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Alston, GA Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in Alston is about the same as Georgia average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in Alston is lower than Georgia average and is lower than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #185

Alston, GA
0.07
Georgia
0.08
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

Alston, GA
0.0000
Georgia
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #573

Alston, GA
121.06
Georgia
179.92
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 2,278 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of Alston, GA were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:0Cold:13Dense Fog:2Drought:43
Dust Storm:0Flood:108Hail:544Heat:14Heavy Snow:12
High Surf:0Hurricane:4Ice Storm:5Landslide:0Strong Wind:26
Thunderstorm Winds:1,357Tropical Storm:11Wildfire:1Winter Storm:5Winter Weather:5
Other:128 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near Alston, GA.

Historical Earthquake Events

A total of 1 historical earthquake event that had a recorded magnitude of 3.5 or above found in or near Alston, GA.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeDepth (km)LatitudeLongitude
9.31976-12-273.7532.22-82.46

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 49 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near Alston, GA.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
3.91963-01-20232°02'N / 82°30'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Montgomery
3.91966-02-28232°02'N / 82°30'W0.90 Mile33 Yards0025K0Montgomery
9.71968-06-02232°13'N / 82°25'W0.10 Mile33 Yards0025K0Toombs
12.41975-01-12232°12'N / 82°19'W2.00 Miles100 Yards0125K0Toombs
12.82008-05-11232°15'N / 82°23'W32°15'N / 82°22'W1.00 Mile150 Yards03500K0KToombs
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down in extreme northwest Toombs county, approxmiately three miles south-southwest of Normantown. This tornado was spawned by the same thunderstorm that less than 10 minutes prior had spanwed an EF3 tornado, the strongest tornado of this event, just south of Soperton in Treutlen county, which tracked into extreme northeast Montgomery county. This first tornado in Toombs county was only on the ground for about one mile, but caused considerable damage. Four mobile homes were completely destroyed, resulting in three minor injuries and the displacement of seven families from their homes. A church also sustained heavy damage. Two brick homes were damaged as well as several barns, sheds, and storage buildings. In addition a tractor-trailer rig was overturned. Some 200 to 300 pine trees were also blown down in the area. The tornado path width was determined to be 150 yards. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
15.92008-05-11332°19'N / 82°29'W32°19'N / 82°27'W2.00 Miles150 Yards0025K0KMontgomery
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the EF3 tornado, that initially touched down approximately three miles south-southeast of Soperton, continued on an east-southeastward track approximately seven miles into extreme northeast Montgomery county. The tornado likely weakened to less than EF3 intensity as it entered Montgomery county. A number of outbuildings and sheds were destroyed along the path of the tornado in northeast Montgomery county. A number of trees and power lines were also downed. However, no damage to any homes was observed or reported in Montgomery county. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
16.72008-05-11332°20'N / 82°34'W32°19'N / 82°29'W5.00 Miles150 Yards00200K0KTreutlen
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF3 tornado, the strongest tornado of the 15 separate tornadoes to affect north and central Georgia this Mother's Day, touched down approximately three miles south-southeast of Soperton, then tracked east-southeast across southern Treutlen county and into extreme northeastern Montgomery county. The second floor of a two-story home was completely removed by the tornado. Numerous sheds and outbuildings were destroyed along the path of the tornado. Trees and power lines were also down along the path of the tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
20.32007-12-15232°20'N / 82°39'W32°22'N / 82°37'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00100K0KTreutlen
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A storm survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that a tornado, an EF2 at maximum intensity, tracked across southwest Treutlen county, west of Soperton. The tornado touched down as an EF1 in a heavily forested area approximately one mile southwest of Lothair. Significant tree damage was noted within the forested area as a result of the tornado. The tornado then strengthened to an EF2 as it moved northeast and reached the town of Lothair where a fire department building on Georgia Highway 199 was destroyed. The tornado then weakened back to an EF1 as it continued moving northeastward. A mobile home, about 1.5 miles northeast of Lothair, was completely destroyed by the tornado and another home was moved off its foundation. The tornado then weakened to an EF0 another mile to the northeast and lifted, but not before ripping a carport off a home and throwing it approximately 50 yards across the street. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong negatively titled upper atmospheric disturbance and associated strong cold front were moving through the southeast states late on December 15th. Unseasonably warm conditions had prevailed across this region of the country throughout the preceding days, while much colder weather and significant winter weather prevailed to the northwest across the southern plains and midwest. A wedge of cool air was intensifying across north central and northeast Georgia, with the front marking this wedge of cooler air lying across central and southeast Georgia. Meanwhile, deep coastal low development along the mid-Atlantic coast was underway as the upper trough rotated into the southeast states. The combination of these strong dynamics, a strong low-level jet, and unseasonably warm, moist air across southeast Georgia in advance of the front and upper disturbance resulted in the development of thunderstorms across south Georgia. As the storms moved northeast and encountered the wedge front, they quickly became rotating supercells spawning three tornadoes in a one-hour period across the southeast portion of the Peachtree City, Georgia Weather Forecast Office County Warning Area.
22.41961-04-03231°48'N / 82°18'W0.50 Mile33 Yards003K0Appling
23.22008-05-11332°18'N / 82°13'W32°17'N / 82°07'W5.00 Miles200 Yards021.0M0KTattnall
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A confirmed EF-3 Tornado crossed into extreme northwestern Tattnall county from Toombs county, then continued east-southeastward into the community of Cobbtown, Georgia before turning east and dissipating. The first indications of significant damage, consistent with an EF-1 Tornado, occurred along Representative Kennedy Road where a mobile home was partially destroyed. A well defined path of debris was noted trailing southeast of this area across open farm fields. Several homes were also severely damaged with roofs blown off along Henry Moxley Road about 1 mile southeast of Representative Kennedy Road. The Tornado continued to strengthen as it turned east toward Cobbtown, Georgia and peaked in intensity as it tracked near the intersection of Georgia State Highways 121 and 57. Here the Tornado completely leveled a brick convenience store and caused considerable damage to trees and nearby structures. Two people working in the store at the time of the Tornado were injured but not killed. The damage pattern in this area was consistent with an EF-3 Tornado with winds estimated between 140 and 150 mph. Also in this same general area, but south of the Tornado track there was evidence of a strong downburst. The winds were estimated to be around 100 mph with the downburst, likely associated with the rear flank downdraft of the Supercell Thunderstorm. The Tornado continued to move east across open farm fields where extensive tree damage and minor structural damage consistent with an EF-1 and EF-0 Tornado was noted. The Tornado dissipated about 1.5 miles east of Cobbtown, however occasional bouts of non-tornadic straight line winds were observed across portions of northeast Tattnall County and northern Evans County near Undine, Georgia. Maximum sustained winds were estimated between 140 and 150 mph with a maximum width of approximately 200 yards. Considerable damage was reported along the path of the Tornado, and although no one was killed, 2 people were injured. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A warm front lifted northward through southern South Carolina and southeast Georgia during the morning, with a strong cold front then sweeping through the area during the evening. This resulted in several rounds of severe weather across the region.
23.51971-01-15232°14'N / 82°07'W0025K0Tattnall
31.91971-01-15231°38'N / 82°35'W0025K0Bacon
32.41957-04-08331°51'N / 83°05'W31°51'N / 82°50'W14.70 Miles400 Yards1325K0Telfair
32.61962-01-06231°36'N / 82°24'W31°39'N / 82°20'W5.40 Miles300 Yards0025K0Bacon
32.81971-04-23232°00'N / 81°58'W32°02'N / 81°53'W5.60 Miles100 Yards0325K0Tattnall
33.71971-01-15231°56'N / 81°56'W1.00 Mile100 Yards0025K0Tattnall
33.91969-04-18231°34'N / 82°38'W31°48'N / 81°40'W59.10 Miles233 Yards003K0Bacon
34.32007-04-15232°25'N / 82°57'W32°27'N / 82°51'W6.00 Miles200 Yards03400K0KLaurens
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, GA confirmed that an EF2 tornado had touched down in central Laurens county, about 8.5 miles south-southwest of Dublin, or just south of Garetta, near the intersection of U.S. Highway 441/319 and Georgia Highway 117. The tornado traveled east-northeast across Turkey Creek Church Road, lifting approximately 5.5 miles south-southeast of Dublin near the Oconee River. The tornado had a path length of approximately six miles and a maximum path width of 200 yards. Maximum wind speeds were estimated at 120 mph. Most of the damage caused by the tornado was along Turkey Creek Church Road between U.S. Highway 441 and the Oconee River. A tied-down double-wide mobile home was completely destroyed along Turkey Creek Church Road resulting in two injuries. Another tied-down mobile home was destroyed in the same area with two adults and two children inside. All occupants survived, but one sustained minor injuries. The carport of a site-built home was removed as well as a portion of the roof. Several other mobile homes and site-built homes sustained minor damage from wind and fallen trees. A large greenhouse was also destroyed. A number of trees and power lines were down all along the path of the tornado. A few trees were also down just prior to the path of the tornado near Rentz and Cadwell. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The fourth tornado outbreak of the year for the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area, and the second major tornado outbreak for the year, occurred across the southern portion of the forecast area, or central Georgia. A broad upper trough over the central U.S. was tracking eastward while a surface low deepened rapidly as it moved from northern Mississippi into eastern Virginia. A strong low-level jet accompanied the system with 50-60 knot winds observed at 850mb across central and south Georgia late in the day on the 14th. The low-level jet transported deep Gulf moisture northward into the region. Sunshine during the early part of the day destabilized the region sufficiently to allow for strong to severe supercell thunderstorms to track across central Georgia just south of a warm frontal boundary across north Georgia. Damage surveys confirmed that nine tornadoes tracked across central Georgia, including many of the same areas that were affected during the major tornado outbreak on March 1st. The was the second most significant tornado outbreak to impact the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area since the August 29, 2005 outbreak associated with Hurricane Katrinia. The state insurance commissioner reported that at least 81 site-built homes, 28 mobile homes, and 10 businesses were damaged or destroyed during the event. Damages to structures alone were near $5 million, with additional damages the result of downed trees and power lines.
34.31958-11-28232°06'N / 83°04'W0.20 Mile33 Yards01250K0Dodge
34.51961-03-31232°00'N / 81°54'W0.20 Mile33 Yards003K0Tattnall
35.91982-12-29231°56'N / 83°04'W2.00 Miles33 Yards0025K0Telfair
35.91997-10-26231°32'N / 82°26'W31°36'N / 82°28'W6.00 Miles30 Yards01200K0Bacon
 Brief Description: Ten homes destroyed, four with major damage, and 17 sustained minor damage. A four mile line of standing pine timber was completely destroyed.
37.51974-05-12231°56'N / 81°56'W31°59'N / 81°47'W9.40 Miles100 Yards272.5M0Tattnall
38.21961-02-24232°05'N / 83°08'W0.50 Mile600 Yards0025K0Baldwin
39.32007-04-15232°11'N / 83°10'W32°12'N / 83°07'W4.00 Miles200 Yards00500K0KDodge
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet another tornado touched down in Dodge county and traveled very near the city of Eastman once again. This tornado was from a different complex of thunderstorms than the one that caused the first tornado earlier. However, this was the same complex of thunderstorms that caused the tornado earlier in Crisp county. This time the tornado touched down one mile south of downtown Eastman, traveling northeast. The total path length was 4.5 miles with a maximum path width of 200 yards. The maximum wind speed within the tornado was estimated to be 120 mph. The Dodge County Road Department's garage was destroyed. Two mobile homes in the area were destroyed. A nearby home suffered significant damage when parts of its roof, an exterior wall, and patio were removed. An adjacent barn was also destroyed. Several other homes in the area sustained minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The fourth tornado outbreak of the year for the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area, and the second major tornado outbreak for the year, occurred across the southern portion of the forecast area, or central Georgia. A broad upper trough over the central U.S. was tracking eastward while a surface low deepened rapidly as it moved from northern Mississippi into eastern Virginia. A strong low-level jet accompanied the system with 50-60 knot winds observed at 850mb across central and south Georgia late in the day on the 14th. The low-level jet transported deep Gulf moisture northward into the region. Sunshine during the early part of the day destabilized the region sufficiently to allow for strong to severe supercell thunderstorms to track across central Georgia just south of a warm frontal boundary across north Georgia. Damage surveys confirmed that nine tornadoes tracked across central Georgia, including many of the same areas that were affected during the major tornado outbreak on March 1st. The was the second most significant tornado outbreak to impact the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area since the August 29, 2005 outbreak associated with Hurricane Katrinia. The state insurance commissioner reported that at least 81 site-built homes, 28 mobile homes, and 10 businesses were damaged or destroyed during the event. Damages to structures alone were near $5 million, with additional damages the result of downed trees and power lines.
39.91971-05-12231°36'N / 82°54'W31°38'N / 82°51'W4.30 Miles100 Yards0025K0Coffee
40.12007-04-15232°33'N / 82°09'W32°37'N / 82°06'W5.00 Miles200 Yards00250K0KEmanuel
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet another tornado struck in Emanuel county, this time on the far eastern end of the county. This tornado was an EF2 tornado and touched down about two miles southeast of Twin City and traveled northeast to a point about five miles northeast of Twin City. The total tornado path length was five miles with a maximum path width of 200 yards. The maximum wind speed in this tornado was estimated to be 115 mph. Two homes along the path of the tornado sustained major damage when they both lost a significant portion of their roofs and outer walls. A mobile home was also damaged and some nearby outbuildings were destroyed. A large portion of the tornado was through a rural area. EPISODE NARRATIVE: The fourth tornado outbreak of the year for the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area, and the second major tornado outbreak for the year, occurred across the southern portion of the forecast area, or central Georgia. A broad upper trough over the central U.S. was tracking eastward while a surface low deepened rapidly as it moved from northern Mississippi into eastern Virginia. A strong low-level jet accompanied the system with 50-60 knot winds observed at 850mb across central and south Georgia late in the day on the 14th. The low-level jet transported deep Gulf moisture northward into the region. Sunshine during the early part of the day destabilized the region sufficiently to allow for strong to severe supercell thunderstorms to track across central Georgia just south of a warm frontal boundary across north Georgia. Damage surveys confirmed that nine tornadoes tracked across central Georgia, including many of the same areas that were affected during the major tornado outbreak on March 1st. The was the second most significant tornado outbreak to impact the Peachtree City, Georgia forecast area since the August 29, 2005 outbreak associated with Hurricane Katrinia. The state insurance commissioner reported that at least 81 site-built homes, 28 mobile homes, and 10 businesses were damaged or destroyed during the event. Damages to structures alone were near $5 million, with additional damages the result of downed trees and power lines.
40.51961-04-12231°30'N / 82°35'W31°30'N / 82°19'W15.70 Miles33 Yards0225K0Bacon
41.12009-12-02231°31'N / 82°13'W31°34'N / 82°11'W4.00 Miles440 Yards020K0KAppling
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado first touched down at approximately 1415EST in northwest Pierce County near Merson Road and Crump Road. It crossed the Big Satilla Creek, entering into Appling County at this point, and continued on a northeast track. The funnel may have briefly lifted off the ground at this point. The next significant damage occurred along Metts-Overstreet Road with the complete destruction of a singlewide mobile home and a farm shed at approximately 1425EST. Additionally, at this location, a brick cider block structure had one wall knocked over. The tornado then moved into a dairy just west of the intersection of State Road 15 and Wireglass Road. The event was rated as an EF-2 with winds of 135 mph at this location. Three metal building structures were destroyed with one removed from its foundation and blown into a pile of scrap metal. It is possible the funnel may have approached EF-3 at this particular location with winds of 140 to 150 mph; however, other damage to frame and masonry structures at the dairy suggested a lower wind value should be assigned to this area. One individual escaped injury by jumping into a depressed area inside one of the structures before it blew down around her. East of State Road 15, along Wireglass Road, extensive tree blow down and snapping continued in a tree farm. Once again the funnel likely lifted off the ground touching down again at 1430EST near 4230 Antioch Church Road destroying a doublewide mobile home. At this location, two middle aged individuals were in the bedroom, preparing for work, when the funnel destroyed the mobile home. Both escaped with only minor cuts despite the fact that the doublewide was completely obliterated and the frames bent. Once again at this location the winds were rated at 135 mph for a strong EF-2 rating. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Strong mid and upper low initially over Texas was moving east-northeast while the upper level trough it was embedded in became negatively tilted. This led to a broad diffluent pattern over most of the southeastern states. As the system approached the right rear quadrant of upper jet moved into the forecast area coincident with a low-level jet of, at least, 60 knots. This created atmospheric dynamics favorable for severe weather, with the only limiting factor being modest instability. A warm front over the area during the morning moved rapidly north in response to increasing southerly flow allowing a gradual increase in low level instability. By afternoon several severe weather events and three tornadoes occurred over portions of southeast Georgia.
41.41961-04-12231°30'N / 82°40'W31°30'N / 82°35'W4.90 Miles33 Yards0025K0Coffee
42.62009-12-02231°30'N / 82°14'W31°31'N / 82°13'W1.00 Mile440 Yards000K0KPierce
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado first touched down at approximately 1415EST in northwest Pierce County near Merson Road and Crump Road. Several trees were damaged and a farm shed had portions of its sheet metal roof removed. Winds here were estimated to have been near 70 mph or EF-0. The tornado moved northeast across several fields and encountered two small farm structures and a wooded area along Tiny Lane. The structures were completely destroyed with their contents strewn across the wooded area. Extensive tree blow down occurred in the woods with many pines snapped at 10 to 15 feet above ground level. The tornado was estimated to have been an EF-1 event in this location with winds of 110 mph. The funnel continued to move across fields next encountering wooded areas and structures near Scuffletown Road. At this point the funnel was one quarter mile or approximately 440 yards wide with winds estimated at 105 mph. Extensive tree blow down continued here with one mobile home destroyed and substantial damage to a wood frame structure. The tornado crossed the Big Satilla Creek at this point, and crossed into Appling County, continuing on a northeast track. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Strong mid and upper low initially over Texas was moving east-northeast while the upper level trough it was embedded in became negatively tilted. This led to a broad diffluent pattern over most of the southeastern states. As the system approached the right rear quadrant of upper jet moved into the forecast area coincident with a low-level jet of, at least, 60 knots. This created atmospheric dynamics favorable for severe weather, with the only limiting factor being modest instability. A warm front over the area during the morning moved rapidly north in response to increasing southerly flow allowing a gradual increase in low level instability. By afternoon several severe weather events and three tornadoes occurred over portions of southeast Georgia.
42.92008-05-11232°42'N / 82°31'W32°43'N / 82°27'W5.00 Miles880 Yards037.0M0KJohnson
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that yet another tornado had touched down within Johnson county. This tornado was an EF2 and touched down in far eastern Johnson county, about one mile northwest of Kite and continued on an east-northeastward track into Emanuel county, crossing into Emanuel county just west of the city of Blundale. Maximum winds within the tornado were estimated to be 130 mph and the maximum path width was determined to be up to 1/2 mile wide. As the tornado touched down northwest of Kite, a mobile home was rolled and several other homes and vehicles were damaged along U.S. Highway 221 north of Kite. The most significant damage occurred about three miles north of Kite, along Minton Chapel Road, where a mobile home was completely destroyed and the debris thrown up to 50 feet away. Three injuries were reported as a result of the destruction of this mobile home. An additional indirect injury occurred later when a tree fell on an individual during debris clean up. A well constructed metal building in the same general area sustained substantial wall, frame, and column anchor failures. A number of trees and several power lines were downed along the path of the tornado as well. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
43.21972-01-13232°30'N / 83°02'W32°37'N / 82°54'W11.30 Miles200 Yards00250K0Laurens
43.51957-11-29231°28'N / 82°21'W1.00 Mile300 Yards0625K0Bacon
44.71996-11-08232°23'N / 83°10'W32°25'N / 83°08'W4.00 Miles50 Yards16200K0Dodge
 Brief Description: A mixture of severe thunderstorm winds and tornado damage occurred in a track from near Chester in northern Dodge county into Laurens county. In Dodge county near the intersection of highways 257 and 126 down-burst/straight-line winds pushed over several very large oak and sycamore trees, blew the tin roof off of an older home, and blew the steeple off of a church. The roof was lifted from a stronger, well-built home about three-quarters of a mile from the Dodge/Laruens county line. A tornado touched down just inside Dodge county near the Dodge/Laurens county line destroying a double-wide mobile home. A seven year old girl was killed and six other family members were injured. Victims were found in a wooded area as far as 200 yards away from where the mobile home had stood. The home had not been tied down. F7MH
44.82008-05-11232°43'N / 82°27'W32°45'N / 82°24'W3.00 Miles880 Yards00750K0KEmanuel
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that the second tornado, an EF2, that touched down in far eastern Johnson county, just northwest of Kite, continued on an east-northeastward track into far northwestern Emanuel county, lifting approximately one mile west of Blundale, just north of Cordie Road. Maximum winds within the tornado were estimated to be 130 mph with a maximum path width up to 1/2 mile as the tornado first entered Emanuel county. Approximately 28 homes in Emanuel county sustained damage from the tornado, two of which were destroyed, 13 of which suffered major damage, and 10 had minor damage. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
44.82008-05-11232°36'N / 83°04'W32°36'N / 82°50'W14.00 Miles250 Yards221.4M0KLaurens
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A damage survey conducted by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City, Georgia confirmed that an EF2 tornado touched down in far northern Laurens county, just south of the Wilkinson county line. The tornado initially touched down as an EF0 tornado near the intersection of Old Macon Road and Oscar Wynn Road. The tornado quickly intensified to an EF2 tornado as it tracked almost due eastward and crossed U.S. Highway 441 at the 2700 block, about seven miles northwest of Dublin, or near the intersection of U.S. Highway 441 and Evergreen Road. Here, a double-wide mobile home was destroyed and the occupants, a man and woman in their early 50s were both killed. Their two grandchildren sustained non-life threatening injuries. Another home along Evergreen Road was also destroyed as the EF2 tornado continued on its eastward track. The tornado continued eastward and weakened back to an EF0 as it crossed the Oconee River. The tornado then once again strengthened to an EF2 as it crossed Buckeye Road in the 2100 block, approximaltely four miles north-northeast of East Dublin. EF2 tornado damage was noted to a home at 2185 Buckeye Road and EF1 tornado damage to another home at 1533 Buckeye Road. In between the destruction to the homes on Evergreen Road and those on Buckeye Road, sporadic tree and power line damage was observed, mostly consistent with an EF0 intensity rating. The tornado path length was about 15 miles. A maximum path width of 250 yards was observed at the tornado crossed U.S. Highway 441 at Evergreen Road. All together this tornado resulted in the destruction of two mobile homes, major damage to six other site built homes, some shifted off their foundations, one home with a missing roof, and many other homes with minor roof or siding damage. Numerous sheds and outbuildings were also destroyed. Several dozen trees were either uprooted or snapped off along the path of the tornado, along with several power lines. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A stationary front was draped across north Georgia early on May 10th with an active northwest flow aloft. Meanwhile...a vigorous short wave aloft was approaching the area from the southern plains. The stationary front provided the focus for two rounds of showers and thunderstorms, one early in the morning on the 10th and another in the afternoon. The activity tracked east-southeast with the upper flow aloft, mainly across north Georgia during the early morning and across central Georgia during the afternoon. An isolated strong supercell also tracked across the southern part of central Georgia during the evening. After a lull of convective activity for about four hours, intense multicell thunderstorms tracked into the area from Alabama after midnight and before dawn on the 11th. As these thunderstorms tracked across west central and central Georgia, 15 tornadoes were identified by subsequent surveys making this the most significant tornado outbreak to affect the area since the Katrina-associated tornadoes on August 29, 2005. Millions of dollars of property damage were reported as many homes were destroyed from these tornadoes from the western and southern suburbs of Atlanta southeastward across Macon, Dublin, and other counties in east central and southeast Georgia. Many of these counties were eligible for disaster assistance from the federal government. In addition to the tornadoes and thunderstorm winds that caused extensive damage in dozens of counties across north and central Georgia during the early morning hours of May 11th, strong gradient winds developed on the back side of the strong cold front that moved through the area as low pressure intensified across the mid-Atlantic region. The strong winds combined with wet ground resulted in dozens of trees being blown down in some north Georgia counties. There were also two deaths as a result of downed trees in Barrow and Gwinnett county, all non-thunderstorm-related winds.
44.91976-03-16231°28'N / 82°15'W0.30 Mile100 Yards00250K0Pierce
45.11998-04-09231°50'N / 81°47'W31°51'N / 81°45'W2.50 Miles400 Yards324200K0Long
 Brief Description: Tornado touched down in the Rye Patch Community where 3 people died (all were in mobile homes).Ten mobile homes were destroyed and two others were damaged along with a roof blown off a block house. Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped off above the ground. F13MH, F30MH, M49MH
45.71971-01-05231°31'N / 82°50'W31°30'N / 82°53'W3.30 Miles77 Yards0125K0Coffee
46.12009-10-27232°00'N / 81°42'W32°00'N / 81°42'W1.00 Mile880 Yards000K425KLiberty
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The United States Army Garrison at Fort Steward, Georgia found 850 full size trees downed in one of their training areas. Crew members of Fort Steward determined many downed trees were in a dropped matchstick pattern. A survey from air and ground confirmed EF2 tornado damage with estimated wind speeds between 115 to 125 miles per hour. The tornado occurred along a southwest to northeast path beginning at latitude and longitude coordinates 32.002, -81.708 and ending at 32.013, -81.708. The tornado path length was 0.80 mile long and approximately 1/4 mile to 1/2 mile wide. A total of 63 acres were damaged. The monetary damage was estimated at $425,000. Timber from the trees will be salvaged. No injuries or deaths resulted from this event. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A weak short wave tracked northeast to the lee of the Southern Appalachians late Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday evening, providing ascent and allowing a band of convection to shift east into the forecast area. Convection became enhanced as a warm front lifted north and west into the forecast area causing dewpoints to surge into the mid 70s and destabilization to occur. Meanwhile, strong low-level shear developed as a low-level jet strengthened to 30-50 kt over the area.
46.91969-04-18231°26'N / 83°08'W31°34'N / 82°38'W30.80 Miles233 Yards0282.5M0Coffee
47.41972-06-19231°29'N / 82°52'W1.50 Miles50 Yards00250K0Coffee
48.81984-05-03232°22'N / 81°53'W32°31'N / 81°38'W20.00 Miles200 Yards0302.5M0Bulloch
48.91963-09-28232°36'N / 82°22'W32°55'N / 82°04'W27.90 Miles100 Yards00250K0Emanuel
48.91974-05-12231°50'N / 81°42'W0.60 Mile40 Yards0225K0Long
49.21976-03-16232°42'N / 82°03'W0.80 Mile400 Yards00250K0Jenkins
49.51970-07-22232°48'N / 82°24'W2.00 Miles300 Yards1125K0Emanuel
49.72005-03-22231°29'N / 82°01'W31°29'N / 82°01'W2.00 Miles880 Yards0000Wayne
 Brief Description: NWS Storm Survey revealed 56 homes were damaged or destroyed (includes mobile and manufactured homes), 12 businesses were damaged or destroyed, 2 public buildings were damaged as well as 1 church. Only minor injuries were reported. Georgia Emergency Management issued a statement that stated 61 homes and 8 businesses were damaged; 10 homes and 5 business were destroyed. Below is a time line of calls the NWS received: 0430 pm EDT: Emergency Management reported 3 businesses destroyed and campers severely damaged in Screven from a tornado. 0430 pm EDT: Emergency Management reported numerous trees and power lines down in Screven. 0432 pm EDT: Tranied stomr spotter repored a tornado 5 miles south of Jesup and about 8 miles south of Odum. 0449 pm EDT: Tranied storm spotter and amateur radio operator reported quarter size hail in downtown Jesup and a tornado in Screven along 9 Run Road. 0450 pm EDT: Emergency Management reported campers were destroyed in Screven and a cabinet shop (Sreven Cabinet Company) was severely damaged with 1 person trapped inside. Other reports received about this event included 2 children trapped in a video store in Screven. They were pulled out and taken to the hospital with no major injuries. The Jesup Press Sentinel newspaper reported extensive damage occurred along J.L. Tyre Street and U.S. 84 in Screven. Two businesses hit particulary hard were the Screven Cabinet Company and Boyette's Camper Sales. One male was trapped in the cabinet shop after the tornado, and was successfully rescued with no notable injuries. A truck driver was driving at about 25 miles per hour in front of the cabinet shop when the tornado hit and flipped the vehicle, and the driver sufferd minor injuries. Additional business damaged by the tornado included the town's video store, Mary's IGA and Wasdin Cabinet and Doors. 0450 pm EDT: The general public sent an email that and reported a tornado in Screven and 2 inch hail in Jesup.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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