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Cotton Center, TX Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Cotton Center is about the same as Texas average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Cotton Center is much higher than Texas average and is much higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #1075

Cotton Center, TX
0.01
Texas
0.04
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Cotton Center, TX
0.0000
Texas
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #76

Cotton Center, TX
359.68
Texas
208.58
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 3,466 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Cotton Center, TX were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:0Cold:1Dense Fog:0Drought:50
Dust Storm:6Flood:173Hail:2,177Heat:2Heavy Snow:10
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:3Landslide:0Strong Wind:48
Thunderstorm Winds:888Tropical Storm:1Wildfire:2Winter Storm:13Winter Weather:24
Other:68 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Cotton Center, TX.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Cotton Center, TX.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Cotton Center, TX.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 96 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Cotton Center, TX.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
4.51957-04-21233°50'N / 102°03'W34°00'N / 102°05'W11.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hale
4.51957-04-21233°50'N / 102°03'W34°00'N / 102°05'W11.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hale
6.31965-06-02433°54'N / 102°09'W33°56'N / 102°05'W4.70 Miles200 Yards0025K0Lamb
7.21957-04-21234°00'N / 102°05'W34°08'N / 102°06'W9.20 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lamb
7.21957-04-21234°00'N / 102°05'W34°08'N / 102°06'W9.20 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lamb
8.81961-06-03233°53'N / 102°09'W33°52'N / 102°06'W3.00 Miles440 Yards000K0Hockley
12.81966-05-10234°05'N / 101°51'W34°05'N / 101°51'W000K0Hale
12.92007-04-21234°03'N / 102°13'W34°14'N / 102°03'W15.00 Miles1230 Yards01810K50KLamb
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The development of this significant tornado was witnessed by storm chasers between Fieldton and Otlon at 17:57 CST. A National Weather Service damage survey team noted that the first damages to occur as a result of the tornado included five medium voltage power poles downed just east of the intersection of Farm to Market Road 168 and County Road 162. Just east of this location, the tops of five power poles were blown off to the north and two center pivot irrigation systems were overturned. One irrigation system was blown toward the west and another toward the northeast. Farther to the northeast along the tornado's path, along County Road 152 just east of Farm to Market Road 168, two power poles were sheared off above the ground. At this location, a historic multi-story house that was originally constructed in 1913 suffered severe roof damage. A portion of the roof was blown off of the structure toward the southeast. The owners of the home were within days of completing a two year-long renovation. In addition, the skirting was removed from a mobile home across the street from the historic home. Several outbuildings near the residence also sustained minor damage. The tornado continued northeastward and destroyed several more center pivot irrigation systems and snapped utility poles three to five feet above the ground along County Road 321. The tornado's damage path was measured at seven-tenths of a mile wide in this area. As the tornadic circulation crossed U.S. Highway 70 two miles east of Olton, four homes were heavily damaged. Two well-built brick structures suffered total roof losses. The resident of one home, and elderly woman, suffered minor injuries while seeking shelter under a kitchen table. A number of light-weight medal structures were destroyed, along with three vehicles and several pieces of farm equipment. One family pet, a dog, was killed at one of the residences. The tornado killed an unknown number of live-stock as it continued northeast of U.S. Highway 70. The damaging tornado crossed the Lamb and Hale County line at 18:10 CST. The damages sustained by two of the well-built single-family residences, light-weight medal structures, and numerous utility poles support an EF-2 rating. Winds were estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
13.11970-04-17434°00'N / 101°59'W34°11'N / 101°43'W19.80 Miles880 Yards2472.5M0Hale
13.31965-06-02433°56'N / 102°05'W34°13'N / 101°35'W34.60 Miles200 Yards47625.0M0Hale
14.01956-06-17333°49'N / 102°11'W1.00 Mile20 Yards003K0Hockley
14.21998-04-26234°06'N / 101°50'W34°06'N / 101°50'W0.30 Mile30 Yards00100K25KHale
 Brief Description: A short-lived but strong (F2) tornado occurred just north of Hale Center. Two people narrowly escaped injury when their home was destroyed (they had sought shelter in a small, interior closet in this ranch-style house). The tornado also heavily damaged a vacant house, barn, hangar, and center-pivot irrigation system. Several large trees were destroyed/uprooted. Damage was investigated by NWS officials just a few hours after it occurred. A round of severe thunderstorms affected the South Plains on the 26th. The most significant storm was the one that hit Hale Center (see above) and caused a lightning fatality and tornado damage. Elsewhere, large hail was reported near Friona, Cone, Aspermont, and Jayton.
14.41957-04-21233°42'N / 102°00'W33°50'N / 102°03'W9.70 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lubbock
14.41957-04-21233°42'N / 102°00'W33°50'N / 102°03'W9.70 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Lubbock
15.21951-07-02234°11'N / 102°07'W1.00 Mile20 Yards00250K0Lamb
15.61967-04-12233°55'N / 102°20'W33°58'N / 102°16'W5.20 Miles33 Yards000K0Lamb
16.61966-05-10233°56'N / 102°19'W2.00 Miles50 Yards020K0Lamb
17.61971-10-17234°01'N / 102°25'W34°11'N / 102°11'W17.60 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lamb
17.71971-10-17234°01'N / 102°25'W34°20'N / 102°02'W31.00 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lamb
17.81978-04-08233°52'N / 101°45'W2.00 Miles100 Yards003K0Hale
18.51961-06-03334°07'N / 102°32'W33°55'N / 102°10'W25.10 Miles200 Yards0025K0Lamb
18.71967-06-01233°45'N / 101°51'W0.10 Mile67 Yards003K0Lubbock
19.31970-04-17433°44'N / 102°20'W33°49'N / 102°12'W9.50 Miles880 Yards0025.0M0Hockley
19.51957-04-21433°50'N / 102°21'W34°01'N / 102°23'W12.80 Miles880 Yards032.5M0Lamb
19.61969-10-19234°15'N / 102°07'W1.00 Mile10 Yards0025K0Lamb
20.22007-04-21234°13'N / 102°05'W34°19'N / 102°02'W5.00 Miles1230 Yards00200K0KHale
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The large tornado tracked across northwestern Hale County between 18:10 and 18:18 CST. Local newspaper reports indicate that the most notable damage along the tornado's path in northwestern Hale County occurred to numerous center pivot irrigation systems. At least ten irrigation systems were reportedly destroyed in fields west and northwest of Halfway. Damage caused by the tornado east of Olton (Lamb County) supported an EF-2 rating with winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
20.31971-10-17234°02'N / 102°23'W34°19'N / 102°12'W22.20 Miles400 Yards002.5M0Lamb
20.71963-06-04233°43'N / 101°51'W2.00 Miles33 Yards000K0Lubbock
20.91965-06-10234°11'N / 101°46'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Hale
22.91971-10-17234°11'N / 102°11'W34°24'N / 102°07'W15.50 Miles100 Yards002.5M0Lamb
23.31978-04-08233°48'N / 101°41'W2.00 Miles30 Yards00250K0Lubbock
23.41965-10-17333°55'N / 102°26'W0.20 Mile17 Yards0025K0Hockley
23.41969-06-10233°44'N / 102°19'W000K0Hockley
23.81957-05-15234°11'N / 101°42'W2.00 Miles17 Yards0025K0Hale
23.81968-05-31234°18'N / 101°55'W34°18'N / 101°52'W3.00 Miles33 Yards002.5M0Hale
23.91990-05-29234°04'N / 102°26'W2.40 Miles150 Yards0025K0Lamb
24.01957-04-21233°35'N / 101°50'W33°42'N / 102°00'W12.60 Miles880 Yards002.5M0Lubbock
24.51977-05-17234°12'N / 101°42'W0.50 Mile60 Yards000K0Hale
24.51957-04-21433°36'N / 102°18'W33°50'N / 102°21'W16.40 Miles880 Yards042.5M0Hockley
25.21973-04-15334°11'N / 101°45'W34°14'N / 101°38'W7.60 Miles200 Yards2260K0Hale
25.31955-05-22233°50'N / 101°50'W33°40'N / 101°32'W20.70 Miles400 Yards003K0Hale
26.11989-06-06234°11'N / 101°39'W2.50 Miles200 Yards00250K0Hale
26.21969-05-06334°12'N / 102°24'W1.00 Mile100 Yards000K0Lamb
26.41980-06-17233°41'N / 102°35'W34°19'N / 102°24'W45.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0Parmer
27.02007-04-21234°19'N / 102°05'W34°25'N / 102°00'W8.00 Miles1230 Yards00200K0KCastro
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The large tornado caused damage to center pivot irrigation systems and utility lines as it tracked over southeastern Castro County between 18:18 and 18:33 CST. Local newspapers reported that numerous irrigation systems were destroyed, and utility poles were downed along Texas Highway 194 and Farm to Market Road 145 southeast and east of Hart. Damage caused by the tornado east of Olton (Lamb County) supported an EF-2 rating with winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
27.11965-10-17233°36'N / 102°10'W0.20 Mile20 Yards000K0Hockley
27.11969-05-16333°55'N / 102°30'W0.60 Mile50 Yards0025K0Lamb
27.51970-04-17434°11'N / 101°43'W34°19'N / 101°39'W10.10 Miles880 Yards000K0Floyd
27.71971-10-17234°19'N / 102°12'W34°24'N / 102°09'W6.40 Miles400 Yards042.5M0Castro
27.91967-06-01233°36'N / 101°51'W2.00 Miles67 Yards010K0Lubbock
28.41955-05-22233°48'N / 101°35'W000K0Lubbock
28.81987-05-29233°30'N / 102°02'W33°37'N / 102°01'W8.00 Miles80 Yards03250K0Lubbock
29.91970-05-11533°33'N / 101°54'W33°36'N / 101°46'W8.40 Miles1333 Yards26500250.0M0Lubbock
30.71960-04-12334°21'N / 102°18'W34°24'N / 102°14'W5.20 Miles100 Yards332250K0Castro
30.71964-06-11234°25'N / 101°58'W1.00 Mile27 Yards043K0Swisher
31.71971-08-22234°22'N / 101°46'W34°22'N / 101°43'W2.70 Miles20 Yards000K0Swisher
32.31963-06-08233°36'N / 102°22'W2.00 Miles50 Yards000K0Hockley
32.51991-05-10333°50'N / 102°34'W33°51'N / 102°35'W1.00 Mile450 Yards00250K0Hockley
32.81970-04-17433°36'N / 102°36'W33°44'N / 102°20'W18.50 Miles880 Yards0425.0M0Hockley
32.92007-04-21234°27'N / 101°59'W34°27'N / 101°58'W1.00 Mile1230 Yards0030K0KSwisher
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A large and long-tracked tornado cut a path of damage twenty-nine miles in length and at times nearly three-quarters of a mile wide across portions of Lamb, Hale, Castro and Swisher Counties between 17:57 and 18:36 CST on the 21st. Total damages from the tornado were estimated to exceed $1.2 million, and one person was injured. The tornado was in the final stages of its life cycle as it crossed into extreme southwestern Swisher County at 18:33 CST. Storm chasers documented an extended rope-out phase before the tornado finally dissipated over cotton fields in southwestern Swisher County at 18:36 CST. Reports in local newspapers indicated that at least one center pivot irrigation system was heavily damaged west of Kress. Damage caused by the tornado east of Olton (Lamb County) supported an EF-2 rating with winds estimated between 110 and 120 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
33.11991-05-10333°51'N / 102°35'W33°52'N / 102°36'W4.00 Miles450 Yards00250K0Lamb
34.41971-08-10234°24'N / 101°43'W0.50 Mile100 Yards000K0Swisher
34.51991-05-10333°52'N / 102°36'W33°55'N / 102°39'W3.50 Miles450 Yards00250K0Bailey
36.51957-04-21433°26'N / 101°38'W33°35'N / 101°50'W15.50 Miles100 Yards062.5M0Lubbock
37.01970-04-17434°19'N / 101°39'W34°22'N / 101°28'W11.00 Miles880 Yards2025.0M0Swisher
37.42005-06-09333°52'N / 101°31'W33°52'N / 101°16'W10.00 Miles900 Yards00200K70.0MFloyd
 Brief Description: The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX conducted a damage survey in the vicinity of McCoy, TX in Floyd county. The tornado was a long-lived occurrence stretching from the Petersburg area in southeast Hale county across portions of southwest and south-central Floyd county. Significant damage resulted from a tornado impacting a grain elevator about 5 miles east of Petersburg/5 miles west of McCoy. The tornado destroyed the grain elevator, numerous power poles and center pivot irrigation systems across the area along and either side of FM 54. Numerous homes sustained roof and structural damage. One home sustained extensive roof damage as tornadic winds breached the garage and moved a pickup truck about ten inches in the driveway. The damage surveyed indicated the tornadic circulation was multi-vortex in nature. Extensive video of the tornado was captured by media and storm chasers depicting a very large, wedge tornado appearance. Another residence sustained extensive damage with a pickup truck thrown over 1/2 mile from the driveway into a field behind the home. The truck was lifted and carried through the air to the field and sustained only glass damage. The Fujita-rating for this long-lived tornado was rated F-3 based on the movement and condition of the vehicle, however the majority of the damage was rated in the F-1 and F-2 categories.
38.61980-05-28234°30'N / 101°52'W34°31'N / 101°47'W4.90 Miles1667 Yards000K0Swisher
38.91989-06-03234°13'N / 102°42'W34°17'N / 102°33'W8.00 Miles880 Yards00250K0Bailey
39.31971-04-18234°15'N / 102°40'W34°15'N / 102°36'W4.30 Miles200 Yards0025K0Bailey
39.31971-04-18234°15'N / 102°40'W34°15'N / 102°36'W4.30 Miles200 Yards000K0Bailey
39.41980-05-28334°31'N / 101°56'W34°33'N / 101°50'W6.10 Miles2333 Yards003K0Swisher
40.21965-05-13233°25'N / 101°50'W0.50 Mile33 Yards000K0Lubbock
40.62005-05-12233°41'N / 101°25'W33°44'N / 101°23'W4.50 Miles500 Yards00100K75KCrosby
 Brief Description: F2 tornado in Ralls. In assessing the damage from the F3 tornado, the debris field diminished in areal coverage as the tornado tracked farther to the northeast along the end of its path. Damage assessment and public accounts of the storm suggested the tornado weakened and lifted. Meanwhile, a second tornado developed. This occurrence coincided with a break in the debris field observed during the Survey. This cycle of one tornado weakening and lifting while another tornado forms to the right of the former path is typical in well-organized tornadic thunderstorms. This second tornado developed approximately 1.5 miles west of Ralls and tracked to the north and northwest before dissipating three miles north of Ralls. The tornado damaged a residence and a nearby barn. Two thousand pound bales of hay were tossed from one side of US Highway 62/82 to the other as the tornado scattered debris to the south and southwest across an adjacent field. In addition, a vehicle was overturned on the property within debris from the residence and power poles were either blown down or snapped and center pivots overturned. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
40.71963-05-29233°21'N / 102°17'W33°30'N / 102°17'W10.30 Miles67 Yards010K0Bailey
41.11980-07-27234°33'N / 102°18'W34°31'N / 102°16'W3.00 Miles40 Yards010K0Castro
41.22005-05-12333°35'N / 101°30'W33°39'N / 101°25'W6.00 Miles500 Yards00300K200KCrosby
 Brief Description: F3 tornado in Ralls. A strong tornado developed approximately 9 miles to the southwest of Ralls around 8:40 PM and tracked to the northeast for six miles. Along the path of this tornado, several power poles were blown over or snapped and a few center pivots were overturned or twisted. A residence was completely destroyed with debris entirely removed from the foundation. The majority of the debris from this structure was blown to the northeast approximately 10 to 30 feet from the foundation...with other related debris dispersed over a mile away. Two pickup trucks were lifted and deposited upside down 5 to 30 feet from former locations. Trees were mud-splattered and stripped of bark with large branches completely torn off trunks. Center pivot irrigation systems were either blown over or twisted in surrounding fields...however some were left unscathed to the northeast of this tornado. Additional debris associated with this tornado was also deposited in a field across from US Highway 62/82 before dissipating. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
41.21965-06-09233°43'N / 102°46'W33°50'N / 102°39'W10.40 Miles33 Yards003K0Cochran
41.41980-05-28334°32'N / 101°46'W2.00 Miles833 Yards003K0Swisher
41.82007-04-21234°31'N / 101°46'W34°34'N / 101°47'W3.00 Miles200 Yards032.0M0KSwisher
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A strong tornado delivered a crippling impact on the local economy of Tulia, Texas, when it devastated industrial and residential sections of the small community of 5,000 residents around 19:00 CST on the 21st. A two block wide swath of damage paralleled U.S. Highway 87 in west Tulia for fifteen blocks. Three persons were treated at area hospitals for injuries, almost thirty homes sustained damage or were destroyed along with twenty businesses, and approximately five hundred people were displaced or made homeless. Local officials and newspaper accounts indicated that several of the businesses that were heavily damaged during the tornado served as staples to the Tulia economy prior to the storm. U.S. President George W. Bush declared Swisher County a federal disaster area on May 1, 2007. This destructive tornado developed near a power plant at the intersection of Broadway Street and U.S. Highway 87 in west Tulia at 18:57 CST. The tornado moved north and caused extensive damage to a local supermarket at the intersection of U.S. Highway 87 and Sixth Street. A large portion of the roof was removed on the east side of the structure, and one exterior wall collapsed inward. Smaller sections of two additional exterior walls additionally collapsed. A local auto dealership, located near the supermarket, also sustained a large amount of structural and inventory damage. Forty-one vehicles were damaged by flying debris, and a motor home on the property was overturned. A large overhead door on the east side of the structure's show room failed, resulting in the failure of the west wall. A large storage container was blown into the southwest corner of the building and caused the partial collapse of the roof. Several large metal industrial-style buildings sustained major damage due to the failure of large overhead doors and buckling of roof purlins on the south side of the buildings. One such structure collapsed onto a collection of classic cars, and resulted in a $250,000 loss. Two storm chasers escaped injuries when they were struck by the tornado along the industrial stretch of U.S. Highway 87. Their vehicle was blown into a brick building, and then a tractor-trailer was blown broadside against the chase vehicle. Damage also was observed to the north and northeast of the industrial area, with severe damage in residential areas including a mobile home community between Eighth and Ninth Streets just west of Highland Elementary School. Five mobile homes were damaged, with two others completely destroyed. The most significant residential damage occurred in a subdivision along Northwest Ninth Street through Northwest Eleventh Street. Across this area, a number of homes suffered roof losses. Roofs were totally removed from at least two single-family homes on Tenth Street near Airport Road, with partial exterior wall collapses also noted. The tornado dissipated near the Tulia Municipal Airport at 19:01 CST. Meteorologists from the National Weather Service in Lubbock, Texas, Texas Tech University, and engineers from numerous private and governmental agencies surveyed the Tulia damage. All indications suggest that the maximum winds with the Tulia tornado were between 125 and 135 mph. This makes the Tulia tornado an EF-2 tornado on the Enhanced Fujita scale for tornado intensity. The total economic loss is estimated at $2.0 million. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An outbreak of severe weather impacted much of the central U.S. from Minnesota to Texas during the late afternoon and evening hours of the 21st. The west Texas South Plains and the extreme southern Texas Panhandle were affected by a series of significant tornadoes. At least five tornadoes were spawned by a single cyclic supercell thunderstorm that resulted in more than $3.5 million in damages. The most severely impacted communities included Olton (Lamb County) and Tulia (Swisher County). Both of these west Texas towns were impacted by EF-2 tornadoes that destroyed property and injured four people, and more than 14,000 customers were without electrical power throughout the night. The tornado outbreak was caused by a potent storm system that progressed east over the Four Corners region of the western U.S. on the 21st. A potent upper level jet stream spread over the Southern Plains of the U.S., and helped to create a favorable environment for supercell thunderstorms and tornadoes along a dryline that was stretched across west Texas.
42.31957-05-24333°24'N / 101°40'W33°43'N / 101°19'W29.80 Miles200 Yards00250K0Lubbock
42.41970-04-17433°36'N / 102°38'W33°36'N / 102°36'W2.00 Miles880 Yards02025.0M0Cochran
42.51971-05-08233°24'N / 101°46'W2.00 Miles67 Yards0025K0Lubbock
42.61981-05-07233°42'N / 101°22'W1.00 Mile30 Yards00250K0Crosby
43.11965-06-09233°52'N / 102°48'W34°10'N / 102°46'W20.80 Miles33 Yards003K0Bailey
43.21970-04-17434°23'N / 102°37'W34°27'N / 102°31'W7.40 Miles880 Yards132.5M0Parmer
43.21981-05-07233°40'N / 101°22'W33°45'N / 101°20'W6.10 Miles40 Yards000K0Crosby
44.12005-05-12234°13'N / 101°19'W34°13'N / 101°19'W1.50 Miles1000 Yards0000Floyd
 Brief Description: F2 Tornado South Plains. Several power poles were snapped in half or blown over. The telephone poles surveyed were blown over in a variety of patterns, south to north direction, southwest to northeast direction, and a west to east direction. In addition, several center pivots were either blown over or twisted and two vehicles were flipped over in a field from a south to north direction. The Tornado produced the most damage shortly before and after crossing State Highway 207. This tornado was the parent or main tornado involved in what is known as a multi-vortex tornado. At times, this tornado was greater than one-half mile in width. Large tornadoes sometimes undergo a process where the flow inside the tornado becomes disrupted, but does not dissipate. The result is a turbulent circulation, or vortex, where smaller and typically weaker tornadoes develop and rotate around the parent or much broader circulation. The following South Plains tornado was one of these smaller and weaker tornadoes associated with this multi-vortex tornado. An outbreak of severe thunderstorms occurred across portions of the Texas panhandle and the South Plains of West Texas on Thursday May 12, 2005. The weather pattern on this day was highly conducive for severe thunderstorm and tornado development. A southward moving cold front early in the day became nearly stationary by afternoon as a strong flow of moisture overspread the area from the southeast. Numerous waves of severe thunderstorms developed throughout the afternoon on Thursday and continued well into the after midnight hours on Friday. During this long duration event, between the hours of 4:30 PM and 10:00 PM, several tornadoes occurred across the area. The National Weather Service in Lubbock, TX, dispatched a damage survey team to assess reports of tornadoes and associated damage.
44.51969-05-16234°25'N / 102°36'W0.10 Mile20 Yards003K0Parmer
45.41981-05-07233°41'N / 101°20'W33°42'N / 101°18'W2.70 Miles150 Yards00250K0Crosby
45.91966-05-28234°34'N / 102°24'W1.50 Miles67 Yards003K0Castro
46.51963-05-29233°25'N / 102°29'W1.00 Mile1320 Yards000K0Hockley
47.11991-05-10234°25'N / 102°40'W34°27'N / 102°37'W3.00 Miles100 Yards01250K0Parmer
47.81966-06-10234°21'N / 101°44'W34°35'N / 101°09'W36.90 Miles100 Yards000K0Swisher
48.31970-04-17434°22'N / 101°28'W34°28'N / 101°17'W12.60 Miles880 Yards140K0Briscoe
48.72007-03-23233°43'N / 102°50'W33°44'N / 102°49'W2.00 Miles150 Yards00175K0KCochran
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The Levelland Fire Department reported a second tornado west-northwest of Morton shortly before 22:30 CST. A National Weather Service damage survey found evidence of a strong tornado that developed west of Morton and crossed Texas Highway 114 as it tracked north-northwestward through north-central Cochran county. The tornado impacted the Star Route Gin, which sustained severe damage including the partial collapse of the structure. Concrete anchors were pulled out of the ground and portions of the steel roof beams were heavily damaged. The tornado continued north-northwestward across Farm to Market Road 596 where the tornado destroyed at least three irrigation systems and snapped more than one dozen utility poles. Damage at the Star Route Gin and the snapped utility poles support an EF-2 rating. No injuries were reported and damage estimates totaled $175,000. EPISODE NARRATIVE: An active round of severe thunderstorms, including damaging tornadoes, affected a large portion of the Southern Plains of the U.S. during the afternoon and evening hours of the 23rd. Supercell thunderstorms with a history of producing deadly tornadoes propagated northeastward from the plains of eastern New Mexico into the extreme southwestern Texas Panhandle and the western South Plains of west Texas during the evening hours. As these storms moved eastward across the state line, convective modes transitioned from classic supercells toward mini-bow segments and line-echo-waves. Despite the linear nature of the storms, extreme wind shear resulted in at least five tornadoes across the western South Plains region. Tornadoes were initially observed in the extreme southwestern Texas Panhandle and the northwestern South Plains around 20:00 CST. The hardest hit area was the Bovina vicinity in Parmer County, where a weak tornado struck the city resulting in minor structural damage. Severe storms producing widespread wind damage and at least one strong tornado then impacted portions of Cochran, southern Bailey, and Lamb Counties during the late evening hours. Two cotton gins in Cochran County were severely damaged, and power outages were widespread. No injuries were reported during the severe weather outbreak on the 23rd, but property damage estimates totaled more than $400,000.
49.01957-05-24334°11'N / 102°51'W1.90 Miles200 Yards03250K0Lamb


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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