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58121 Zip Code Natural Disasters and Weather Extremes

 
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The chance of earthquake damage in 58121 Zip Code is about the same as North Dakota average and is much lower than the national average. The risk of tornado damage in 58121 Zip Code is much higher than North Dakota average and is higher than the national average.

Topics:Earthquake IndexVolcano IndexTornado IndexOther Weather Extremes EventsVolcanos NearbyHistorical Earthquake EventsHistorical Tornado Events

Earthquake Index, #86

58121 Zip Code
0.00
North Dakota
0.00
U.S.
1.81

The earthquake index value is calculated based on historical earthquake events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the earthquake level in a region. A higher earthquake index value means a higher chance of an earthquake.

Volcano Index, #1

58121 Zip Code
0.0000
North Dakota
0.0000
U.S.
0.0023

The volcano index value is calculated based on the currently known volcanoes using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the possibility of a region being affected by a possible volcano eruption. A higher volcano index value means a higher chance of being affected.

Tornado Index, #6

58121 Zip Code
156.30
North Dakota
81.79
U.S.
136.45

The tornado index value is calculated based on historical tornado events data using USA.com algorithms. It is an indicator of the tornado level in a region. A higher tornado index value means a higher chance of tornado events.

Other Weather Extremes Events

A total of 2,161 other weather extremes events within 50 miles of 58121 Zip Code were recorded from 1950 to 2010. The following is a break down of these events:

TypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCountTypeCount
Avalanche:0Blizzard:23Cold:19Dense Fog:0Drought:10
Dust Storm:0Flood:189Hail:1,067Heat:1Heavy Snow:14
High Surf:0Hurricane:0Ice Storm:4Landslide:0Strong Wind:11
Thunderstorm Winds:729Tropical Storm:0Wildfire:0Winter Storm:28Winter Weather:0
Other:66 

Volcanos Nearby

No volcano is found in or near 58121 Zip Code.

Historical Earthquake Events

No historical earthquake events that had recorded magnitudes of 3.5 or above found in or near 58121 Zip Code.

No historical earthquake events found in or near 58121 Zip Code.

Historical Tornado Events

A total of 37 historical tornado events that had recorded magnitude of 2 or above found in or near 58121 Zip Code.

Distance (miles)DateMagnitudeStart Lat/LogEnd Lat/LogLengthWidthFatalitiesInjuriesProperty DamageCrop DamageAffected County
4.41975-06-28446°52'N / 96°44'W46°57'N / 96°41'W5.40 Miles1320 Yards00250K0Clay
4.41956-08-30346°54'N / 96°48'W46°59'N / 96°47'W5.10 Miles60 Yards08250K0Cass
5.31960-05-31246°52'N / 96°54'W000K0Cass
10.21975-06-28346°52'N / 96°35'W46°55'N / 96°34'W2.30 Miles1760 Yards00250K0Clay
12.42005-09-05246°42'N / 96°51'W46°42'N / 96°48'W4.00 Miles200 Yards0000Cass
 Brief Description: After strong winds and heavy rain hit a farmstead, a tornado followed closely behind. The tornado tracked intermittently along a 4 mile path. A 30 foot concrete silo was lifted and blown onto a machine shed. Concrete pieces spread in a 60 degree arc 40 to 50 feet from the foundation. One-half of the machine shed was demolished by silo debris. Numerous trees were also snapped off. A window was blown in and siding was ripped off the house. The peak wind speeds were estimated at 120 mph.
12.71957-06-20546°54'N / 97°21'W46°53'N / 96°46'W27.40 Miles500 Yards1010325.0M0Cass
13.71957-06-20546°53'N / 96°46'W46°52'N / 96°14'W25.00 Miles400 Yards00250K0Clay
16.41965-05-05246°53'N / 97°19'W47°00'N / 96°56'W19.60 Miles83 Yards00250K0Cass
16.51952-07-16246°43'N / 96°32'W46°50'N / 96°25'W9.40 Miles333 Yards0025K0Aitkin
18.01959-06-09246°43'N / 96°33'W46°51'N / 96°19'W14.10 Miles150 Yards00250K0Clay
19.41959-06-10246°54'N / 97°12'W003K0Cass
20.01960-07-10247°00'N / 97°12'W46°54'N / 97°12'W6.90 Miles33 Yards000K0Cass
21.21953-05-29247°09'N / 96°56'W47°12'N / 96°52'W3.60 Miles100 Yards0025K0Cass
21.51965-05-05246°42'N / 97°12'W46°47'N / 97°12'W5.70 Miles83 Yards00250K0Cass
21.71973-06-15346°52'N / 97°15'W00250K0Cass
22.31965-05-05246°47'N / 97°12'W46°53'N / 97°19'W8.50 Miles83 Yards00250K0Cass
26.61955-07-02446°30'N / 97°00'W46°30'N / 96°48'W9.10 Miles150 Yards219250K0Richland
27.31976-08-19246°47'N / 97°21'W0.30 Mile20 Yards003K0Cass
28.11996-06-05246°58'N / 96°13'W46°58'N / 96°12'W5.00 Miles100 Yards00250K50KClay
 Brief Description: Extensive damage to farm.
31.31950-06-15246°35'N / 96°20'W46°31'N / 96°20'W4.60 Miles67 Yards043K0Wilkin
31.91964-06-08246°16'N / 97°08'W46°39'N / 97°01'W26.90 Miles33 Yards00250K0Richland
32.32007-07-15246°50'N / 97°27'W46°48'N / 97°29'W3.00 Miles150 Yards000.3M0KCass
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado toppled a barn, severely injuring a horse. It tumbled farm outbuildings and toppled one high voltage power tower. The tower was made of steel and had four footings. Peak winds were estimated at 125 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: At 3 pm CST on the 15th, a stationary front was located from near Minot (ND) to Jamestown (ND) to near Sisseton (SD). South of the front, mid afternoon temperatures ranged in the mid 80s to lower 90s. To the north of the front, a meso-high had formed, with much cooler and drier air around it. The temperature across the boundary ranged from 89F at Minot, to 73F at Devils Lake, to 64F at Crookston. The upper air pattern had a western ridge and an eastern trough, putting the northern plains in northwest flow aloft. A strengthening upper jet also moved toward eastern North Dakota, giving this system good surface and upper level support. A supercell thunderstorm developed over southern Steele County around 530 pm CST and tracked across western Cass County and into eastern Ransom County before weakening after 7 pm CST. Then, another supercell thunderstorm formed over northern Steele County around 725 pm CST. This storm tracked just west of the path of the first storm, again mainly hitting central Steele County, western Cass County, and eastern Ransom County, before weakening around 915 pm CST. Both thunderstorms tracked south-southeast at speeds between 40 and 50 mph and spawned multiple tornadoes which were embedded within the overall downburst wind and hail pattern. The significant downburst wind and wind driven hail was seen in two partially overlapping paths, with each path from 5 to 7 miles wide and between 60 and 80 miles long (this damage path showed up clearly on satellite images). The strength of these winds is believed to have exceeded 80 mph with speeds over 100 mph in some localized areas. Hail sizes ranged from penny to hen egg sized. Most areas received considerable hail damage at the same time as the strong winds. Law enforcement officials and witnesses stated that the hail often persisted for longer than 5 minutes and completely covered the ground. The hail damaged roofs, windows, and siding in many homes along the damage path. Stripped and decimated corn, bean, and wheat fields were typical along the entire storm path too. The ND Farm Service Administration estimated losses occurred on over 700,000 acres in five counties. Total crop losses may exceed $250 million, with other property losses from $15 to $20 million. Cass and Steele Counties received a Presidential Disaster Declaration.
33.72002-06-19246°32'N / 96°17'W46°32'N / 96°17'W0.20 Mile25 Yards0025K0Wilkin
 Brief Description: A brief tornado touchdown demolished a 76x296 foot roof on a turkey barn.
34.51955-07-02346°31'N / 96°42'W46°16'N / 96°32'W18.70 Miles440 Yards03250K0Wilkin
36.21973-06-16347°22'N / 97°04'W00250K0Traill
37.52007-07-15246°55'N / 97°36'W46°49'N / 97°34'W8.00 Miles250 Yards002.5M0KCass
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado plowed through wooden power poles and viciously ripped up mature trees over its damage path. The tornado also damaged a sturdy pole shed, where the sidewall was caved in and the roof and rafters were torn off. It tore the roof off and collapsed an older barn, then lifted and threw a well-built two car garage from its slab foundation. The tornado crumpled one steel, four footing, high voltage power tower. In combination with extreme downburst winds, the collapse of this first tower helped initiate the collapse of dozens more of these power towers. Peak winds were estimated at 130 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: At 3 pm CST on the 15th, a stationary front was located from near Minot (ND) to Jamestown (ND) to near Sisseton (SD). South of the front, mid afternoon temperatures ranged in the mid 80s to lower 90s. To the north of the front, a meso-high had formed, with much cooler and drier air around it. The temperature across the boundary ranged from 89F at Minot, to 73F at Devils Lake, to 64F at Crookston. The upper air pattern had a western ridge and an eastern trough, putting the northern plains in northwest flow aloft. A strengthening upper jet also moved toward eastern North Dakota, giving this system good surface and upper level support. A supercell thunderstorm developed over southern Steele County around 530 pm CST and tracked across western Cass County and into eastern Ransom County before weakening after 7 pm CST. Then, another supercell thunderstorm formed over northern Steele County around 725 pm CST. This storm tracked just west of the path of the first storm, again mainly hitting central Steele County, western Cass County, and eastern Ransom County, before weakening around 915 pm CST. Both thunderstorms tracked south-southeast at speeds between 40 and 50 mph and spawned multiple tornadoes which were embedded within the overall downburst wind and hail pattern. The significant downburst wind and wind driven hail was seen in two partially overlapping paths, with each path from 5 to 7 miles wide and between 60 and 80 miles long (this damage path showed up clearly on satellite images). The strength of these winds is believed to have exceeded 80 mph with speeds over 100 mph in some localized areas. Hail sizes ranged from penny to hen egg sized. Most areas received considerable hail damage at the same time as the strong winds. Law enforcement officials and witnesses stated that the hail often persisted for longer than 5 minutes and completely covered the ground. The hail damaged roofs, windows, and siding in many homes along the damage path. Stripped and decimated corn, bean, and wheat fields were typical along the entire storm path too. The ND Farm Service Administration estimated losses occurred on over 700,000 acres in five counties. Total crop losses may exceed $250 million, with other property losses from $15 to $20 million. Cass and Steele Counties received a Presidential Disaster Declaration.
38.22007-07-15246°30'N / 97°22'W46°27'N / 97°19'W3.00 Miles200 Yards001.0M1.0MRansom
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado cut a large gap in mature hardwood trees near the Sheyenne River and snapped several wooden power poles. Several sections of a large irrigation system were also tipped over. Peak winds were estimated at 115 mph. Some crops were damaged in Owego Township. EPISODE NARRATIVE: At 3 pm CST on the 15th, a stationary front was located from near Minot (ND) to Jamestown (ND) to near Sisseton (SD). South of the front, mid afternoon temperatures ranged in the mid 80s to lower 90s. To the north of the front, a meso-high had formed, with much cooler and drier air around it. The temperature across the boundary ranged from 89F at Minot, to 73F at Devils Lake, to 64F at Crookston. The upper air pattern had a western ridge and an eastern trough, putting the northern plains in northwest flow aloft. A strengthening upper jet also moved toward eastern North Dakota, giving this system good surface and upper level support. A supercell thunderstorm developed over southern Steele County around 530 pm CST and tracked across western Cass County and into eastern Ransom County before weakening after 7 pm CST. Then, another supercell thunderstorm formed over northern Steele County around 725 pm CST. This storm tracked just west of the path of the first storm, again mainly hitting central Steele County, western Cass County, and eastern Ransom County, before weakening around 915 pm CST. Both thunderstorms tracked south-southeast at speeds between 40 and 50 mph and spawned multiple tornadoes which were embedded within the overall downburst wind and hail pattern. The significant downburst wind and wind driven hail was seen in two partially overlapping paths, with each path from 5 to 7 miles wide and between 60 and 80 miles long (this damage path showed up clearly on satellite images). The strength of these winds is believed to have exceeded 80 mph with speeds over 100 mph in some localized areas. Hail sizes ranged from penny to hen egg sized. Most areas received considerable hail damage at the same time as the strong winds. Law enforcement officials and witnesses stated that the hail often persisted for longer than 5 minutes and completely covered the ground. The hail damaged roofs, windows, and siding in many homes along the damage path. Stripped and decimated corn, bean, and wheat fields were typical along the entire storm path too. The ND Farm Service Administration estimated losses occurred on over 700,000 acres in five counties. Total crop losses may exceed $250 million, with other property losses from $15 to $20 million. Cass and Steele Counties received a Presidential Disaster Declaration.
40.62004-07-18246°59'N / 97°40'W46°56'N / 97°37'W4.00 Miles100 Yards00500K0Cass
 Brief Description: The tornado knocked down high voltage power lines and three metal towers north of Tower City. Several farm buildings were also damaged northeast of Tower City.
41.11960-08-25246°18'N / 97°00'W0025K0Richland
42.91964-05-05246°36'N / 95°59'W46°38'N / 95°57'W013250K0Otter Tail
44.11965-06-26247°30'N / 97°00'W2.00 Miles33 Yards00250K0Traill
44.32007-06-07246°34'N / 96°00'W46°40'N / 95°52'W7.00 Miles150 Yards000K0KOtter Tail
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: A tornado touched down near the southwest end of Lake Lida, crossed Lake Lida and Crystal Lake (moving north-northeast), and lifted around 4 miles west of Vergas. Several houses were structurally damaged on Lake Lida and Crystal Lake. Boats, docks, travel trailers, and mobile homes were lofted and completely destroyed. Numerous power poles and trees were snapped off, cutting power to nearly 400 customers. Peak winds were estimated at 130 to 135 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: By noon on the 7th, a surface low was located near Lake Park, Minnesota, with a trailing cold front extending back into extreme southeast North Dakota. An occluded front also extended to the northeast, toward the Bemidji, MN, area. Surface dew points pooled right around 60 F in the vicinity of the surface low with temperatures in the middle 70s. The cold front was strong for early June, with a noon temperature in Devils Lake, ND, of 48 degrees. This set up a strong surface thermal and moisture boundary along a Wahpeton-Breckenridge to Bemidji line. Storms initially fired across southeast ND and then spread into portions of west central and northwest MN. There was also strong upper level support for these storms, as one severe report north of Embden (in Cass County, ND) occurred well behind the surface boundary.
44.81978-07-05247°20'N / 96°21'W47°27'N / 96°04'W15.20 Miles400 Yards33525.0M0Norman
45.11953-06-27247°30'N / 97°05'W003K0Traill
49.51953-05-29246°12'N / 97°08'W003K0Richland
49.61974-07-20247°30'N / 97°19'W00250K0Traill
49.92010-06-17247°21'N / 97°37'W47°21'N / 97°34'W3.00 Miles75 Yards000K0KSteele
 Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado tracked northeastward for nearly 3 miles to around 8 miles east-northeast of Hope. Numerous trees were severely damaged in shelterbelts. An abandoned farmhouse was collapsed and other farm buildings were damaged. Peak winds were estimated at 125 mph. EPISODE NARRATIVE: Conditions were ripe by the afternoon of the 17th for a major severe weather outbreak. A surface low had moved into east central North Dakota with an occluded front extending to the southeast. Warm and humid air was in place ahead of the front, with a much drier airmass pushing in behind it. The 500mb low was located over northwest North Dakota with a nice southwest to northeast upper jet pushing into eastern North Dakota. Two lines of convection formed by late afternoon, one from Roseau County down toward Eastern Otter Tail County and the other over east central North Dakota. Nearly all the cells that formed took on a classic hook shape with rotation very evident on radar imagery. Multiple tornado warnings were issued before the event wound down by mid evening. The strongest tornadoes were determined to be EF4 tornadoes, two in west central Minnesota and one in northeast North Dakota.


* The information on this page is based on the global volcano database, the U.S. earthquake database of 1638-1985, and the U.S. Tornado and Weather Extremes database of 1950-2010.


 
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