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Carolina Beach, NC Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Carolina Beach is about the same as North Carolina average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Carolina Beach is lower than North Carolina average and is much lower than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #489

Carolina Beach, NC
0.02
North Carolina
0.18
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Carolina Beach, NC
0.0000
North Carolina
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #870

Carolina Beach, NC
48.96
North Carolina
115.21
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 1,212 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Carolina Beach, NC were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:0Cold:2Dense Fog:1Drought:3
Dust Storm:0Flood:175Hail:413Heat:0Heavy Snow:2
High Surf:2Hurricane:7Ice Storm:0Landslide:0Strong Wind:6
Thunderstorm Winds:435Tropical Storm:6Wildfire:3Winter Storm:4Winter Weather:0
Other:153 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Carolina Beach, NC.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Carolina Beach, NC.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Carolina Beach, NC.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 13 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Carolina Beach, NC.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
18.81962-06-13234°18'N / 78°00'W0025K0Brunswick
25.21954-11-02234°22'N / 77°42'W0025K0Pender
27.22004-08-13234°24'N / 77°53'W34°28'N / 77°50'W5.00 Miles500 Yards3291.3M0Pender
 Brief Description: The remnants of Tropical Storm Bonnie produced a tornado that touched down just south of Rocky Point and moved northeast, causing F0-F2 damage. Damage (F0) was first observed near West Strawberry Lane, with roof damage to a couple of structures. The tornado crossed I-40, just southeast of Rocky Point. It then tracked across Martin Marietta Access Road, causing f0-f1 tree damage. The tornado intensified to f1-f2 as it moved into a small community along Hwy 210. Significant damage occurred on Clayton Lane, Nixon Avenue, and Pickett Road. The tornado reached peak intensity as it moved across Cart Wheel Road, where several homes were completely leveled. It continued to track northeast, with F1 tree damage. The tornado crossed the Northeast Cape Fear River and finally dissipated near Shaw Highway, approximately one mile north of Hwy 210. The following is a summary of damage from Pender County Emergency Management. 17 homes destroyed 25 other homes suffered major damage 34 other homes suffered minor damage 2 businesses suffered major damage 1 business suffered minor damage M26MH, F1MH, M28MH
27.92006-11-16334°20'N / 78°14'W34°21'N / 78°13'W2.00 Miles300 Yards820500K0KColumbus
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: Tornado touched down among manufactured homes just north of Old Lake Road and tracked across an area of more substantial homes and businesses along NC Highway 87. There were 13 homes (mobile and brick) destroyed and more than two dozen damaged. Damage was rated as F3 due to construction of structures that were damaged and destroyed - if structures were better constructed the damage may have been rated higher. The wind speed was estimated to be around 200 mph. As the tornado tracked north of NC Highway 87 toward the county line, the tree damage was rated as F1. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A fast moving tornadic thunderstorm moved ashore on the coast of Brunswick County. There was no damage found until the storm moved across extreme eastern Columbus County and then extreme western Pender County. The tornado produced F3 damage through Riegelwood and diminished to F1 intensity as it crossed a wooded area to the Cape Fear River and into Pender County. This was the second deadliest tornado to hit North Carolina in the last 50 years.
35.01982-09-26234°24'N / 77°28'W1.00 Mile17 Yards0025K0Pender
38.61969-08-05234°36'N / 77°54'W0.30 Mile50 Yards0025K0Pender
41.01950-10-09334°10'N / 78°36'W2.00 Miles880 Yards03250K0Columbus
44.91964-10-04234°18'N / 78°54'W34°40'N / 78°03'W54.60 Miles50 Yards00250K0Columbus
45.51990-07-01234°31'N / 78°27'W0.20 Mile30 Yards00250K0Bladen
45.91965-07-15234°42'N / 78°00'W0025K0Duplin
46.31965-08-17333°50'N / 78°40'W0.30 Mile50 Yards046250K0Horry
46.61979-09-04233°49'N / 78°40'W1.00 Mile97 Yards002.5M0Horry
47.52009-04-06234°26'N / 78°35'W34°27'N / 78°34'W1.00 Mile100 Yards00300K0KBladen
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A National Weather Service Storm Survey concluded an EF-2 tornado with winds up to 115 mph occurred near Clarkton, North Carolina. The tornado initially touched down on Farmers Union Road about 0.3 miles south of Porterville School Road. Significant damage occurred to four homes in this area, including one which was pushed approximately 20 feet off its foundation. A storage trailer weighing more than 8500 pounds was blown approximately 40 feet and flipped upside down as it rotated 180 degrees. A full-size pickup truck was blown 15 feet across a yard and a 12 x 12 feet structure was completely destroyed. Damage in this area was rated as EF-2 with winds up to 115 mph. The width of the damage path in this area was approximately 100 yards. The tornado briefly weakened as it tracked to the northeast. Numerous 12-18 inch diameter treetops were snapped and a few trees up to 18 inches in diameter were uprooted as the tornado approached Chancey Road. Two homes on Chancey Road suffered EF-0 damage primarily to roofs and windows. The tornado continued to the northeast across mainly woods and farmland where spotty EF-0 damage was confined to trees. The tornado strengthened once again as it crossed Baer Mill Road and caused damage to two homes. The front porch of one home was destroyed and the roof covering material on the windward side of the structure was stripped. The wind penetrated the second story of the home and blew out two upstairs windows. Numerous large trees up to two feet in diameter were snapped off or uprooted. One wooden storage shed was completely destroyed. Damage in this area was rated as EF-2 with wind speeds estimated to 115 mph. The width of the damage path was approximately 60 yards at this location. The tornado weakened as it moved northeast from Baer Mill Drive. Spotty minor tree damage was observed between Baer Mill Drive and Susie Baldwin Road. There were injuries or fatalities. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front moved across the area during the morning. Ahead of the front, moderate instability and favorable shear supported the development of severe weather including tornadoes.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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