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Blackgum, OK Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Blackgum is lower than Oklahoma average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Blackgum is much lower than Oklahoma average and is much higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #617

Blackgum, OK
0.02
Oklahoma
0.31
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Blackgum, OK
0.0000
Oklahoma
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #516

Blackgum, OK
281.02
Oklahoma
363.83
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 5,540 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Blackgum, OK were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:1Cold:9Dense Fog:6Drought:31
Dust Storm:0Flood:466Hail:2,576Heat:24Heavy Snow:35
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:29Landslide:0Strong Wind:37
Thunderstorm Winds:2,152Tropical Storm:2Wildfire:12Winter Storm:45Winter Weather:39
Other:76 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Blackgum, OK.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near Blackgum, OK.

No historical earthquake events found in or near Blackgum, OK.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 121 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Blackgum, OK.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
3.91973-05-26335°34'N / 95°06'W35°36'N / 94°46'W18.70 Miles250 Yards06250K0Sequoyah
9.81981-05-17235°37'N / 95°10'W000K0Muskogee
12.51956-11-20235°42'N / 95°12'W35°44'N / 95°09'W3.60 Miles150 Yards003K0Muskogee
14.51957-05-20335°23'N / 95°00'W35°28'N / 94°45'W15.20 Miles200 Yards003K0Delaware
14.71965-06-22235°28'N / 94°48'W1.00 Mile33 Yards0025K0Sequoyah
15.21960-11-15235°48'N / 94°51'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0025K0Cherokee
15.52008-04-10235°45'N / 94°48'W35°46'N / 94°46'W3.00 Miles300 Yards00100K0KAdair
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An NWS storm survey determined that a strong tornado destroyed several mobile homes, caused extensive tree damage, destroyed barns and other outbuildings, and snapped power poles. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms occurred across eastern Oklahoma from the evening of the 9th into the morning of the 10th.
15.51959-05-10235°29'N / 94°46'W1.50 Miles50 Yards013K0Sequoyah
15.51968-05-25235°27'N / 94°48'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0125K0Sequoyah
15.71951-06-07235°34'N / 95°16'W010K0Muskogee
16.21960-05-05435°23'N / 94°51'W35°27'N / 94°49'W4.90 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Sequoyah
16.41976-02-20235°31'N / 94°45'W35°33'N / 94°41'W4.50 Miles30 Yards0025K0Sequoyah
16.41959-03-25235°30'N / 95°15'W000K0Muskogee
16.91982-05-28235°27'N / 94°46'W0.50 Mile50 Yards00250K0Sequoyah
17.11973-05-26435°33'N / 95°19'W35°35'N / 95°16'W3.60 Miles500 Yards525250K0Muskogee
17.21957-05-20335°21'N / 95°05'W35°23'N / 95°00'W5.20 Miles200 Yards013K0Mayes
17.71964-05-10335°52'N / 94°57'W2.00 Miles440 Yards0025K0Cherokee
19.51960-05-05335°24'N / 94°42'W35°31'N / 94°42'W8.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Sequoyah
20.21965-04-11235°35'N / 95°21'W003K0Muskogee
20.31966-04-11235°52'N / 95°14'W35°52'N / 95°07'W6.50 Miles20 Yards00250K0Cherokee
21.51981-04-19335°55'N / 95°06'W35°55'N / 95°03'W3.00 Miles100 Yards003K0Creek
22.51977-07-25235°37'N / 95°25'W35°40'N / 95°22'W4.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Muskogee
22.61995-04-17235°51'N / 95°18'W35°52'N / 95°13'W4.50 Miles125 Yards00500K0Wagoner
22.71957-01-22435°24'N / 94°41'W1020250K0Sequoyah
22.71965-04-08235°46'N / 95°21'W0.30 Mile100 Yards0025K0Muskogee
22.91960-05-05335°21'N / 94°43'W35°24'N / 94°42'W3.60 Miles33 Yards10250K0Sequoyah
22.91954-05-25235°22'N / 95°16'W003K0Muskogee
23.91970-06-11335°41'N / 94°46'W35°56'N / 94°31'W22.20 Miles33 Yards010K0Adair
25.21981-04-19235°58'N / 95°08'W35°58'N / 95°04'W3.60 Miles600 Yards002.5M0Creek
26.51999-06-01335°58'N / 95°15'W35°54'N / 95°15'W2.00 Miles350 Yards251.5M0Cherokee
 Brief Description: A strong tornado, rated an F3, touched down in far western Cherokee County, possibly as a waterspout on Fort Gibson Lake. The tornado moved south onshore and through the rural Amber Hills housing area, crossing OK Hwy 51, and lifting after tracking through much of the Sequoyah State Park. In the Amber Hills and Hammer Hill Road areas, a total of 68 homes sustained some form of damage. Of that, 17 single family dwellings and 13 mobile homes were destroyed. Eight single family dwellings sustained major damage and 11 others had minor damage. One mobile home sustained minor damage. Fourteen other single family dwellings and four other mobile homes were affected. In one of the destroyed mobile homes, an elderly man and woman were inside. The woman was killed immediately, and the man was seriously injured, dying one week later in a hospital of tornado-related complications. This becomes eastern Oklahoma's first killer tornado since the April 1994 Catoosa tornado. Across OK Hwy 51 in Sequoyah State Park, between 400 and 500 trees were lost to the tornado. The carport at the park manager's residence was destroyed, and an RV was turned on its side. Fortunately, most Memorial Day campers had cleared out, therefore there were no injuries in the park. F69MH, M69MH Summary of events for the afternoon and evening of June 1 1999: A cold front moving in from the northwest moved into an extremely unstable air mass on the afternoon of June 1. Along the front, an isolated supercell thunderstorm developed around the Pryor/Locust Grove area and then moved in a slow and unusual south-southwest direction. This storm produced very large hail in addition to several strong tornadoes. This storm also produced eastern Oklahoma's first killer tornado in at least half of a decade.
26.71999-05-04335°39'N / 94°33'W35°43'N / 94°30'W7.00 Miles175 Yards007K0Adair
 Brief Description: A significant long-track tornado first touched down in Sequoyah County 4 miles west of Short, moving northeast for 39 miles to a point about 7 miles southwest of Fayetteville, AR. This tornado clipped the extreme southeast portion of Adair County as the tornado reached its peak strength as an F3 tornado. Fortunately, the tornado travelled across an unpopulated portion of Adair County. However, an aerial survey by NWS personnel over extreme southeast Adair County revealed that every tree in a hardwood forest was completely leveled. Summary of events for May 3-4 1999: Following a week-long blocking weather pattern, a strong upper level trough finally moved out of the southwestern U.S. Interactions with a dryline in western Oklahoma and a slow-moving cold front brought the largest tornado outbreak in Oklahoma history from the afternoon of May 3 through the afternoon of May 4. Most notable was the F5 tornado that moved through southern parts of the Oklahoma City metro area. While the loss of life and the heaviest property damage was limited to central Oklahoma, eastern Oklahoma got into the act with a significant number of tornadoes. While there were dozens of individual storms on May 3 and 4, there are two storms in eastern Oklahoma that stand out as outstanding. The first outstanding storm moved northeast along the I-44 corridor on the evening of May 3, causing F3 damage to Stroud in Lincoln County. The storm went on to cause significant F1 damage in Sapulpa and southwestern portions of the city of Tulsa and millions of dollars in damage. The second outstanding storm got its start in southeast Oklahoma well south of McAlester. This storm moved northeast across Pushmataha, Latimer, Haskell, LeFlore and Sequoyah Counties, producing several damaging tornadoes along the way. The final tornado touched down in Sequoyah County and tracked 39 miles to near Fayetteville, AR, producing F3 damage in an unpopulated forest in Adair County. Following a very wet April that saturated area grounds, another slow-moving weather system made flash flooding another serious problem to deal with as most rainfall quickly ran off into creeks, streams and mainstem rivers. One flash flood in Vinita caused millions of dollars in damage following the flooding of dozens of homes.
26.71999-05-04335°34'N / 94°33'W35°38'N / 94°29'W6.50 Miles175 Yards007K0Sequoyah
 Brief Description: A significant long-track tornado first touched down in Sequoyah County 4 miles west of Short, travelling northeast for 39 miles to a point about 7 miles southwest of Fayetteville, AR. This tornado eventually reached its peak as an F3 tornado in extreme southeast Adair County. In Sequoyah County, this tornado travelled across a sparsely-populated part of the county, causing mostly tree damage. Property damage listed with this entry is just for the portion of the tornado in Sequoyah County, while the F-rating reflects the peak strength of the tornado in Adair County. Summary of events for May 3-4 1999: Following a week-long blocking weather pattern, a strong upper level trough finally moved out of the southwestern U.S. Interactions with a dryline in western Oklahoma and a slow-moving cold front brought the largest tornado outbreak in Oklahoma history from the afternoon of May 3 through the afternoon of May 4. Most notable was the F5 tornado that moved through southern parts of the Oklahoma City metro area. While the loss of life and the heaviest property damage was limited to central Oklahoma, eastern Oklahoma got into the act with a significant number of tornadoes. While there were dozens of individual storms on May 3 and 4, there are two storms in eastern Oklahoma that stand out as outstanding. The first outstanding storm moved northeast along the I-44 corridor on the evening of May 3, causing F3 damage to Stroud in Lincoln County. The storm went on to cause significant F1 damage in Sapulpa and southwestern portions of the city of Tulsa and millions of dollars in damage. The second outstanding storm got its start in southeast Oklahoma well south of McAlester. This storm moved northeast across Pushmataha, Latimer, Haskell, LeFlore and Sequoyah Counties, producing several damaging tornadoes along the way. The final tornado touched down in Sequoyah County and tracked 39 miles to near Fayetteville, AR, producing F3 damage in an unpopulated forest in Adair County. Following a very wet April that saturated area grounds, another slow-moving weather system made flash flooding another serious problem to deal with as most rainfall quickly ran off into creeks, streams and mainstem rivers. One flash flood in Vinita caused millions of dollars in damage following the flooding of dozens of homes.
26.81960-05-05435°04'N / 95°03'W35°23'N / 94°51'W24.60 Miles200 Yards362.5M0Haskell
27.41982-08-27235°51'N / 95°23'W1.00 Mile50 Yards0225K0Wagoner
27.51960-05-05335°11'N / 94°47'W35°21'N / 94°43'W12.10 Miles33 Yards00250K0Le Flore
27.91957-01-22235°15'N / 95°18'W35°17'N / 95°12'W6.10 Miles50 Yards003K0Haskell
28.01961-05-08235°48'N / 94°33'W0025K0Adair
29.01973-05-26235°30'N / 95°32'W35°34'N / 95°28'W5.70 Miles200 Yards00250K0Mcintosh
29.21983-11-22335°53'N / 94°48'W36°03'N / 94°37'W16.00 Miles100 Yards062.5M0Le Flore
29.51960-05-05435°23'N / 94°33'W35°27'N / 94°30'W5.40 Miles33 Yards513250K0Sequoyah
29.62008-04-10235°47'N / 94°32'W35°49'N / 94°30'W4.00 Miles400 Yards0050K0KAdair
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: An NWS storm survey determined that a strong tornado destroyed a mobile home, caused extensive tree damage, and snapped power poles. This tornado continued into Washington County Arkansas, lifting about 4 miles southwest of Lincoln. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms occurred across eastern Oklahoma from the evening of the 9th into the morning of the 10th.
29.91984-10-16235°25'N / 94°31'W0.10 Mile3 Yards0025K0Sequoyah
30.01971-05-05335°49'N / 95°45'W35°55'N / 95°06'W37.00 Miles600 Yards00250K0Muskogee
30.01960-05-05235°18'N / 95°30'W35°25'N / 95°21'W11.70 Miles200 Yards26250K0Mcintosh
30.61999-05-04335°43'N / 94°29'W35°45'N / 94°27'W3.00 Miles175 Yards003K0Crawford
 Brief Description: A significant long-track tornado first developed 4 miles west of Short, OK, moving northeast to about 7 miles southwest of Fayetteville, AR. This tornado reached its peak strength as an F3 tornado as it clipped extreme southeast Adair County, OK. This tornado then clipped extreme northwest Crawford County, passing through an unpopulated, forested area in the Ozark National Forest. An aerial survey by NWS personnel just west of the Oklahoma/Arkansas state line west of Natural Dam revealed that every tree in a hardwood forest was completely leveled. Property damage listed with this entry reflects tree damage sustained in Crawford County, while the F-rating reflects the tornado's peak strength in Adair County, OK. Summary of events for May 4 1999: Following a record tornado outbreak in Oklahoma on May 3-4, a significant severe weather outbreak affected northwest Arkansas on the morning and afternoon of May 4 as a vigorous upper level system continued to move slowly east. While there were many individual storms in the area on May 4, the most outstanding storm of the day was a supercell thunderstorm that spawned a tornado in Sequoyah County, OK, which then moved northeast for 39 miles to near Fayetteville. Other storms produced damaging winds and large hail.
30.71976-03-29235°33'N / 95°32'W0.30 Mile30 Yards003K0Mcintosh
31.21983-11-22335°51'N / 94°45'W36°04'N / 94°31'W19.00 Miles100 Yards00250K0Le Flore
31.41999-06-01335°26'N / 95°31'W35°23'N / 95°28'W4.50 Miles350 Yards00700K0Mcintosh
 Brief Description: The F3 tornado described here was the second of two tornadoes to touch down in the Checotah area on the evening of June 1. Both tornadoes were spawned from the same parent thunderstorm. Even though this tornado had a stronger F-rating than the first, it caused less widespread damage since it travelled through a less densely populated area. The second tornado touched down on the southeast side of Checotah near I-40 and Grapevine Road at 650 PM CDT. The tornado travelled southeast for 4.5 miles and then lifted at 706 PM CDT. Damage assessments in Checotah combined the effects of the first and second tornadoes. For details of the damage assessment, see the third paragraph of the narrative for the Tornado entry immediately preceding this entry. This tornado, the second of the two, was rated an F3 based based on the near-complete destruction of a farm house 3 to 4 miles southeast of Checotah. Summary of events for the afternoon and evening of June 1 1999: A cold front moving in from the northwest moved into an extremely unstable air mass on the afternoon of June 1. Along the front, an isolated supercell thunderstorm developed around the Pryor/Locust Grove area and then moved in a slow and unusual south-southwest direction. This storm produced very large hail in addition to several strong tornadoes. This storm also produced eastern Oklahoma's first killer tornado in at least half of a decade.
32.11983-07-30235°20'N / 95°27'W0.10 Mile10 Yards0025K0Mcintosh
32.41960-05-05235°56'N / 95°25'W35°59'N / 95°21'W5.10 Miles200 Yards00250K0Wagoner
33.11960-05-05335°23'N / 94°29'W35°26'N / 94°26'W4.50 Miles33 Yards1025K0Sequoyah
33.22008-04-10235°49'N / 94°30'W35°54'N / 94°28'W6.00 Miles400 Yards0075K0KWashington
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The strong tornado that began 5.5 miles east-southeast of Stillwell in Adair County Oklahoma moved into Washington County. The tornado destroyed a mobile home, destroyed a barn, rolled a vehicle, caused extensive tree damage, and snapped power poles. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms occurred across Northwest Arkansas during the evening and early morning hours on the 9th and 10th.
33.81999-06-01235°25'N / 95°32'W35°23'N / 95°32'W2.00 Miles75 Yards0040K0Mcintosh
 Brief Description: Spotters reported a tornado touchdown in open rangeland, moving due south for about 2 miles. Along the way, this tornado killed 28 head of cattle when they were hurled into a fence line. This tornado also caused minor damage to a home near Onapa. Summary of events for the afternoon and evening of June 1 1999: A cold front moving in from the northwest moved into an extremely unstable air mass on the afternoon of June 1. Along the front, an isolated supercell thunderstorm developed around the Pryor/Locust Grove area and then moved in a slow and unusual south-southwest direction. This storm produced very large hail in addition to several strong tornadoes. This storm also produced eastern Oklahoma's first killer tornado in at least half of a decade.
34.21984-10-16235°38'N / 94°24'W35°34'N / 94°22'W8.00 Miles50 Yards022.5M0Crawford
34.71976-03-26535°12'N / 94°42'W35°15'N / 94°30'W11.90 Miles440 Yards2642.5M0Le Flore
34.71961-05-07235°54'N / 95°30'W000K0Wagoner
35.11960-05-19235°52'N / 95°32'W000K0Wagoner
35.41957-04-02235°03'N / 95°01'W35°09'N / 94°58'W7.60 Miles880 Yards0225K0Haskell
35.41970-06-11235°15'N / 95°30'W35°18'N / 95°26'W5.20 Miles440 Yards1142.5M0Pittsburg
36.01954-04-30335°38'N / 94°24'W35°45'N / 94°19'W9.20 Miles440 Yards00250K0Crawford
36.01996-04-21235°23'N / 94°25'W35°23'N / 94°25'W4.00 Miles1050 Yards240150.0M0Sebastian
36.51958-05-02235°16'N / 94°30'W0.30 Mile100 Yards0025K0Le Flore
36.71976-03-26235°52'N / 94°25'W2.00 Miles77 Yards00250K0Washington
36.92010-12-31236°00'N / 94°34'W36°01'N / 94°32'W2.00 Miles250 Yards0060K0KAdair
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This segment is the first of six segments of this long-track tornado. A tornado developed just northeast of Westville and moved rapidly northeastward damaging a home, tossing or rolling four vehicles, snapping at least 13 large power poles, and snapping or uprooting large trees. Estimated maximum wind based on this damage was 125 mph. This tornado continued into Washington County, Arkansas. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Unseasonably warm and moist air spread into eastern Oklahoma ahead of a cold front. Scattered thunderstorms developed in the late evening and early morning hours ahead of the cold front as a weak upper level disturbance passed through the region. Large hail and damaging wind gusts occurred with some of these storms. Another round of storms developed on the cold front as it moved into eastern Oklahoma a few hours before sunrise. Weak to moderate instability combined with very strong low level wind shear created an environment that supported supercell thunderstorm structures. Several supercells developed resulting in large hail and damaging wind gusts in the hours just before and after sunrise on the 31st. One of these supercells produced a long-track, strong tornado that began in Adair County, Oklahoma, and moved into Washington County, Arkansas, where it killed four people in and near the town of Cincinnati.
37.21961-03-26335°16'N / 95°43'W35°30'N / 95°28'W21.40 Miles200 Yards0125K0Mcintosh
37.41989-05-18235°28'N / 94°21'W0.70 Mile120 Yards00250K0Crawford
37.71960-05-05235°45'N / 95°40'W35°48'N / 95°36'W4.90 Miles100 Yards0025K0Muskogee
37.91965-05-08235°21'N / 94°25'W35°24'N / 94°21'W5.10 Miles100 Yards08250K0Sebastian
38.11999-03-08235°26'N / 95°43'W35°26'N / 95°33'W9.00 Miles100 Yards00910K0Mcintosh
 Brief Description: The same parent storm which produced a tornado near Burney and Tiger Mountain produced another tornado which touched down near Pierce. At Pierce, the tornado removed roofs from quite a few homes. In Pierce, the tornado also damaged vehicles and boats. Further east, the tornado crossed Interstate 40 near Fountainhead Road (OK Hwy 150). As it crossed the interstate, four 18-wheelers were knocked over, but the drivers escaped injury. After crossing the interstate, the tornado travelled through the Sycamore Bay development, damaging ten to twelve homes. The damage included cracked ceilings, a destroyed garage, and shingles ripped off to the bare wood. One home was moved 30 feet from its foundation, and it took the roof off of another. The tornado then crossed Lake Eufaula as a waterspout, destroying five boats and several docks at Emerald Bay. Once the tornado came back onshore, it hit Lotawatah Road, where it moved a double-wide mobile home from its foundation. Another home lost its roof, and outbuildings were destroyed. A trucking company was hit, destroying five 60-foot trailers and damaging others. The tornado then crossed Humphrey Road at a racing stable, destroying six of their structures and six corrals. When the tornado reached US Hwy 266, part of a home's roof collapsed, and a horse trailer was thrown on top of a barn, which then collapsed. Along its entire path, numerous power poles were snapped off at the base. Spotters reported seeing two or three simultaneous tornadoes at times. Fortunately, the tornado lifted just before entering Checotah. Summary of events for March 8 1999: A band of moderate to heavy rain moved across the area during the morning of March 8 in association with a warm front out in advance of a low pressure center. The rain brought localized nuisance flooding. Once the morning rains passed, warmer air moved into eastern Oklahoma during the afternoon, and an upper level low with lots of cold air aloft moved into the area. Thunderstorms then erupted late in the afternoon along an eastward moving dryline/cold front. Some of these thunderstorms displayed characteristics of low-precipitation supercells which then produced damaging tornadoes, most notably in McIntosh County and at Broken Arrow in Tulsa County. The Broken Arrow tornado occurred miles behind any radar-indicated thunderstorm activity and was possibly the result of a cold-air funnel under the cold upper low which reached the ground.
38.61967-12-21235°21'N / 94°24'W35°23'N / 94°21'W3.80 Miles833 Yards0625K0Sebastian
39.01998-06-08235°05'N / 95°14'W35°05'N / 95°14'W0.50 Mile50 Yards0060K0Haskell
 Brief Description: An F2 tornado destroyed one single family dwelling, while another single family dwelling received major damage. Summary of events for the evening of June 8 and the early morning of June 9 1998: A classic southern plains severe weather event shaped up on the afternoon and evening of June 8 as a number of isolated severe thunderstorms developed over central Oklahoma to the east of a dryline. The first severe thunderstorm to affect eastern Oklahoma scraped the northwestern part of Osage County, causing a report of a severe thunderstorm gust. This storm quickly died as it entered Kansas. A second more serious severe thunderstorm formed west of Oklahoma City and tracked all the way to the Arkansas state line south of Fort Smith, traversing Pittsburg, Haskell, and Le Flore Counties. This storm travelled east along an instability axis and a warm front. From a radar perspective, this storm was impressive in that it kept a classic, well-defined hook on its entire journey across southeast Oklahoma. From a human perspective, this storm was impressive in that it produced ten tornadoes in southeast Oklahoma, hail as large as golfballs, damaging thunderstorm winds, and torrential flooding rains. A third cluster of severe thunderstorms developed over Creek County and moved east across Okmulgee, Muskogee, Cherokee, and Adair Counties before weakening as it entered Arkansas. These storms slowed their movement across Muskogee County and regeneration along the southwest flank of the storms caused torrential rainfalls that dumped nearly three inches of rain in northern Muskogee, southern Cherokee, southern Adair, and northern Sequoyah Counties. In addition to flooding rains, these storms produced hail as large as nickels and damaging thunderstorm winds.
39.11981-07-21235°12'N / 94°31'W0.50 Mile30 Yards0025K0Kiowa
39.11996-04-21335°26'N / 94°21'W35°31'N / 94°17'W6.00 Miles1050 Yards049150.0M0Crawford
39.91999-05-04335°45'N / 94°28'W36°00'N / 94°15'W22.00 Miles175 Yards0080K0Washington
 Brief Description: A significant long-track tornado first touched down 4 miles west of Short, OK, and tracked 39 miles to a point about 7 miles southwest of Fayetteville, AR. Along the way, this tornado passed through portions of four counties but mainly affected sparsely-populated areas. It reached its peak strength as an F3 tornado in extreme southeast Adair County, OK, but mainly caused F2 damage in Washington County, AR. Fortunately, this tornado lifted before it reached heavily-populated Fayetteville. The tornado's first real property damage took place at a property between the Hogeye and Strickland communities, where the tornado peeled off the roof to a home, shattered windows, uprooted trees, destroyed two barns, and wiped a porch off of its stone foundation. Numerous trees were blown down along County Roads 212 and 214. Only a few miles away in the Cove Creek community, south of Prarie Grove, the tornado blew off a home's roof, demolished an enclosed garage, and destroyed a barn. A flagpole was bent almost in half, and a road sign ended up wrapped around a mailbox. The tornado uprooted a 200-year old walnut tree which then fell onto a pickup truck. About a half-dozen other oak and cedar trees on one property dating back at least 150 years were snapped or uprooted. The Washington County Judge's Office supplied a picture of a church near Cove Creek that was moved off of its foundation. Several poultry buildings along the tornado's path were also damaged. The property damage listed in this entry is for just that damage sustained in Washington County, while the F-rating reflects the tornado's peak strength in Adair County, OK. Summary of events for May 4 1999: Following a record tornado outbreak in Oklahoma on May 3-4, a significant severe weather outbreak affected northwest Arkansas on the morning and afternoon of May 4 as a vigorous upper level system continued to move slowly east. While there were many individual storms in the area on May 4, the most outstanding storm of the day was a supercell thunderstorm that spawned a tornado in Sequoyah County, OK, which then moved northeast for 39 miles to near Fayetteville. Other storms produced damaging winds and large hail.
40.31960-05-05235°17'N / 95°35'W1.00 Mile400 Yards0025K0Mcintosh
40.51986-09-26235°54'N / 95°39'W36°00'N / 95°31'W8.00 Miles73 Yards00250K0Wagoner
40.81984-10-16235°34'N / 94°22'W35°44'N / 94°10'W14.00 Miles50 Yards012.5M0Crawford
41.11971-12-14235°11'N / 95°30'W0.10 Mile77 Yards00250K0Pittsburg
41.21954-03-24235°49'N / 95°41'W1.00 Mile33 Yards00250K0Muskogee
41.32010-05-10235°26'N / 95°48'W35°31'N / 95°37'W13.00 Miles800 Yards00125K0KMcintosh
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado developed just north of I-40 and south of Lake Eufaula, moved east-northeast across the lake, and then curved northeast before dissipating north-northeast of the intersection of Highway 266 and Highway 72. The tornado severely damaged homes and mobile homes, destroyed several barns, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, and blew down power poles. The estimated peak wind in the tornado based on this damage was 115 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed along and ahead of a dry line over central Oklahoma during the afternoon hours. Very unstable air along with very strong low level wind shear resulted in a number of supercell thunderstorms. These storms produced numerous tornadoes, very large hail, and damaging wind gusts as they moved eastward across eastern Oklahoma during the evening hours.
41.41980-04-07335°08'N / 94°33'W0.50 Mile127 Yards092.5M0Le Flore
41.41979-04-11235°50'N / 94°23'W35°59'N / 94°19'W11.10 Miles200 Yards04250K0Washington
41.92010-05-10235°30'N / 95°44'W35°30'N / 95°43'W1.00 Mile200 Yards00200K0KMcintosh
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado destroyed a mobile home and a barn, severely damaged a couple homes, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, and blew down power poles. The estimated peak wind in the tornado based on this damage was 115 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Severe thunderstorms developed along and ahead of a dry line over central Oklahoma during the afternoon hours. Very unstable air along with very strong low level wind shear resulted in a number of supercell thunderstorms. These storms produced numerous tornadoes, very large hail, and damaging wind gusts as they moved eastward across eastern Oklahoma during the evening hours.
41.91968-06-01236°06'N / 94°36'W36°08'N / 94°33'W3.60 Miles200 Yards0025K0Adair
41.91958-06-25235°08'N / 94°32'W0.50 Mile200 Yards0125K0Le Flore
42.32010-12-31336°01'N / 94°32'W36°06'N / 94°25'W9.00 Miles500 Yards471.5M0KWashington
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This segment is the second of six segments of this long-track tornado. The tornado moved into Washington County snapping numerous trees as it approached the town of Cincinnati. In Cincinnati, the tornado destroyed several permanent homes, destroyed the volunteer fire station, destroyed a mobile home, damaged several other permanent homes, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, snapped numerous power poles, and destroyed barns and outbuildings. Two people were killed in the mobile home that was destroyed and a third person was killed either in or near a barn while he was tending to his cattle. At least seven injuries also occurred. The tornado was about 300 yards wide when it went through town. The maximum estimated wind speed in the tornado based on this damage was 140 mph. The tornado continued to move rapidly northeastward and widened to about 500 yards northeast of Cincinnati. Several permanent homes were severely damaged, several mobile homes were destroyed, at least four chicken houses were destroyed, outbuildings were destroyed, numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, and power poles were snapped. A woman in one of the mobile homes that was destroyed was transported to a hospital with serious injuries. She later died from those injuries on January 4th. The tornado continued into Benton County, Arkansas. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Unseasonably warm and moist air spread into northwestern Arkansas ahead of a cold front. Scattered thunderstorms developed in the late evening and early morning hours ahead of the cold front as a weak upper level disturbance passed through the region. Large hail and damaging wind gusts occurred with some of those storms. Another round of storms developed on the cold front over eastern Oklahoma as it pushed into the area. Weak to moderate instability combined with very strong low level wind shear created an environment that supported supercell thunderstorm structures. Several supercells developed resulting in large hail and damaging wind gusts in the hours just before and after sunrise on the 31st. One of these supercells produced a long-track, strong tornado that killed four people in and near the town of Cincinnati in Washington County. Debris was transported by the tornado into northern Benton County and was reported in Bella Vista and Pea Ridge. The Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport (XNA) was closed for three hours to remove the debris from the flight line. Another supercell produced a short-lived, weak tornado in Carroll County that moved into Missouri.
42.41960-05-05434°58'N / 95°18'W35°04'N / 95°03'W15.70 Miles200 Yards002.5M0Latimer
42.71954-05-01235°13'N / 95°37'W35°16'N / 95°35'W4.30 Miles33 Yards0025K0Mcintosh
43.51993-04-24236°12'N / 95°15'W36°14'N / 95°10'W4.50 Miles150 Yards015.0M0Mayes
43.51982-12-02335°29'N / 94°14'W1.00 Mile500 Yards00250K0Crawford
44.51953-04-23335°29'N / 94°13'W003K0Crawford
44.51974-06-08336°10'N / 95°25'W36°13'N / 95°16'W9.00 Miles100 Yards0725.0M0Mayes
44.62006-03-12336°10'N / 94°55'W36°18'N / 94°38'W17.00 Miles440 Yards083.0M0Delaware
 Brief Description: The first tornado, which touched down in northwestern Cherokee County, continued into southern Delaware County. Damage suggested the tornado widened and strengthened as it moved through southern Delaware County reaching a maximum width of around 1/4 of a mile. The tornado damaged 95 homes, destroying 42 of those homes. Five businesses were also damaged. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted and about 100 power poles were downed, which resulted in more than 5000 people losing power as a result of the storm. The worst damage from this tornado was found from near Twin Oaks to about 4 miles west-southwest of Colcord. The tornado injured eight people.
45.12010-05-13236°10'N / 95°26'W36°11'N / 95°22'W4.00 Miles1000 Yards02300K0KMayes
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado that developed near Inola in Rogers County moved northeast toward Chouteau. In Mayes County, the tornado severely damaged several homes, destroyed a metal shop, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, and snapped numerous high tension wire poles. The estimated peak wind in this tornado based on this damage in Mayes County was 115 mph. Two people were injured by flying debris. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A line of thunderstorms intensified as it moved into eastern Oklahoma during the early morning hours of the 13th. A number of tornadoes developed on the leading edge of the bowing line of storms over northeastern Oklahoma. The storms also produced damaging wind gusts.
45.41982-06-11235°38'N / 95°52'W35°39'N / 95°44'W6.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Okmulgee
45.51980-09-16236°03'N / 95°36'W2.50 Miles2200 Yards00250K0Wagoner
45.81954-04-30335°45'N / 94°19'W36°00'N / 94°10'W19.20 Miles440 Yards01250K0Washington
45.91989-05-08236°15'N / 94°39'W36°11'N / 94°39'W5.00 Miles50 Yards01250K0Delaware
46.11970-11-19236°10'N / 94°32'W2.50 Miles100 Yards0025K0Benton
46.31966-04-11335°54'N / 95°46'W35°58'N / 95°40'W7.30 Miles100 Yards06250K0Wagoner
46.32010-05-13236°00'N / 95°42'W36°01'N / 95°37'W5.00 Miles550 Yards02400K0KWagoner
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado severely damaged a home, destroyed several shops and outbuildings, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, and blew down power poles. The estimated peak wind in the tornado based on this damage was 120 mph. Two people were injured by flying debris in the severely damaged home. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A line of thunderstorms intensified as it moved into eastern Oklahoma during the early morning hours of the 13th. A number of tornadoes developed on the leading edge of the bowing line of storms over northeastern Oklahoma. The storms also produced damaging wind gusts.
46.31961-05-08236°15'N / 95°15'W003K0Mayes
46.41957-04-02234°50'N / 95°06'W35°03'N / 95°01'W15.70 Miles880 Yards0025K0Latimer
46.71968-06-01236°08'N / 94°33'W36°11'N / 94°27'W6.50 Miles500 Yards003K0Benton
47.11960-04-14335°28'N / 94°17'W35°31'N / 94°03'W13.60 Miles833 Yards03250K0Crawford
47.31975-12-05335°40'N / 95°58'W35°57'N / 95°38'W27.00 Miles50 Yards00250K0Okmulgee
47.51999-03-08235°26'N / 95°49'W35°26'N / 95°48'W1.20 Miles200 Yards0490K0Mcintosh
 Brief Description: A tornado first touched down near Burney, which is in western McIntosh County near mile marker 248 on Interstate 40. The tornado travelled parallel to and south of the interstate in the Tiger Mountain area but then crossed interstate 40 closest to mile marker 249 as it was lifting. Most of the damage from this tornado was F1-strength, but some F2-strength damage occurred. The tornado first destroyed two mobile homes. Roofing from the first destroyed home was found 150 feet to the east, and a car was crushed in a car port. The second mobile home destroyed was a brand new double-wide that had recently been tied down. The mobile home rolled 30 to 40 feet and was totally destroyed. Four members of a family inside the home were injured, one of them critically. Two cars in a car port were damaged. Further east, shingles were torn off the south and west sides of a house, and a tin shed was destroyed with debris scattered to the north and east. Another shed with appliances inside was destroyed. The tornado then passed near a small dwelling, where numerous large trees were down and a 20-foot pontoon was moved 15 feet over a tree. The tornado then hit another double-wide mobile home, which had its apron blown out on one side, had trim peeled off, and it had a window broken. Two nearby power poles were snapped off. Finally, the tornado passed a well-built two-story home. This home had shingles blown off the roof, windows broken, a sun porch was destroyed, a metal hay shed lost its roof, many large trees were blown down, two small storage sheds were destroyed,a 20-foot horse trailer rolled over, and a Ford F150 crew cab was moved 10 feet. Summary of events for March 8 1999: A band of moderate to heavy rain moved across the area during the morning of March 8 in association with a warm front out in advance of a low pressure center. The rain brought localized nuisance flooding. Once the morning rains passed, warmer air moved into eastern Oklahoma during the afternoon, and an upper level low with lots of cold air aloft moved into the area. Thunderstorms then erupted late in the afternoon along an eastward moving dryline/cold front. Some of these thunderstorms displayed characteristics of low-precipitation supercells which then produced damaging tornadoes, most notably in McIntosh County and at Broken Arrow in Tulsa County. The Broken Arrow tornado occurred miles behind any radar-indicated thunderstorm activity and was possibly the result of a cold-air funnel under the cold upper low which reached the ground.
47.72010-12-31236°06'N / 94°25'W36°07'N / 94°23'W2.00 Miles400 Yards02200K0KBenton
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This segment is the third of six segments of this long-track tornado. The tornado severely damaged a couple permanent homes, destroyed a mobile home, destroyed barns, snapped or uprooted numerous trees, and snapped power poles in this portion of Benton County. Two injuries occurred in the mobile home that was destroyed on Winwood Ranch Road. The maximum estimated wind speed based on this damage was 130 mph. The tornado continued into Washington County, Arkansas. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Unseasonably warm and moist air spread into northwestern Arkansas ahead of a cold front. Scattered thunderstorms developed in the late evening and early morning hours ahead of the cold front as a weak upper level disturbance passed through the region. Large hail and damaging wind gusts occurred with some of those storms. Another round of storms developed on the cold front over eastern Oklahoma as it pushed into the area. Weak to moderate instability combined with very strong low level wind shear created an environment that supported supercell thunderstorm structures. Several supercells developed resulting in large hail and damaging wind gusts in the hours just before and after sunrise on the 31st. One of these supercells produced a long-track, strong tornado that killed four people in and near the town of Cincinnati in Washington County. Debris was transported by the tornado into northern Benton County and was reported in Bella Vista and Pea Ridge. The Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport (XNA) was closed for three hours to remove the debris from the flight line. Another supercell produced a short-lived, weak tornado in Carroll County that moved into Missouri.
47.71970-11-19235°58'N / 94°29'W36°10'N / 94°13'W20.30 Miles300 Yards0125K0Washington
48.11971-05-05236°16'N / 95°20'W36°19'N / 95°02'W17.00 Miles200 Yards0025K0Mayes
48.31973-05-01236°11'N / 94°33'W36°13'N / 94°30'W3.80 Miles150 Yards04250K0Benton
48.61968-04-19234°58'N / 94°39'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0125K0Le Flore
48.61973-05-26234°57'N / 94°42'W1.50 Miles33 Yards0025K0Le Flore
48.81974-06-08336°05'N / 95°46'W36°10'N / 95°25'W20.40 Miles100 Yards0025.0M0Wagoner
49.01960-05-05335°29'N / 95°51'W0.80 Mile150 Yards215250K0Okmulgee
49.11981-05-23236°16'N / 94°39'W000K0Delaware
49.51970-06-11335°56'N / 94°31'W36°12'N / 94°06'W29.60 Miles250 Yards1442.5M0Washington
49.51953-03-13235°00'N / 94°32'W003K0Le Flore
49.81968-04-19435°12'N / 94°16'W2.00 Miles300 Yards142702.5M0Sebastian
49.82010-12-31236°07'N / 94°23'W36°08'N / 94°21'W2.00 Miles300 Yards000K0KWashington
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: This segment is the fourth of six segments of this long-track tornado. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted in this segment. Estimated maximum wind speed based on this damage was 125 mph. The tornado moved northeastward and crossed back into Benton County, Arkansas. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Unseasonably warm and moist air spread into northwestern Arkansas ahead of a cold front. Scattered thunderstorms developed in the late evening and early morning hours ahead of the cold front as a weak upper level disturbance passed through the region. Large hail and damaging wind gusts occurred with some of those storms. Another round of storms developed on the cold front over eastern Oklahoma as it pushed into the area. Weak to moderate instability combined with very strong low level wind shear created an environment that supported supercell thunderstorm structures. Several supercells developed resulting in large hail and damaging wind gusts in the hours just before and after sunrise on the 31st. One of these supercells produced a long-track, strong tornado that killed four people in and near the town of Cincinnati in Washington County. Debris was transported by the tornado into northern Benton County and was reported in Bella Vista and Pea Ridge. The Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport (XNA) was closed for three hours to remove the debris from the flight line. Another supercell produced a short-lived, weak tornado in Carroll County that moved into Missouri.
49.91954-02-19235°13'N / 94°15'W1.00 Mile33 Yards000K0Sebastian


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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