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Dickens County Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Dickens County is about the same as Texas average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Dickens County is much lower than Texas average and is lower than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #79

Dickens County
0.02
Texas
0.04
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Dickens County
0.0000
Texas
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #166

Dickens County
106.07
Texas
208.58
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 10,150 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Dickens County were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:2Cold:5Dense Fog:1Drought:68
Dust Storm:7Flood:533Hail:6,551Heat:6Heavy Snow:24
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:11Landslide:0Strong Wind:75
Thunderstorm Winds:2,668Tropical Storm:1Wildfire:9Winter Storm:28Winter Weather:45
Other:116 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Dickens County.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 1 historical earthquake event that had a recorded magnitude of 3.5 or above found in or near Dickens County.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
40.41978-06-165.31033.03-100.77

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 29 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Dickens County.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
10.81960-05-24333°45'N / 100°51'W33°47'N / 100°49'W3.30 Miles17 Yards003K0Motley
15.31989-06-06333°29'N / 101°01'W33°29'N / 100°59'W1.00 Mile900 Yards0025K0Dickens
21.31989-05-15233°40'N / 100°23'W33°45'N / 100°29'W7.00 Miles90 Yards0025K0King
22.81991-04-24233°18'N / 100°45'W33°18'N / 100°35'W12.10 Miles350 Yards0025K0Kent
24.81957-04-20233°48'N / 100°25'W0.40 Mile100 Yards003K0King
25.41973-03-23233°52'N / 100°22'W34°00'N / 100°46'W24.70 Miles300 Yards0025K0Motley
26.41987-05-28233°33'N / 100°25'W33°33'N / 100°15'W13.00 Miles100 Yards000K0King
26.72005-06-12233°15'N / 100°39'W33°14'N / 100°41'W2.00 Miles1200 Yards00150K15KKent
 Brief Description: The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX conducted a damage survey in Kent County, approximately 8 miles to the northeast of Clairemont. In collaboration with the Center for Severe Weather Research in Boulder, CO and Texas Tech University meteorologists assessing the tornadoes across the county with Doppler-On-Wheels (DOW) data, a better understanding of the wind fields and tornado timing was achieved. The area of assessed damage was bounded by a triangle comprised of FM2320 to the south, FM1228 to the east, and CR112 to the west. There was a damage path characterized by tree damage across the zone. The path of the damage was oriented from a northeast-east to southwest-west direction. DOW data confirmed the large, wedge tornado initially propagated to the east and northeast, became nearly stationary, then rotate southward around the west side of the parent mesocyclone. The tornado moved to the southwest, then south and crossed FM1228 from the north/northeast to the south/southwest. The path of the tornado was between 0.6 to 0.7 miles wide. In assessing the damage, a circulatory patter was evident in a wheat field owned by a private farmer, with all of the wheat laying down to the south. Along this quadrant of the circulation, large farm equipment (tractors and cotton trailers) were tossed and mangled. An 80,000 lb box car was shaken by the tornado and the associated strong wind but was not moved from its location, however the contents inside were disturbed. The farm vehicles were tossed briefly a few times as there were scar marks and impact marks in the field as the equipment was blown to the south. The front-end of one tractor was snapped off after the second impact with the ground, as the vehicle was likely too heavy to remain airborne and was dragged and rolled by the tornadic wind and circulation. On the east side of the circulation, there were tree branches not grown in that immediate area that were stripped clean of bark. A cotton trailer (lighter than the other equipment) was lifted from its original location and was tossed to the north and mangled upon impact. The equipment was tossed approximately 3/10 of a mile within the circulation. It was evident from the damage pattern and debris, the circulation was multi-vortex in nature. The DOW measured wind speeds ranging from 45, 65 and 90 meters per second at various stages of the tornado life cycle at heights between 3 and 50 meters above ground level.
27.71961-05-03233°57'N / 101°05'W33°56'N / 101°03'W2.70 Miles100 Yards0025K0Floyd
28.51989-06-06333°37'N / 101°32'W33°29'N / 101°01'W29.00 Miles900 Yards0025K0Crosby
29.11984-05-01334°03'N / 100°55'W34°01'N / 100°47'W8.00 Miles440 Yards012.5M0Motley
31.01981-05-07233°41'N / 101°20'W33°42'N / 101°18'W2.70 Miles150 Yards00250K0Crosby
32.61971-05-31233°50'N / 100°17'W2.00 Miles67 Yards003K0Cottle
33.01981-05-07233°40'N / 101°22'W33°45'N / 101°20'W6.10 Miles40 Yards000K0Crosby
33.91981-05-07233°42'N / 101°22'W1.00 Mile30 Yards00250K0Crosby
35.51981-05-07233°29'N / 101°23'W1.50 Miles40 Yards00250K0Crosby
35.92005-05-12233°41'N / 101°25'W33°44'N / 101°23'W4.50 Miles500 Yards00100K75KCrosby
 Brief Description: F2 tornado in Ralls. In assessing the damage from the F3 tornado, the debris field diminished in areal coverage as the tornado tracked farther to the northeast along the end of its path. Damage assessment and public accounts of the storm suggested the tornado weakened and lifted. Meanwhile, a second tornado developed. This occurrence coincided with a break in the debris field observed during the Survey. This cycle of one tornado weakening and lifting while another tornado forms to the right of the former path is typical in well-organized tornadic thunderstorms. This second tornado developed approximately 1.5 miles west of Ralls and tracked to the north and northwest before dissipating three miles north of Ralls. The tornado damaged a residence and a nearby barn. Two thousand pound bales of hay were tossed from one side of US Highway 62/82 to the other as the tornado scattered debris to the south and southwest across an adjacent field. In addition, a vehicle was overturned on the property within debris from the residence and power poles were either blown down or snapped and center pivots overturned. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
38.72005-05-12333°35'N / 101°30'W33°39'N / 101°25'W6.00 Miles500 Yards00300K200KCrosby
 Brief Description: F3 tornado in Ralls. A strong tornado developed approximately 9 miles to the southwest of Ralls around 8:40 PM and tracked to the northeast for six miles. Along the path of this tornado, several power poles were blown over or snapped and a few center pivots were overturned or twisted. A residence was completely destroyed with debris entirely removed from the foundation. The majority of the debris from this structure was blown to the northeast approximately 10 to 30 feet from the foundation...with other related debris dispersed over a mile away. Two pickup trucks were lifted and deposited upside down 5 to 30 feet from former locations. Trees were mud-splattered and stripped of bark with large branches completely torn off trunks. Center pivot irrigation systems were either blown over or twisted in surrounding fields...however some were left unscathed to the northeast of this tornado. Additional debris associated with this tornado was also deposited in a field across from US Highway 62/82 before dissipating. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
38.92005-06-09333°52'N / 101°31'W33°52'N / 101°16'W10.00 Miles900 Yards00200K70.0MFloyd
 Brief Description: The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX conducted a damage survey in the vicinity of McCoy, TX in Floyd county. The tornado was a long-lived occurrence stretching from the Petersburg area in southeast Hale county across portions of southwest and south-central Floyd county. Significant damage resulted from a tornado impacting a grain elevator about 5 miles east of Petersburg/5 miles west of McCoy. The tornado destroyed the grain elevator, numerous power poles and center pivot irrigation systems across the area along and either side of FM 54. Numerous homes sustained roof and structural damage. One home sustained extensive roof damage as tornadic winds breached the garage and moved a pickup truck about ten inches in the driveway. The damage surveyed indicated the tornadic circulation was multi-vortex in nature. Extensive video of the tornado was captured by media and storm chasers depicting a very large, wedge tornado appearance. Another residence sustained extensive damage with a pickup truck thrown over 1/2 mile from the driveway into a field behind the home. The truck was lifted and carried through the air to the field and sustained only glass damage. The Fujita-rating for this long-lived tornado was rated F-3 based on the movement and condition of the vehicle, however the majority of the damage was rated in the F-1 and F-2 categories.
39.32010-04-22234°09'N / 100°39'W34°10'N / 100°31'W8.00 Miles1300 Yards00100K0KMotley
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Multiple storm chasers observed a large and rain-wrapped tornado that moved east-northeastward across the Motley and Cottle County line south-southeast of Northfield and southwest of Cee Vee during the 18:00 CST hour on the 22nd. Doppler radar, along with post-storm ground and aerial surveys, suggest that the tornado developed at approximately 18:20 CST 9 miles south-southwest of Northfield, just east of Farm to Market Road 94. Storm chasers first obtained a visual confirmation of the tornado at 18:37 CST as it partially emerged from obscuring rain curtains. Photographs show a very large wedge-shaped tornado, with only the southern portion of the vortex visible through the wrapping precipitation. The tornado's track across northeastern Motley County remained over uninhabited ranch land. A National Weather Service cooperative observer, however, reported a loud roar as the tornado passed south of her home south of Northfield. Surveys of adjacent ranch land, conducted by private land owners as well as National Weather Service and Texas Tech University West Texas Mesonet meteorologists, revealed that the tornado destroyed four windmills, severely damaged mesquite trees, and snapped at least a half dozen wooden utility poles. The damage path was measured to be three-quarters of a mile wide. The tornado again became totally obscured by rain and hail within the parent high precipitation supercell storm before it crossed the Motley and Cottle County line approximately 8.25 miles south-southeast of Northfield at 18:42 CST. It likely dissipated just a few minutes later at approximately 18:45 CST southwest of Cee Vee in northwestern Motley County. The total path length of the tornado across portions of Motley and Cottle Counties was approximately 9 miles, with a 25-minute duration. Enhanced-Fujita Scale damage indicators for both free-standing metal towers and metal electrical transmission line poles were considered to gauge expected wind speeds for the destroyed windmills. The lower bounds for degrees of damage 2 and 5 respectively were accepted, yielding estimated wind speeds between 110 and 115 mph. Winds of at least this magnitude are additionally supported by the expected value for snapped wooden utility poles, which were additionally observed along the damage path. Therefore an EF-2 rating was assigned for this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Scattered thunderstorms developed over the central and eastern South Plains region of west Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 22nd. These storms resulted in significant severe weather, including strong tornadoes, as they impacted portions of the extreme southeastern Panhandle and the Rolling Plains. The severe weather over the South Plains of west Texas on the 22nd was part of a larger tornado outbreak that impacted areas from west Texas northward through western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Thunderstorms initiated over the central South Plains along and east of a dryline late in the day. These storms, some exhibiting supercell characteristics, initially became severe and produced large hail and damaging winds before 18:00 CST. By 18:20 CST, the first of three tornadoes, two of which were long-lived and significant, developed over northeastern Motley County. The parent supercell thunderstorm produced two damaging and rain-wrapped tornadoes over portions of Motley and Cottle Counties. The initial tornado south of Northfield crossed the Motley and Cottle County line southwest of Cee Vee. This three-quarter mile wide EF-2 tornado destroyed windmills and utility poles as it tracked through rural ranchlands. The second tornado heavily damaged or destroyed three farmsteads south and southeast of Cee Vee (Cottle County). Winds were estimated at approximately 140 mph where one home was destroyed east of that community. No injuries were reported. A second supercell thunderstorm developed south of the initial tornadic storm, and became tornadic near Swearingen (Cottle County) shortly after 21:00 CST. In addition to tornadoes, numerous reports of large hail up to the size of baseballs were received. Another Cottle County home was heavily damaged by thunderstorm winds just north of Paducah as convection organized into a linear complex late in the evening. Also, training thunderstorms repeatedly moved over the Tahoka area in Lynn County. This resulted in areas of flooding and portions of two U.S. Highways were rendered impassable. In all, property damages were estimated at $530,000. No injuries were reported.
39.31954-06-01334°01'N / 100°18'W33°52'N / 100°09'W13.40 Miles267 Yards1142.5M0Cottle
40.01956-05-08234°01'N / 100°17'W1.00 Mile67 Yards003K0Cottle
40.81957-05-24333°24'N / 101°40'W33°43'N / 101°19'W29.80 Miles200 Yards00250K0Lubbock
41.82010-04-22234°10'N / 100°31'W34°11'N / 100°30'W2.00 Miles1300 Yards000K0KCottle
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Multiple storm chasers observed a large and rain-wrapped tornado that moved east-northeastward across the Motley and Cottle County line south-southeast of Northfield and southwest of Cee Vee during the 18:00 CST hour on the 22nd. Doppler radar, along with post-storm ground and aerial surveys, suggest that the tornado developed at approximately 18:20 CST south-southwest of Northfield in Motley County. Storm chasers first obtained a visual confirmation of the tornado at 18:37 CST as it partially emerged from obscuring rain curtains, while still in rural areas of northeastern Motley County. Photographs from that time show a very large wedge-shaped tornado. The tornado's maximum intensity, per post storm surveys by private land owners and meteorologists from the National Weather Service and Texas Tech University West Texas Mesonet, occurred in northeastern Motley County where four windmills were destroyed, mesquite trees were severely damaged, and where a number of wooden utility poles were snapped. The damage path was measured to be three-quarters of a mile wide near the Motley and Cottle County line. The tornado again became totally obscured by rain and hail within the parent high precipitation supercell storm before it crossed the Motley and Cottle County line approximately 4.8 miles west-southwest of Cee Vee at 18:42 CST. Doppler radar velocity data shows subtle evidence that a mesocyclone occlusion may have occurred, and that the tornado likely dissipated just a few minutes later at approximately 18:45 CST 3.5 miles southwest of Cee Vee. A second tornado, however, quickly developed in a cyclic fashion just southeast of the initial tornado as a new mesocyclone became dominant. The total path length of the tornado across portions of Motley and Cottle Counties was approximately 9 miles, with a 25-minute duration. Enhanced-Fujita Scale damage indicators for both free-standing metal towers and metal electrical transmission line poles were considered to gauge expected wind speeds for the destroyed windmills observed in northeastern Motley County. The lower bounds for degrees of damage 2 and 5 respectively were accepted, yielding estimated wind speeds between 110 and 115 mph. Winds of at least this magnitude are additionally supported by the expected value for snapped wooden utility poles, which were additionally observed along the damage path. Therefore an EF-2 rating was assigned for this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Scattered thunderstorms developed over the central and eastern South Plains region of west Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 22nd. These storms resulted in significant severe weather, including strong tornadoes, as they impacted portions of the extreme southeastern Panhandle and the Rolling Plains. The severe weather over the South Plains of west Texas on the 22nd was part of a larger tornado outbreak that impacted areas from west Texas northward through western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Thunderstorms initiated over the central South Plains along and east of a dryline late in the day. These storms, some exhibiting supercell characteristics, initially became severe and produced large hail and damaging winds before 18:00 CST. By 18:20 CST, the first of three tornadoes, two of which were long-lived and significant, developed over northeastern Motley County. The parent supercell thunderstorm produced two damaging and rain-wrapped tornadoes over portions of Motley and Cottle Counties. The initial tornado south of Northfield crossed the Motley and Cottle County line southwest of Cee Vee. This three-quarter mile wide EF-2 tornado destroyed windmills and utility poles as it tracked through rural ranchlands. The second tornado heavily damaged or destroyed three farmsteads south and southeast of Cee Vee (Cottle County). Winds were estimated at approximately 140 mph where one home was destroyed east of that community. No injuries were reported. A second supercell thunderstorm developed south of the initial tornadic storm, and became tornadic near Swearingen (Cottle County) shortly after 21:00 CST. In addition to tornadoes, numerous reports of large hail up to the size of baseballs were received. Another Cottle County home was heavily damaged by thunderstorm winds just north of Paducah as convection organized into a linear complex late in the evening. Also, training thunderstorms repeatedly moved over the Tahoka area in Lynn County. This resulted in areas of flooding and portions of two U.S. Highways were rendered impassable. In all, property damages were estimated at $530,000. No injuries were reported.
42.21967-04-12233°50'N / 100°06'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Cottle
44.11961-06-05233°13'N / 101°22'W33°09'N / 101°20'W5.10 Miles200 Yards000K0Garza
45.81962-06-16233°12'N / 101°32'W33°18'N / 101°22'W11.90 Miles33 Yards000K0Garza
46.42010-04-22334°10'N / 100°30'W34°15'N / 100°19'W12.00 Miles975 Yards00300K0KCottle
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and rain wrapped tornado tracked from southwest of Cee Vee to just west of U.S. Highway 62/83 east-northeast of Cee Vee between 18:46 and 19:20 CST. A storm spotter observed the tornado as it passed southeast of Cee Vee at approximately 19:05 CST, and described it visually as a large wedge-shaped vortex. A post-storm ground and aerial survey conducted by local emergency management officials and National Weather Service meteorologists concluded that the tornado resulted in significant EF-3 damage. A number light weight objects and structures, including well-houses, horse stables, utility poles, empty semi-truck trailers, and a partially filled petroleum tank were heavily damaged or destroyed along the initial portions of the tornado's track through ranchland southwest and south of Cee Vee. This includes minor roof damage to a permanent farm home near County Road 172. Significant damage first occurred at a farmstead 3 miles east-southeast of Cee Vee, south of Farm to Market Road 1440. At this site, upwards of twenty-percent of the roof was removed from a well-built permanent home. A large metal building was partially collapsed and a well-house was completely destroyed. A horse trailer was blown over and rolled. In addition, several large trees were uprooted. The tornado continued to move northeastward and impacted a second farmstead four miles east of Cee Vee, just south of Farm to Market Road 1440. The tornado's maximum damage intensity was observed at this site, where a well-built stucco constructed permanant home, a cinderblock two-car garage, and several outbuildings were destroyed. The home's roof was totally removed, and three exterior walls collapsed. A portion of the home's roof and exterior walls were blown downwind and struck the two-car cinderblock garage broadside. This contributed to the complete destruction of that structure with only the frames of two exterior walls remaining. Two outbuildings and a horse stable were completely destroyed, with another unroofed. In addition, an entire stand of more than a dozen large trees were uprooted. A detailed survey by local officials of the site, revealed that the home was well-built, and that the exterior walls were secured to the slab foundation with bolts. In collaboration with experts at Texas Tech University's Wind Engineering Department, the developers of the Enhanced-Fujita Scale, it was determined that estimated wind speeds at the site of the destroyed residence ranged between 130 and 150 mph. With an average expected wind speed of 140 mph, the tornado was assigned an EF-3 rating based on this damage. The tornado continued northeastward across Farm to Market Road 1440. It caused light roof damage to a couple of light weight structures before dissipating just west of U.S. Highway 62/83 east-northeast of Cee Vee at approximately 19:20 CST. Despite damaging three residences, no injuries were reported. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Scattered thunderstorms developed over the central and eastern South Plains region of west Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 22nd. These storms resulted in significant severe weather, including strong tornadoes, as they impacted portions of the extreme southeastern Panhandle and the Rolling Plains. The severe weather over the South Plains of west Texas on the 22nd was part of a larger tornado outbreak that impacted areas from west Texas northward through western Kansas and eastern Colorado. Thunderstorms initiated over the central South Plains along and east of a dryline late in the day. These storms, some exhibiting supercell characteristics, initially became severe and produced large hail and damaging winds before 18:00 CST. By 18:20 CST, the first of three tornadoes, two of which were long-lived and significant, developed over northeastern Motley County. The parent supercell thunderstorm produced two damaging and rain-wrapped tornadoes over portions of Motley and Cottle Counties. The initial tornado south of Northfield crossed the Motley and Cottle County line southwest of Cee Vee. This three-quarter mile wide EF-2 tornado destroyed windmills and utility poles as it tracked through rural ranchlands. The second tornado heavily damaged or destroyed three farmsteads south and southeast of Cee Vee (Cottle County). Winds were estimated at approximately 140 mph where one home was destroyed east of that community. No injuries were reported. A second supercell thunderstorm developed south of the initial tornadic storm, and became tornadic near Swearingen (Cottle County) shortly after 21:00 CST. In addition to tornadoes, numerous reports of large hail up to the size of baseballs were received. Another Cottle County home was heavily damaged by thunderstorm winds just north of Paducah as convection organized into a linear complex late in the evening. Also, training thunderstorms repeatedly moved over the Tahoka area in Lynn County. This resulted in areas of flooding and portions of two U.S. Highways were rendered impassable. In all, property damages were estimated at $530,000. No injuries were reported.
47.51955-05-22233°48'N / 101°35'W000K0Lubbock


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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