22'W30°52'N / 84°18'W5.00 Miles200 Yards091.0M0Grady
 Brief Description: The F2 tornado raced northeast from just southeast of Climax in Decatur County to just southeast of Whigham in Grady County, then dissipated. Nine persons were injured, one critically. Ten homes were damaged and two homes destroyed on Piney Grove Road four miles southwest of Whigham. A half dozen homes were damaged two miles southwest of Whigham at the intersection of Attapulgus and Cleon Roads. Additionally, ten barns and sheds were damaged and eight trailers destroyed. Numerous trees and power lines down with outages. Reported by the Grady County EMA and a SKYWARN storm spotter.
2002-11-11234°18'N / 84°59'W34°19'N / 84°50'W12.00 Miles100 Yards001.5M0Bartow
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service disaster survey team and the Bartow county Emergency Management Director confirmed a 12 mile long west-east path of damage beginning on Barnsley Garden Road near Barnsley Gardens in northwest Bartow county continuing east to just south of Halls Station crossing U.S. Highway 41, then east across Pleasant Valley Road, to just east of Interstate 75 on Crowe Spring Road. The path of damage, up to 500 yards wide in some area, consisted mostly of damage caused by straight line winds with speeds of 80 to 100 mph, but there was definite evidence of tornadic damage of F2 intensity in an isolated area on Clear Creek Road. This portion of the tornado had a path length of 500 yards with a path width of 100 yards. Tornadic damage of F1 intensity was evident along a secondary segment of the damage path at the intersection of Cedar Creek Road and Hazel Road about 3 miles north of Cassville. This portion of the torando had a path length of 500 yards with a path width of 100 yards. Twelve to 15 residental homes suffered major structural damage, seven chicken houses were destroyed, including 7500 chickens, and a barn was completely destroyed. There were also numerous downed trees and power lines along and near the the damage path. Bartow county was one of five counties declared in a state of emergency by the governor.
2002-11-11234°21'N / 84°35'W34°23'N / 84°28'W6.00 Miles100 Yards001.8M0Cherokee
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service disaster survey team and the Cherokee county Emergency Manager Director observed a 6-mile long path of damage, beginning near Beasley Gap in northwest Cherokee county, then continuing east-northeast toward the town of Worley Crossroads on the Pickens county border. While much of the damage along the path was determined as straight line wind damage with speeds of at least 70 mph, there was definite indication of a multi-segmented tornado. The most significant tornado damage occurred on Salacoa Road near Beasley Gap, where the tornado damage was classified as F2. The damage path was approximately 627 yards wide at its widest point, but the tornadic portion of this damage was limited to around 100 yards wide. Two homes were completely destroyed, three were severely damaged, and six were moderately damaged. Numerous trees and power lines were down along and near the damage path as well. Some livestock was also killed during the event. Cherokee county was one of five counties declared in a state of emergency by the governor.
2002-11-11234°21'N / 84°27'W34°26'N / 84°16'W14.00 Miles100 Yards0105.6M0Pickens
 Brief Description: The tornado that originated in Cherokee county near Beasley Gap, continued into and across Pickens county. Once again, the National Weather Service disaster survey team determined that this was a multi-segmented tornado, with much of the damage along the path caused by straight line winds of at least 70 mph. The tornado entered the county southwest of Cagle, then continued on to just north of Tate roughly paralleling Georgia Highway 108, then turned more eastward along Georgia Highway 53 to near Marblehill, through the Big Canoe golf course and recreation area, then east of Big Canoe into extreme western Dawson county. There was definite evidence of F2 tornadic damage just north of Tate where winds were estimated in the 113 to 157 mph range. Some of the hardest hit areas included homes on Pleasant Union Road near the Cherokee county border; the Mountain Lakes Estates area, where several homes suffered extensive damage; the Bethany-Salem district where at least 56 structures were damaged or destroyed; Refuge Road near Tate, the town suffering some of the greatest damage where several homes and business were destroyed; the Big Canoe area near the Dawson county border, where several homes were damaged and the tennis center suffered extensive damage. All together, a total of 26 structures, mostly residential homes were destroyed, 142 structures were partially damaged, 2 businesses were destroyed, and 14 vehicles were totally destroyed. In addition, ten people were injured, primarily in damaged homes or trapped in vehicles on which trees fell. One of the businesses destroyed was the popular Davis's Barbeque on Georgia Highway 108. The restaurant was completely blown away, including the 20-foot white columns that stood in front of the restaurant. Three of the injuries in the county occurred in new mobile homes behind the Barbeque restaurant when their homes were flattened by the winds and other debris from the restaurant. One of the children injured, a 4-year old girl, was found by a nearby pond. The Refuge Baptist Church suffered extensive damage and was left in shambles. The historic Big Canoe chapel was also among the structures suffering damage. The steeple and all of the windows were lost from the church along with other structural damage to both the exterior and interior walls. Numerous trees were uprooted and many power lines were damaged along the path. Thirty people had to be put up in shelters and at least 6000 people were left without power for an extended period. Pickens county was the hardest hit of five counties declared in a state of emergency by the governor.
2002-11-11234°25'N / 84°16'W34°27'N / 84°14'W3.00 Miles100 Yards03200K0Dawson
 Brief Description: The Dawson county Emergency Management Director reported that the tornado that originated in Cherokee county and traveled across Pickens county, entered Dawson county in the Big Canoe area and continued to just east-northeast of the Big Canoe area before dissipating. Two double-wide mobile homes were completely destroyed just east of the Big Canoe area as large trees fell on the structures. While the contents of one were salvagable, those of the other were destroyed. Three injuries occurred at one of these mobile homes as the residents were trapped by the downed trees on the structure. In addition, there were four other homes that received minor damage in the Big Canoe area. Numerous trees and power lines were blown down in the area of the tornado and some roads were temporarily blocked as a result. Dawson county was one of five counties declared in a state of emergency by the governor.
2002-11-12231°26'N / 82°56'W31°27'N / 82°51'W3.00 Miles200 Yards02500K50KCoffee
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down in field along the Atkinson-Coffee County line near Marshal Corbet Road. Just inside of Coffee county one wood frame structure had a portion of its roof removed. Three large 100 yard long chicken houses were totally destroyed and machinery tossed about. One automobile was picked up and landed on the roof of a brick structure. Extensive roof damage to brick structure. Several work sheds destroyed. Trees snapped off and twisted at tops with debris wrapped in tree tops. Numerous large live oak trees felled. Clear evidence of rotation was noted by investigating officials. The storm continued north in a discontinuous path doing damage to cotton fields. the tornado crossed Highway 135 at the Satilla River with trees again snapped and twisted at the tops. Approximately 1 mile north of the Satilla River the tornado passed over an airstrip destroying a hanger/office structure and severely damaging a crop dusting aircraft. Debris from the destroyed chicken houses was identified at this site some 3 miles from its point of origin. This was the final discernable touchdown, although there was some evidence from debris further north that the system continued as a funnel cloud just above tree top level into southeast Douglas.
2003-02-22233°35'N / 82°13'W33°36'N / 82°11'W2.00 Miles150 Yards00310K2KColumbia
 Brief Description: A combination of an intense microburst and a tornado produced winds estimated at 120-130mph. A barn and camper trailer. Moderate damage was done to 4 homes with minor damage to 34 other homes. Debris from the barn was found a mile downstream. The microburst width was 1/8-1/4 mile wide with the vortex circulation about 50 yds wide.
2003-03-20231°22'N / 84°02'W31°24'N / 83°57'W6.00 Miles400 Yards20750K0Worth
 Brief Description: The F2 tornado traveled northeast from northeast Mitchell County into southwest Worth County. It damaged a few dozen homes and destroyed several others. Two persons were killed when their mobile home was destroyed. Numerous trees and power lines were down. A state of emergency was declared for Worth County. Reported by the Worth County EMA and CAP/NWS aerial survey team. F77MH, M50MH
2003-05-06234°13'N / 83°06'W34°12'N / 83°02'W4.00 Miles200 Yards012200K0Elbert
 Brief Description: This tornado moved from Madison County into northwest Elbert County and intensified, destroying or severely damaging several houses and mobile homes. A parked car was also flipped before the tornado lifted.
2003-07-01232°31'N / 81°46'W32°33'N / 81°43'W4.50 Miles100 Yards0000Bulloch
 Brief Description: A tornado knocked down trees and damaged mobile homes Much of WFO Charleston's CWA was impacted by the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill as it tracked to the northeast across the extreme northern section of Georgia. The mini outbreak of tornadoes started around 8 p.m. on the night of July 1st and did not stop until after 115 a.m. on the morning of July 2nd. Fortunately, there were no deaths with the tornadoes. Screven County was hardest hit with three separate tornadoes and three areas of wind damage.
2003-07-01232°34'N / 81°42'W32°36'N / 81°42'W2.50 Miles100 Yards0000Screven
 Brief Description: A tornado moved out of Bulloch county into the extreme southern part of the county. Numerous trees were knocked down. Much of WFO Charleston's CWA was impacted by the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill as it tracked to the northeast across the extreme northern section of Georgia. The mini outbreak of tornadoes started around 8 p.m. on the night of July 1st and did not stop until after 115 a.m. on the morning of July 2nd. Fortunately, there were no deaths with the tornadoes. Screven County was hardest hit with three separate tornadoes and three areas of wind damage.
2003-07-01232°41'N / 81°36'W32°45'N / 81°32'W6.00 Miles500 Yards0000Screven
 Brief Description: A tornado knocked down numerous trees and power lines and overturned a car. Much of WFO Charleston's CWA was impacted by the remnants of Tropical Storm Bill as it tracked to the northeast across the extreme northern section of Georgia. The mini outbreak of tornadoes started around 8 p.m. on the night of July 1st and did not stop until after 115 a.m. on the morning of July 2nd. Fortunately, there were no deaths with the tornadoes. Screven County was hardest hit with three separate tornadoes and three areas of wind damage.
2004-09-16234°17'N / 83°09'W34°17'N / 83°09'W2.00 Miles60 Yards001.1M0Franklin
 Brief Description: This tornado moved north across the town of Franklin Springs, damaging or destroying numerous structures along its 3-mile path. The city government building and the fire and police stations incurred significant damage, as did approximately 25 residences. Several large chicken houses were also destroyed.
2004-09-16234°17'N / 83°16'W34°20'N / 83°16'W5.50 Miles50 Yards1175K0Franklin
 Brief Description: This tornado touched down west of Franklin Springs, then moved north-northwest, damaging several homes, businesses, and vehicles as it tracked toward Carnesville. Numerous trees and power lines were also blown down. A 38-year-old woman was killed when the vehicle she was driving was hit by a falling tree. A passenger in the vehicle received minor injuries. F38VE
2005-03-22231°03'N / 84°55'W31°04'N / 84°53'W2.80 Miles1000 Yards181.5M0Seminole
 Brief Description: A tornado touched down just south of U.S. Highway 84. It destroyed seven mobile homes and damaged 17 others. Many trees and power lines were down. A woman was killed when the tornado demolished her mobile home. Eight people suffered minor injuries. The storm survey was conducted by the NWS Tallahassee WCM and SOO. F34MH
2005-03-22231°29'N / 82°01'W31°29'N / 82°01'W2.00 Miles880 Yards0000Wayne
 Brief Description: NWS Storm Survey revealed 56 homes were damaged or destroyed (includes mobile and manufactured homes), 12 businesses were damaged or destroyed, 2 public buildings were damaged as well as 1 church. Only minor injuries were reported. Georgia Emergency Management issued a statement that stated 61 homes and 8 businesses were damaged; 10 homes and 5 business were destroyed. Below is a time line of calls the NWS received: 0430 pm EDT: Emergency Management reported 3 businesses destroyed and campers severely damaged in Screven from a tornado. 0430 pm EDT: Emergency Management reported numerous trees and power lines down in Screven. 0432 pm EDT: Tranied stomr spotter repored a tornado 5 miles south of Jesup and about 8 miles south of Odum. 0449 pm EDT: Tranied storm spotter and amateur radio operator reported quarter size hail in downtown Jesup and a tornado in Screven along 9 Run Road. 0450 pm EDT: Emergency Management reported campers were destroyed in Screven and a cabinet shop (Sreven Cabinet Company) was severely damaged with 1 person trapped inside. Other reports received about this event included 2 children trapped in a video store in Screven. They were pulled out and taken to the hospital with no major injuries. The Jesup Press Sentinel newspaper reported extensive damage occurred along J.L. Tyre Street and U.S. 84 in Screven. Two businesses hit particulary hard were the Screven Cabinet Company and Boyette's Camper Sales. One male was trapped in the cabinet shop after the tornado, and was successfully rescued with no notable injuries. A truck driver was driving at about 25 miles per hour in front of the cabinet shop when the tornado hit and flipped the vehicle, and the driver sufferd minor injuries. Additional business damaged by the tornado included the town's video store, Mary's IGA and Wasdin Cabinet and Doors. 0450 pm EDT: The general public sent an email that and reported a tornado in Screven and 2 inch hail in Jesup.
2005-07-06233°23'N / 84°19'W33°25'N / 84°18'W9.00 Miles880 Yards0070.0M0Henry
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service damage survey confirmed an F2 tornado, the strongest tornado of the evening associated with the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy, touched down just a few hundred yards south of McDonough Street at the Atlanta Motor Speedway then traveled north-northwest passing just east of Lovejoy in Clayton county, then across the Edgar Blalock Raw Water Reservation, at which point it turned northwest and finally passed into Clayton county before lifting near Jodeco Road. The tornado center line crossed the western bank of the race track then across Tara Field just west of the race track. Damages to the Atlanta Motor Speedway, including several condominiums at the facility, and the Tara Field Airport just west of the Atlanta Motor Speedway were estimated at $40,000,000. Eleven planes and five vintage helicopters were heavily damaged at Tara Field. Nearby a Chevron auto service station was destroyed. Damage between these facilities and the Clayton county line was confined mainly to trees and power lines. The tornado had a path length of nine miles tracking across western Henry and a small portion of eastern Clayton county. The tornado initially had a path width of 1/2 mile, then narrowed as it moved north-northwest. It was determined that the tornado had winds of 120 mph. Electrical power was out in much of the county throughout the night as a result of the damage in the area. All together during the evening, 229 homes in the county had minor damage from thunderstorm winds and/or tornadoes, with 61 homes suffering major damage. In addition, the steeple at Kelly Chapel fell to the ground.
2005-08-29233°24'N / 85°05'W33°25'N / 85°05'W1.50 Miles200 Yards03750K0Heard
 Brief Description: A National Weather Survey Team concluded that an F2 tornado touched down approximately 1/4 mile south of Glenloch in far northern Heard county, then continued north at 30-35 mph into Carroll county about three miles southeast of Roopville, finally terminating three miles northeast of Roopville. This was the first confirmed tornado in the Peachtree City forecast area associated with Hurricane Katrina. While the overall damage path with this tornado was 5.5 miles long, only 1.5 miles of this damage path occurred within Heard county. The path width of this tornado was approximately 200 yards wide. Several homes in the Glenloch area were severely damaged, along with a number of downed trees and power lines. Three residents at one of the damaged homes were injured by debris during the tornado.
2005-08-29233°25'N / 85°06'W33°29'N / 85°06'W4.00 Miles200 Yards104.4M0Carroll
 Brief Description: A National Weather Service Damage Survey Team, in conjunction with the Carroll County Emergency Manager and Chief of Fire and Rescue operations, concluded that the F2 tornado, which began just south of Glenloch in Heard county, continued north into Carroll county. The tornado entered Carroll county approximately three miles southeast of Roopville and continued north at 30-35 mph to a point about three miles northeast of Roopville. The overall path length within Carroll county was 4.0 miles with an approximate path width of 200 yards. Extensive damage occurred along the path of the tornado. A total of 17 large chicken houses were destroyed along with 1,000,000 chickens. This resulted in agricultural damages alone in Carroll county of $3,000,000. A 40-year old man was killed while stepping outside his house to check on the status of his poultry and one of his chicken houses. Other livestock, including cattle and horses were also killed along the tornado path. Several homes and vehicles were also damaged or destroyed. One Chevrolet pickup truck was flipped over by the tornado onto a pile of bricks and wooden panels. Damage to homes and residential property from the tornado was estimated at $1,435,800. Overall damage in Carroll county from the tornado and subsequent thunderstorm wind was estimated at $5,235,800. All together 30 homes in the county suffered moderate damage, with another 100 homes sustaining minor damage. M40OU
2005-08-29232°33'N / 83°53'W32°36'N / 83°53'W4.00 Miles50 Yards032.6M0Peach
 Brief Description: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service confirmed that an F2 tornado had touched down just south of Fort Valley, crossed Georgia Highway 49 in Fort Valley and continued north for approximately four miles. The overall damage path was four miles long and 50 yards wide. The worst damage was along Taylor's Mill Road. Extensive damage occurred to homes and businesses in the area. Several homes and businesses were destroyed or damaged beyond repair, including a branch of the Robins Federal Credit Union. Hundreds of large trees in the area were completely uprooted, including a pecan orchard which was destroyed. Three people suffered minor injuries in the way of bruises and scrapes from tornado debris. Parts of Taylor's Mill Road and Georgia Highway 49 were blocked by debris and had to be closed.
2005-08-29234°40'N / 83°42'W34°44'N / 83°43'W5.00 Miles300 Yards003.0M0White
 Brief Description: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in cooperation with the White County Emergency Management Director and the White County Sheriff concluded that an F2 tornado had carved a five mile long path of destruction, roughly parallel to Georgia Highway 75, causing major destruction to the town of Helen. Extensive damage was reported to several business in downtown Helen, a Bavarian tourist town in the northeast Georgia mountains. The entire second floor was ripped off the Helen Econo Lodge by the tornado. A nearby chapel was completely destroyed. The roof of Hansel & Gretel's Candy Kitchen, the Alpine Village Shoppes, as well as that of a nearby barbecue company were all ripped off by the tornadic winds. A Circle K grocery store also suffered significant damage. Hundreds of trees were also down. One resident reported losing 200 trees just at his property. Georgia Highway 75 was completely blocked on both the north and south side of Helen from downed trees. Many power lines were also down in the area and power was out to much of the area for at least two days.
2005-12-05230°58'N / 82°52'W30°58'N / 82°51'W3.00 Miles100 Yards0000Clinch
 Brief Description: A mini-supercell storm over western Clinch county tracked north-northeast roughly along Highway 84. At 310 pm tornado damage was reported near Du Pont. A home was damaged at 2371 Edward Lee Road, which is about 2 miles east of downtown Du Pont. Numerous trees and power lines were also down mainly south of Du Pont along Olive Leaf Road. An NWS Storm Survey the day after the tornado revealed F2 damage. The tornado path was narrow (50 yards), but the circulation damaged several structures near Du Pont including a brick carport and porch. A semi-truck was lifted on top of another semi, and much of a blueberry packaging structure was destroyed. Winds were estimated at 120-150 mph.
2006-01-02233°31'N / 84°40'W33°31'N / 84°35'W4.00 Miles440 Yards00250K0Fulton
 Brief Description: A damage survey team from the National Weather Service in Peachtree City concluded that an F2 tornado had touched down just east of Palmetto in the far southern portion of Fulton county near the Coweta and Fayette county borders. The tornado touched down near Interstate-85 and U.S. Highway 29 east of Palmetto and then traveled east into extreme northwest Fayette county. The tornado was rated an F2 and traveled a path of seven miles, of which approximately four miles occurred within Fulton county. The maximum path width was 1/4 mile wide. Roof damage was observed to a number of homes along the path of the tornado. At least six homes east of Palmetto had sustained major damage with large trees down on the structures. Additionally, a number of trees were down along the path along with several power lines. Specifically, the tornado began around 8225 Tatum Road. Numerous trees were down in this area and several homes had sustained roof damage. The chimney was destroyed on one home. The tornado then continued across the intersection of Johnson and Tatum Road to Gullatt Road. Several homes in this area had sustained roof damage and in fact, one home had completely lost its roof. Numerous trees were either uprooted or snapped off along the path and several power lines were down as well. From this point, the tornado traveled toward the intersection of Bohannon and Kirkley Roads. Damage in this section was less extensive with just minor roof damage and only a few trees uprooted or down in the area. The tornado then crossed into Fayette county.
2006-01-02233°31'N / 84°36'W33°30'N / 84°33'W3.00 Miles440 Yards002.0M0Fayette
 Brief Description: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City Georgia and the Fayette County Emergency Management Director concluded that the F2 tornado, which originally developed in far south Fulton county just east of Palmetto continued into extreme northwest Fayette county. The overall tornado path length was seven miles, of which approximately three miles occurred within Fayette county. The maximum path width was 1/4 mile. The most significant damage associated with the tornado occurred in Fayette county. The tornado entered the county just south of Fairburn and just west of Georgia Highway 74 (Senoia Road) near Milam Road. In this area the tornado destroyed a small apartment home and rolled a hay baler approximately 15 yards from its origin. A number of trees were uprooted or snapped off in this area as well. The storm then skipped across Georgia Highway 74 just south of the Wendell Coffee Golf Center into the River Oaks Subdivision. A home on Westbourne Drive next to the Golf Center was damaged with trees down on the structure. A metal awning was also torn off the home. Further down the street, also in the River Oaks Subdivision, a large home was damaged beyond repair and about six others sustained minor to moderate damage, mainly to the roofs of the structures. While one family was trapped in their home during the event, they were rescued without injury. The tornado ended in the 600 block of Westbourne Drive in the River Oaks Subdivision.
2006-04-08234°01'N / 85°04'W34°01'N / 85°01'W3.00 Miles100 Yards01450K0Polk
 Brief Description: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that a second tornado, this one an F2, touched down one mile northwest of Rockmart and traveled to the east approximately three miles, terminating at a point around two miles east-northeast of Rockmart. Over two dozen homes along the path of the tornado were destroyed. A young child was injured at one of the damaged homes when sheet rock and rafters fell on the couch where he was sleeping. Over three dozen outbuildings were also heavily damaged or destroyed. A carport was blown off one home northwest of Rockmart and five coal cars were completely blown off a railroad track in the Rockmart area and left lying on their side, while an 18-wheel truck trailer was also blown over in the same general area. Finally, minor damage was reported to the roof of the Rockmart Highschool and especially to the athletic fields. Hundreds of trees and dozens of power lines were blown down along the path of the tornado. A total of 700 residents were left without power for many hours following the storm. The tornado was determined to have a path length of approximately 3.0 miles with a path width of 50 to 100 yards. Overall tornado damage from the two tornadoes in Polk county netted: 30 homes with minor damage. 2 homes destroyed. 60 outbuildings heavily damaged or destroyed. Minor damage to the Rockmart Highschool and athletic facility. 700 customers without power. Extensive loss to timber in the area
2006-12-31232°16'N / 83°43'W32°16'N / 83°43'W01150K250KDooly
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, GA, concluded that a tornado touched down near the intersection of Snow Springs Road or Georgia Highway 230, just west-northwest of Unadilla, and traveled 1/2 mile to a point just east-northeast of Unadilla. While the tornado was initially determined to be an F0 tornado, it intensified to an F2 tornado before dissipating. The tornado first touched down in an open cotton field pushing over a 30-yard section of an irrigation system near Snow Springs Road and U.S. Highway 41. The tornado then moved east to northeast to the northeast side of Unadilla breaking trees, damaging signs, roofs, and billboards along its path. On the east side of Unadilla, three mobile homes were destroyed, several pecan trees were uprooted in a pecan orchard, and shingles were peeled from several homes in the area. The tornado dissipated in the area of Peavy Street and Peavy Lane. The tornado was determined to be approximately 50 yards wide at its widest point and traveled a distance of about 0.5 miles. One minor injury was reported at one of the destroyed mobile homes as a result of minor cuts, bruises, and scrapes from debris. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, closed upper low moved from Texas on December 29th into the Ohio Valley on December 31st. The system weakened considerably as it moved out of Texas, where a number of tornadoes occurred. However, the trailing trough still brought showers and thunderstorms to the southeast as it moved through the area on New Year's Eve. In the southern portion of this area, although instability was limited, shear was quite strong. As a result, a small thunderstorm spawned a tornado in northern Dooly county. This same cell continued to threaten areas further east, but no further tornadoes or damage was reported.
2007-01-07233°17'N / 84°54'W33°18'N / 84°49'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00350K0KCoweta
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service office in Peachtree City, GA confirmed that an F2 tornado had touched down approximately 8 miles southwest of Newnan near the intersection of Bohannon Road and New Corinth Road near Blalock Lake. The tornado then traveled northeast between Old Corinth Road and New Corinth Road traveling approximately 4 miles to the northeast along Earl North Road before lifting. As the tornado crossed Walker Brooks Road and Joe Brown Road just northeast of its touchdown point, a home was destroyed. The winds in the tornado at this point were estimated to range between 125 and 135 mph. As the tornado continued northeast along Earl North Road, several homes sustained minor to moderate damage. A number of trees and at least two power lines were also downed along the path of the tornado. Damage was also reported to a convenience store awning and several storage sheds were destroyed. Portions of Earl North Road were blocked from downed trees and telephone poles. While several residents, including a 14-year old boy were trapped in homes from debris and downed trees, no injuries were reported and all were rescued safely. The tornado path length was approximately four miles long with a maximum path width of 200 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Another strong storm system and deep upper trough, similar to the one of January 5th, swept through the area during the afternoon hours of January 7th. A weak warm front was located across middle Georgia. A narrow, yet intense squall line spread into the area during the mid-afternoon bringing severe weather and yet another tornado to Coweta county in West Central Georgia. This was the third tornado in Coweta county since January 1st. Overall, however, the total amount of severe weather was less also less widespread than that observed on January 5th.
2007-03-01232°29'N / 84°09'W32°34'N / 84°04'W8.00 Miles448 Yards14500K0KTaylor
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that an EF2 tornado had tracked across a 7-mile stretch of eastern Taylor county from about three miles southwest of Potterville to about two miles east of Reynolds. The tornado traveled a path of between seven and eight miles with a maximum path width of 448 yards or roughly 1/3 of a mile wide. The heaviest damage was southwest of Potterville, where two mobile homes were destroyed and others were damaged. One of the mobile homes was rolled. One death and four injuries were reported in the area of the damaged and destroyed mobile homes. Numerous trees and power lines were down throughout the area. Several were down on Bear Road in Potterville. Damage to trees and roofs of several homes continued through and east of Reynolds, although the damage in this area was not as severe. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01232°29'N / 85°00'W32°34'N / 84°52'W9.00 Miles300 Yards0128.0M0KMuscogee
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City and the National Weather Service in Calera, Alabama, concluded that an EF2 tornado, that originated in Russell county, Alabama, tracked across northwest and north central Muscogee county. The tornado first touched down in extreme northeast Russell county, Alabama about three miles from the Georgia border, then crossed into extreme southeast Lee county, Alabama, and then entered Georgia as it moved across the north end of Lake Oliver, about 1.5 miles west-southwest of Green Island Hills. The tornado continued to travel east-northeast across north Muscogee county, including the north suburbs of Columbus (Green Island Hills, Brookstone, Autumn Ridge, Hamilton Station, and Old Moon Road), before finally lifting three miles west of Midland in north central Muscogee county. The overall tornado path length was approximately 12 miles, with about nine miles of the tornado path within Georgia. The maximum path width was 300 yards. The heaviest damage occurred in the 6200 block of Brookstone Boulevard just north of U.S. Highway 80 in the northwest part of Columbus. Several homes in this area suffered heavy damage and at least one injury was confirmed. In addition, several commercial buildings on Veterans Parkway sustained substantial structural damage. Windows were blown out, large air conditioning units were tossed about, large metal business signs were blown down, and power poles were twisted and blown down. The Hawthorn Suites on North Lake Parkway was destroyed from roof and water damage. Nearby, the Ramada Inn under construction also suffered considerable damage while a nearby Holiday Inn Express sustained minor damage. In addition, several churches, including Wynnbrook Baptist, Saint Mark's United Methodist, and Old Moon Road Churches were heavily damaged. Hundreds of trees were down in the area, a number of which fell on parked cars. Many power lines were down and thousands were left without power, some for over a day. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01233°25'N / 82°36'W33°26'N / 82°33'W3.00 Miles448 Yards03700K0KWarren
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA concluded that an EF2 tornado tracked across eastern Warren county, touching down about four miles east-northeast of Warrenton, and continued into McDuffie county, terminating about 6 miles northeast of Thomson near Interstate-20. The overall tornado path length was 15 miles, but only about 2.5 miles of the path occurred within Warren county. The maximum path width was 448 yards or about one-quarter nautical mile. The tornado tracked very close to U.S. Highway 278 or Georgia Highway 12, the main highway between Warrenton and Thomson. The most significant damage occurred to the Briarwood Academy on U.S. Highway 278. In addition, a number of homes, mostly double-wide mobile homes, sustained significant damage between Warrenton and the McDuffie county line, especially on the northeast side of Warrenton. Most of the damage was in the Camak Road and Thomson Highway area. One double-wide mobile home was completely destroyed with only the base slab left standing. There were eight homes with major damage, 13 with moderate damage, and 17 with minor damage. Three individuals sustained minor injuries from flying glass and debris. Dozens of trees and power lines were down along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01233°25'N / 82°33'W33°30'N / 82°27'W9.00 Miles250 Yards000K0KMcduffie
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF2 started in Warren county and moved through McDuffie county taking down numerous trees and powerlines. The twister moved along hwy 278 to Thomson then along hwy 150 to I-20. Several vehicles were totaled and many homes and a private school had moderate damage. Ground survey found a damage path of 9 miles in McDuffie county but an areal survey found the total length to be 15 miles. There were no injuries or deaths. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Supercells moved across the southern states and into GA producing tornadoes across the region.
2007-03-01232°39'N / 83°09'W32°46'N / 82°58'W13.00 Miles895 Yards0030K0KWilkinson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia concluded that an EF2 tornado had touched down in southwest Wilkinson county about 4.5 miles west-southwest of Nicklesville and tracked over 13 miles to a point nine miles northeast of Nicklesville. The maximum path width was 1/2 mile. The tornado traveled through a mostly rural area. Damage was confined mainly to trees and power lines. Most of the damage was focused along Georgia Highway 112. One home sustained minor to moderate damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A major, negatively tilted and closed upper trough rotated through the mid-south and southeast U.S. on March 1st. A 150kt jet was located over the region at 250mb with a strong 50kt low-level jet from central Alabama into central Tennessee. A wedge of cool air was present over much of north central and northeast Georgia. Rain, which spread over this area early in the day, helped enhance the wedge of cool air. Little to no severe weather was noted north of the wedge boundary across north Georgia where the air mass remained relatively cool and stable. Meanwhile...a warm, humid air mass was present across much of central and south Georgia where dewpoints had risen well into the 60s during the afternoon. The strong upper dynamics present over this region combined with the instability just south of the wedge provided a very favorable environment for long lived, strong tornadoes. A total of 14 tornadoes affecting 17 counties tracked across central and east central Georgia and within the Peachtree City, Georgia county warning area during the late afternoon and evening hours of March 1st. This was the second greatest number of tornadoes recorded to have occurred in the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area within a 24-hour period, second only to the 16 tornadoes, affecting 18 counties, associated with Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005. The March 1st tornadoes spanned an area from Stewart county in the far southwest part of the county warning area to Warren county in the far east central portion of the county warning area. The first tornado touched down in Stewart county at 4:11 pm EST and the last tornado lifted in Marion county at 10:55 pm EST. By far the hardest hit county was Sumter county, and especially the city of Americus, where hundreds of homes and business, including the regional hospital, were heavily damaged or destroyed. Additional tornadoes were reported further south in Tallahassee and Jacksonville's, Florida's forecast areas. Federal disaster assistance had been approved for 1,836 households across the state for a total of $14.2 million. Another $5.8 million had been approved for public assistance of debris removal and to repair infrastructure. The Small Business Association also approved $7 million in disaster assistance loans. Overall damages, however, are estimated to be several hundred million. Substantial rainfall fell across much of the state, but rainfall amounts of three to five inches were common across central and east central areas. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Hancock, Putnam, and Baldwin county areas, where some spots received in excess of six inches of rain. Some flooding was reported in these areas.
2007-03-01231°19'N / 84°27'W31°24'N / 84°13'W15.00 Miles200 Yards631.3M0KBaker
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF-2 tornado touched down in rural Baker County west of Newton, then traveled rapidly northeast, and caused extensive damage to a mobile home park a mile north of Newton. Six people died and three were injured when their mobile homes were demolished by the tornado. A church was destroyed on State Highway 37 a few miles west of Newton. GEMA and FEMA damage assessments determined ten minor damaged homes, nine major damaged homes, and 18 destroyed homes. The tornado crossed into northern Mitchell County north of Baconton. A state of emergency was declared by the Governor. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed during the afternoon of March 1 ahead of advancing warm front across southwest Georgia, producing several reports of wind damage. Later that evening into the predawn hours of March 2, a squall line formed ahead of a cold front, with several reports of wind damage and tornadoes across portions of southwest and south central Georgia. One of the tornadoes tore through a mobile home park just north of Newton, killing six and injuring three.
2007-03-02231°22'N / 84°12'W31°27'N / 84°05'W8.00 Miles200 Yards002.3M500KMitchell
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The EF-2 tornado moved northeast from Baker County into Mitchell County just west of Baconton. GEMA and FEMA assessed 26 minor damaged homes, 25 major damaged homes, and two destroyed homes. Thirteen businesses sustained minor losses. Most of the damage occurred just north of Baconton on Gravel Hill Road in the Pleasant Grove community. Over 200 acres of pecan trees were uprooted. The tornado flipped over a semi on U.S. Highway 19 about four miles north of Baconton then crossed into southeastern Dougherty County. A state of emergency was declared by the Governor. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed during the afternoon of March 1 ahead of advancing warm front across southwest Georgia, producing several reports of wind damage. Later that evening into the predawn hours of March 2, a squall line formed ahead of a cold front, with several reports of wind damage and tornadoes across portions of southwest and south central Georgia. One of the tornadoes tore through a mobile home park just north of Newton, killing six and injuring three.
2007-03-02231°26'N / 84°05'W31°28'N / 84°00'W6.00 Miles200 Yards00300K0KDougherty
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The EF-2 tornado continued on its northeast track from northern Mitchell County into southeastern Dougherty County. It ripped carports and roof shingles off several homes on County Line Road and Jenkins Road. It also snapped hundreds of trees before it crossed into western Worth County. Ten homes suffered minor damage and two were heavily damaged. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed during the afternoon of March 1 ahead of advancing warm front across southwest Georgia, producing several reports of wind damage. Later that evening into the predawn hours of March 2, a squall line formed ahead of a cold front, with several reports of wind damage and tornadoes across portions of southwest and south central Georgia. One of the tornadoes tore through a mobile home park just north of Newton, killing six and injuring three.
2007-03-02231°27'N / 84°00'W31°28'N / 83°58'W2.00 Miles200 Yards00175K0KWorth
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The EF-2 tornado moved into western Worth County from southeastern Dougherty County. It uprooted trees and damaged several mobile homes north of Bridgeboro before lifting. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed during the afternoon of March 1 ahead of advancing warm front across southwest Georgia, producing several reports of wind damage. Later that evening into the predawn hours of March 2, a squall line formed ahead of a cold front, with several reports of wind damage and tornadoes across portions of southwest and south central Georgia. One of the tornadoes tore through a mobile home park just north of Newton, killing six and injuring three.
2007-03-02231°26'N / 83°53'W31°30'N / 83°51'W5.00 Miles150 Yards02275K0KWorth
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado, rated EF-2, was spawned from the same supercell thunderstorm that produced the earlier tornado in Worth County. It touched down near McCarty Road. A brick frame house sustained severe roof damage with a couple of exterior walls collapsing. Two vehicles parked outside were carried into a nearby field. Large oak trees were uprooted, with one falling on a house. One mobile home was flipped over and rolled into a nearby tree. The tornado then moved northeast into a forest and uprooted hundreds of pines. It flattened a house, causing two minor injuries, before lifting just west of State Highway 33. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed during the afternoon of March 1 ahead of advancing warm front across southwest Georgia, producing several reports of wind damage. Later that evening into the predawn hours of March 2, a squall line formed ahead of a cold front, with several reports of wind damage and tornadoes across portions of southwest and south central Georgia. One of the tornadoes tore through a mobile home park just north of Newton, killing six and injuring three.
2007-03-02231°30'N / 83°45'W31°31'N / 83°42'W3.00 Miles200 Yards00500K0KWorth
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF-2 tornado touched down on Sumner Lakes Road just south of Sumner. One mobile home was completely destroyed, with the debris blown several hundred yards away. The four occupants inside received warning of the approaching tornado and promptly vacated the home for a reinforced shelter. Of the two dozen structures that were damaged, half were heavily damaged. Numerous utility poles and trees in the path of the tornado were snapped. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed during the afternoon of March 1 ahead of advancing warm front across southwest Georgia, producing several reports of wind damage. Later that evening into the predawn hours of March 2, a squall line formed ahead of a cold front, with several reports of wind damage and tornadoes across portions of southwest and south central Georgia. One of the tornadoes tore through a mobile home park just north of Newton, killing six and injuring three.
2007-04-15232°25'N / 82°57'W32°27'N / 82°51'W6.00 Miles200 Yards03400K0KLaurens
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA confirmed that an EF2 tornado had touched down in central Laurens county, about 8.5 miles south-southwest of Dublin, or just south of Garetta, near the intersection of U.S. Highway 441/319 and Georgia Highway 117. The tornado traveled east-northeast across Turkey Creek Church Road, lifting approximately 5.5 miles south-southeast of Dublin near the Oconee River. The tornado had a path length of approximately six miles and a maximum path width of 200 yards. Maximum wind speeds were estimated at 120 mph. Most of the damage caused by the tornado was along Turkey Creek Church Road between U.S. Highway 441 and the Oconee River. A tied-down double-wide mobile home was completely destroyed along Turkey Creek Church Road resulting in two injuries. Another tied-down mobile home was destroyed in the same area with two adults and two children inside. All occupants survived, but one sustained minor injuries. The carport of a site-built home was removed as well as a portion of the roof. Several other mobile homes and site-built homes sustained minor damage from wind and fallen trees. A large greenhouse was also destroyed. A number of trees and power lines were down all along the path of the tornado. A few trees were also down just prior to the path of the tornado near Rentz and Cadwell. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The fourth tornado outbreak of the year for the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area, and the second major tornado outbreak for the year, occurred across the southern portion of the forecast area, or central Georgia. A broad upper trough over the central U.S. was tracking eastward while a surface low deepened rapidly as it moved from northern Mississippi into eastern Virginia. A strong low-level jet accompanied the system with 50-60 knot winds observed at 850mb across central and south Georgia late in the day on the 14th. The low-level jet transported deep Gulf moisture northward into the region. Sunshine during the early part of the day destabilized the region sufficiently to allow for strong to severe supercell thunderstorms to track across central Georgia just south of a warm frontal boundary across north Georgia. Damage surveys confirmed that nine tornadoes tracked across central Georgia, including many of the same areas that were affected during the major tornado outbreak on March 1st. The was the second most significant tornado outbreak to impact the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area since the August 29, 2005 outbreak associated with Hurricane Katrinia. The state insurance commissioner reported that at least 81 site-built homes, 28 mobile homes, and 10 businesses were damaged or destroyed during the event. Damages to structures alone were near $5 million, with additional damages the result of downed trees and power lines.
2007-04-15232°33'N / 82°09'W32°37'N / 82°06'W5.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0KEmanuel
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet another tornado struck in Emanuel county, this time on the far eastern end of the county. This tornado was an EF2 tornado and touched down about two miles southeast of Twin City and traveled northeast to a point about five miles northeast of Twin City. The total tornado path length was five miles with a maximum path width of 200 yards. The maximum wind speed in this tornado was estimated to be 115 mph. Two homes along the path of the tornado sustained major damage when they both lost a significant portion of their roofs and outer walls. A mobile home was also damaged and some nearby outbuildings were destroyed. A large portion of the tornado was through a rural area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The fourth tornado outbreak of the year for the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area, and the second major tornado outbreak for the year, occurred across the southern portion of the forecast area, or central Georgia. A broad upper trough over the central U.S. was tracking eastward while a surface low deepened rapidly as it moved from northern Mississippi into eastern Virginia. A strong low-level jet accompanied the system with 50-60 knot winds observed at 850mb across central and south Georgia late in the day on the 14th. The low-level jet transported deep Gulf moisture northward into the region. Sunshine during the early part of the day destabilized the region sufficiently to allow for strong to severe supercell thunderstorms to track across central Georgia just south of a warm frontal boundary across north Georgia. Damage surveys confirmed that nine tornadoes tracked across central Georgia, including many of the same areas that were affected during the major tornado outbreak on March 1st. The was the second most significant tornado outbreak to impact the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area since the August 29, 2005 outbreak associated with Hurricane Katrinia. The state insurance commissioner reported that at least 81 site-built homes, 28 mobile homes, and 10 businesses were damaged or destroyed during the event. Damages to structures alone were near $5 million, with additional damages the result of downed trees and power lines.
2007-04-15232°11'N / 83°10'W32°12'N / 83°07'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00500K0KDodge
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet another tornado touched down in Dodge county and traveled very near the city of Eastman once again. This tornado was from a different complex of thunderstorms than the one that caused the first tornado earlier. However, this was the same complex of thunderstorms that caused the tornado earlier in Crisp county. This time the tornado touched down one mile south of downtown Eastman, traveling northeast. The total path length was 4.5 miles with a maximum path width of 200 yards. The maximum wind speed within the tornado was estimated to be 120 mph. The Dodge County Road Department's garage was destroyed. Two mobile homes in the area were destroyed. A nearby home suffered significant damage when parts of its roof, an exterior wall, and patio were removed. An adjacent barn was also destroyed. Several other homes in the area sustained minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The fourth tornado outbreak of the year for the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area, and the second major tornado outbreak for the year, occurred across the southern portion of the forecast area, or central Georgia. A broad upper trough over the central U.S. was tracking eastward while a surface low deepened rapidly as it moved from northern Mississippi into eastern Virginia. A strong low-level jet accompanied the system with 50-60 knot winds observed at 850mb across central and south Georgia late in the day on the 14th. The low-level jet transported deep Gulf moisture northward into the region. Sunshine during the early part of the day destabilized the region sufficiently to allow for strong to severe supercell thunderstorms to track across central Georgia just south of a warm frontal boundary across north Georgia. Damage surveys confirmed that nine tornadoes tracked across central Georgia, including many of the same areas that were affected during the major tornado outbreak on March 1st. The was the second most significant tornado outbreak to impact the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area since the August 29, 2005 outbreak associated with Hurricane Katrinia. The state insurance commissioner reported that at least 81 site-built homes, 28 mobile homes, and 10 businesses were damaged or destroyed during the event. Damages to structures alone were near $5 million, with additional damages the result of downed trees and power lines.
2007-12-15232°20'N / 82°39'W32°22'N / 82°37'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00100K0KTreutlen
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that a tornado, an EF2 at maximum intensity, tracked across southwest Treutlen county, west of Soperton. The tornado touched down as an EF1 in a heavily forested area approximately one mile southwest of Lothair. Significant tree damage was noted within the forested area as a result of the tornado. The tornado then strengthened to an EF2 as it moved northeast and reached the town of Lothair where a fire department building on Georgia Highway 199 was destroyed. The tornado then weakened back to an EF1 as it continued moving northeastward. A mobile home, about 1.5 miles northeast of Lothair, was completely destroyed by the tornado and another home was moved off its foundation. The tornado then weakened to an EF0 another mile to the northeast and lifted, but not before ripping a carport off a home and throwing it approximately 50 yards across the street. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong negatively titled upper atmospheric disturbance and associated strong cold front were moving through the southeast states late on December 15th. Unseasonably warm conditions had prevailed across this region of the country throughout the preceding days, while much colder weather and significant winter weather prevailed to the northwest across the southern plains and midwest. A wedge of cool air was intensifying across north central and northeast Georgia, with the front marking this wedge of cooler air lying across central and southeast Georgia. Meanwhile, deep coastal low development along the mid-Atlantic coast was underway as the upper trough rotated into the southeast states. The combination of these strong dynamics, a strong low-level jet, and unseasonably warm, moist air across southeast Georgia in advance of the front and upper disturbance resulted in the development of thunderstorms across south Georgia. As the storms moved northeast and encountered the wedge front, they quickly became rotating supercells spawning three tornadoes in a one-hour period across the southeast portion of the Peachtree City, Georgia Weather Forecast Office County Warning Area.
2008-03-14233°46'N / 84°25'W33°44'N / 84°21'W5.00 Miles200 Yards13025.0M0KFulton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A ground and aerial survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia in cooperation with the Atlanta Police Department, confirmed that an EF2 tornado tracked through the heart of the city of Atlanta causing millions of dollars of damage to buildings, including several high rise business and/or hotel buildings, within the downtown Atlanta area. The tornado also resulted in one death and 30 non-life threatening injuries. The death occurred on Decatur Street across from the Martin Luther King MARTA station. The tornado first touched down near the intersection of Simpson and Burbank Streets in the Vine City neighborhood just west of downtown Atlanta. The tornado then tracked near due east over the center of the Georgia World Congress Center, about 100 yards north of the Georgia Dome, which was concurrently hosting an SEC basketball conference, across the CNN Omni Hotel Complex and the Phillips Arena, where an NBA basketball game was underway, across the Equitable Bank tower, across the Interstate 75/85 Downtown Connector at the Edgewood Exit, and then into the Cotton Mill Lofts across the Oakland Cemetery located near the Fulton/DeKalb county line. The tornado then weakened, but continued into extreme western DeKalb county before finally lifting for good. The tornado had a total path length of six miles, five of which fell within Fulton county, and a maximum path width of 200 yards. Maximum wind speeds were estimated at 130 mph, which is a high end EF2. The tornado had a path width of 100 yards as it moved across the Georgia World Congress Center and CNN Omni Hotel complex and was ranked an EF1 at that point. At least 50 homes were damaged by the tornado, as were several multi-story towers and commercial buildings near and east of Centennial Olympic Park. Windows were blown out of several of these high rise tower buildings at multiple heights. Damage in residential and industrial areas ranged from roofing materials blown from homes and businesses to trees falling on structures and vehicles. The Cotton Mill Lofts experienced some of the most significant damage with the roof blown off and exterior walls on the top or fourth floors blown inward. Two sections of the fourth flour collapsed all the way into the basement of the building, trapping several people. Most of the injuries observed were associated with this damage. Damaged buildings and structures in the downtown Atlanta area included two Hermes 65-foot tall light towers at Centennial Olympic Park, the CNN Center/Omni Hotel, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Equitable Bank Building, Georgia-Pacific Building, Georgia World Congress Center, Grady Hospital, Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum, Martin Luther King Center, Oakland Cemetery, SunTrust Building, Tabernacle, Ted's Montana Grill, Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel, and Walton Building Barbershop. In addition to the damage reports, a wind gust of 83 mph was measured at Atlanta Fire Station No. 13 at 447 Flat Shoals Road Southeast in Atlanta, and a wind gust of 65 mph was measured at Atlanta Fire Station No. 4 at 309 Edgewood Drive in Atlanta. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A series of vigorous upper-level disturbances were racing through a fast zonal flow across the southern states. A supercell thunderstorm developed across north central Alabama and tracked southeast into northwest Georgia and eventually across downtown Atlanta, spawning an EF2 tornado that tracked right through the heart of downtown Atlanta. This was the first recorded incident of a tornado touchdown in downtown Atlanta. The tornado wreaked havoc on the downtown streets as it tracked from the Vine City neighborhood on the west, across the I-75/85 corridor, through the Cotton Mill Lofts, and into extreme western DeKalb county before weakening. One death was reported and dozens were injured as they were trapped in downtown buildings amidst debris. Damage was in the millions.
2008-03-15234°00'N / 82°43'W34°01'N / 82°36'W8.00 Miles100 Yards00100K0KElbert
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: NWS survey found a tornado damage track in far southern and southeast Elbert County. The tornado, which was spawned from a supercell, touched down southeast of Fortsonia near the intersection of River Rd and Flatwoods Rd. As the tornado tracked east along River Rd, damage was mainly confined to trees and power lines. The tornado began to take on a more east/southeast track near the intersection of River Rd and Balchin Rd, remaining just north of the Wilkes County line. Intensification occurred just west of highway 79 near its intersection with Cooter Creek Rd. The tornado continued to track east southeast, snapping or uprooting numerous trees between Cooter Creek Rd and the Broad River. Two homes received heavy roof damage consistent with EF2 intensity on Bramblett Circle along the Broad River. A boat dock was also lifted and tossed 25 feet in this area. The tornado continued to blow down trees before finally lifting in Bobby Brown State Park in the extreme southeast corner of the county. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Several supercell thunderstorms affected the mountains and foothills of extreme northeast Georgia during the afternoon and early evening hours. Very large hail, damaging winds and a few tornadoes accompanied the storms.
2008-03-15233°12'N / 82°23'W33°12'N / 82°14'W8.00 Miles440 Yards00500K0KJefferson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down in northern Jefferson county. The tornado touched down approximately one mile northwest of Wrens and traveled east a little less than nine miles across northeastern Jefferson county and the town of Matthews, before crossing into Burke county just south of the town of Keysville. The tornado continued on the ground an additional eight to nine miles into Burke county before finally lifting near the Applewood County Club in Burke county. The total tornado path length was 19 miles. The maximum path width was one-quarter mile and maximum sustained winds were estimated at 120 mph. The most significant damage occurred in Matthews, where several mobile homes were destroyed. Two businesses in Wrens were destroyed and several others sustained damage. A church and an elementary school, and several homes in Wrens also suffered at least minor damage from wind and numerous downed trees. ficant roof damage. No serious injuries or fatalities were reported from this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The pattern that began to evolve on March 14th continued and intensified on March 15th. A stationary front remained draped across north Georgia from near Atlanta to Athens. South of this front, the air mass was becoming increasingly warm, moist and unstable. Meanwhile, aloft, a low amplitude, yet vigorous short wave embedded within a fast zonal flow, was tracking rapidly eastward from the mid south into the southeast. Strong shear and high helicity combined with the unstable air mass and the frontal boundary to allow repeated severe thunderstorms to develop and track eastward along the boundary across north Georgia. The activity began early in the day as a complex of thunderstorms moved into the area from Alabama and continued until nearly midnight. As the day progressed, especially during the afternoon, the development of the activity gradually progressed further south and by midnight had reached the south and southeast parts of the state. Numerous severe thunderstorms and tornadic supercells were observed throughout the day. Historical records indicate that this was one of the most significant severe weather days for the Peachtree City Weather Forecast Office with more events and warnings than had been observed since May 2003.
2008-03-15233°12'N / 82°14'W33°12'N / 82°00'W14.00 Miles880 Yards000K0KBurke
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A supercell spawned a tornado over Wrens in Jefferson county which moved across northern Burke county. It destroyed a church, a mobile home, and a large portion of a dairy farming business and damaged other homes and mobile homes. Numerous trees and powerlines were down. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Three supercells tracked across portions of the GA CSRA and produce multiple long-lived tornadoes that produced significant damage.
2008-03-15232°23'N / 81°18'W32°22'N / 81°12'W7.00 Miles440 Yards051.5M0KEffingham
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF2 Tornado was confirmed by a Storm Survey conducted by the Charleston, South Carolina National Weather Service Forecast Office. The Tornado touched down in Effingham county 1 mile northeast of Springfield, Georgia at 934 PM EDT and traveled southeast approximately 7 miles before lifting at 943 PM EDT about 6 miles east-southeast of Springfield, Georgia. This Tornado destroyed three mobile homes, damaged three to four dozen homes, knocked down 15 high voltage transmission towers, destroyed or damaged 20 vehicles, destroyed numerous outbuildings, sheds, and barns. Five people were injured when the mobile home they were in was blown over and rolled a time or two. Another person was injured when they drove a car into a tree that had fallen across the road. This tornado was a quarter mile wide at its widest point when it crossed Ebenezer Road and had maximum sustained winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A large and intense area of low pressure lifted northward through the central Appalachians, dragging a strong cold front toward southern South Carolina and southeast Georgia. The combination of the approaching cold front along with strong dynamic forcing and plenty of instability resulted in a widespread organized severe weather outbreak across the region.
2008-03-15232°19'N / 81°12'W1.00 Mile100 Yards003.0M0KEffingham
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An EF2 Tornado was confirmed by a Storm Survey conducted by the Charleston, South Carolina National Weather Service Forecast Office. The Tornado touched down in Effingham county 3.5 miles northeast of Rincon, Georgia and just northwest of the Georgia Power McIntosh Plant around 944 PM EDT and traveled southeast approximately a half a mile before lifting at 945 PM EDT. This Tornado destroyed a water cooling tower, damaged another water cooling tower and several buildings, toppled two high voltage transmission towers, knocked down or uprooted several dozen trees, tossed tractor trailer cargo containers with equipment inside up to 100 yards. In addition, at the time of the survey one of the tractor trailer containers could not be found. A steel hoist roof assembly weighing a couple thousand pounds used to load and unload heavy items was tossed 100 feet. This tornado was up to 100 yards wide and had maximum sustained winds estimated between 120 and 130 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A large and intense area of low pressure lifted northward through the central Appalachians, dragging a strong cold front toward southern South Carolina and southeast Georgia. The combination of the approaching cold front along with strong dynamic forcing and plenty of instability resulted in a widespread organized severe weather outbreak across the region.
2008-05-11233°04'N / 84°55'W33°04'N / 84°55'W1.00 Mile150 Yards0080K0KTroup
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down approximately one mile south of Louise or 5.5 miles northeast of LaGrange in northeast Troup county. This was just one of 15 tornadoes that affected the central portion of Georgia early on Mother's Day 2008 and the first of two tornadoes, within the same parent thunderstorm, to touch down in Troup county. The tornado touched down near the intersection of U.S. Highway 29 and Willowwood Road. The tornado tracked approximately 1 mile to the east-northeast to a point less than one mile east-southeast of Louise. The path width was approximately 150 yards wide. Three homes were damaged, a well house was destroyed, and numerous large trees were snapped in half along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11233°33'N / 85°13'W33°33'N / 85°13'W002.0M0KCarroll
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that two brief spinup tornadoes occurred within a larger and extensive area of straight-line wind damage across much of central Carroll county. The first brief tornado spinup was an EF2 in the Jonesville community, just northeast of Bowdon and west of Carrollton. The tornado touched down approximately two miles east of where the straight-line wind damage began. The tornado was only on the ground approximately 100 yards and had a path width of 100 yards as well. The roofs of two homes were completely blown off the structures, including nearly $1 million in damages to a Dalton Carpet Outlet. Hundreds of trees were also down in the area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11233°06'N / 84°53'W33°07'N / 84°52'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0050K0KTroup
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that a second tornado touched down in Troup county. This was spawned by the same thunderstorm that earlier spawned the first tornado south of Louise. This second tornado was also rated an EF2, touching down initially 4.5 south-southeast of Hogansville along the 1100 block of Perkins Road. The tornado tracked about one mile east-northeast across Troup county before crossing into Meriwether county. At the point of the initial touchdown on Perkins Road, a house was damaged and two trucks were destroyed as they were lifted up and tossed approximately 50 feet. Just before the tornado crossed into Meriwether county, near the intersection of Perkins Road and Duchesne Lane along the Troup/Meriwether county line, it completly lifted the roof off a brick home and partially destroyed a cinder block outbuilding. The path length within Troup county was approximately one mile with a maximum path width of 300 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11233°06'N / 84°51'W33°07'N / 84°49'W2.00 Miles300 Yards0030K0KMeriwether
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the tornado, that originally touched down in northeastern Troup county, continued into Meriwether county. The EF2 tornado entered Meriwether county a little over two miles west-southwest of Saint Marks and tracked to a point approximately 9.25 miles northwest of Greenville along Saint Marks Road, approximately 3.67 miles northeast of Saint Marks. The tornado tracked a little over two miles within Meriwether county with a maximum path width of 300 yards. Many trees were snapped or uprooted along the path of the tornado. Structural damage was confined to one shed, which was destroyed, and minor roof damage to several homes in the Saint Marks area and east-northeastward toward U.S. Highway 27. Some of this later damage may have been caused by straight-line winds. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11233°34'N / 84°57'W33°34'N / 84°57'W007.0M0KCarroll
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet a second brief spinup tornado, spawned by the same parent thunderstorm, touched down in Carroll county. This tornado affected eastern Carroll county, touching down near the Diamond Court Subdivision off Cross Plains-Hulett Road, about three miles south of Hulett. Again, this tornado was embedded within a much larger and extensive area of straight-line wind damage that tracked across much of central Carroll county from near Bowden to the Douglas county line, southeast of Hulett. One home was completely destroyed by this second tornado and another received significant damage. A number of other homes sustained minor to moderate roof damage. Again, the path length and path width of this tornado were also only 100 yards. The combined damage from the two tornadoes and straight-line wind damage within Carroll county caused damages in excess of $10 million. Damages consisted of the destruction of three mobile homes, 18 mobile homes with major damage, and 16 mobile homes with minor damage. Thirty-five single family dwellings were destroyed, 211 single-family dwellings sustained major damage, and another 346 suffered minor damage. In addition, a total of four businesses were destroyed, 133 more which had major damage, and 31 suffering minor damage. A public works building was also destoyed. Finally, at least $800,000 in damages was reported to electric utility poles in Carroll county. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11233°37'N / 84°16'W33°36'N / 84°13'W3.00 Miles100 Yards007.5M0KClayton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado with maximum winds of 130 mph touched down in far northeast Clayton county, approximately four miles northeast of Morrow, and tracked on the ground for nearly 19 miles from northeast Clayton into northern Henry, southern Rockdale, and into western Newton county before finally lifting. Within Clayton county the tornado path was about 2.75 miles long with a maximum path width of 100 yards. Shortly after touchdown, the tornado caused extensive and significant damage within a 2.5 square mile area of the Ellenwood community. There were 185 private dwellings damaged, 53 of which were destroyed or left uninhabitable. At least 500 residents were displaced from their homes. Numerous trees and power lines were also down in the area. By far, the worst damage caused by this tornado occurred within Clayton county as the tornado weakened as it tracked further east into Henry, Rockdale, and Newton county. Despite the extensive damage, no injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11232°49'N / 83°46'W32°45'N / 83°37'W17.00 Miles100 Yards005.0M0KBibb
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down near Lizella and continued across Bibb county into extreme western Twiggs county near Dry Branch producing sporadic, but significant damage as it varied in intensity from EF0 to EF2. The tornado tracked from just east-northeast of Lizella across the south shores of Lake Tobesofkee, then across the city of Macon, producing widespread significant damage, and then eastward to the Twiggs county line. By far the most significant damage occurred within the city of Macon, especially along Eisenhower Parkway and Pio Nono Avenue where two businesses were completely destroyed and several others were heavily damaged. Macon State College was also hit by the tornado, destroying the gymnasium and causing significant damage to a number of other buildings on the campus. In addition, more than 50 percent of the trees on the campus either snapped in half or uprooted. Maximum wind speeds within the tornado were estimated at 130 mph, which occurred near the intersection of Eisenhower Parkway and Pio Nono Avenue. Nearly all of the 18 mile long path of the tornado fell within Bibb county. Less than one mile of the tornado occurred within Twiggs county. The maximum path width of the tornado was estimated to be 100 yards, mainly as it traveled through the Macon State College area. A summary of damages from Bibb county shows that 1,479 homes suffered at least some damage as a result of the storms. Ninety-three of these homes were destroyed, 275 suffered major damage, and 569 sustained minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11232°36'N / 83°04'W32°36'N / 82°50'W14.00 Miles250 Yards221.4M0KLaurens
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down in far northern Laurens county, just south of the Wilkinson county line. The tornado initially touched down as an EF0 tornado near the intersection of Old Macon Road and Oscar Wynn Road. The tornado quickly intensified to an EF2 tornado as it tracked almost due eastward and crossed U.S. Highway 441 at the 2700 block, about seven miles northwest of Dublin, or near the intersection of U.S. Highway 441 and Evergreen Road. Here, a double-wide mobile home was destroyed and the occupants, a man and woman in their early 50s were both killed. Their two grandchildren sustained non-life threatening injuries. Another home along Evergreen Road was also destroyed as the EF2 tornado continued on its eastward track. The tornado continued eastward and weakened back to an EF0 as it crossed the Oconee River. The tornado then once again strengthened to an EF2 as it crossed Buckeye Road in the 2100 block, approximaltely four miles north-northeast of East Dublin. EF2 tornado damage was noted to a home at 2185 Buckeye Road and EF1 tornado damage to another home at 1533 Buckeye Road. In between the destruction to the homes on Evergreen Road and those on Buckeye Road, sporadic tree and power line damage was observed, mostly consistent with an EF0 intensity rating. The tornado path length was about 15 miles. A maximum path width of 250 yards was observed at the tornado crossed U.S. Highway 441 at Evergreen Road. All together this tornado resulted in the destruction of two mobile homes, major damage to six other site built homes, some shifted off their foundations, one home with a missing roof, and many other homes with minor roof or siding damage. Numerous sheds and outbuildings were also destroyed. Several dozen trees were either uprooted or snapped off along the path of the tornado, along with several power lines. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11232°42'N / 82°31'W32°43'N / 82°27'W5.00 Miles880 Yards037.0M0KJohnson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet another tornado had touched down within Johnson county. This tornado was an EF2 and touched down in far eastern Johnson county, about one mile northwest of Kite and continued on an east-northeastward track into Emanuel county, crossing into Emanuel county just west of the city of Blundale. Maximum winds within the tornado were estimated to be 130 mph and the maximum path width was determined to be up to 1/2 mile wide. As the tornado touched down northwest of Kite, a mobile home was rolled and several other homes and vehicles were damaged along U.S. Highway 221 north of Kite. The most significant damage occurred about three miles north of Kite, along Minton Chapel Road, where a mobile home was completely destroyed and the debris thrown up to 50 feet away. Three injuries were reported as a result of the destruction of this mobile home. An additional indirect injury occurred later when a tree fell on an individual during debris clean up. A well constructed metal building in the same general area sustained substantial wall, frame, and column anchor failures. A number of trees and several power lines were downed along the path of the tornado as well. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11232°43'N / 82°27'W32°45'N / 82°24'W3.00 Miles880 Yards00750K0KEmanuel
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the second tornado, an EF2, that touched down in far eastern Johnson county, just northwest of Kite, continued on an east-northeastward track into far northwestern Emanuel county, lifting approximately one mile west of Blundale, just north of Cordie Road. Maximum winds within the tornado were estimated to be 130 mph with a maximum path width up to 1/2 mile as the tornado first entered Emanuel county. Approximately 28 homes in Emanuel county sustained damage from the tornado, two of which were destroyed, 13 of which suffered major damage, and 10 had minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2008-05-11232°15'N / 82°23'W32°15'N / 82°22'W1.00 Mile150 Yards03500K0KToombs
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down in extreme northwest Toombs county, approxmiately three miles south-southwest of Normantown. This tornado was spawned by the same thunderstorm that less than 10 minutes prior had spanwed an EF3 tornado, the strongest tornado of this event, just south of Soperton in Treutlen county, which tracked into extreme northeast Montgomery county. This first tornado in Toombs county was only on the ground for about one mile, but caused considerable damage. Four mobile homes were completely destroyed, resulting in three minor injuries and the displacement of seven families from their homes. A church also sustained heavy damage. Two brick homes were damaged as well as several barns, sheds, and storage buildings. In addition a tractor-trailer rig was overturned. Some 200 to 300 pine trees were also blown down in the area. The tornado path width was determined to be 150 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
2009-02-18233°13'N / 84°46'W33°14'N / 84°30'W16.00 Miles1760 Yards00500K0KCoweta
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the EF2 tornado that touched down at 923 Bradberry Road, just inside the Meriwether county line, quickly crossed into Coweta county and continued on an east-northeastward track across far southern Coweta county, crossing into Spalding county approximately four miles east-northeast of Haralson. Within Coweta county the tornado caused minor to moderate damage to several homes. One home completely lost its roof. A horse was killed from flying debris near U.S. Highway 27A. Hundreds of trees were also blown down along the path of the tornado. The tornado tracked almost 16 miles within Coweta county. The maximum path width was estimated to be one mile with maximum winds of 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front accompanied and deep negatively tilted upper trough through the eastern U.S. from the 18th into the 19th. An unseasonably warm and unstable air mass developed in advance of the cold front during the late afternoon and early evening across north and central Georgia as warm, moist air rode northward into Georgia on a strong low-level jet. Afternoon temperatures in the 70s and dewpoints in the 60s, combined with strong shear and moderate instability, resulted in the development of numerous supercell thunderstorms from mid-afternoon until a few hours after midnight on the 19th. Ten tornadoes, ranging in scale from EF0 to EF3 tracked across several north and central Georgia counties. The worst tornadoes affected the east central Georgia counties of Jasper, Putnam, Hancock, and Jasper. A death was observed in Hancock county with an EF3 tornado and several injuries were reported from Putnam and Hancock counties. In addition to the tornadoes, very large hail occurred with several of the thunderstorms, including four-inch diameter hail in Coweta and Fayette counties just south of Atlanta. Numerous reports of golf ball and larger-sized hail were received. The event resulted in millions of dollars of damage and the destruction of several homes in north and central Georgia counties.
2009-02-18233°15'N / 84°30'W33°12'N / 84°25'W5.00 Miles1760 Yards00825K0KSpalding
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the tornado that initially touched down in Meriwether county, then tracked across southern Coweta county, crossed into Spalding county approximately four miles east-northeast of Haralson or 7 miles west of Zetella. The tornado remain an EF2 as it tracked across southwest and into south central Spalding county, lifting just shy of the Pike county line about five miles west of Rover. Extensive damage was observed along the track of the tornado Four homes were completely destroyed and 40 others sustained minor to moderate damage. Dozens of trees were also down along the path of the tornado. The tornado tracked roughly five miles with southern Spalding county with a maximum path width of one mile and maximum winds of 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front accompanied and deep negatively tilted upper trough through the eastern U.S. from the 18th into the 19th. An unseasonably warm and unstable air mass developed in advance of the cold front during the late afternoon and early evening across north and central Georgia as warm, moist air rode northward into Georgia on a strong low-level jet. Afternoon temperatures in the 70s and dewpoints in the 60s, combined with strong shear and moderate instability, resulted in the development of numerous supercell thunderstorms from mid-afternoon until a few hours after midnight on the 19th. Ten tornadoes, ranging in scale from EF0 to EF3 tracked across several north and central Georgia counties. The worst tornadoes affected the east central Georgia counties of Jasper, Putnam, Hancock, and Jasper. A death was observed in Hancock county with an EF3 tornado and several injuries were reported from Putnam and Hancock counties. In addition to the tornadoes, very large hail occurred with several of the thunderstorms, including four-inch diameter hail in Coweta and Fayette counties just south of Atlanta. Numerous reports of golf ball and larger-sized hail were received. The event resulted in millions of dollars of damage and the destruction of several homes in north and central Georgia counties.
2009-02-19230°48'N / 84°10'W30°48'N / 84°04'W6.00 Miles250 Yards001.0M0KGrady
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down near Rawls and Lewis Roads just west of Georgia Highway 93. Damage along Rawls Road was limited to uprooted or snapped trees. One horse trailer was tipped over. The tornado continued eastward and moved a double wide modular home off its foundation on the west side of Holstein Lane. On the east side of Holstein Lane, a large cinder-block building was severely damaged, with the top level of the structure destroyed and lower west- and south-side facing walls collapsed. Three large grain silos south of the building were damaged or destroyed, and two large barns 50 yards to the east were destroyed. The tornado crossed Georgia Highway 93 just north of Lewis Road and plowed through a pine forest along the north side of Lower Cairo Road. Before crossing into Thomas County, over 95 percent of the trees near Plantation Drive adjacent to Lower Cairo Road were snapped. According to the Grady County Emergency Management Agency, a total of 15 homes were damaged, with about 300 residents without power. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Just after midnight on the 19th, a long track supercell thunderstorm spawned an EF-2 tornado south of Cairo in Grady County. The tornado raced to the east into Thomas County, causing EF-2 damage just south of Thomasville. A second tornado developed and produced EF-3 damage near Boston.
2009-02-19230°48'N / 84°04'W30°48'N / 83°54'W10.00 Miles400 Yards0010.0M0KThomas
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado crossed from adjacent Grady County into Thomas County along Lower Cairo Road where it caused extensive damage to a pine forest plantation. Three homes on the south side of the tornado's path were damaged, with one home losing part of its roof. A barn and two garages were damaged or destroyed. Along its path toward U.S. Highway 319 and Cindy Road, numerous pine trees were snapped or uprooted and fell on homes. Brookwood School and its grounds sustained significant damage, including a hole in the roof of the main building. The tornado crossed U.S. Highway 319 near Metcalf Road and moved toward the Southwest Georgia State Hospital just south of Pinetree Boulevard. It snapped more pine trees and removed two air conditioning units from the roof of one of the hospital buildings. Another hospital building was heavily damaged. The tornado began to weaken as it approached U.S. Highway 19 south of Glen Arven Country Club, and crossed U.S. Highway 19 just south of Sunset Drive. Damage in this area was limited to power lines and a few trees. Before lifting, the tornado moved across County Farm Road at the Thomas County Landfill, where a storage building was damaged with debris blown several hundred yards. According to the Thomas County Emergency Management Agency, nine mobile homes were destroyed, 29 single family homes were destroyed, and a total of 170 structures were damaged. About 4,200 residents were without power. The Governor declared a state of emergency in Thomas County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Just after midnight on the 19th, a long track supercell thunderstorm spawned an EF-2 tornado south of Cairo in Grady County. The tornado raced to the east into Thomas County, causing EF-2 damage just south of Thomasville. A second tornado developed and produced EF-3 damage near Boston.
2009-04-10233°28'N / 82°15'W33°27'N / 82°09'W6.00 Miles880 Yards001.0M0KColumbia
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A supercell tornado tracked across Columbia county from northeast of Harlem through Grovetown damaging many homes and taking down numerous trees and powerlines. Several vehicles were crushed and there were about a dozen minor injuries. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Supercell thunderstorms moved across the CSRA and produced large tornadoes. One tornado tracked across Columbia and Richmond counties then went into Aiken county South Carolina along highway 278. The second tornado tracked across Burke county then into lower Barnwell and Allendale counties in South Carolina. Several homes were destroyed and many had moderate to severe damage. Widespread trees and powerlines were also down. Total damage estimate was 3 million dollars.
2009-04-10234°25'N / 83°16'W34°27'N / 83°07'W10.00 Miles200 Yards000K0KFranklin
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado damage path began near Farmers Academy Rd, about 0.5 mile south of highway 106. The tornado crossed Red Hill School Rd, where some outbuildings were destroyed and a couple of mobile homes received minor roof damage. As the tornado continued northeast, some frame homes on highway 106 received minor roof damage. The most significant damage occurred on Crumps Bridge Rd, where one large chicken house was completely destroyed, and several others received major damage. The tornado continued to move northeast, uprooting or snapping off numerous trees as it crossed highway 145 and Greater Hope Rd. From there, the tornado began to move in a more east/northeast direction, continuing to blow down trees as it moved roughly parallel to North Clarks Creek Rd. As the tornado crossed Hulsey Rd, roofs were blown off the wood frame addition to a mobile home and a barn. After the tornado crossed highway 17 and Pleasant Hill Circle, it continued to turn more to the right, traveling due east near the to Wilson Rd, where a mobile home was moved off its foundation, and the steel siding and some roofing material was blown off a building. The tornado continued to travel east, or even east/southeast, before lifting in the Gerrard Rd area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Supercell thunderstorms moved into extreme northeast Georgia in the early evening hours. Tornadoes were spawned by the supercells. There was also quite a bit of large hail and straight-line wind damage.
2009-04-10234°29'N / 85°22'W34°29'N / 85°21'W00900K0KChattooga
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that a brief EF2 tornado had touched down approximately one mile southeast of Summerville and tracked less than one mile almost due east. The tornado was determined to have a maximum path width of 200 yards with maximum winds estimated to be 120 mph. Considerable damage was noted in the Summerville area. Over 30 homes were damaged along with 10 businesses. Most of the damage to these structures was determined to be minor. The majority of the damage occurred on Commerce Street. The brick wall of a car care center collapsed, the roof was shifted and lifted from a lumber warehouse, and windows were blown out of a barbecue restaurant. All of these events occurred on Commerce Street. At the intersection of Cleghorn and Scoggin Streets nearby, a single-wide mobile home was completely destroyed. Although the mobile home was anchored, the metal frame was ripped from the foundation and the home was tossed on its side. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A vigorous upper closed low was moving from the mid-south and Mississippi valley region into the mid-Atlantic and southeast U.S. A strong cold front accompanied the upper system. A strong low-level jet in advance of these weather systems transported warm, moist Gulf air northward into the region. With strong dynamics, hence shear, combined with an unusually moist, unstable atmosphere, the atmosphere was primed for a major weather outbreak. One round of thunderstorms passed through north Georgia during the early morning hours. A few minor severe weather events accompanied this system in northwest Georgia. Partial clearing followed the morning convection, allowing temperatures to soar into the mid 70s across much of north and central Georgia in advance of the main weather system. Scattered to numerous discrete supercell thunderstorms developed during mid-afternoon in northwest Georgia and progressed east and southeast across the remaining portions of the county warning area during the evening hours. Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes lingered into the early morning hours of the 11th across the southern counties of central Georgia. During the eight hour period from 5 pm EDT on April 10th to 1 am EDT on April 11th, a total of 14 tornadoes were confirmed to have touched down in north and central Georgia causing millions in damages. While some injuries were observed, no deaths were observed.
2009-10-27232°00'N / 81°42'W32°00'N / 81°42'W1.00 Mile880 Yards000K425KLiberty
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The United States Army Garrison at Fort Steward, Georgia found 850 full size trees downed in one of their training areas. Crew members of Fort Steward determined many downed trees were in a dropped matchstick pattern. A survey from air and ground confirmed EF2 tornado damage with estimated wind speeds between 115 to 125 miles per hour. The tornado occurred along a southwest to northeast path beginning at latitude and longitude coordinates 32.002, -81.708 and ending at 32.013, -81.708. The tornado path length was 0.80 mile long and approximately 1/4 mile to 1/2 mile wide. A total of 63 acres were damaged. The monetary damage was estimated at $425,000. Timber from the trees will be salvaged. No injuries or deaths resulted from this event. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A weak short wave tracked northeast to the lee of the Southern Appalachians late Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday evening, providing ascent and allowing a band of convection to shift east into the forecast area. Convection became enhanced as a warm front lifted north and west into the forecast area causing dewpoints to surge into the mid 70s and destabilization to occur. Meanwhile, strong low-level shear developed as a low-level jet strengthened to 30-50 kt over the area.
2009-12-02231°30'N / 82°14'W31°31'N / 82°13'W1.00 Mile440 Yards000K0KPierce
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado first touched down at approximately 1415EST in northwest Pierce County near Merson Road and Crump Road. Several trees were damaged and a farm shed had portions of its sheet metal roof removed. Winds here were estimated to have been near 70 mph or EF-0. The tornado moved northeast across several fields and encountered two small farm structures and a wooded area along Tiny Lane. The structures were completely destroyed with their contents strewn across the wooded area. Extensive tree blow down occurred in the woods with many pines snapped at 10 to 15 feet above ground level. The tornado was estimated to have been an EF-1 event in this location with winds of 110 mph. The funnel continued to move across fields next encountering wooded areas and structures near Scuffletown Road. At this point the funnel was one quarter mile or approximately 440 yards wide with winds estimated at 105 mph. Extensive tree blow down continued here with one mobile home destroyed and substantial damage to a wood frame structure. The tornado crossed the Big Satilla Creek at this point, and crossed into Appling County, continuing on a northeast track. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Strong mid and upper low initially over Texas was moving east-northeast while the upper level trough it was embedded in became negatively tilted. This led to a broad diffluent pattern over most of the southeastern states. As the system approached the right rear quadrant of upper jet moved into the forecast area coincident with a low-level jet of, at least, 60 knots. This created atmospheric dynamics favorable for severe weather, with the only limiting factor being modest instability. A warm front over the area during the morning moved rapidly north in response to increasing southerly flow allowing a gradual increase in low level instability. By afternoon several severe weather events and three tornadoes occurred over portions of southeast Georgia.
2009-12-02231°31'N / 82°13'W31°34'N / 82°11'W4.00 Miles440 Yards020K0KAppling
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado first touched down at approximately 1415EST in northwest Pierce County near Merson Road and Crump Road. It crossed the Big Satilla Creek, entering into Appling County at this point, and continued on a northeast track. The funnel may have briefly lifted off the ground at this point. The next significant damage occurred along Metts-Overstreet Road with the complete destruction of a singlewide mobile home and a farm shed at approximately 1425EST. Additionally, at this location, a brick cider block structure had one wall knocked over. The tornado then moved into a dairy just west of the intersection of State Road 15 and Wireglass Road. The event was rated as an EF-2 with winds of 135 mph at this location. Three metal building structures were destroyed with one removed from its foundation and blown into a pile of scrap metal. It is possible the funnel may have approached EF-3 at this particular location with winds of 140 to 150 mph; however, other damage to frame and masonry structures at the dairy suggested a lower wind value should be assigned to this area. One individual escaped injury by jumping into a depressed area inside one of the structures before it blew down around her. East of State Road 15, along Wireglass Road, extensive tree blow down and snapping continued in a tree farm. Once again the funnel likely lifted off the ground touching down again at 1430EST near 4230 Antioch Church Road destroying a doublewide mobile home. At this location, two middle aged individuals were in the bedroom, preparing for work, when the funnel destroyed the mobile home. Both escaped with only minor cuts despite the fact that the doublewide was completely obliterated and the frames bent. Once again at this location the winds were rated at 135 mph for a strong EF-2 rating. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Strong mid and upper low initially over Texas was moving east-northeast while the upper level trough it was embedded in became negatively tilted. This led to a broad diffluent pattern over most of the southeastern states. As the system approached the right rear quadrant of upper jet moved into the forecast area coincident with a low-level jet of, at least, 60 knots. This created atmospheric dynamics favorable for severe weather, with the only limiting factor being modest instability. A warm front over the area during the morning moved rapidly north in response to increasing southerly flow allowing a gradual increase in low level instability. By afternoon several severe weather events and three tornadoes occurred over portions of southeast Georgia.
2010-11-30234°02'N / 83°57'W34°04'N / 83°55'W2.00 Miles100 Yards005.0M0KGwinnett
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down near Holland Park Drive in east central Gwinnett county, or about five miles northwest of Dacula. The tornado then tracked slightly over two miles to the north-northeast between Mountain View High School and Twin Rivers Middle School before lifting just east of the intersection of Gravel Springs Road and Interstate-85. The tornado was determined to have a path width of 300 yards with maximum wind gusts of 130 mph. Extensive damage was observed to homes mainly in the Kirkstone Subdivision of Buford. A total of 56 homes and one business along the path of the tornado sustained at least minor damage. Of these, 15 to 20 homes sustained major damage or were destroyed and thus were declared uninhabitable. One of these homes collapsed on itself. Damage to homes and property was estimated by the state insurance commissioner to exceed $5 million. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A deep full-latitude upper trough was sweeping from the central into the eastern U.S. The trough brought a quick transition to the eastern U.S. from mild fall temperatures to an extended period of well below normal temperatures. As the trough swept through the southeastern U.S. on November 30th, it took on a significant negative tilt. Although only marginal instability was noted because of extensive pre-frontal cloud cover and light to moderate rain showers, a strong 50-60kt low-level jet accompanied the trough as it rotated through Georgia during the afternoon of November 30th. This was sufficient combined with minimal instability (CAPE) in place at the time to support the development of a fairly well marked, yet very narrow, quasi-linear convective system (QLCS) which spawned two tornadoes, one an EF2 causing extensive damage to homes in Gwinnett county, and another weaker tornado in Henry county. In addition, the squall line or QLCS also produced numerous damaging wind events across north and central Georgia.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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