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Elkhorn, NE Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Elkhorn is about the same as Nebraska average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Elkhorn is about the same as Nebraska average and is higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #557

Elkhorn, NE
0.01
Nebraska
0.04
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Elkhorn, NE
0.0000
Nebraska
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #315

Elkhorn, NE
201.99
Nebraska
205.07
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 4,612 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Elkhorn, NE were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:46Cold:87Dense Fog:1Drought:8
Dust Storm:0Flood:357Hail:2,029Heat:20Heavy Snow:47
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:25Landslide:0Strong Wind:112
Thunderstorm Winds:1,579Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:0Winter Storm:137Winter Weather:21
Other:143 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Elkhorn, NE.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Elkhorn, NE.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Elkhorn, NE.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 65 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Elkhorn, NE.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
8.21988-05-07241°11'N / 96°10'W41°12'N / 96°07'W2.50 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Douglas
8.52008-06-08241°11'N / 96°08'W41°13'N / 96°07'W3.00 Miles440 Yards030K0KDouglas
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This is the continuation of tornado number 1 (of 2) to hit the Omaha metro area this night. Tornado number 1 crossed over from Sarpy county near 144th and Harrison Streets before merging with tornado number 2 just east of 132nd and Westwood Lane. From there the merged tornado continued northeast to near 114th and Shirley Streets. Tornado number 1 traveled at about 50 mph in Douglas county. Tornado number 1 produced EF2 damage in both Douglas and Sarpy counties. Although tree and roof damage was noted along most of the track, the area hardest hit in Douglas county was around 137th and Y Streets. A few homes had their roofs completely blown off in this area, while others had significant roof and siding damage. The tornado then hit a Walmart, Sams Club and Home Depot causing damage to each of those businesses after it crossed L Street. Tornado number 1 first set down just southeast of 232nd and West Angus Road about a mile west of Gretna in Sarpy county. It traveled about 8 miles in Sarpy county before crossing into Douglas county. The tornadoes spun up on the leading edge of a bow echo that gathered strength and raced through the Omaha metropolitan region. OPPD reported that 13,800 customers lost power from the storm. In total, more than 500 homeowners reported damage from the storm and according to FEMA, 7 homes were destroyed and 21 others sustained major damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: As one unseasonably strong upper level system lifted into Canada another one dropped down behind it across the northern Plains. This caused surface low pressure to develop over northeast Kansas along a cold front that was crossing the plains. This in turn caused the front to slow down as it moved into southeast Nebraska and southwest Iowa. A small line of thunderstorms that had developed along the front moved ahead of it and encountered a strong low level jet. The combination of the low level jet, and a warm front that extended east of the low, strengthened the line segment just to the southwest of Omaha and causing it to bow out. In turn a few quick moving spin-up circulations and 2 tornadoes developed as the bow echo crossed the Omaha area. Although these tornadoes hit in the middle of the night and caused significant damage in the Omaha area, there were no deaths or serious injuries with the storm. The system also produced areas of heavy rain which caused some flash flooding and then eventual river flooding.
8.72008-06-08241°08'N / 96°16'W41°11'N / 96°08'W8.00 Miles440 Yards000K0KSarpy
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This was the first touchdown of 2 tornadoes that hit the Omaha metro area this night. Tornado number 1 started just southeast of 232ND and West Angus Road about a mile west of Gretna. A garage was demolished at this point, suggesting EF1 damage. The tornado moved east northeast at 45 mph and produced scattered EF0 damage in Gretna with tree and shingle damage noted. From there tornado number 1 continued northeast to near 156th and Giles Road. EF 2 damage was noted just southwest of that point with major roof damage to a home. The tornado then crossed over into the Millard area of Douglas county where it continued for about 3 more miles before merging with tornado number 2. Tornado 1 also caused EF2 damage in Douglas county with much of it concentrated in the vicinity of 137th and Y Streets. The tornadoes spun up on the leading edge of a bow echo that gathered strength as it raced through the Omaha metropolitan area. More than 500 homeowners reported damage from the storm and OPPD reported that 13,800 customers lost power. EPISODE NARRATIVE: As one unseasonably strong upper level system lifted into Canada another one dropped down behind it across the northern Plains. This caused surface low pressure to develop over northeast Kansas along a cold front that was crossing the plains. This in turn caused the front to slow down as it moved into southeast Nebraska and southwest Iowa. A small line of thunderstorms that had developed along the front moved ahead of it and encountered a strong low level jet. The combination of the low level jet, and a warm front that extended east of the low, strengthened the line segment just to the southwest of Omaha and causing it to bow out. In turn a few quick moving spin-up circulations and 2 tornadoes developed as the bow echo crossed the Omaha area. Although these tornadoes hit in the middle of the night and caused significant damage in the Omaha area, there were no deaths or serious injuries with the storm. The system also produced areas of heavy rain which caused some flash flooding and then eventual river flooding.
8.81988-05-07241°07'N / 96°20'W41°11'N / 96°10'W6.70 Miles73 Yards212.5M0Sarpy
9.81975-03-27241°15'N / 96°04'W0.50 Mile300 Yards04250K0Douglas
11.41975-05-06441°11'N / 96°04'W41°17'N / 96°01'W6.90 Miles267 Yards3118250.0M0Douglas
12.01975-05-06441°10'N / 96°04'W41°11'N / 96°04'W1.10 Miles267 Yards015250K0Sarpy
13.51988-05-07241°07'N / 96°28'W41°07'N / 96°20'W7.00 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Saunders
15.11952-08-13441°13'N / 96°35'W41°01'N / 96°19'W19.40 Miles110 Yards020250K0Saunders
19.11959-05-20241°14'N / 96°37'W12.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Saunders
19.51953-06-07241°33'N / 96°15'W41°34'N / 96°10'W4.10 Miles33 Yards0125K0Washington
20.01988-07-15241°16'N / 95°52'W2.30 Miles100 Yards04225.0M0Pottawattamie
20.01988-07-15341°16'N / 95°52'W2.80 Miles73 Yards03425.0M0Pottawattamie
20.71988-05-07241°20'N / 95°57'W41°27'N / 95°49'W7.20 Miles73 Yards002.5M0Pottawattamie
20.91952-08-13441°01'N / 96°19'W40°56'N / 96°13'W7.30 Miles33 Yards00250K0Cass
21.11970-06-15241°26'N / 96°57'W41°33'N / 96°08'W42.90 Miles600 Yards000K0Butler
21.91992-06-16241°09'N / 95°54'W41°09'N / 95°50'W3.00 Miles73 Yards0025K0Mills
22.11957-04-25440°49'N / 96°54'W41°11'N / 96°02'W51.70 Miles333 Yards002.5M0Lancaster
25.11966-05-22241°07'N / 96°48'W41°10'N / 96°36'W10.60 Miles33 Yards010K0Saunders
25.71962-05-07241°36'N / 96°30'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0525K0Dodge
26.61968-08-18341°15'N / 95°57'W41°15'N / 95°32'W21.30 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Douglas
27.21952-08-13341°21'N / 97°10'W41°15'N / 96°23'W41.10 Miles1300 Yards010K0Butler
27.41964-05-06241°19'N / 96°48'W41°21'N / 96°45'W2.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Saunders
28.22009-03-23241°33'N / 95°57'W41°40'N / 95°55'W9.00 Miles440 Yards000K0KHarrison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down near highway 30 about 1.5 miles west of the interchange between Interstate 29 and Highway 30, or about 3 miles west of Missouri Valley Iowa. The tornado was at its strongest and widest within a mile of its touchdown point, becoming weaker with more intermittent damage farther north. Near the touchdown point, a barn sustained roof damage and a windmill was knocked down. One-half mile north of Highway 30, 54 empty grain rail cars were derailed. One mile north of Highway 30, along 305th St., two residences were impacted by the tornado. A 100-year-old single family residence directly in its path was completely destroyed, with all walls collapsed and debris relocated about 50 feet north of the foundation. The debris collected over the site of a cinder block garage, which also partially collapsed. About 100 yards north of the garage site, a machine shed was collapsed onto a combine inside, which had been moved by the wind. Trees near the house sustained some broken limbs and treetops, and a power pole was snapped. The damage at this site was given an EF2 rating. Another residence one-quarter mile to its west sustained minor siding and shingle damage and windows were broken. Seven of the eight outbuildings at that residence were collapsed, with debris strewn into nearby fields. Damage at the two houses indicated a path width of one quarter mile at that point, the widest along the path of the tornado. The tornado continued northward, overturning two semis on Interstate 29. From there to a point about 3 miles southwest of Magnolia, near the intersection of the Loess Hills Trail and Melody Oaks Trail, intermittent light damage to trees and roofs of a couple of outbuildings was noted. From this point, the survey team determined the damage path narrowed to 100 yards or less based on scattered tree and outbuilding damage, with EF0 intensity north of Interstate 29. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An intense upper level low pressure system tracked from eastern Colorado into southeast South Dakota from March 23rd to March 24th. This caused a surface low pressure system to move from western Nebraska into southeast South Dakota during that time. As the low tracked northeast, a dry-line moved into eastern Nebraska during the afternoon of March 23rd. With surface temperatures in the 60s and 70s, and dewpoint temperatures in the 50s, ample instability was in place to allow a line of severe thunderstorms to develop as the dry-line punched eastward. Several fast moving and low-topped supercell thunderstorms were embedded in the line, and one cell produced cyclic tornadoes from southeast of Lincoln into western Iowa. The storms in the line were moving north northeast at between 50 and 60 mph. In addition to the severe weather, strong southerly gradient winds prevailed ahead of the low pressure. In some cases the winds gusted between 50 and 60 mph for several hours across parts of eastern Nebraska.
28.41975-05-06241°28'N / 95°52'W41°37'N / 95°48'W10.60 Miles33 Yards0025K0Pottawattamie
28.81975-05-06241°24'N / 95°51'W41°32'N / 95°40'W12.80 Miles500 Yards0025K0Pottawattamie
29.21960-06-15241°42'N / 96°17'W0025K0Burt
30.51984-06-12240°48'N / 96°09'W40°55'N / 95°59'W11.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Cass
32.21999-05-16341°38'N / 95°54'W41°38'N / 95°48'W6.20 Miles200 Yards00100K0Harrison
 Brief Description: The smaller of 2 strong tornadoes that hit Harrison county the afternoon of 5/16/99. This one destroyed a home west of Logan before it weakened, it then made a loop back to the northwest before dissipating.
32.91984-06-12240°52'N / 95°56'W0.50 Mile50 Yards003K0Cass
33.61983-05-06241°34'N / 95°57'W41°45'N / 95°45'W15.00 Miles20 Yards00250K0Harrison
33.71999-05-16341°36'N / 95°52'W41°40'N / 95°45'W7.50 Miles440 Yards2161.9M0Harrison
 Brief Description: The stronger of the 2 tornadoes that ripped through Harrison county the afternoon of 5/16/99 killed 2 people and destroyed 6 homes and a bridge before it dissipated a couple of miles east of Logan. A family of 5 leaving a high school graduation party encountered the tornado on a road around 6 miles northeast of Missouri Valley and took cover in a ditch about the time the path of the tornado widened to a quarter mile. Two of them were killed after their car and a 3-ton combine head were thrown on them. There were also numerous flipped or smashed vehicles in this area. F37OU, F15OU
33.81984-06-12240°54'N / 96°50'W40°54'N / 96°30'W20.00 Miles150 Yards002.5M0Lancaster
35.01972-09-12241°30'N / 95°42'W41°35'N / 95°39'W5.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Harrison
35.71999-05-16241°12'N / 95°35'W41°17'N / 95°33'W5.00 Miles120 Yards00690K0Pottawattamie
 Brief Description: Destroyed mostly farm buildings and equipment, did damage a few homes.
36.21970-06-10241°17'N / 96°57'W0025K0Butler
36.31950-07-15441°48'N / 96°36'W41°44'N / 96°25'W10.00 Miles440 Yards0332.5M0Burt
38.61979-08-28340°55'N / 95°46'W40°52'N / 95°40'W5.60 Miles533 Yards003K0Mills
38.71976-06-26441°27'N / 95°36'W41°29'N / 95°30'W5.10 Miles200 Yards062.5M0Pottawattamie
39.12008-06-11241°48'N / 96°06'W41°51'N / 96°01'W5.00 Miles440 Yards000K0KHarrison
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This is a continuation of the tornado that initially touched down in Burt county Nebraska, about 4.5 miles west of Little Sioux Iowa. The tornado eventually reached EF3 strength in Monona county when it hit a boyscout camp where 4 fatalities and 48 injuries occurred. The tornado crossed into Harrison county near mile marker 97 on Interstate 29 where a semi-truck was flipped. The tornado snapped power poles northeast of there with an estimated strength of EF2 in Harrison county. The tornado then crossed into Monona county Iowa about 4 miles north of Little Sioux. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A very strong and unseasonably cold upper level low pressure system that was tracking across the northern plains brought a strong low level jet to the region during the early morning hours of June 11th. The warm and unstable air that worked north into the region helped spawn early morning severe thunderstorms across eastern Nebraska and southwest Iowa. Later that day as the upper level system worked into the central Dakotas, a cold front pushed across the region. This helped set off another round of thunderstorms that developed over east central Nebraska by late afternoon. Isolated small supercell thunderstorms initially developed ahead of the cold front over eastern Nebraska, but they were quickly overtaken by a broken line of larger supercell thunderstorms, some of the heavy precipitation type, that developed along the cold front. Cell mergers and training were observed well into the evening hours as the activity quickly spread across southwest Iowa. The storms produced a total of 8 confirmed tornadoes in the Omaha/Valley warning area which covers eastern Nebraska and southwest Iowa.
39.21981-04-03240°52'N / 96°52'W40°53'N / 96°42'W8.30 Miles50 Yards00250K0Lancaster
39.91953-06-07241°21'N / 97°04'W41°25'N / 96°57'W6.90 Miles33 Yards02250K0Butler
40.51959-08-30240°55'N / 96°52'W4.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Lancaster
40.51982-05-20241°37'N / 96°55'W41°37'N / 96°52'W2.00 Miles30 Yards003K0Dodge
40.61991-04-26340°36'N / 96°24'W40°47'N / 96°16'W14.00 Miles350 Yards022.5M0Otoe
41.11965-07-01340°43'N / 96°25'W40°39'N / 96°11'W12.80 Miles33 Yards01250K0Otoe
41.21990-03-13441°26'N / 97°02'W41°27'N / 97°00'W4.00 Miles440 Yards0025.0M0Colfax
41.21963-04-28241°35'N / 97°01'W41°40'N / 96°47'W13.10 Miles300 Yards0025K0Colfax
43.01992-06-16241°52'N / 96°25'W41°55'N / 96°21'W4.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0Burt
44.01982-05-20241°34'N / 97°04'W41°37'N / 96°55'W5.00 Miles30 Yards003K0Colfax
44.21991-05-27341°53'N / 96°28'W41°56'N / 96°20'W6.00 Miles1760 Yards022.5M0Burt
44.32008-06-11341°51'N / 96°01'W41°54'N / 95°52'W7.00 Miles440 Yards4480K0KMonona
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado tragically hit a boyscout camp north of Little Sioux Iowa killing 4 young scouts. The tornado initially touched down in Burt county Nebraska, crossed into Harrison county Iowa near mile marker 97 on Interstate 29, and then finally crossed into Monona county Iowa about 4 miles north of Little Sioux. In Monona county the tornado entered the Little Sioux Scout Ranch, destroying the rangers home near the entrance of the park giving it a rating of EF3. The storm then blew down trees and destroyed bunk houses at the camp. Four scouts were killed in one bunk house when a brick chimney collapsed on them. In total 48 people were injured at the camp. The tornado continued to topple trees as it tracked into Preparation Canyon State Park. Just before it entered the park a farmstead sustained damage. The tornado hit another farmstead about 2.5 miles southwest of Moorhead where trees were blown down and sheds damaged. The tornado then began to weaken and finally lifted about 2 miles southwest of Moorhead. The total path length was around 14 miles. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A very strong and unseasonably cold upper level low pressure system that was tracking across the northern plains brought a strong low level jet to the region during the early morning hours of June 11th. The warm and unstable air that worked north into the region helped spawn early morning severe thunderstorms across eastern Nebraska and southwest Iowa. Later that day as the upper level system worked into the central Dakotas, a cold front pushed across the region. This helped set off another round of thunderstorms that developed over east central Nebraska by late afternoon. Isolated small supercell thunderstorms initially developed ahead of the cold front over eastern Nebraska, but they were quickly overtaken by a broken line of larger supercell thunderstorms, some of the heavy precipitation type, that developed along the cold front. Cell mergers and training were observed well into the evening hours as the activity quickly spread across southwest Iowa. The storms produced a total of 8 confirmed tornadoes in the Omaha/Valley warning area which covers eastern Nebraska and southwest Iowa.
45.01992-06-16341°39'N / 95°48'W41°52'N / 95°32'W19.00 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Harrison
45.61967-06-09240°35'N / 96°23'W40°39'N / 96°11'W11.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Otoe
45.81998-06-23241°36'N / 97°04'W41°36'N / 96°59'W2.70 Miles1000 Yards0000Colfax
 Brief Description: Debris on highway.
45.91990-06-13240°52'N / 95°39'W40°53'N / 95°27'W10.50 Miles67 Yards00250K0Fremont
45.91991-05-28241°56'N / 96°24'W1.00 Mile440 Yards00250K0Burt
46.11992-06-15340°46'N / 96°57'W40°58'N / 96°57'W14.00 Miles500 Yards0125.0M0Seward
46.72007-05-05241°09'N / 95°22'W41°15'N / 95°21'W7.00 Miles400 Yards000K0KPottawattamie
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This tornado crossed into Pottawattamie county from Montgomery county about 4 miles southeast of Macedonia. The total path length was around 11.5 miles. Although over half of it was in Pottawattamie county, most of the damage was done in Montgomery county where a roof was torn off of a house, barns were destroyed and cars were tossed into a field. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front that was along the Kansas and Nebraska border early Saturday morning May 5th, lifted north during the day bringing widespread heavy rain and severe weather, including tornadoes, to eastern Nebraska and southwest Iowa. The warm front was part of a large upper level system that brought several days of severe weather and flooding to the region. Heavy rain and flooding was reported with some of the activity Saturday morning, along with isolated severe thunderstorm reports. However, during the afternoon the severe weather became more widespread over northeast Nebraska where supercells spawned several tornadoes. At this time, thunderstorms, some severe with heavy rain, produced flash flooding over parts of southeast Nebraska. By evening much of the severe weather, including supercell producing tornadoes, shifted into southwest Iowa, although isolated severe thunderstorms persisted over parts of eastern Nebraska until after midnight CDT.
47.31957-05-09240°32'N / 96°18'W40°39'N / 96°11'W9.90 Miles120 Yards0025K0Otoe
48.12009-03-23240°37'N / 96°35'W40°38'N / 96°34'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0KLancaster
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This is the second of 5 cyclic tornadoes that a low-topped supercell thunderstorm produced at it tracked southeast through east of the Lincoln area. This tornado touched down around 2 miles east of Hickman and damaged a house in the area, destroyed some farm outbuildings, took the roof off of a barn and also caused tree damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An intense upper level low pressure system tracked from eastern Colorado into southeast South Dakota from March 23rd into March 24th. This caused a surface low pressure system to move from western Nebraska into southeast South Dakota during that time. As the low tracked northeast, a dry-line moved into eastern Nebraska during the afternoon of March 23rd. With surface temperatures in the 60s and 70s, and dewpoint temperatures in the 50s, ample instability was in place to allow a line of severe thunderstorms to develop as the dry-line punched eastward. Several fast moving low-topped supercell thunderstorms were embedded in the line, and one cell produced cyclic tornadoes from southeast of Lincoln into western Iowa. The storms in the line were moving north northeast at 50 to 60 mph. In addition to the severe weather, strong southerly gradient winds prevailed ahead of the low pressure. In some cases the winds gusted between 50 and 65 mph for several hours across parts of eastern Nebraska.
48.32001-06-13440°51'N / 97°05'W40°57'N / 96°59'W8.00 Miles400 Yards021.0M0Seward
 Brief Description: A slow moving tornado tracked from south of Seward to just east of town with a total track length of 8 miles. The tornado was caught on film by several chasers. The tornado destroyed an entire farmstead and a propane and anhydrous ammonia tank farm and machine shed. Several vehicles were tumbled and tossed into a field across from the farm house. The tornado was at its maximum intensity at the farmstead it destroyed. Northeast of highway 34 the tornado struck several sheds and barns.
48.51991-05-28241°56'N / 95°57'W41°56'N / 95°53'W5.00 Miles60 Yards00250K0Monona
49.01959-05-26240°36'N / 95°38'W40°49'N / 95°45'W15.90 Miles400 Yards0025K0Fremont
49.91964-06-22340°45'N / 95°36'W40°50'N / 95°29'W8.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Fremont


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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